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Henry Gregory

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England
Death: Died in Stamford, Fairfield, Connecticut, United States
Place of Burial: Stratford,Fairfield,Connecticut
Immediate Family:

Son of John Gregory and Alice Alton
Husband of Sarah Gregory; Elizabeth Gregory and Mary (Goody) Gregory
Father of John Gregory; Elizabeth Webb; Judah Gregory; Perry Gregory; Miss Gregory and 5 others
Brother of Michael Gregory; William Gregory; John Gregory, II; Edward Gregory; Elizabeth Gregory and 1 other

Occupation: shoemaker, shoemaker--work complained of in 1647, Shoe Maker, Immigrant, Boston Shoemaker
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Henry Gregory

He came from Dorchester, England. He was in Springfield, MA. in 1637. Later, he moved to Stratford, CT.

Henry Gregory was at Springfield, Mass. in 1639 and moved a few years

later to Stratford, Connecticut. He was a shoemaker by trade. The date

of his death is unknown, but it is assume d to have been in 1655 as the

distribution of his estate was ordered June 19, 1655. His eldest son

John was appointed administrator and received a double portion, and no

other children are mentioned. -------------------- From the ancestral file of Lucille Chestnut, "Betts Genealogy", on Ancestry.com:

"Bio of HENRY-1 GREGORY (d 1655) ENG>CT

Posted by: Rich HoughtonDate: November 02, 2000 at 12 :16:40

of 2796

This is the information I have collected on Henry-1 Gregory of Fairfield County, Conencticut. Each factual statement is footnoted with the source from which I acquired the material, but GenForum does not support footnotes so if you have a question about sources please e-mail me and I'll be happy to provide them to you. Of course, I also welcome corrections or additions to any of the information which I do have.

Henry Gregory, the immigrant ancestor, was born around 1590 in England, probably Nottingham. While his parentage is presently uncertain, he is thought to be the Henry Gregory of St. Peter's Parish, Nottinghamshire, who was the son of John Gregory of the same shire.

A William Gregory of Nottingham, England, "Gentleman," in a will dated 18 June 1650 and proved on 5 February 1651, gave a legacy to his brother Henry Gregory "now in New England." While there is as of yet no evidence of his birth year, when he died in 1655 he was called "an old man" in the town records. The Nottingham record of William's will refers to Henry of New England, and no other Henry Gregory has been uncovered in New England. The Nottingham Henry was a shoemaker, as was the New England Henry (and seven generations of his

descendants). Henry of New England named his eldest son John, which was the name of Henry of Nottingham's father. Nottingham Henry has a daughter named Anne, of the correct age to be Henry of New England's daughter Anne.

He married ------ ------ ; nothing is known about her or her origins.

Henry came to New England sometime after 6 August 1635, probably in 1636. He appears to have settled first in Boston, but by 1639 had settled in Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts; a record there dated 16 Janu ary 1638[/9] noted that:

"[i]t is ordered that the three rod of grownd yt lyes betwixt John Woodcocks pale and Goodman Grigorys Lott shall be appropriated 2 rod of it to Goodman Grigory & one rod of it to Rich: Everitt reserving 40 rod for a place for a meeting howse wch is to be alowed out of Goodman Grigorys Lott. "

He was probably there by March 1637/8. The original land grants in Springfield were made conditional on the recipient remaining at least five years; since the town bought Henry's land back from him on 14 March 1642/3, he must have fulfilled that condition. Henry's original homelot ran sout hwesterly from Town (later Main) Street to the Connecticut River — a distance of about 1337 feet. It had an eight rod frontage on the street, and two additional rods were granted to him in trade for land upon which the church was to be built . The lot contained about five acres, less forty rods for the church. Opposite his lot he owned land of the same frontage that ran northeasterly through a "hassocky marsh" and up a wooded ridge to present-day School Street. It contained two acres of marsh and four acres of woodland.

