Henry Giles Lee, II

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Henry Giles Lee, II

Nicknames: "Lightfoot"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Lee Hall, Westmoreland, Virginia
Death: Died in Leesylvania Plantation, Westmoreland, Virginia
Place of Burial: Prince William County, Virginia
Immediate Family:

Son of Capt. Henry Lee and Mary Lee
Husband of Lucy Ludwell Lee
Father of major general henry lee; Theodosia Maiden; Maj. Gen. Henry Lee, "Light Horse Harry"; Eleanor Glazener; Charles Lee, U.S. Attorney General and 7 others
Brother of Unknown Lee; John Lee; Robert Lee; Richard "Squire" Lee; Unknown Lee and 2 others

Occupation: Judge/Senator, Burgess, State Senator 1780
Managed by: Martin Paul Ludwig Andreas Günt...
Last Updated:

About Henry Giles Lee, II

A Patriot of the American Revolution for VIRGINIA. DAR Ancestor #: A068551

Please note: These children, and ONLY these, are recognized in the "official studbook":

=======================================================
  • 1. Maj. Gen. Henry Lee III "Light Horse Harry" (1756–1818), Governor of Virginia. Lee III married:
  • Matilda Lee (1766–1790), daughter of Hon. Philip Ludwell Lee, Sr., Esq. (1727–1775) and Elizabeth Steptoe (1743–1789), who married secondly, Philip Richard Fendall I, Esq. (1734–1805).
  • Anne Hill Carter (1773–1829), daughter of Hon. Charles Carter, Sr. (1737–1802) of "Shirley", and his second wife, Anne Butler Moore (1756). Their son was Confederate General Robert E. Lee.[1]
  • 2 Hon. Charles Lee (1758–1815), U.S. Attorney General. Charles married:
  • Anne Lee (1770–1804), daughter of Richard Henry Lee (1732–1794) and his second wife, Anne (Gaskins) Pinckard.
  • Margaret Christian (Scott) Peyton (1783–1843), widow of Yelverton Peyton (1771–1802). Margaret was the daughter of Rev. John Scott (1747–1785) and Elizabeth Gordon .
  • 3 Richard Bland Lee I (1761–1827) of "Sully", who married Elizabeth "Eliza" Collins (1768–1858), daughter of Stephen Collins and Mary Parish.
  • 4 Mary "Mollie" Lee (1764–1827), who married Philip Richard Fendall I, Esq. (1734–1805), his third wife. Philip was the son of Benjamin Fendall, Esq. (1708–1764) and his first wife, Eleanor Lee (1710–1759).
  • 5 Theodorick Lee (1766–1849) of "Eckington", who married Catherine Hite (1766–1849).
  • 6 Edmund Jennings Lee I (1772–1843), who married Sally Lee (1775–1837), daughter of Richard Henry Lee (1732–1794) and Anne (Gaskins) Pinckard.
  • 7 Lucy Lee (1774), who never married.
  • 8 Anne Lee (1776–1857), who married William Byrd Page, Sr. (1768–1812), son of Mann Page (1742–1787) and Mary Mason Selden (1754–1787).
(1730-1787) of “Leesylvania”, Prince William Co., Virginia. Henry II, was the third son of Capt. Henry Lee I (1691-1747) of “Lee Hall”, Westmoreland County, and his wife, Mary Bland (1704-1764), whose mother was a great-aunt of President Thomas Jefferson and descended once from King John of England, twice from King Edward I of England, once from King Jean de Brienne of Jerusalem, twice from King Edward III of England and once from King Pedro I of Castile [1] [2].

Henry was born at “Lee Hall” in 1729, settled in Prince William County, living at “Leesylvania”, near the town of Dumfries. He served as a Justice of the Peace in that county and first in commission. In addition he was commissioned as a Burgess in 1758, where he served on and off until 1772. He was a member of the Convention from 1774-1776. Mr. Lee served as County Lieutenant for Prince William, and was active in the duties of that office during the Revolution. Henry also served as a member of the State Senate in 1780. Henry’s will was dated August 10, 1787, and was probated in Prince William County on October 1 of the same year.Henry married Lucy Grymes (1734-1792), nicknamed "The Lowland Beauty" [3] [4]. She was very fair. Her eyes were blue and her hair exceptionally blonde, soft and light as a baby's. According to local tradition, she was one of the Virginia beauties adored by Gen. George Washington (1732-1799) in his early youth. To her legend also ascribes his schoolboy verses, and many have surmised that when in after years Washington so favored her son "Harry", it was because of his tender memories of the boy's mother.

