Henry Lawrence Burnett

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Henry Lawrence Burnett

Also Known As: "Brigadier-General /Burnett/"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Youngstown, Mahoning, Ohio, United States
Death: Died in Goshen, Orange, New York, United States
Place of Burial: Goshen, Orange County, New York, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Henry Burnett and Nancy Burnett
Husband of Grace (Kitty) Burnett; Sarah Gibson Lansing and Agnes Suffren Tailer
Father of Kitty Cleveland Burnett; Grace Burnett; Catherine Olivia Burnett; Lansing Burnett and Henry L Burnett, Jr.
Brother of Rueben D Burnett; Elliott (Ailett) R Burnett; Harriett Burnett; Hiram Burnett and John S Burnett

Occupation: Brevet Brigadier General
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Henry Lawrence Burnett

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Lawrence_Burnett

Their were  three judges in charge of the Lincoln assassination trial. Joseph Holt along with John Bingham  and Henry Burnett were the three judges in charge of the Lincoln assassination trial.

After the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln in 1865, Burnett was called upon by Secretary of War Edwin Stanton to be an Assistant Judge Advocate General. Along with him were John Bingham and Joseph Holt, the Judge Advocate General. The accused conspirators where George Atzerodt, David Herold, Lewis Powell a.k.a. Paine, Samuel Arnold, Michael O'Laughlen, Edman Spangler, Samuel Mudd and Mary Surratt. The trail began on May 10, 1865. The three spent nearly two months in court, awaiting a verdict from the jury. Holt and Bingham attempted to obscure the fact that there were two plots. The first plot was to kidnap President Lincoln in exchange for the Confederate prisoners the Union had. The second was to assassinate Lincoln, Vice President Andrew Johnson and Secretary of State William H. Seward in a plot to throw the government into electoral chaos. It was important for the prosecution not to reveal the existence of a diary taken from the body of Lincoln's assassin John Wilkes Booth. The diary made it clear that the assassination plan dated from the 14th of April. The defence surprisingly did not call for Booth's diary to be produced in court. Holt was accused of withholding evidence, but it was never proven.

Burnett in his later years On June 29, 1865, the eight were found guilty for their involvement in the conspiracy to kill the President. Arnold, O'Laughlen and Mudd where sentenced to life in prison, Spangler six years in prison and Atzerodt, Herold, Paine and Surratt were to hang. They were executed July 7, 1865. Surratt was the first woman in American history to be executed. O'Laughlen died in prison in 1867. Arnold, Spangler and Mudd where pardoned by President Andrew Johnson in early 1869.


Henry Lawrence Burnett (December 26, 1838–January 4, 1916) was a Brevet Brigadier General for the Union in the American Civil War and a prosecutor in the trial that followed the Abraham Lincoln assassination.


Early life Burnett was born in Youngstown, Ohio, in 1838. Determined not to become a farmer, he ran away from home to get an education and eventually married Kitty Hoffman, the daughter of a judge.

Civil War When the Civil War broke out, Burnett joined the 2nd Ohio Cavalry, where he rose to the rank of major. After being trampled by a horse and seriously injured, however, he transferred to the Judge Advocate General's Corps of the Department of the Ohio.

After the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln in 1865, Burnett was called upon by Secretary of War Edwin Stanton to be an Assistant Judge Advocate General. Along with him were John Bingham and Joseph Holt, the Judge Advocate General. The accused conspirators where George Atzerodt, David Herold, Lewis Powell a.k.a. Paine, Samuel Arnold, Michael O'Laughlen, Edman Spangler, Samuel Mudd and Mary Surratt. The trail began on May 10, 1865. The three spent nearly two months in court, awaiting a verdict from the jury. Holt and Bingham attempted to obscure the fact that there were two plots. The first plot was to kidnap President Lincoln in exchange for the Confederate prisoners the Union had. The second was to assassinate Lincoln, Vice President Andrew Johnson and Secretary of State William H. Seward in a plot to throw the government into electoral chaos. It was important for the prosecution not to reveal the existence of a diary taken from the body of Lincoln's assassin John Wilkes Booth. The diary made it clear that the assassination plan dated from the 14th of April. The defence surprisingly did not call for Booth's diary to be produced in court. Holt was accused of withholding evidence, but it was never proven.

On June 29, 1865, the eight were found guilty for their involvement in the conspiracy to kill the President. Arnold, O'Laughlen and Mudd where sentenced to life in prison, Spangler six years in prison and Atzerodt, Herold, Paine and Surratt were to hang. They were executed July 7, 1865. Surratt was the first woman in American history to be executed. O'Laughlen died in prison in 1867. Arnold, Spangler and Mudd where pardoned by President Andrew Johnson in early 1869.