Like many of the early settlers, he was involved in his share of court cases. On 16 June 1640, "John Leonard complain[ed] in an action of the case against Henry Gregory for taking more recompense for driving home of certaine stray sowes than his share comes to & for taking more pigges with his sow than his share comes to. "The jury found for the plaintiff in the sum of £0.08.0 0. That same day, William Warrener, Henry's neighbor to the northwest, lodged a complaint against him "for layinge false imputations of wronge dealing in taking of those pompions [pumpkins] that Richard Everit gave to both of them wch Hnery Gregory affirmeth to be contrary to the appointment of Richard Everit;" no verdict is recorded.

On 10 September 1640, Henry sued his neighbor to the southe ast John Woodcock for £4.14.00 relating to a pig and "the double ingagment of the hogges." The jury awarded him £4.07.03 and £0.03.00 in court costs, but in a moment of excessive generosity he consented to a new trial and on 24 September this time found himself on the losing side to the extent of £2.02.00 and  £0.09.00 in costs. As the magistrate noted, the verdict did not sit well with Henry:

"Henry Gregory after the verdict was much moved & said ["]I marvill with what conscience the jury can find such damages seeing in the case of John Searles I had of him but twenty shillinges for three slanders,["] and he added ["]But such Juries — ["] He was about to speak more but Mr. Moxon [Rev. George Moxon, the minister] bid him take heed, take heed, and so gave him grave admonition. Presently after the admonition Henry Gregory acknowledged his fault & earnestly craved pardon & promised more care & watchfulness for tyme to come and so all the Jury acknowledged satisfaction in hopes of reformation."

Finally, on 24 December 1640/1, Henry and two others were accused of violating a town ordinance against selling or pawning cannoes to outsiders. The court gave him five months to reacquire them.

The court appearances were not confined to Henry. On 15 Feb ruary 1640/1, he and his wife were witnesses in a suit against John Woodcock and testified to Woodcock making false statements regarding how much he owned. Pynchon wrote:

"Goody Gregory being accused by oath of John Woodcoke & Richard Williams for swearing before God ["]I could break thy head["]; she did acknowld it was her great sin & fault & saith she hath bin much humbled for it. She is fined 12d to the pore to be paid to Henry Smuth within a month; or if she doe not she is to sit 3 hours in the stockes."

Sometime in 1642 or early 1643, Henry decided to sell his land in Springfield. At a town meeting on 14 March 1642/3,

"Henry Gregory beinge purposed to sell his lott and ppoundinge it to ye Plantation by his son Judah accordinge to order, Richard Everit beinge his chapman [buyer] the Plantation gave ye voate wherein they disalowed ye chapman ppounded and resolved to buy ye lott accordinge to ye conditions expssed in a former order Dated January 24th 1638."

Henry moved south down the Connecticut River to New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut, where his son John lived. He remained there for a breif period, before finally removing west along the coast to Startford, Fairfield County, sometime before 1647.

He spent time moving back and forth between Stratford and New Haven, where he worked with his son as a shoemaker. On 7 December 1647, John Meigs (No. 282:10:5762; No. 283:14:5774) of New Haven sued Henry:

"John Meges declareth that at two severall times or agreements, he bargained with Henry Gregory of Stratford to make 14 dosson of shoes, and was to give him 12d a pare for makeing them, carrying them to him readie cutt out, that he payed 48s of this before handm and £6 more he was to have when he had done halfe the work . . . that Goodman Gregory hath made 13 dosson of them, but they are all naught and fall in peces, some in a weeke, some in 14 dayes time, [Henry was accused of spoiling the shoe leather by leaying the shoes out in the sand, of making some without the required wooden heels, and of making others a size too small] so that the plaintiffe is damadged both in his name and estate. In his name, bothe at Connecticote, Long Island, Totoket, Guil ford, Startford, Farefield, they all cry out, and some think the plaintiffe worthy to be putt in prisson. Henery Gregory, the defendant, saith that he received a hide from John Meges [Meigs was a tanner] at 48s pric, for which hide he was to make hime 4 dosson of shooes wch came to 48s; pt of this he did before the other bargaine, and he saw the ware and accepted it, and Mr. Evanc took it as currant and good, but it proved not so. The plaintiff seing this ware agreed for the rest, but hee, this defendant, before the agreement, told the plaintiffe he would make no more of such leather. The plaintiffe promised bothe better leather, and to procure hempe from Connecticote to sow the shoes wth, but did not performe accordingly, so that the defendant was forced to buy flax at 18d p1, and sowed them with flaw. [The second hide furnished by Meigs was as bad or worse than the first, causing Henry to remark, "It is pittie but the tanner should be hanged wch tanned it, for he cossens the countrye."] The defendant dissiered to have hemp; the plaintiffe said that [flax] thread would last as long as the leather. . . . For making the showes lesse than they were cutt out it was because they were marked by hime [Meigs] more than they would reach, for some wch was to be made up to ye tens would not reache a nines last, but would teare, they were so little and the leather so bad. [As for the charge concering the wooden heels, Henry stated that he had not been supplied with the proper materials.] Juda Gregory testifyeth upon oath that he looked upon pt of the leather wch his father was to worke of Goodman Meges, and some of it was so hornie that according to his judgment no man could make shooes to pase his word on them to hold. Allso shooes so tainted, though they might seem to be tanned, yet they would not hold that a man was able to justify himselfe or the leather in it. Allso that his father complained to hime, this deponent, and himself saw shooes of the tenns marked for elevens, that by a size he could not sowe them either for credite to himself or proffitt to the countery . . . . Allso that Goodman Meges would have this deponent wrought, but he sawe the lether so bad that if he never wrought more he would not worke it, in reg ard to the uncomfortableness to worke, because it was hornie, and so l ittle that it would not come together, and because it would be wrong to the cun try. The wife of William Crooker [Henry's son-in-l aw] testifyeth upon oath . . . that when Goodman Meges came for the shoes he saw them lye upon a sandye bench in the sellar, and he said he liked the lyin g of them very well . . . [and] after Goodman Meges was gon and delaied to fetch away the shooes, her father wiped them with a cloth, and took some clapboards and other things and laid under them. And further she saith her father blamed the tanner for the leather not beinge well tanned. Goodman Meges answered he could not blame the tanner so much for he was faine to tak it oute before it was tanned. She saith further she saw it tear in peces when her father put it upon the last. William Hooke junr testifyeth upon oath that he clearly remembereth Goodman Gregory was making 2 pare of shooes in their shopp. Goodman Meges came in in the meantime and said to Goodman Gregory, flapp them up together, they are to goe farr inoughe. John gregory testifyeth upon oath that Goodma n Meges said, flapp them up together, they are to goe far inoughe, this was aboute the beginning of the last bargaine, wch was for the ten dosson. . . . John Gregory saith that aboute the time of the bargaine he gave Goodman Meges some cautions, because his father was old and his eyesight failed hime, and he durst not employe hime himself, for he could not do as he had done."

The outcome of the case is not recorded.

In a pre-1651 list of "every man's fense in the outfield, " Henry appears as No. 32 with eight rods. In March 1652, the town gave him permission to cut a piece of meadow on "the west side of the dich" until otherwise disposed of. Although it his clear he had a home lott -- a reference to Isaac Nichols' land described it as being bordered by Henry's land on the west. -- there is no record of the grant.

He died in Stratford — "an oulde man" — in 1655, probably in June; on 19 June the court ordered his estate distributed. An inventory of his estate included:

"5 pillowes, all the wooden ware, 3 Chayres & 1 wheel, 1 pair Skales, some pewter ware,2 Iron pots, 1 skillit, 2 axes, 1 drawing knife, 1 meat knife, 2 spones, all the books, 1 howe, 1 pot hanger, 1 sieth, 1 Iron ringe, 3 pound of rosen, 1 baskitt, 1 maat, 1 coat, old pacede & bagg, Pease & hopps, Lasts."

