Henry Howland, Jr., of Duxbury (1604 - 1671) MP

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Birthplace: Fen Stanton, Huntingdonshire, England
Death: Died in Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts
Occupation: became constable of Duxbury, Draper, Arrived in America in 1625, Pilgram
Managed by: Thomas Edward Shirley
Last Updated:

About Henry Howland, Jr., of Duxbury

Henry - occupation: Apprentice Draper - married Mary Newland - they probably died at the Duxbury Homestead - Nancy in 1674. - 8 children - all born in Duxbury.

The family was made up of Quakers. He was sentenced to 10 shillings for absenting himself from Public Worship.

(From the Howland Heirs)

HENRY HOWLAND, the pioneer, with his brother Arthur, came to this country in either the Fortune, 1621, or the Ann, 1623. Their brother John had preceded them to Plymouth as one of the Mayflower Pilgrims in 1620. The origin of this family is believed to have been in Essex County, England, but extensive researches have failed to reveal the parentage of the three brothers. There was another brother, Humphrey Howland, a draper, of the parish of St. Swithin, London, whose will, proved July 10, 1646, left certain legacies to his three brothers, Arthur, John and Henry in New England. Still another brother, George, was of St. Dunstan's parish in the east.


The first mention made of Henry Howland is in the allotment of cattle in Plymouth in 1624, when he appears as owner of the "black cow." In 1633 his name is found in the list of freemen, and in the same year he indentured a servant, Walter Harris. In 1634 he was taxed eighteen shillings, as against a tax of nine shillings the year previous. He was among the earliest settlers of Duxbury, where in 1635 he was chosen constable, and was described as "one of the substantial landholders and freemen." In 1640 he purchased five acres of upland and an acre of marsh meadow in Duxbury, the price paid being "twelve bushells of Indian Corne." For several years he was surveyor of highways in the town, and for nine years served on the grand jury. But in 1657 he refused to serve longer on the grand inquest, the apparent reason being that he had turned Quaker and could not conscientiously perform the duties required of him. Thereafter he was an object of persecution by the authorities of the Colony. In October, 1657, he was "summonsed to appear at the next March Court to answare for intertaining Quakers meetings at his house." He was fined ten shillings. In March, 1659, his wife, their son Zoeth, and the latter's wife, and Arthur Howland and wife, with others, were fined ten shillings each for "frequently absenting themselues from the publicke worship of God." In 1659 Henry Howland was convicted and sentenced by the Court "to be disfranchised of his freedom in the corporation" for being an abettor and entertainer of Quakers. The following year he was again convicted and fined for a similar offense. Once, on refusing to pay his fine, his house and lands were seized by the marshal.

In 1652 Henry Howland was among the original purchasers of Dartmouth, where his son Zoeth and four of his six grandsons were destined to become settlers. He was the owner of half a share, or one sixty-eighth of the purchase, which was acquired from the Indians. Subsequently, with twenty-six others he bought the land known as Assonet, including the present town of Freetown, Mass., and here his son Samuel settled. In 1664 he bought a large tract of land at Swansea. It is probable that he lived for a time at Apponegansett, on his share of the Dartmouth purchase, as his will of 1670 gave to two of his children his horses and cattle "now running" there, and his wife's will, four years later, made this bequest: "Unto my son John Howland my house at Apponegansett." His old homestead at Duxbury was left to his son Joseph, excepting the "new room," which was reserved for the widow of the testator.

Henry Howland died in Duxbury, Jan. 17, 1671. His wife was Mary Newland, a sister of William Newland, who came from Lynn in 1637 and settled in Sandwich. She died in Duxbury, June 17, 1674. To the couple were born four sons and four daughters, Zoeth, Joseph, John, Samuel, Sarah, Elizabeth, Mary and Abigail, all of whom were legatees under the wills of both

.II) Zoeth Howland, son of Henry Howland, was born in Duxbury, Mass. He moved, with his wife Abigail, to Dartmouth, and there embraced the Quaker religion, his father and wife also being members of that church. Zoeth and Abigail Howland were tried and fined for their religious faith, it being proven that meetings were held at their home. Zoeth Howland was killed by Indians at Pocasset, R. I., January 21, 1676, the place of his death now known as Tiverton

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Henry Howland

Origin: Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire

MIGRATION: 1632

FIRST RESIDENCE: Plymouth

The first mention made of Henry Howland in New England is in the allotment of cattle to the different families in Plymouth in 1624, he appears as the owner of the "black cow."

FREEMAN: In the "1633" list of Plymouth freemen Henry Howland appears

immediately before those admitted on 1 January 1632/3.

In the 6 March 1636/7 list of Plymouth Colony freemen.

REMOVES: Duxbury 1636

In the Duxbury section of the 1639 and 1658 lists of Plymouth freemen.

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By March 25 1633 Henry had come to America and was on the tax rolls of Plymouth.

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Henry Howland Sr. "The Quaker" 1, 2, 3, 4 was born in 1605 in Fen Stanton, Huntingdonshire, England. He died on 17 Jan 1671 in Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts. He married Mary Newland in 1626 in Massachusetts. He had other parents.

Came to American Colonies with brother Arthur in ship Fortune abt 1621 or ship Anne with William Pierce as Master about 1623. Brother John had come on Mayflower in 1620. Two brothers stayed in England, George and Humphrey .

Joined Quaker religion with wife about 1657.Henry Howland was a Quaker. (1604-1671) He left Fen Stanton, Huntingtonshire, England and went to the American colonies with his brother Arthur, ca 1623, probably as passengers on the ship "Anne" with William Pierce as Master. They followed their brother, John Howland, who had come over on the Mayflower in 1620. Henry Howland settled in Duxbury, Massachusetts, where he lived form 1633 until he died in 1671. He was a Quaker. Henry Howland was one of those Quakers fined in 1658 for bing a Quaker. (See Ralph Allen notes) One of the first mentions of Henry Howland is an allotment of cattle in Plymouth in 1623, and in the original purchase of Dartmouth he is assigned one share with William Bassett in 1652. He married Mary Newland, probably about 1639 in Massachusetts. She was the daughter of William Newland. She had lived at Freetown and Swansea. She had a brother, William Newland, at Linn, Massachusetts in 1637. Mary Newland Howland died June 17, 1674. She left a will dated 3 month 8 day of 1674, which was proved April 8th 1675, and was witnessed by Ralph Allen, her son-in-law. In her will she left 1 shilling each to her daughters, Sarah Dennis and Elizabeth "Allin". Sarah Howland had married Robert Dennis 11.16.1672, and Robert Dennis, in his will, called Jedediah Allen (husband of Elizabeth Howland Allen) his brother-in-law. Henry and Mary (Newland) Howland had the following children:

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Descendants of HENRY HOWLAND

Generation No. 1

1. HENRY3 HOWLAND (HENRY2, JOHN1) was born ABT 1604 in Scrooby, notts, England, and died January 17, 1670/71 in Duxbury,MA. He married MARY NEWLAND 1628 in England, daughter of WILLIAM NEWLAND and AGNES GREENWAY.

Notes

Ref: A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada, By Franklyn Howland, First Edition, New Bedford, MA: Published by the author 1885

Henry Howland and his Descendants.

The youngest (at least the last mentioned in the will of Humphrey) of the Howlands who have been heretofore referred to as arriving at plymouth probably before 1625, was without doubt Henry. It is on record that he was a brother of Arthur, and they all doubtless held the same family relationship to each other. Some of the colonists may have reached greater distinction in civil affairs, but none have a better record for integrity, thrift, uprightness, and unmixed faith in the Divine One, than Henry Howland. It is clear that these virtues did not die with him, but permeated the lives of many of his children, and his children's children, unto the ninth generation. As we read of his vicissitudes, discouragements, perseverance, endurance, courage and victories, let us, like our honored ancestor,

"In the world's broad field of battle, In the bivouac of life, Be not like dumb, driven cattle! But be heroes in the strife."

Search has been made in vain for his name on records of departures from england and arrivals in this country. The first mention made of him in New England is that in the allotment of cattle to the different families in plymouth in 1624, he appears as the owner of the "black cow." On the first page of Vol. I of the court records of new plymouth, is found in a list of freemen, under date of 1633, the name of "Henery Howland". On the 25th of march of the same year he is taxed "s.9 for the publike vse,.....rated in corne at vi s p bushell." His thrift is shown in the fact that on the 27th of march, 1634, he is on the tax list for 18s.

He appears in Duxbury among its earliest settlers, some of the first inhabitants of Plymouth locating themselves there across the harbor, on the north side of the bay. Here he is referred to as living "by the bay side, near love Brewster's," and the record reads that he was "one of the substantial landholders and freemen."

The old records of Plymouth Colony say that "Att a Courte held ye 5 of Jan., Ano 1635," Henry Howland was chosen "cunstable for Duxberry."

"At a Genall Meeting the xxth of March 1636-7" to appoint committees to assign the "Hey Grounds of Ducksbury were appoynted to view the hey grounds from the riuer beyong Phillip Delanoys to the South Riuer." (Mr Edward Winslow, Henry Howland, The messenger Phillip Delanoy.)

In 1640 he purchased five acres of upland and one acre of marsh meadow in Duxbury, the price which he paid being "Twelve bushells of Indian Corne." For several years he was surveyor of highways in the town. in 1643 he was on a list of freemen of Duxbury, and of men able to bear arms. He served on the "Grand Inquest" (grand jury) in 1636, 37, 39, 40, 49, 51, 52, 53, 56.