"Leesylvania" was located between Neabsco Creek and Powell Creek in Prince William Co., Virginia. It had a magnificent view up the Potomac River. It was the ancestral home of Robert E. Lee's branch of the family where his grandparents, Henry Lee II and Lucy Grymes lie buried. The plantation home burned about 1790. The estate was sold to Henry Fairfax in 1825, whose family lived there in a home which may have pre-dated the Lee residence. The Fairfax home burned in 1910 and the ruins of the walls and a chimney are all that remain.

Lucy was the daughter of Hon. Charles Grymes (1693-1743) (twice related to President George Washington) and Frances Jennings (great-aunt of Edmund Randolph). Charles was of the estate "Morattico", in Richmond County, Virginia. He was Sheriff of Richmond County, and a member of the Council from 1724-1725.

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Henry Lee II (1730-1787) of “Leesylvania”, Prince William Co., Virginia. Henry II, was the third son of Capt. Henry Lee I (1691-1747) of “Lee Hall”, Westmoreland County, and his wife, Mary Bland (1704-1764), whose mother was a great-aunt of President Thomas Jefferson and descended once from King John of England, twice from King Edward I of England, once from King Jean de Brienne of Jerusalem, twice from King Edward III of England and once from King Pedro I of Castile.

Henry was born at “Lee Hall” in 1729, settled in Prince William County, living at “Leesylvania”, near the town of Dumfries. He served as a Justice of the Peace in that county and first in commission. In addition he was commissioned as a Burgess in 1758, where he served on and off until 1772. He was a member of the Convention from 1774-1776. Mr. Lee served as County Lieutenant for Prince William, and was active in the duties of that office during the Revolution. Henry also served as a member of the State Senate in 1780. Henry’s will was dated August 10, 1787, and was probated in Prince William County on October 1 of the same year.

Henry married Lucy Grymes (1734-1792), nicknamed "The Lowland Beauty". She was very fair. Her eyes were blue and her hair exceptionally blonde, soft and light as a baby's. According to local tradition, she was one of the Virginia beauties adored by Gen. George Washington (1732-1799) in his early youth. To her legend also ascribes his schoolboy verses, and many have surmised that when in after years Washington so favored her son "Harry", it was because of his tender memories of the boy's mother.

"Leesylvania" was located between Neabsco Creek and Powell Creek in Prince William Co., Virginia. It had a magnificent view up the Potomac River. It was the ancestral home of Robert E. Lee's branch of the family where his grandparents, Henry Lee II and Lucy Grymes lie buried. The plantation home burned about 1790. The estate was sold to Henry Fairfax in 1825, whose family lived there in a home which may have pre-dated the Lee residence. The Fairfax home burned in 1910 and the ruins of the walls and a chimney are all that remain.

Lucy was the daughter of Hon. Charles Grymes (1693-1743) (twice related to President George Washington) and Frances Jennings (great-aunt of Edmund Randolph). Charles was of the estate "Morattico", in Richmond County, Virginia. He was Sheriff of Richmond County, and a member of the Council from 1724-1725.

The Papers of George Washington: Revolutionary War Series, 13 Pages: 632-632


Dover Feby 21st 78

This country does not answer our excpectation with respect to waggons. Consequently the conveyance of the salt provision &c. collected at this place will not be so expidetious as could be wished. A drove of cattle from seventy to an hundred head, will set out tomorrow from Middletown. We do business very regularly visiting in our route each & every farm, & taking with us every article necessary for an army. Very little discontent prevails among the inhabitants, & that only from among the notoriously disaffected. This state is void of all government, therefore we can meet with no aid from the civil. They have a form, but there is no spirit or energy. The situation of the country, the want of government & the artifice of the friends to the British army renders these lower counties an asylum to deserters from the continental army. Several officers are now here on the business of apprehending deserters, but tho’ very active they meet with little success because they have no aid from government. The Assembly is now convened at this place, the active & spirited members wish a letr to the House from your Excelly on this head: they think many good consequences would result from it. I am informed that there cannot be less than <______&rt; hund’d deserters who live on <______&rt; fruits of their labor in this country. Some men of power and influence encourage the abominable practice by their private countenance.

Perhaps, if your Excellency would address the Legislature on the subject, at the same time furnish me with directions and authority to apprehend & deliver to Provost, such persons as are notoriously guilty of this high crime against the interest of the States great advantages might accrue to the army. I am convinced it would encourage the recruiting service.