The court appointed Henry's son John administrator of the estate, ordered all his debts to be paid, and the remainder of the estate distributed to his children with a double portion to John as the eldest son. " -------------------- He came from Dorchester, England. He was in Springfield, MA. in 1637. Later, he moved to Stratford, CT. He was a shoemaker by trade. The date of his death is unknown, but it is assume d to have been in 1655 as the distribution of his estate was ordered June 19, 1655. His eldest sonJohn was appointed administrator and received a double portion, and no other children are mentioned. -------------------- From the ancestral file of Lucille Chestnut, "Betts Genealogy", on Ancestry.com:

"Bio of HENRY-1 GREGORY (d 1655) ENG>CT

Posted by: Rich HoughtonDate: November 02, 2000 at 12 :16:40

of 2796

This is the information I have collected on Henry-1 Gregory of Fairfield County, Conencticut. Each factual statement is footnoted with the source from which I acquired the material, but Gen Forum does not support footnotes so if you have a question about sources please e-mail me and I'll be happy to provide them to you. Of course, I also welcome corrections or additions to any of the information which I do have.

Henry Gregory, the immigrant ancestor, was born around 1590 in England, probably Nottingham. While his parentage is presently uncertain, he is thought to be the Henry Gregory of St. Peter's Parish, Nottinghamshire, who was the son of John Gregory of the same shire.

A William Gregory of Nottingham, England, "Gentleman," in a will dated 18 June 1650 and proved on 5 February 1651, gave a legacy to his brother Henry Gregory "now in New England." While there is as of yet no evidence of his birth year, when he died in 1655 he was called "an old man" in the town records. The Nottingham record of William's will refers to Henry of New England, and no other Henry Gregory has been uncovered in New England. The Nottingham Henry was a shoemaker, as was the New England Henry (and seven generations of his descendants). Henry of New England named his eldest son John, which was the name of Henry of Nottingham's father. Nottingham Henry has a daughter named Anne, of the correct age to be Henry of New England's daughter Anne.

He married ------ ------ ; nothing is known about her or her origins.

Henry came to New England sometime after 6 August 1635, probably in 1636. He appears to have settled first in Boston, but by 1639 had settled in Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts; a record there dated 16 Janu ary 1638[/9 noted that:

"[i]t is ordered that the three rod of grownd yt lyes betwixt John Woodcocks pale and Goodman Grigorys Lott shall be appropriated 2 rod of it to Goodman Grigory & one rod of it to Rich: Everitt reserving 40 rod for a place for a meeting howse wch is to be alowed out of Goodman Grigorys Lott. "

He was probably there by March 1637/8. The original land grants in Springfield were made conditional on the recipient remaining at least five years; since the town bought Henry's land back from him on 14 March 1642/3, he must have fulfilled that condition. Henry's original homelot ran sout hwesterly from Town (later Main) Street to the Connecticut River — a distance of about 1337 feet. It had an eight rod frontage on the street, and two additional rods were granted to him in trade for land upon which the church was to be built . The lot contained about five acres, less forty rods for the church. Opposite his lot he owned land of the same frontage that ran northeasterly through a "hassocky marsh" and up a wooded ridge to present-day School Street. It contained two acres of marsh and four acres of woodland.

Like many of the early settlers, he was involved in his share of court cases. On 16 June 1640, "John Leonard complain[ed] in an action of the case against Henry Gregory for taking more recompense for driving home of certaine stray sowes than his share comes to & for taking more pigges with his sow than his share comes to. "The jury found for the plaintiff in the sum of £0.08.0 0. That same day, William Warrener, Henry's neighbor to the northwest, lodged a complaint against him "for layinge false imputations of wronge dealing in taking of those pompions [pumpkins] that Richard Everit gave to both of them wch Hnery Gregory affirmeth to be contrary to the appointment of Richard Everit;" no verdict is recorded.