He was evidently placed on the next grand jury, for his name appears in 1657, June 3d, on a list of those who refused "to serue on the Grand enquest". The apparent reason for this is that he had joined the Friends' sect, which was just beginning to spread in America, and the duties were such that he could not conscientiously perform them.

The Friends had adopted as the guide of their purposes and the polar star of their lives, a religious faith which had for its foundation the pure word of the Almighty Father, and with the strictest conscientiousness they courageously carried out its precepts, as we have said before, against the fiercest opposition and hardest warfare ever waged against any so-claimed religious belief in this country, where licentious free-lovers and adulterous Mormons have since wallowed in their pools of filth without molestation. They passed through the furnace of affliction, and were yet surrounded by great tribulation when they stepped out into the great future, but their descendants lived to see peace and good will to smile upon their principles so fondly cherished. They suffered much in both colonies, but Cotton says that though their persecutions were equally great here, yet they were never subjected to those cruel and sanguinary laws which the other colonies enacted. The law against heretics in general was first enforced agianst them, and then special laws were enacted against them. A fine of L5 or a whipping was the penalty for entertaingin them, and for attending their meetings one was liable to a fine of L2. At this time the laws against the people of this society were being enforced, and Henry being one of them, he could not conscientiously sit on the jury before which his own brother Arthur, who had joined the society, his brethren in the faith, and himself, were liable to be brought as transgressors of the civil laws of the colony, which were as inflexible and unalterable as those of the Medes and persians.

It may be of interest to the reader, as it has to the writer, to peruse the entries in the Plymouth Colony records in relation to the part in which Henry acted as victim in these persecutions. For this reason they are given here as they appear there.

On the 3d of June, 1657, Ralph Allen, Sr., of Sandwich, was drawn, but refused to serve on the grand jury, and at the very next session of the court, October 6th, he was brought before the jury for entertaining Quakers, fined and imprisoned; and before many weeks Henry Howland, his brother, Arthur, and his son Zoeth met the same fate. Henry entertained Nicholas Upsall, who was an earnest and courageous defender of the tenets of the sect, whom Whittier immortalizes in verse, and who visited this section in 1657. Public proclamation was made that for every hour Nicholas Upsall as entertained "a severe fine was to be exacted" from his host.

At the court of October 1657, Henry "was summonsed to appear at the next March Court to answare for intertaining Quakers meetings in his house." He appeared at the court referred to, and was fined 10s.

The Howland family was well represented in the dock of the court of March 1st, 1659, as follows: "John Smith Junir, of Plymouth, and Deborah, his wife, Goodwife Howland wife of Henery Howland, Zoeth Howland and his wife, Arthur Howland and his wife of Marshfield, hauing bene p'sented for frequently absenting themselues from publicke worship of God, were sentanced by the court each ten shillings to the collonies vse."

At the court of 1659, Oct. 6th, "William Newland and Henry Howland appeared, being summoned, and were convicted by law and sentanced by the court to bee disfranchised of theire freedome of this corporation...for theire being abettors and entertainors of Quackers." May 1st and October 2d, 1660, Henry was fined for "p'rmitting a quaker meeting in his house twise... and for entertaining a forraigne Quaker contrary to order of the court." Once, when refusing to pay his fine, his house and lands were seized by the marshal.

There is a remarkable coincidence of history in the fact that while Henry of New England was passing through these trials, there was a Henry in old England under going similar ones. It appears that in 1662 a "Henry Howland of Tewksbury, in Glocestershire, for refusing to bear Arms, or to pay toward the Charge of the Maletia had a Horse taken from him worth 4 1. 8s. The Person who took the Horse acknowledging that he did it against his Conscience, Henry Howland told him, he might then expect some judgment would follow; and it was observed, that the said Person, having ordered his Son to sell the Horse, as he was riding, the Horse ran violently with him against the Arm of a Tree, so that he died of the Blow immediately." In November, 1665, the same Henry had "three Cows and one Steer taken from him for permitting religious Meetings at his House."

Through all this persecution and suffering Henry and his "goodwife" clung to the cause thay had espoused, and died as they had lived during the sunset hours of life, triumphant in the faith.

Toward the latter part of his life he became a large possessor of real estate. In 1652 he was associated with others in a large tract of land in Dartmouth. On the 2d of April, 1659, together with twenty-six others, he bought of Wamsutta and pattapanum what was then called Assonet and is now Freetown. they gave 20 coats, 2 rugs, 2 iron pots, 2 kettles and one little kettle, 8 pairs shoes, 6 pairs stockings, 1 dozen hats, 2 dozen hatchets, and 2 yards broadcloth. At the division, in 1660, of "ye ffreeman's land att Taunton River," which was this purchase, he received for his share the sixth lot. This was afterwards inherited by his son Samuel. he was one of the grantees of Bridgewater, but probably never lived there. In 1664 he bought a large tract of land in Mettapoisett (Swanzey.)

Were the early records of Duxbury in existence, we should know more of the life of this noble man. they were probably burned in Miles Standish's house, as at the time it was destroyed by fire Alexander Standish, who lived with Miles, was clerk of the town.

It appears from Henry's will, that he owned a house in Duxbury, where he doubtless died and expected his widow would remain. It is evident, however, that he had assisted in provinding for his immediate posterity a more gongenial home than Plymouth, namely in Freetown and Dartmouth.

Roger Williams, who had already been banished form Massachusetts Bay and Plymouth colonies, had established in rhode Island a government the charter of which guarantied that every one should be free to enjoy his own opinions, as long as they did not militate against the general goods. Into and on the borders of this land of religious liberty the Friends fled. Henry's property was near the boundary line of that state, but within the jurisdiction of Plymouth Colony. On the land he owned at Freetown his son Samuel settled probably as early as 1665, as his last appearance on the P.C.R. is in 1664. At the commencement of the Quaker persecutions at plymouth, Henry became interested in the original purchase of Dartmouth, for a Plymouth in 1652, there was assigned:

One share to Mr. Howland and one to Wm. Bassett.

He doubtless built a house on this land, the one his widow gave to their son John. He and his wife may have lived there, as his horses and cattle were there. On this purchase Zoeth settled, without doubt, as early as 1662, his name appearing on the P.C. R. for the last time in 1661, and immediately preceding that frequently. Of the other two sons, John was probably a bachelor; and it is safe to judge that Joseph lived on the old homestead at Duxbury which his father gave him, and took care of his mother after his father's death, she living in the "new Room," as she gave him all her goods and chattels.

Children of HENRY HOWLAND and MARY NEWLAND are:

2. i. SAMUEL4 HOWLAND, b. ABT 1646, Duxbury, Plymouth Co, MA; d. 1716, Freetown or Middleborough, Bristol Co, MA.

ii. ZOETH HOWLAND.

iii. JOSEPH HOWLAND.

iv. SARAH HOWLAND, b. 1645.

v. ELIZABETH HOWLAND.

vi. MARY HOWLAND.

vii. ABIGAIL HOWLAND, b. 1629, Eastham, Barnstable, MA; d. April 7, 1692, Eastham, Barnstable, MA; m. JOHN YOUNG, December 13, 1648, Plymouth MA.

viii. JOHN HOWLAND.

http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~kenzie/GenHOWLAND2.htm

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and

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Family Group of Henry Howland

HENRY HOWLAND ( Henry, John, John, John ) was born November 25, 1604 in Fen Stanton, Huntingdonshire, England, and died January 17, 1670/71 in Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts 1. He married MARY ( ? NEWLAND ? 10, daughter of WILLIAM NEWLAND and AGNES GREENWAY ? ), Abt. 1623.

Notes for HENRY HOWLAND

Duxbury Deaths: Hennery [h. Mary], Jan. 1, 1670. 24

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"Howland, Henry, born England; died Duxbury, Mass., Jan 17, 1671... Henry resided for a while in Plymouth, but became an early settler in Duxbury "by the bayside, near Love Brewster." He was a surveyor of highways, and was able to bear arms in 1643. As a Quaker he suffered the persecutions of the times. On April 2, 1659 Henry with 26 others bought of the Indians what is now Freetown, for a few old coats, rugs, iron pots, etc. including "one little kittle". In 1664 he purchased a large portion of land in Mattapoisett (Swansea). Henry was owner of the sixth lot in Freetown. However, his sons, John and Samuel, really became the actual settlers." 5

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"HENRY HOWLAND - A brother of 1620 Mayflower passenger, John Howland, Henry Howland was in Plymouth at least as early as 25 March 1633, when his name appears on the tax list, and he was also on the original freeman list. On 8 April 1633, Walter Harris had his indenture transferred to Henry Howland. On 5 January 1635/36 Henry became the constable of Duxbury. He was frequently a member of trial and grand juries. On 3 June 1657, he, John Tompson, Morris Truant, Ralph Allen, and Thomas Greenfield refused to serve on the grand jury. On 2 March 1657/58, the same day his brother Arthur was fined for permitting a Quaker meeting in his house and for resisting the constable of Marshfield in the execution of his office, Henry Howland was fined ten shillings for entertaining a meeting in his house contrary to court orders. On 7 June 1659 the court, referring to an order disenfranching Quakers and other offenders, gave notice to four men to appear in court the following August, and on 6 October 1659 Howland had his freeman status taken away from him. On 1 May 1660 Henry Howland was charged with entertaining another man's wife in his house after her husband had complained to him, and for permitting a Quaker meeting in his house and entertaining a foreign Quaker. He stiffly denied the first charge, and the court noted that the evidence 'did not appeer to make it out,' but he was convicted on the Quaker charges. On the 2nd of March 1657/58 he was fined for entertaining a meeting of Quakers in his home. On the 6th of Oct 1659 he and his brother-in-law, William Newland, were were sentenced "to bee defranchised of their freedom of this corpation". 4