Post-Civil War After his wife Kitty died, Burnett moved to New York to practice law, serving as counsel to the Buffalo and Erie Railroad. He was married a second time, to Sarah Lansing, only to find himself widowed once again in 1877. At this point, Burnett left his children with his late wife's family and relocated to New York City. He married once again, this time to Agnes Tailer, and moved to an exclusive district of the city. In 1898, President William McKinley appointed Burnett federal district attorney for the southern district of New York and upon completion of his four-year term, he was reappointed by McKinley's successor, Theodore Roosevelt.

Seeking a country home away from the city, Burnett and his wife purchased a horse- breeding farm in Goshen, New York where Henry raced on the amateur circuit. He died January 4, 1916 and was interred in Slate Hill Cemetery in Goshen.


OBITUARY:

Extracted from the Middletown Daily Times Front Page, Dated January 5, 1916

GENERAL BURNETT IS DEAD!

New York, Jan 5—General Henry Lawrence Burnett, formerly United States District Attorney for the Southern district of New York, and last of the judge advocates who sat in the conviction of the assassins of Abraham Lincoln, died yesterday of arterio sclerosis at his home, No. 1 East 12th street. His fatal illness was the aftermath of an attack of bronchial pneumonia, which he suffered In November when at his country home, Hillside Farm, near Goshen. He then expressed a wish to be removed to his old home.

General Burnett was carried to the train on a cot and thus transferred to this city. He seemed to recover for a time, but his age of 78 years counted against his chances, and about two weeks ago he began to weaken.

General Burnett was besides a fine soldier and a good lawyer; a great lover of horses. His whole life was picturesque. He was born in Youngstown, Ohio, December 26, 1837. He was a lineal descendant of William Burnett, Colonial Governor of New York and New Jersey in 1720.

When 15 years old he ran away from home and walked nearly 100 miles to Chester Academy, where James A. Garfield was a student at that time. He worked his way through the school and later entered Hiram Institute, from which he was graduated. General Burnett graduated in 1869 from the Ohio State and National Law School, and the following year he was admitted at the Bar and began to practiced law at Warren, Ohio.

At the outbreak of the civil war, General Burnett made frequent speeches to stimulate enlistments, and while thus engaged was once asked why he did not enlist. He immediately said he would He enlisted at once and was elected captain of Company, Second Ohio cavalry. Under Colonel Doubleday, this regiment was sent to Missouri and took part in the actions at Carthage, Fort Wayne, and Fort Gibson.

Captain Burnett served also under General Burnslde in the Knoxville campaign, and was promoted to the rank of major and soon after was chosen colonel of his regiment. He was appointed Judge Advocate of the Department of the Ohio in July, 1863. He was sent by Secretary Stantoh at the suggestion of Governor Morton to prosecute the Sons of Liberty In Indiana, and he succeeded in convicting seven or eight of them, and they were sentenced to death.

Two years later, after the assassination of President Lincoln, he was called to Washington to take charge of the Investigation of the slaying of the President. Colonel Burnett rose to the rank of brigadier general.

After the war he was associated with J. D Cox, formerly Governor of Ohio, in the practice of law at Cincinnati. He came to New York about 1876. He became associate counsel for the Erie Railroad Company and also was counsel for the English bondholders in the Emma Mine litigation.

General Burnett was appointed by President McKinley in 1898, to the office of United States District Attorney for the Southern District of New York.

He was a member of the Century Lawyers' Tuxedo Whist Metropolitan Union, Republican and Army and Navy clubs and the Goshen Riding and Driving Club. He was once president of the Ohio Society and the Loyal Legion.

He was thrice married. His first wife was Miss Grace Hoffman, daughter of Judge Hoffman, of Ohio, and there were two daughters of that marriage, the Baroness Victor von Oertzen, wife of a general In command of the German prison camps, and Miss Katherine Cleveland Burnett. His second wife was Miss Sarah Lansing, of Buffalo, and his third wife, who survives him, was Miss Agnes Suffern Tailer, daughter of E.N. Tailer, and a sister of T. Suffern Tailer, Mrs. Robert L. Livingston and Mrs. Tailer Smith. There are two sons of that marriage, Henry Lawrence Burnett, Jr., and Edward N.T. Burnett.

General Burnett's funeral will be held on Friday morning from the Church of the Ascension. His body will est in a vault at Trinity Cemetery, 155th street, and later will be removed to Goshen.

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Henry Lawrence Burnett's Timeline

1838
December 26, 1838
Youngstown, Mahoning, Ohio, United States
1860
June 20, 1860
Age 21
1864
1864
Age 25
1867
September 9, 1867
Age 28
1869
January 18, 1869
Age 30
Canandaigua, Ontario, New York, United States
1873
May 2, 1873
Age 34
1882
January 31, 1882
Age 43
1882
Age 43
1916
January 4, 1916
Age 77
Goshen, Orange, New York, United States
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