On 10 September 1640, Henry sued his neighbor to the southe ast John Woodcock for £4.14.00 relating to a pig and "the double ingagment of the hogges." The jury awarded him £4.07.03 and £0.03.00 in court costs, but in a moment of excessive generosity he consented to a new trial and on 24 September this time found himself on the losing side to the extent of £2.02.00 and £0.09.00 in costs. As the magistrate noted, the verdict did not sit well with Henry:

"Henry Gregory after the verdict was much moved & said ["]I marvill with what conscience the jury can find such damages seeing in the case of John Searles I had of him but twenty shillinges for three slanders,["] and he added ["]But such Juries €” ["] He was about to speak more but Mr. Moxon [Rev. George Moxon, the minister] bid him take heed, take heed, and so gave him grave admonition. Presently after the admonition Henry Gregory acknowledged his fault & earnestly craved pardon & promised more care & watchfulness for tyme to come and so all the Jury acknowledged satisfaction in hopes of reformation."

Finally, on 24 December 1640/1, Henry and two others were accused of violating a town ordinance against selling or pawning cannoes to outsiders. The court gave him five months to reacquire them.

The court appearances were not confined to Henry. On 15 Feb ruary 1640/1, he and his wife were witnesses in a suit against John Woodcock and testified to Woodcock making false statements regarding how much he owned. Pynchon wrote:

"Goody Gregory being accused by oath of John Woodcoke & Richard Williams for swearing before God ["]I could break thy head["]; she did acknowld it was her great sin & fault & saith she hath bin much humbled for it. She is fined 12d to the pore to be paid to Henry Smuth within a month; or if she doe not she is to sit 3 hours in the stockes."

Sometime in 1642 or early 1643, Henry decided to sell his land in Springfield. At a town meeting on 14 March 1642/3,

"Henry Gregory beinge purposed to sell his lott and ppoundinge it to ye Plantation by his son Judah accordinge to order, Richard Everit beinge his chapman [buyer] the Plantation gave ye voate wherein they disalowed ye chapman ppounded and resolved to buy ye lott accordinge to ye conditions expssed in a former order Dated January 24th 1638."

Henry moved south down the Connecticut River to New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut, where his son John lived. He remained there for a breif period, before finally removing west along the coast to Startford, Fairfield County, sometime before 1647.

He spent time moving back and forth between Stratford and New Haven, where he worked with his son as a shoemaker. On 7 December 1647, John Meigs (No. 282:10:5762; No. 283:14:5774) of New Haven sued Henry:

"John Meges declareth that at two severall times or agreements, he bargained with Henry Gregory of Stratford to make 14 dosson of shoes, and was to give him 12d a pare for makeing them, carrying them to him readie cutt out, that he payed 48s of this before handm and £6 more he was to have when he had done halfe the work . . . that Goodman Gregory hath made 13 dosson of them, but they are all naught and fall in peces, some in a weeke, some in 14 dayes time, [Henry was accused of spoiling the shoe leather by leaying the shoes out in the sand, of making some without the required wooden heels, and of making others a size too small] so that the plaintiffe is damadged both in his name and estate. In his name, bothe at Connecticote, Long Island, Totoket, Guil ford, Startford, Farefield, they all cry out, and some think the plaintiffe worthy to be putt in prisson. Henery Gregory, the defendant, saith that he received a hide from John Meges [Meigs was a tanner] at 48s pric, for which hide he was to make hime 4 dosson of shooes wch came to 48s; pt of this he did before the other bargaine, and he saw the ware and accepted it, and Mr. Evanc took it as currant and good, but it proved not so. The plaintiff seing this ware agreed for the rest, but hee, this defendant, before the agreement, told the plaintiffe he would make no more of such leather. The plaintiffe promised bothe better leather, and to procure hempe from Connecticote to sow the shoes wth, but did not performe accordingly, so that the defendant was forced to buy flax at 18d p1, and sowed them with flaw. [The second hide furnished by Meigs was as bad or worse than the first, causing Henry to remark, "It is pittie but the tanner should be hanged wch tanned it, for he cossens the countrye."] The defendant dissiered to have hemp; the plaintiffe said that [flax] thread would last as long as the leather. . . . For making the showes lesse than they were cutt out it was because they were marked by hime [Meigs] more than they would reach, for some wch was to be made up to ye tens would not reache a nines last, but would teare, they were so little and the leather so bad. [As for the charge concering the wooden heels, Henry stated that he had not been supplied with the proper materials.] Juda Gregory testifyeth upon oath that he looked upon pt of the leather wch his father was to worke of Goodman Meges, and some of it was so hornie that according to his judgment no man could make shooes to pase his word on them to hold. Allso shooes so tainted, though they might seem to be tanned, yet they would not hold that a man was able to justify himselfe or the leather in it. Allso that his father complained to hime, this deponent, and himself saw shooes of the tenns marked for elevens, that by a size he could not sowe them either for credite to himself or proffitt to the countery . . . . Allso that Goodman Meges would have this deponent wrought, but he sawe the lether so bad that if he never wrought more he would not worke it, in reg ard to the uncomfortableness to worke, because it was hornie, and so l ittle that it would not come together, and because it would be wrong to the cun try. The wife of William Crooker [Henry's son-in-l aw] testifyeth upon oath . . . that when Goodman Meges came for the shoes he saw them lye upon a sandye bench in the sellar, and he said he liked the lyin g of them very well . . . [and] after Goodman Meges was gon and delaied to fetch away the shooes, her father wiped them with a cloth, and took some clapboards and other things and laid under them. And further she saith her father blamed the tanner for the leather not beinge well tanned. Goodman Meges answered he could not blame the tanner so much for he was faine to tak it oute before it was tanned. She saith further she saw it tear in peces when her father put it upon the last. William Hooke junr testifyeth upon oath that he clearly remembereth Goodman Gregory was making 2 pare of shooes in their shopp. Goodman Meges came in in the meantime and said to Goodman Gregory, flapp them up together, they are to goe farr inoughe. John gregory testifyeth upon oath that Goodma n Meges said, flapp them up together, they are to goe far inoughe, this was aboute the beginning of the last bargaine, wch was for the ten dosson. . . . John Gregory saith that aboute the time of the bargaine he gave Goodman Meges some cautions, because his father was old and his eyesight failed hime, and he durst not employe hime himself, for he could not do as he had done."

The outcome of the case is not recorded.

In a pre-1651 list of "every man's fense in the outfield, " Henry appears as No. 32 with eight rods. In March 1652, the town gave him permission to cut a piece of meadow on "the west side of the dich" until otherwise disposed of. Although it his clear he had a home lott -- a reference to Isaac Nichols' land described it as being bordered by Henry's land on the west. -- there is no record of the grant.

He died in Stratford — "an oulde man" — in 1655, probably in June; on 19 June the court ordered his estate distributed. An inventory of his estate included:

"5 pillowes, all the wooden ware, 3 Chayres & 1 wheel, 1 pair Skales, some pewter ware,2 Iron pots, 1 skillit, 2 axes, 1 drawing knife, 1 meat knife, 2 spones, all the books, 1 howe, 1 pot hanger, 1 sieth, 1 Iron ringe, 3 pound of rosen, 1 baskitt, 1 maat, 1 coat, old pacede & bagg, Pease & hopps, Lasts."

The court appointed Henry's son John administrator of the estate, ordered all his debts to be paid, and the remainder of the estate distributed to his children with a double portion to John as the eldest son. "

view all 22

Henry Gregory's Timeline

1590
1590
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England
1603
1603
Age 13
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England
1604
March 17, 1604
Age 14
Great Bentley, Essex, England
1611
February 19, 1611
Age 21
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England
1612
1612
Age 22
Nottingham, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England
1615
December 16, 1615
Age 25
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England
1617
1617
Age 27
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England
1619
1619
Age 29
of, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England
1623
1623
Age 33
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England
1625
January 29, 1625
Age 35
St. Peters, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England