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He made his will 28 November 1670, and he named his wife Mary (her surname is not known; they were possibly married in England), his sons Zoeth, Joseph, John, and Samuel, and his daughters Sarah, Elizabeth, Mary, and Abigail. Will was probated on March 8, 1670/71. 8

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Henry Howland January 14, 1670/1671

Plymouth Colony Wills, vol. III, p. 27

THE INVENTORY OF HENRY HOWLAND (note: Probate)

A true Inventory of the estate viz: of the goods and Chattles of Henery Howland of Duxborrow: late deceased exhibited to the Court held att Plymouth the eight of March 1670; on the oath of Ioseph Howland the sonne of the said Henery Howland

Impr: To 4 oxen att 18 00 00

Item To two steers 06 00 00

Item To 3 Cowes 09 00 00

Item To 5 heiffers 13 00 00

Item To 1 old mare att Ponagansett 02 00 00

Item To 1 younge mare and a Colt att Ponagansett 03 10 00

Item To 1 horse att home and a smale mule 06 00 00

Item To 10 swine 04 00 00

Item To Cart plow & plow Irons with 2 Cheines 2 boxes & yoakes 02 10 00

Item To goods in the new Rome as 2 beds 1 feather bed and a flocke bed with the Couerings 06 00 00

Item to six paire of sheets 05 00 00

Item To 1 Chest 1 Table 3 Chaires and stooles 01 00 00

Item To his wearing Clothes with his purse 10 04 00

Item To new cloth with silke and buttons (that was to make him a Coate) 02 10 06

Item To 23 yards of New Cloth of theire owne makeing 05 15 00

Item To one bed in the middle Rome 05 00 00

Item To 3 beds aboue in the Chambers 10 10 00

Item To one warming pan 00 04 00

Item To 2 old Chestes & 2 old boxes 00 12 00

Item To Table linnine 02 10 00

Item To pewter and some earthen potts & Cups & other smale things 01 05 00

Item To brasse and Iron 03 00 00

Item To earthen and wooden thinges 01 05 00

Item To 2 guns with one old Rapier 02 15 00

Item To 10 barrells of Sider 04 00 00

Item To 15 bushells of Mault 16 bushells of Indian Corne fiue bushells of wheate and 7 bushells of peases 07 14 06

Item To meat as beife porke bacon 03 00 00

Item To 1 old Cannooe & axes wedges old barrells hogsheds and other smale lumber as hoes sythes &c: 02 00 00

Item to a bridle saddle and a pannell 00 12 00

Item To a fier shouell Tonges gridjron Chaffing dish and one smoothing Iron 00 12 00

Item To bookes 00 10 00

Item To about 20 pound of feathers 01 00 00

Taken and aprised the 14 day of the 11th month 1670) by Constant Southworth, Samuell Nash, Iohn Soule;

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Franklyn Howland; A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur , Henry , and John Howland, and their Descendants; Printed by E. Anthony & Sons, Printers and Publishers in New Bedford, Mass.; pg.63

"He arrived in Plymouth, Ma. in 1623 on the Anne, sister ship of the Mayflower. His brother John arrived on Dec 26, 1620. He was known to be one of the largest land holders in Duxbury and a member of the Freeman (Quakers). He had been apprenticed to his brother Humphrey at the Drapers Co. in London, England before his emigration to America."

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Excerpted and Reprint from the New England Historical and Genealogical Register, "Mayflower Source Record", (Genealogical Publicating Co, Inc Baltimore 1986), pg 30, Extracted forom the early probate Records of Bristol County, with note from the Registry of Deeds and Town Records.

"Samuel, John and Zoeth, were the sons of Henry Howland, of Duxbury, said Henry being one of the 26 origional proprietors of Freetown. Henry Howland died in 1670, and Mary his wife died June 16, 1674."

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"Henry, Daxbury, brother of 1st John and 1st Arthur, appeared as early as 1633, and m. Mary Newland, and had Joseph, m. Rebecca, d. of John Huzzy of Hampton; Zoeth; John, m. Mary Walker; Samuel removed to Freetown; Sarah, m. Robert Dennis of Newport; Elizabeth; Mary, m. James Cudworth; Abigail, m. John Young." 10

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The History of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations: Biographical, by the American Historical Society, Inc., 1920. For an unknown reason there are several copies of the book with the same title page, but with different contents. From pages 118-20 of one edition. Henry Howland, the founder, appeared early in Plymouth Colony, being first of record in 1624. He was made a freeman in 1633; was an early settler in Duxbury, Mass., and was there chosen constable in 1635; owned land in Dartmouth in 1652; was one of the twenty-seven purchasers of what is now Freetown, Mass., and finally ended his days in the Duxbury homestead. He married Mary Newland, and reared a large family, this branch tracing through Zoeth, their second son.

Notes for MARY ( ? NEWLAND ? ):

Duxbury Deaths: Mary, wid. Hennery (Hoowland), Aug. 16, 1674. 24

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From the book, "SEVENTEENTH CENTURY COLONIAL ANCESTORS of Members of the National Society Colonial Dames XVII Century" compiled by Mary Louise M. Hutton, pg.133: Howland, Henry (_-1671) Mass.; m. Mary Newland; juror; landowner.

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Robert S. Wakefield and Robert M. Sherman,

"Henry Howland of Duxbury, Mass, 1633."

National Genealogical Society Quarterly (June 1987): 75:105

Neither Wakefield & Sherman in the NGSQ articles on Henry Howland and his descendants nor Robert Charles Anderson in his "The Great Migration Begins" accept Mary Newland as proven to be the wife of Henry Howland.

- Although she is often called Mary Newland, no evidence has been found to verify this claim.

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Wakefield published an article on Henry Howland in the National Genealogical Quarterly ca. 1998 which stated that Henry did not marry Mary Newland, and that she married someone else. Henry married a Mary, last name unknown. It is believed that Henry married in England prior to coming to the colony. He first shows up in Plymouth records in 1634. Henry is the son of Henry of Fen Stanton, England. We know this from the will of his brother, Humphrey a draper in London. Humphery mentions his brother John, Arthur and Henry in his will. Humphery's will was discovered in 1955, and is the cite to the relationship of the three.

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A Brief Genealogical and Bio. Hist. of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland; Franklyn Howland; New Bedford, MA, 1885.

p.18: Will of Humphrey Howland, made 28 May 1646, names brothers George of East, London, and Arthur, John, and Henry.

p. 67: Will of Henry Howland; son John Howland; son Joseph Howland; son Zoeth Howland; Dau. Sarah; "my" Elizabeth; son Samuel Howland; Dau. Mary; Dau. Abigail; Made 28 Nov. 1670; Signed Henery Howland; Wit: Samuel Nash, John Sprague; Will exhibited to the court at Plymouth 8 March 1671 on the oaths of Samuel Nash and John Sprague.

p. 68: Henry marr. Mary Newland. Where and when she was born does not appear.

Will of Mary Howland sometimes the wife of Hennery Howland now dec'd; dau. Abigail Young; son Zoith Howland; son John Howland; dau. Mary Cudworth; son Samuel Howland; dau. Sarah Denis; dau. Elizabeth Allin; son Joseph Howland;

Made 8th day 3rd month, 1674;

Mark (M) of Mary Howland;

Wit: Ralph Allin, John Sprague;

John Sprague attested to will on 26th 2nd month 1674;

John Allin and Ralph Allin attested to will on 8 April 1675.

p. 69 - 76: Family information:

Henry and wife Mary probably died at the old Duxbury homestead; Henry on 17,1,1671 and Mary on 17,6,1674;

Children:

Joseph, b. in Duxbury, d. 15,6,1691, m. 4,3,1683 Rebecca, dau. of John Huzzey of Hampton, NH. Rebecca m. 2nd, 6,3,1695 Samuel Collins. Zoeth, b. in Duxbury, d. 31,1,1676, killed by Indians, m. 10th month 1656 to wife Abigall. Abigail m. 2d, 2,12,1678 to Richard Kirby, Jr. John, Davis' Plymouth says this John m. Mary Walker. My belief is he never married. Samuel, b. in Duxbury, d. 1716, wife's name was Mary. Sarah, m. 16,11,1672 Robert Dennis of Portsmouth, RI Elizabeth, m. Jedediah Allen in 1691. He was probably son of George Allen. Mary, m. James Cudworth of Duxbury Abigail, m. John Young 2,9,1678; He was probably son of John Young who "was maried unto ... 13 Dec 1648".

Children of HENRY HOWLAND and MARY (? NEWLAND ?):

SAMUEL HOWLAND 2, b. Abt. 1646 3, Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts 3; d. May 07, 1716, Freetown, Bristol County, Massachusetts; m. (1) MARY SAMPSON , Bef. June 02, 1681; m. (2) MARY MERRIHEW 6 23, July 17, 1708.

 

ZOETH HOWLAND 20, b. January 31, 1635/36, Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusettes; d. January 01, 1675/76, Puncatest, Newport, Rhode Island; m. ABIGAIL, October 10, 1656, Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusettes 21.

 

ELIZABETH HOWLAND 22, b. 1647, Duxbury, Plymouth, Mass; d. Aft. September 15, 1711, Shrewsbury, Monmouth, NJ; m. JEDEDIAH ALLEN, 1668, Sandwich, Barnstable, Mass.

 

SARAH HOWLAND 9, b. Abt. 1650, Duxborough, Plymouth, MA; d. October 02, 1712, Portsmouth, Newport County, Rhode Island; m. ROBERT DENNIS 10, November 16, 1672, Duxborough, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.

Notes for SARAH HOWLAND:

Josiah Vining b. 12/8/1729 Abington, Plymouth, MA (The Vining Families, Chap. 3) - d. 1774 - m. 1/31/1750 (William Dawes Family/Henry A. Holland 1878) Pembrooke, , MA Hannah Abigail Dawes (Pembrooke,MA Vital Records,) (Daughter of Samuel Dawes & Sarah Howland; Sarah's father was Henry Howland, brother of John Howland who came over on the Mayflower; (Ref. Hazel Spencer Howard)) (The Vining Families, Chap. 3) b.1729 East Bridgewater, Plymouth, MA - Josiah & Hannah had 6 children. (The Vining Families, Chap. 3) They removed to Norton, MA where they spent several years.

JOSEPH HOWLAND 11, b. Abt. 1635, Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts; d. June 15, 1692; m. REBECCA HUZZEY 12, May 04, 1683, Hampton, NH.

 

JOHN HOWLAND 13, b. November 16, 1633, Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts; d. August 18, 1687, Freetown, Bristol, Massachusetts; m. MARY WALKER 14 15, January 12, 1684/85, Duxbury, Plymouth, Mass.

 

MARY HOWLAND 16, b. Abt. 1640, Duxburrow,; d. Aft. November 04, 1699, Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts; m. JAMES CUDWORTH, Bef. 1665, Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts.

Notes for MARY HOWLAND:

"Capt. James, the oldest son [of General James Cudworth], had lands in Freetown, in his father's right, and my have resided there for a time, but most of his children are recorded in Scituate. They were mary born 1667, Sarah 1669, Capt. James 1670, who deceased at Freetown, 1729, Joanna 1671, (wife of Zachary Colman 1696), Elizabeth 1672, Abigail 1674, John 1677. John (last named) settled in Scituate, and left sons John born 1706, James 1715, both of whom left sons."Capt. James, sen. decesaed before 1699. His widow Mary deceased 1699, leaving legacies 'to sons James and John, and daughters Mary, Sarah, Joanna Colman, and Eliz. and Abigail.'"John (born 1706, above named) married Mary Briggs, 1731, his sons were John, jr. and Capt. Joseph. John, jr. married Elizabeth Clap 1772, and had sons John, Job, Charles, Abiel, Arvin. This family resided on Hooppole neck. Capt. Joseph married Elizabeth Souther 1775, and has sons Elijah of Scituate and Peter of Boston" 7

ABIGAIL HOWLAND 17, b. 1629, England; d. April 07, 1692, Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts 18; m. JOHN YOUNG 14, December 13, 1648, Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts 19.

 

Surname Lists:

? - D E - G H - Howland, G Howland, H - Howland, P Howland, Q - Hz I - M N - R S - Z

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Endnotes

1. Robert Charles Anderson, The Great Migration Begins: immigrants to New England 1620-1633, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, 1995, Three volumes.

2. Davis, William T., Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families, (2nd Edition; Boston: William T. Davis, 1899), pg. 154, "SAMUEL, Freetown, son of 1st Henry, by wife Mary ... ."

3. Franklyn Howland; A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada,1885. pg. 69.

SAMUEL HOWLAND, b. ABT 1646, Duxbury, Plymouth Co, MA; d. 1716, Freetown or Middleborough, Bristol Co, MA.

4. Plymouth Colony - It's History and People, 1620 - 1691

5. Leon Clark Hills, History and Genealogy of the Mayflower Planters and First Comers to Ye Olde Colonie, pg 161.

6. Davis, William T., Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families, (2nd Edition; Boston: William T. Davis, 1899), Appendix p.328, [Howland] Samuel, 1st in text, 1678, m., Mary Merihew.

7. Deane, Samuel; History of Scituate, Massachusetts, from Its First Settlement to 1831.

8. National Genealogical Society Quarterly; September, 1987, VOL. 75, NO. 3; p.105-116

9. Franklyn Howland; A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada, 1885. pg. 69.

"Sarah, m. 16,11,1672 Robert Dennis of Portsmouth, RI."

10. Davis, William T., Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families, p.150. (Originally published as Part II of 'Davis, William T.; Ancient Landmarks of Plymouth; 2nd Edition; Boston:1899;')

11. Franklyn Howland; A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada, 1885. pg. 69.

"Joseph, b. in Duxbury, d. 15/6/1691, m. 4/3/1683 Rebecca, dau. of John Huzzey of Hampton, NH."

12. Davis, William T., Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families, (2nd Edition; Boston: William T. Davis, 1899), pg.150.

13. Franklyn Howland; A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada, 1885. pg. 69.

14. Davis, William T., Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families, (2nd Edition; Boston: William T. Davis, 1899), pg 327.

15. Franklyn Howland; A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada, 1885. pg. 69.

"John, Davis' Plymouth says this John m. Mary Walker. My belief is he never married."

16. Franklyn Howland; A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada, 1885. pg. 69.

"Mary, m. James Cudworth of Duxbury."

17. Franklyn Howland; A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada, 1885. pg. 69.

"Abigail, m. John Young 2/9/1678; He was probably son of John Young who was maried unto ... 13 Dec 1648 .."

18. "Eastham Mass., Vital Records," transcribed by George Ernest Bowman, Mayflower Descendant, various volumes, Also printed in Vital Records of the Towns of Eastham and Orleans, with index, edited by Leonard H Smith Jr & Norma H. Smith, 1976..

19. Records of the Colony of New Plymouth - Vol. 8, pg 5.

20. Franklyn Howland; A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada, 1885. pg. 69.

"Zoeth, b. in Duxbury, d. 31,1,1676, killed by Indians, m. 10th month 1656 to wife Abigall. Abigail m. 2d, 2/12/1678 to Richard Kirby, Jr ..."

21. Friend's Records at Newport, Rhode Island

22. Franklyn Howland; A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada, pg. 69,

"Elizabeth, m. Jedediah Allen in 1691. He was probably son of George Allen ..."

23. Davis, William T.; Ancient Landmarks of Plymouth; Addendum pg. 366.

"Samuel, 1st in text, m. 1678, Mary Merihew."

24. Records of the Society of Friends of Pembroke, now in the possession of the Society at New Bedford.

25.

26.

 

http://www.bluezstreet.com/FG_Howland/FG_HenryHowland1604.htm -------------------- 1624- His name first appeared in the records of Plymouth, MA.

1635, 5 January- Chosen Constable of Duxbury, MA. He was one of the earliest settlers of Duxbury, MA.

He was Surveyer of Highways and served on the Grand Jury for several years. -------------------- Henry Howland is mentioned at Plymouth in 1624, as owner of the "Black Cow," and is found in list of freemen in 1633, and taxed. He appears in Duxbury among its earliest settlers. A substantial land owner and freeman. Chosen constable for Duxbury, January 5, 1635 ; surveyor of highways; served on grand inquest (grand jury), 1636-37-39-51- 52-53-56. In 1652 was a large real estate holder in Dartmouth. In 1659, with twenty-six others, purchased Wamseeta and Pattapanum, called Assonet, later Freetown. In 1660 land at Taunton river; 1664, large tract at Matta- poisset (Swanzey). He married Mary New- land, who died June 17, 1674, probably at old Duxbury homestead. In his will, November 28, 1670, he mentions wife, Joseph, John, Zoeth, Sarah Elizabeth, Mary, Abigail (3), Samuel. Will exhibited in court March 8, 1671. Wife Mary Rowland's will mentioned (May 8, 1674) Dr. Mary Cudworth, Samuel Howland, daughter Sarah Dennis, daughter Elizabeth Allen, Joseph ; attested February 26, 1674. Children: Joseph, died June 15, 1692: Zoeth, died January 31, 1676; Samuel, died 1776; Sarah, married, November 16, 1672, Robert Dennis; Elizabeth, married, 1691, Jede- diah Allen; Mary, married James Cudworth; Abigail, married John Young, Eastham, February 9, 1648; died April 7, 1692.

Reference:

Page 2684 of the book -

"Genealogical and personal memoirs relating to the families of the state of Massachusetts"

By William Richard Cutter, William Frederick Adams

Published by Lewis Historical Pub. Co., 1910

Item notes: v. 4

Original from Harvard University --------------------

Henry - occupation: Apprentice Draper - married Mary Newland - they probably died at the Duxbury Homestead - Nancy in 1674. - 8 children - all born in Duxbury.

The family was made up of Quakers. He was sentenced to 10 shillings for absenting himself from Public Worship.

(From the Howland Heirs)

HENRY HOWLAND, the pioneer, with his brother Arthur, came to this country in either the Fortune, 1621, or the Ann, 1623. Their brother John had preceded them to Plymouth as one of the Mayflower Pilgrims in 1620. The origin of this family is believed to have been in Essex County, England, but extensive researches have failed to reveal the parentage of the three brothers. There was another brother, Humphrey Howland, a draper, of the parish of St. Swithin, London, whose will, proved July 10, 1646, left certain legacies to his three brothers, Arthur, John and Henry in New England. Still another brother, George, was of St. Dunstan's parish in the east.

The first mention made of He... read more

Henry - occupation: Apprentice Draper - married Mary Newland - they probably died at the Duxbury Homestead - Nancy in 1674. - 8 children - all born in Duxbury.

The family was made up of Quakers. He was sentenced to 10 shillings for absenting himself from Public Worship.

(From the Howland Heirs)

HENRY HOWLAND, the pioneer, with his brother Arthur, came to this country in either the Fortune, 1621, or the Ann, 1623. Their brother John had preceded them to Plymouth as one of the Mayflower Pilgrims in 1620. The origin of this family is believed to have been in Essex County, England, but extensive researches have failed to reveal the parentage of the three brothers. There was another brother, Humphrey Howland, a draper, of the parish of St. Swithin, London, whose will, proved July 10, 1646, left certain legacies to his three brothers, Arthur, John and Henry in New England. Still another brother, George, was of St. Dunstan's parish in the east.

The first mention made of Henry Howland is in the allotment of cattle in Plymouth in 1624, when he appears as owner of the "black cow." In 1633 his name is found in the list of freemen, and in the same year he indentured a servant, Walter Harris. In 1634 he was taxed eighteen shillings, as against a tax of nine shillings the year previous. He was among the earliest settlers of Duxbury, where in 1635 he was chosen constable, and was described as "one of the substantial landholders and freemen." In 1640 he purchased five acres of upland and an acre of marsh meadow in Duxbury, the price paid being "twelve bushells of Indian Corne." For several years he was surveyor of highways in the town, and for nine years served on the grand jury. But in 1657 he refused to serve longer on the grand inquest, the apparent reason being that he had turned Quaker and could not conscientiously perform the duties required of him. Thereafter he was an object of persecution by the authorities of the Colony. In October, 1657, he was "summonsed to appear at the next March Court to answare for intertaining Quakers meetings at his house." He was fined ten shillings. In March, 1659, his wife, their son Zoeth, and the latter's wife, and Arthur Howland and wife, with others, were fined ten shillings each for "frequently absenting themselues from the publicke worship of God." In 1659 Henry Howland was convicted and sentenced by the Court "to be disfranchised of his freedom in the corporation" for being an abettor and entertainer of Quakers. The following year he was again convicted and fined for a similar offense. Once, on refusing to pay his fine, his house and lands were seized by the marshal.

In 1652 Henry Howland was among the original purchasers of Dartmouth, where his son Zoeth and four of his six grandsons were destined to become settlers. He was the owner of half a share, or one sixty-eighth of the purchase, which was acquired from the Indians. Subsequently, with twenty-six others he bought the land known as Assonet, including the present town of Freetown, Mass., and here his son Samuel settled. In 1664 he bought a large tract of land at Swansea. It is probable that he lived for a time at Apponegansett, on his share of the Dartmouth purchase, as his will of 1670 gave to two of his children his horses and cattle "now running" there, and his wife's will, four years later, made this bequest: "Unto my son John Howland my house at Apponegansett." His old homestead at Duxbury was left to his son Joseph, excepting the "new room," which was reserved for the widow of the testator.

Henry Howland died in Duxbury, Jan. 17, 1671. His wife was Mary Newland, a sister of William Newland, who came from Lynn in 1637 and settled in Sandwich. She died in Duxbury, June 17, 1674. To the couple were born four sons and four daughters, Zoeth, Joseph, John, Samuel, Sarah, Elizabeth, Mary and Abigail, all of whom were legatees under the wills of both

.II) Zoeth Howland, son of Henry Howland, was born in Duxbury, Mass. He moved, with his wife Abigail, to Dartmouth, and there embraced the Quaker religion, his father and wife also being members of that church. Zoeth and Abigail Howland were tried and fined for their religious faith, it being proven that meetings were held at their home. Zoeth Howland was killed by Indians at Pocasset, R. I., January 21, 1676, the place of his death now known as Tiverton

--------------------

Henry Howland

Origin: Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire

MIGRATION: 1632

FIRST RESIDENCE: Plymouth

The first mention made of Henry Howland in New England is in the allotment of cattle to the different families in Plymouth in 1624, he appears as the owner of the "black cow."

FREEMAN: In the "1633" list of Plymouth freemen Henry Howland appears

immediately before those admitted on 1 January 1632/3.

In the 6 March 1636/7 list of Plymouth Colony freemen.

REMOVES: Duxbury 1636

In the Duxbury section of the 1639 and 1658 lists of Plymouth freemen.

--------------------

By March 25 1633 Henry had come to America and was on the tax rolls of Plymouth.

--------------------

Henry Howland Sr. "The Quaker" 1, 2, 3, 4 was born in 1605 in Fen Stanton, Huntingdonshire, England. He died on 17 Jan 1671 in Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts. He married Mary Newland in 1626 in Massachusetts. He had other parents.

Came to American Colonies with brother Arthur in ship Fortune abt 1621 or ship Anne with William Pierce as Master about 1623. Brother John had come on Mayflower in 1620. Two brothers stayed in England, George and Humphrey .

Joined Quaker religion with wife about 1657.Henry Howland was a Quaker. (1604-1671) He left Fen Stanton, Huntingtonshire, England and went to the American colonies with his brother Arthur, ca 1623, probably as passengers on the ship "Anne" with William Pierce as Master. They followed their brother, John Howland, who had come over on the Mayflower in 1620. Henry Howland settled in Duxbury, Massachusetts, where he lived form 1633 until he died in 1671. He was a Quaker. Henry Howland was one of those Quakers fined in 1658 for bing a Quaker. (See Ralph Allen notes) One of the first mentions of Henry Howland is an allotment of cattle in Plymouth in 1623, and in the original purchase of Dartmouth he is assigned one share with William Bassett in 1652. He married Mary Newland, probably about 1639 in Massachusetts. She was the daughter of William Newland. She had lived at Freetown and Swansea. She had a brother, William Newland, at Linn, Massachusetts in 1637. Mary Newland Howland died June 17, 1674. She left a will dated 3 month 8 day of 1674, which was proved April 8th 1675, and was witnessed by Ralph Allen, her son-in-law. In her will she left 1 shilling each to her daughters, Sarah Dennis and Elizabeth "Allin". Sarah Howland had married Robert Dennis 11.16.1672, and Robert Dennis, in his will, called Jedediah Allen (husband of Elizabeth Howland Allen) his brother-in-law. Henry and Mary (Newland) Howland had the following children:

--------------------

Descendants of HENRY HOWLAND

Generation No. 1

1. HENRY3 HOWLAND (HENRY2, JOHN1) was born ABT 1604 in Scrooby, notts, England, and died January 17, 1670/71 in Duxbury,MA. He married MARY NEWLAND 1628 in England, daughter of WILLIAM NEWLAND and AGNES GREENWAY.

Notes

Ref: A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada, By Franklyn Howland, First Edition, New Bedford, MA: Published by the author 1885

Henry Howland and his Descendants.

The youngest (at least the last mentioned in the will of Humphrey) of the Howlands who have been heretofore referred to as arriving at plymouth probably before 1625, was without doubt Henry. It is on record that he was a brother of Arthur, and they all doubtless held the same family relationship to each other. Some of the colonists may have reached greater distinction in civil affairs, but none have a better record for integrity, thrift, uprightness, and unmixed faith in the Divine One, than Henry Howland. It is clear that these virtues did not die with him, but permeated the lives of many of his children, and his children's children, unto the ninth generation. As we read of his vicissitudes, discouragements, perseverance, endurance, courage and victories, let us, like our honored ancestor,

"In the world's broad field of battle, In the bivouac of life, Be not like dumb, driven cattle! But be heroes in the strife."

Search has been made in vain for his name on records of departures from england and arrivals in this country. The first mention made of him in New England is that in the allotment of cattle to the different families in plymouth in 1624, he appears as the owner of the "black cow." On the first page of Vol. I of the court records of new plymouth, is found in a list of freemen, under date of 1633, the name of "Henery Howland". On the 25th of march of the same year he is taxed "s.9 for the publike vse,.....rated in corne at vi s p bushell." His thrift is shown in the fact that on the 27th of march, 1634, he is on the tax list for 18s.

He appears in Duxbury among its earliest settlers, some of the first inhabitants of Plymouth locating themselves there across the harbor, on the north side of the bay. Here he is referred to as living "by the bay side, near love Brewster's," and the record reads that he was "one of the substantial landholders and freemen."

The old records of Plymouth Colony say that "Att a Courte held ye 5 of Jan., Ano 1635," Henry Howland was chosen "cunstable for Duxberry."

"At a Genall Meeting the xxth of March 1636-7" to appoint committees to assign the "Hey Grounds of Ducksbury were appoynted to view the hey grounds from the riuer beyong Phillip Delanoys to the South Riuer." (Mr Edward Winslow, Henry Howland, The messenger Phillip Delanoy.)

In 1640 he purchased five acres of upland and one acre of marsh meadow in Duxbury, the price which he paid being "Twelve bushells of Indian Corne." For several years he was surveyor of highways in the town. in 1643 he was on a list of freemen of Duxbury, and of men able to bear arms. He served on the "Grand Inquest" (grand jury) in 1636, 37, 39, 40, 49, 51, 52, 53, 56.

He was evidently placed on the next grand jury, for his name appears in 1657, June 3d, on a list of those who refused "to serue on the Grand enquest". The apparent reason for this is that he had joined the Friends' sect, which was just beginning to spread in America, and the duties were such that he could not conscientiously perform them.

The Friends had adopted as the guide of their purposes and the polar star of their lives, a religious faith which had for its foundation the pure word of the Almighty Father, and with the strictest conscientiousness they courageously carried out its precepts, as we have said before, against the fiercest opposition and hardest warfare ever waged against any so-claimed religious belief in this country, where licentious free-lovers and adulterous Mormons have since wallowed in their pools of filth without molestation. They passed through the furnace of affliction, and were yet surrounded by great tribulation when they stepped out into the great future, but their descendants lived to see peace and good will to smile upon their principles so fondly cherished. They suffered much in both colonies, but Cotton says that though their persecutions were equally great here, yet they were never subjected to those cruel and sanguinary laws which the other colonies enacted. The law against heretics in general was first enforced agianst them, and then special laws were enacted against them. A fine of L5 or a whipping was the penalty for entertaingin them, and for attending their meetings one was liable to a fine of L2. At this time the laws against the people of this society were being enforced, and Henry being one of them, he could not conscientiously sit on the jury before which his own brother Arthur, who had joined the society, his brethren in the faith, and himself, were liable to be brought as transgressors of the civil laws of the colony, which were as inflexible and unalterable as those of the Medes and persians.

It may be of interest to the reader, as it has to the writer, to peruse the entries in the Plymouth Colony records in relation to the part in which Henry acted as victim in these persecutions. For this reason they are given here as they appear there.

On the 3d of June, 1657, Ralph Allen, Sr., of Sandwich, was drawn, but refused to serve on the grand jury, and at the very next session of the court, October 6th, he was brought before the jury for entertaining Quakers, fined and imprisoned; and before many weeks Henry Howland, his brother, Arthur, and his son Zoeth met the same fate. Henry entertained Nicholas Upsall, who was an earnest and courageous defender of the tenets of the sect, whom Whittier immortalizes in verse, and who visited this section in 1657. Public proclamation was made that for every hour Nicholas Upsall as entertained "a severe fine was to be exacted" from his host.

At the court of October 1657, Henry "was summonsed to appear at the next March Court to answare for intertaining Quakers meetings in his house." He appeared at the court referred to, and was fined 10s.

The Howland family was well represented in the dock of the court of March 1st, 1659, as follows: "John Smith Junir, of Plymouth, and Deborah, his wife, Goodwife Howland wife of Henery Howland, Zoeth Howland and his wife, Arthur Howland and his wife of Marshfield, hauing bene p'sented for frequently absenting themselues from publicke worship of God, were sentanced by the court each ten shillings to the collonies vse."

At the court of 1659, Oct. 6th, "William Newland and Henry Howland appeared, being summoned, and were convicted by law and sentanced by the court to bee disfranchised of theire freedome of this corporation...for theire being abettors and entertainors of Quackers." May 1st and October 2d, 1660, Henry was fined for "p'rmitting a quaker meeting in his house twise... and for entertaining a forraigne Quaker contrary to order of the court." Once, when refusing to pay his fine, his house and lands were seized by the marshal.

There is a remarkable coincidence of history in the fact that while Henry of New England was passing through these trials, there was a Henry in old England under going similar ones. It appears that in 1662 a "Henry Howland of Tewksbury, in Glocestershire, for refusing to bear Arms, or to pay toward the Charge of the Maletia had a Horse taken from him worth 4 1. 8s. The Person who took the Horse acknowledging that he did it against his Conscience, Henry Howland told him, he might then expect some judgment would follow; and it was observed, that the said Person, having ordered his Son to sell the Horse, as he was riding, the Horse ran violently with him against the Arm of a Tree, so that he died of the Blow immediately." In November, 1665, the same Henry had "three Cows and one Steer taken from him for permitting religious Meetings at his House."

Through all this persecution and suffering Henry and his "goodwife" clung to the cause thay had espoused, and died as they had lived during the sunset hours of life, triumphant in the faith.

Toward the latter part of his life he became a large possessor of real estate. In 1652 he was associated with others in a large tract of land in Dartmouth. On the 2d of April, 1659, together with twenty-six others, he bought of Wamsutta and pattapanum what was then called Assonet and is now Freetown. they gave 20 coats, 2 rugs, 2 iron pots, 2 kettles and one little kettle, 8 pairs shoes, 6 pairs stockings, 1 dozen hats, 2 dozen hatchets, and 2 yards broadcloth. At the division, in 1660, of "ye ffreeman's land att Taunton River," which was this purchase, he received for his share the sixth lot. This was afterwards inherited by his son Samuel. he was one of the grantees of Bridgewater, but probably never lived there. In 1664 he bought a large tract of land in Mettapoisett (Swanzey.)

Were the early records of Duxbury in existence, we should know more of the life of this noble man. they were probably burned in Miles Standish's house, as at the time it was destroyed by fire Alexander Standish, who lived with Miles, was clerk of the town.

It appears from Henry's will, that he owned a house in Duxbury, where he doubtless died and expected his widow would remain. It is evident, however, that he had assisted in provinding for his immediate posterity a more gongenial home than Plymouth, namely in Freetown and Dartmouth.

Roger Williams, who had already been banished form Massachusetts Bay and Plymouth colonies, had established in rhode Island a government the charter of which guarantied that every one should be free to enjoy his own opinions, as long as they did not militate against the general goods. Into and on the borders of this land of religious liberty the Friends fled. Henry's property was near the boundary line of that state, but within the jurisdiction of Plymouth Colony. On the land he owned at Freetown his son Samuel settled probably as early as 1665, as his last appearance on the P.C.R. is in 1664. At the commencement of the Quaker persecutions at plymouth, Henry became interested in the original purchase of Dartmouth, for a Plymouth in 1652, there was assigned:

One share to Mr. Howland and one to Wm. Bassett.

He doubtless built a house on this land, the one his widow gave to their son John. He and his wife may have lived there, as his horses and cattle were there. On this purchase Zoeth settled, without doubt, as early as 1662, his name appearing on the P.C. R. for the last time in 1661, and immediately preceding that frequently. Of the other two sons, John was probably a bachelor; and it is safe to judge that Joseph lived on the old homestead at Duxbury which his father gave him, and took care of his mother after his father's death, she living in the "new Room," as she gave him all her goods and chattels.

Children of HENRY HOWLAND and MARY NEWLAND are:

2. i. SAMUEL4 HOWLAND, b. ABT 1646, Duxbury, Plymouth Co, MA; d. 1716, Freetown or Middleborough, Bristol Co, MA.

ii. ZOETH HOWLAND.

iii. JOSEPH HOWLAND.

iv. SARAH HOWLAND, b. 1645.

v. ELIZABETH HOWLAND.

vi. MARY HOWLAND.

vii. ABIGAIL HOWLAND, b. 1629, Eastham, Barnstable, MA; d. April 7, 1692, Eastham, Barnstable, MA; m. JOHN YOUNG, December 13, 1648, Plymouth MA.

viii. JOHN HOWLAND.

http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~kenzie/GenHOWLAND2.htm

=

and

=

Family Group of Henry Howland

HENRY HOWLAND ( Henry, John, John, John ) was born November 25, 1604 in Fen Stanton, Huntingdonshire, England, and died January 17, 1670/71 in Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts 1. He married MARY ( ? NEWLAND ? 10, daughter of WILLIAM NEWLAND and AGNES GREENWAY ? ), Abt. 1623.

Notes for HENRY HOWLAND

Duxbury Deaths: Hennery [h. Mary], Jan. 1, 1670. 24

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"Howland, Henry, born England; died Duxbury, Mass., Jan 17, 1671... Henry resided for a while in Plymouth, but became an early settler in Duxbury "by the bayside, near Love Brewster." He was a surveyor of highways, and was able to bear arms in 1643. As a Quaker he suffered the persecutions of the times. On April 2, 1659 Henry with 26 others bought of the Indians what is now Freetown, for a few old coats, rugs, iron pots, etc. including "one little kittle". In 1664 he purchased a large portion of land in Mattapoisett (Swansea). Henry was owner of the sixth lot in Freetown. However, his sons, John and Samuel, really became the actual settlers." 5

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"HENRY HOWLAND - A brother of 1620 Mayflower passenger, John Howland, Henry Howland was in Plymouth at least as early as 25 March 1633, when his name appears on the tax list, and he was also on the original freeman list. On 8 April 1633, Walter Harris had his indenture transferred to Henry Howland. On 5 January 1635/36 Henry became the constable of Duxbury. He was frequently a member of trial and grand juries. On 3 June 1657, he, John Tompson, Morris Truant, Ralph Allen, and Thomas Greenfield refused to serve on the grand jury. On 2 March 1657/58, the same day his brother Arthur was fined for permitting a Quaker meeting in his house and for resisting the constable of Marshfield in the execution of his office, Henry Howland was fined ten shillings for entertaining a meeting in his house contrary to court orders. On 7 June 1659 the court, referring to an order disenfranching Quakers and other offenders, gave notice to four men to appear in court the following August, and on 6 October 1659 Howland had his freeman status taken away from him. On 1 May 1660 Henry Howland was charged with entertaining another man's wife in his house after her husband had complained to him, and for permitting a Quaker meeting in his house and entertaining a foreign Quaker. He stiffly denied the first charge, and the court noted that the evidence 'did not appeer to make it out,' but he was convicted on the Quaker charges. On the 2nd of March 1657/58 he was fined for entertaining a meeting of Quakers in his home. On the 6th of Oct 1659 he and his brother-in-law, William Newland, were were sentenced "to bee defranchised of their freedom of this corpation". 4

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He made his will 28 November 1670, and he named his wife Mary (her surname is not known; they were possibly married in England), his sons Zoeth, Joseph, John, and Samuel, and his daughters Sarah, Elizabeth, Mary, and Abigail. Will was probated on March 8, 1670/71. 8

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Henry Howland January 14, 1670/1671

Plymouth Colony Wills, vol. III, p. 27

THE INVENTORY OF HENRY HOWLAND (note: Probate)

A true Inventory of the estate viz: of the goods and Chattles of Henery Howland of Duxborrow: late deceased exhibited to the Court held att Plymouth the eight of March 1670; on the oath of Ioseph Howland the sonne of the said Henery Howland

Impr: To 4 oxen att 18 00 00

Item To two steers 06 00 00

Item To 3 Cowes 09 00 00

Item To 5 heiffers 13 00 00

Item To 1 old mare att Ponagansett 02 00 00

Item To 1 younge mare and a Colt att Ponagansett 03 10 00

Item To 1 horse att home and a smale mule 06 00 00

Item To 10 swine 04 00 00

Item To Cart plow & plow Irons with 2 Cheines 2 boxes & yoakes 02 10 00

Item To goods in the new Rome as 2 beds 1 feather bed and a flocke bed with the Couerings 06 00 00

Item to six paire of sheets 05 00 00

Item To 1 Chest 1 Table 3 Chaires and stooles 01 00 00

Item To his wearing Clothes with his purse 10 04 00

Item To new cloth with silke and buttons (that was to make him a Coate) 02 10 06

Item To 23 yards of New Cloth of theire owne makeing 05 15 00

Item To one bed in the middle Rome 05 00 00

Item To 3 beds aboue in the Chambers 10 10 00

Item To one warming pan 00 04 00

Item To 2 old Chestes & 2 old boxes 00 12 00

Item To Table linnine 02 10 00

Item To pewter and some earthen potts & Cups & other smale things 01 05 00

Item To brasse and Iron 03 00 00

Item To earthen and wooden thinges 01 05 00

Item To 2 guns with one old Rapier 02 15 00

Item To 10 barrells of Sider 04 00 00

Item To 15 bushells of Mault 16 bushells of Indian Corne fiue bushells of wheate and 7 bushells of peases 07 14 06

Item To meat as beife porke bacon 03 00 00

Item To 1 old Cannooe & axes wedges old barrells hogsheds and other smale lumber as hoes sythes &c: 02 00 00

Item to a bridle saddle and a pannell 00 12 00

Item To a fier shouell Tonges gridjron Chaffing dish and one smoothing Iron 00 12 00

Item To bookes 00 10 00

Item To about 20 pound of feathers 01 00 00

Taken and aprised the 14 day of the 11th month 1670) by Constant Southworth, Samuell Nash, Iohn Soule;

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Franklyn Howland; A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur , Henry , and John Howland, and their Descendants; Printed by E. Anthony & Sons, Printers and Publishers in New Bedford, Mass.; pg.63

"He arrived in Plymouth, Ma. in 1623 on the Anne, sister ship of the Mayflower. His brother John arrived on Dec 26, 1620. He was known to be one of the largest land holders in Duxbury and a member of the Freeman (Quakers). He had been apprenticed to his brother Humphrey at the Drapers Co. in London, England before his emigration to America."

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Excerpted and Reprint from the New England Historical and Genealogical Register, "Mayflower Source Record", (Genealogical Publicating Co, Inc Baltimore 1986), pg 30, Extracted forom the early probate Records of Bristol County, with note from the Registry of Deeds and Town Records.

"Samuel, John and Zoeth, were the sons of Henry Howland, of Duxbury, said Henry being one of the 26 origional proprietors of Freetown. Henry Howland died in 1670, and Mary his wife died June 16, 1674."

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"Henry, Daxbury, brother of 1st John and 1st Arthur, appeared as early as 1633, and m. Mary Newland, and had Joseph, m. Rebecca, d. of John Huzzy of Hampton; Zoeth; John, m. Mary Walker; Samuel removed to Freetown; Sarah, m. Robert Dennis of Newport; Elizabeth; Mary, m. James Cudworth; Abigail, m. John Young." 10

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The History of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations: Biographical, by the American Historical Society, Inc., 1920. For an unknown reason there are several copies of the book with the same title page, but with different contents. From pages 118-20 of one edition. Henry Howland, the founder, appeared early in Plymouth Colony, being first of record in 1624. He was made a freeman in 1633; was an early settler in Duxbury, Mass., and was there chosen constable in 1635; owned land in Dartmouth in 1652; was one of the twenty-seven purchasers of what is now Freetown, Mass., and finally ended his days in the Duxbury homestead. He married Mary Newland, and reared a large family, this branch tracing through Zoeth, their second son.

Notes for MARY ( ? NEWLAND ? ):

Duxbury Deaths: Mary, wid. Hennery (Hoowland), Aug. 16, 1674. 24

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From the book, "SEVENTEENTH CENTURY COLONIAL ANCESTORS of Members of the National Society Colonial Dames XVII Century" compiled by Mary Louise M. Hutton, pg.133: Howland, Henry (_-1671) Mass.; m. Mary Newland; juror; landowner.

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Robert S. Wakefield and Robert M. Sherman,

"Henry Howland of Duxbury, Mass, 1633."

National Genealogical Society Quarterly (June 1987): 75:105

Neither Wakefield & Sherman in the NGSQ articles on Henry Howland and his descendants nor Robert Charles Anderson in his "The Great Migration Begins" accept Mary Newland as proven to be the wife of Henry Howland.

- Although she is often called Mary Newland, no evidence has been found to verify this claim.

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Wakefield published an article on Henry Howland in the National Genealogical Quarterly ca. 1998 which stated that Henry did not marry Mary Newland, and that she married someone else. Henry married a Mary, last name unknown. It is believed that Henry married in England prior to coming to the colony. He first shows up in Plymouth records in 1634. Henry is the son of Henry of Fen Stanton, England. We know this from the will of his brother, Humphrey a draper in London. Humphery mentions his brother John, Arthur and Henry in his will. Humphery's will was discovered in 1955, and is the cite to the relationship of the three.

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A Brief Genealogical and Bio. Hist. of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland; Franklyn Howland; New Bedford, MA, 1885.

p.18: Will of Humphrey Howland, made 28 May 1646, names brothers George of East, London, and Arthur, John, and Henry.

p. 67: Will of Henry Howland; son John Howland; son Joseph Howland; son Zoeth Howland; Dau. Sarah; "my" Elizabeth; son Samuel Howland; Dau. Mary; Dau. Abigail; Made 28 Nov. 1670; Signed Henery Howland; Wit: Samuel Nash, John Sprague; Will exhibited to the court at Plymouth 8 March 1671 on the oaths of Samuel Nash and John Sprague.

p. 68: Henry marr. Mary Newland. Where and when she was born does not appear.

Will of Mary Howland sometimes the wife of Hennery Howland now dec'd; dau. Abigail Young; son Zoith Howland; son John Howland; dau. Mary Cudworth; son Samuel Howland; dau. Sarah Denis; dau. Elizabeth Allin; son Joseph Howland;

Made 8th day 3rd month, 1674;

Mark (M) of Mary Howland;

Wit: Ralph Allin, John Sprague;

John Sprague attested to will on 26th 2nd month 1674;

John Allin and Ralph Allin attested to will on 8 April 1675.

p. 69 - 76: Family information:

Henry and wife Mary probably died at the old Duxbury homestead; Henry on 17,1,1671 and Mary on 17,6,1674;

Children:

Joseph, b. in Duxbury, d. 15,6,1691, m. 4,3,1683 Rebecca, dau. of John Huzzey of Hampton, NH. Rebecca m. 2nd, 6,3,1695 Samuel Collins. Zoeth, b. in Duxbury, d. 31,1,1676, killed by Indians, m. 10th month 1656 to wife Abigall. Abigail m. 2d, 2,12,1678 to Richard Kirby, Jr. John, Davis' Plymouth says this John m. Mary Walker. My belief is he never married. Samuel, b. in Duxbury, d. 1716, wife's name was Mary. Sarah, m. 16,11,1672 Robert Dennis of Portsmouth, RI Elizabeth, m. Jedediah Allen in 1691. He was probably son of George Allen. Mary, m. James Cudworth of Duxbury Abigail, m. John Young 2,9,1678; He was probably son of John Young who "was maried unto ... 13 Dec 1648".

Children of HENRY HOWLAND and MARY (? NEWLAND ?):

SAMUEL HOWLAND 2, b. Abt. 1646 3, Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts 3; d. May 07, 1716, Freetown, Bristol County, Massachusetts; m. (1) MARY SAMPSON , Bef. June 02, 1681; m. (2) MARY MERRIHEW 6 23, July 17, 1708.


ZOETH HOWLAND 20, b. January 31, 1635/36, Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusettes; d. January 01, 1675/76, Puncatest, Newport, Rhode Island; m. ABIGAIL, October 10, 1656, Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusettes 21.


ELIZABETH HOWLAND 22, b. 1647, Duxbury, Plymouth, Mass; d. Aft. September 15, 1711, Shrewsbury, Monmouth, NJ; m. JEDEDIAH ALLEN, 1668, Sandwich, Barnstable, Mass.


SARAH HOWLAND 9, b. Abt. 1650, Duxborough, Plymouth, MA; d. October 02, 1712, Portsmouth, Newport County, Rhode Island; m. ROBERT DENNIS 10, November 16, 1672, Duxborough, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.

Notes for SARAH HOWLAND:

Josiah Vining b. 12/8/1729 Abington, Plymouth, MA (The Vining Families, Chap. 3) - d. 1774 - m. 1/31/1750 (William Dawes Family/Henry A. Holland 1878) Pembrooke, , MA Hannah Abigail Dawes (Pembrooke,MA Vital Records,) (Daughter of Samuel Dawes & Sarah Howland; Sarah's father was Henry Howland, brother of John Howland who came over on the Mayflower; (Ref. Hazel Spencer Howard)) (The Vining Families, Chap. 3) b.1729 East Bridgewater, Plymouth, MA - Josiah & Hannah had 6 children. (The Vining Families, Chap. 3) They removed to Norton, MA where they spent several years.

JOSEPH HOWLAND 11, b. Abt. 1635, Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts; d. June 15, 1692; m. REBECCA HUZZEY 12, May 04, 1683, Hampton, NH.


JOHN HOWLAND 13, b. November 16, 1633, Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts; d. August 18, 1687, Freetown, Bristol, Massachusetts; m. MARY WALKER 14 15, January 12, 1684/85, Duxbury, Plymouth, Mass.


MARY HOWLAND 16, b. Abt. 1640, Duxburrow,; d. Aft. November 04, 1699, Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts; m. JAMES CUDWORTH, Bef. 1665, Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts.

Notes for MARY HOWLAND:

"Capt. James, the oldest son [of General James Cudworth], had lands in Freetown, in his father's right, and my have resided there for a time, but most of his children are recorded in Scituate. They were mary born 1667, Sarah 1669, Capt. James 1670, who deceased at Freetown, 1729, Joanna 1671, (wife of Zachary Colman 1696), Elizabeth 1672, Abigail 1674, John 1677. John (last named) settled in Scituate, and left sons John born 1706, James 1715, both of whom left sons."Capt. James, sen. decesaed before 1699. His widow Mary deceased 1699, leaving legacies 'to sons James and John, and daughters Mary, Sarah, Joanna Colman, and Eliz. and Abigail.'"John (born 1706, above named) married Mary Briggs, 1731, his sons were John, jr. and Capt. Joseph. John, jr. married Elizabeth Clap 1772, and had sons John, Job, Charles, Abiel, Arvin. This family resided on Hooppole neck. Capt. Joseph married Elizabeth Souther 1775, and has sons Elijah of Scituate and Peter of Boston" 7

ABIGAIL HOWLAND 17, b. 1629, England; d. April 07, 1692, Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts 18; m. JOHN YOUNG 14, December 13, 1648, Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts 19.


Surname Lists:

? - D E - G H - Howland, G Howland, H - Howland, P Howland, Q - Hz I - M N - R S - Z

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Endnotes

1. Robert Charles Anderson, The Great Migration Begins: immigrants to New England 1620-1633, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, 1995, Three volumes.

2. Davis, William T., Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families, (2nd Edition; Boston: William T. Davis, 1899), pg. 154, "SAMUEL, Freetown, son of 1st Henry, by wife Mary ... ."

3. Franklyn Howland; A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada,1885. pg. 69.

SAMUEL HOWLAND, b. ABT 1646, Duxbury, Plymouth Co, MA; d. 1716, Freetown or Middleborough, Bristol Co, MA.

4. Plymouth Colony - It's History and People, 1620 - 1691

5. Leon Clark Hills, History and Genealogy of the Mayflower Planters and First Comers to Ye Olde Colonie, pg 161.

6. Davis, William T., Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families, (2nd Edition; Boston: William T. Davis, 1899), Appendix p.328, [Howland] Samuel, 1st in text, 1678, m., Mary Merihew.

7. Deane, Samuel; History of Scituate, Massachusetts, from Its First Settlement to 1831.

8. National Genealogical Society Quarterly; September, 1987, VOL. 75, NO. 3; p.105-116

9. Franklyn Howland; A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada, 1885. pg. 69.

"Sarah, m. 16,11,1672 Robert Dennis of Portsmouth, RI."

10. Davis, William T., Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families, p.150. (Originally published as Part II of 'Davis, William T.; Ancient Landmarks of Plymouth; 2nd Edition; Boston:1899;')

11. Franklyn Howland; A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada, 1885. pg. 69.

"Joseph, b. in Duxbury, d. 15/6/1691, m. 4/3/1683 Rebecca, dau. of John Huzzey of Hampton, NH."

12. Davis, William T., Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families, (2nd Edition; Boston: William T. Davis, 1899), pg.150.

13. Franklyn Howland; A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada, 1885. pg. 69.

14. Davis, William T., Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families, (2nd Edition; Boston: William T. Davis, 1899), pg 327.

15. Franklyn Howland; A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada, 1885. pg. 69.

"John, Davis' Plymouth says this John m. Mary Walker. My belief is he never married."

16. Franklyn Howland; A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada, 1885. pg. 69.

"Mary, m. James Cudworth of Duxbury."

17. Franklyn Howland; A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada, 1885. pg. 69.

"Abigail, m. John Young 2/9/1678; He was probably son of John Young who was maried unto ... 13 Dec 1648 .."

18. "Eastham Mass., Vital Records," transcribed by George Ernest Bowman, Mayflower Descendant, various volumes, Also printed in Vital Records of the Towns of Eastham and Orleans, with index, edited by Leonard H Smith Jr & Norma H. Smith, 1976..

19. Records of the Colony of New Plymouth - Vol. 8, pg 5.

20. Franklyn Howland; A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada, 1885. pg. 69.

"Zoeth, b. in Duxbury, d. 31,1,1676, killed by Indians, m. 10th month 1656 to wife Abigall. Abigail m. 2d, 2/12/1678 to Richard Kirby, Jr ..."

21. Friend's Records at Newport, Rhode Island

22. Franklyn Howland; A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada, pg. 69,

"Elizabeth, m. Jedediah Allen in 1691. He was probably son of George Allen ..."

23. Davis, William T.; Ancient Landmarks of Plymouth; Addendum pg. 366.

"Samuel, 1st in text, m. 1678, Mary Merihew."

24. Records of the Society of Friends of Pembroke, now in the possession of the Society at New Bedford.

25.

26.


http://www.bluezstreet.com/FG_Howland/FG_HenryHowland1604.htm -------------------- 1624- His name first appeared in the records of Plymouth, MA.

1635, 5 January- Chosen Constable of Duxbury, MA. He was one of the earliest settlers of Duxbury, MA.

He was Surveyer of Highways and served on the Grand Jury for several years.

    
  
 

-------------------- John Howland boarded the Mayflower in England in September 1620, arrived in Provincetown Harbor, November 21, 1620 and, although called a man-servant of Governor Carver, he was the thirteenth signer of the Mayflower Compact in Plymouth Harbor on December 21, 1620.

Within a few years he married Elizabeth Tilley, built a house on First Street and gradually as land was allotted to each family, he acquired four acres on Watson’s Hill, Plymouth and considerable acreage in Duxbury. February 2, 1638/9 he bought from John Jenny the property called Rocky Nook (Kingston). Some of this land is still owned by our Society.

He served in the General court of Plymouth as Committeeman in 1637, 1639-1652 and as Deputy 1652, 1659, 1661-1668 and 1670.

He had two brothers, Arthur and Henry who arrived a few years later. Arthur Howland married Margaret Reed, settled in Marshfield and had five children. Sir Winston Churchill, an honorary member of the Pilgrim John Howland Society, was one of his descendants. Henry Howland married Mary (Newland) and lived in Duxbury. They had eight children. Both brothers joined the Society of Friends. For many generations the descendants of these two men remained Quakers, many settled around Dartmouth, MA where they became very prosperous -------------------- ancestor to both Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford

view all 41

Henry Howland, Jr., of Duxbury's Timeline

1604
November 25, 1604
Fen Stanton, Huntingdonshire, England
November 25, 1604
of, Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, England
November 25, 1604
Ely,Cambridge,England
November 25, 1604
of, Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, England
November 25, 1604
Of, Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, England
November 25, 1604
of Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, England
November 25, 1604
Of, Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, England
November 25, 1604
Of, Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, England
1620
1620
- 1623
Age 15
London, England
1623
July, 1623
Age 18
Plymouth, MA, USA