I must again beg that your Excellency will order a proper person with money to pay those persons with whom I must contract debts in the execution of my commission. I have promised the people that they shall be paid & shall be much distressed if my promise is not fulfilled. I have the honor to be with most perfect respect, your Excellency’s most obt servant

Heny Lee jr Capt. L.D.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Lee_II

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Please see Wikipedia link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Lee_II -------------------- (1729-1787) of “Leesylvania”, Prince William Co., Virginia. Henry II, was the third son of Capt. Henry Lee I (1691-1747) of “Lee Hall”, Westmoreland County, and his wife, Mary Bland (1704-1764), whose mother was a great-aunt of President Thomas Jefferson and descended once from King John of England, twice from King Edward I of England, once from King Jean de Brienne of Jerusalem, twice from King Edward III of England and once from King Pedro I of Castile [1] [2]. Henry was born at “Lee Hall” in 1729, settled in Prince William County, living at “Leesylvania”, near the town of Dumfries. He served as a Justice of the Peace in that county and first in commission. In addition he was commissioned as a Burgess in 1758, where he served on and off until 1772. He was a member of the Convention from 1774-1776. Mr. Lee served as County Lieutenant for Prince William, and was active in the duties of that office during the Revolution. Henry also served as a member of the State Senate in 1780. Henry’s will was dated August 10, 1787, and was probated in Prince William County on October 1 of the same year.Henry married Lucy Grymes (1734-1792), nicknamed "The Lowland Beauty" [3] [4]. She was very fair. Her eyes were blue and her hair exceptionally blonde, soft and light as a baby's. According to local tradition, she was one of the Virginia beauties adored by Gen. George Washington (1732-1799) in his early youth. To her legend also ascribes his schoolboy verses, and many have surmised that when in after years Washington so favored her son "Harry", it was because of his tender memories of the boy's mother.

"Leesylvania" was located between Neabsco Creek and Powell Creek in Prince William Co., Virginia. It had a magnificent view up the Potomac River. It was the ancestral home of Robert E. Lee's branch of the family where his grandparents, Henry Lee II and Lucy Grymes lie buried. The plantation home burned about 1790. The estate was sold to Henry Fairfax in 1825, whose family lived there in a home which may have pre-dated the Lee residence. The Fairfax home burned in 1910 and the ruins of the walls and a chimney are all that remain.

Lucy was the daughter of Hon. Charles Grymes (1693-1743) (twice related to President George Washington) and Frances Jennings (great-aunt of Edmund Randolph). Charles was of the estate "Morattico", in Richmond County, Virginia. He was Sheriff of Richmond County, and a member of the Council from 1724-1725.

--------------------

The Papers of George Washington: Revolutionary War Series, 13 Pages: 632-632

Dover Feby 21st 78

This country does not answer our excpectation with respect to waggons. Consequently the conveyance of the salt provision &c. collected at this place will not be so expidetious as could be wished. A drove of cattle from seventy to an hundred head, will set out tomorrow from Middletown. We do business very regularly visiting in our route each & every farm, & taking with us every article necessary for an army. Very little discontent prevails among the inhabitants, & that only from among the notoriously disaffected. This state is void of all government, therefore we can meet with no aid from the civil. They have a form, but there is no spirit or energy. The situation of the country, the want of government & the artifice of the friends to the British army renders these lower counties an asylum to deserters from the continental army. Several officers are now here on the business of apprehending deserters, but tho’ very active they meet with little success because they have no aid from government. The Assembly is now convened at this place, the active & spirited members wish a letr to the House from your Excelly on this head: they think many good consequences would result from it. I am informed that there cannot be less than <______&rt; hund’d deserters who live on <______&rt; fruits of their labor in this country. Some men of power and influence encourage the abominable practice by their private countenance.

Perhaps, if your Excellency would address the Legislature on the subject, at the same time furnish me with directions and authority to apprehend & deliver to Provost, such persons as are notoriously guilty of this high crime against the interest of the States great advantages might accrue to the army. I am convinced it would encourage the recruiting service.

I must again beg that your Excellency will order a proper person with money to pay those persons with whom I must contract debts in the execution of my commission. I have promised the people that they shall be paid & shall be much distressed if my promise is not fulfilled. I have the honor to be with most perfect respect, your Excellency’s most obt servant

Heny Lee jr Capt. L.D. -------------------- WILL OF COLONEL RICHARD LEE OF VIRGINIA, AND LATELY OF STRATFORD LANGTON IN THE COUNTY OF ESSEX, ESQUIRE: [EXCERPT]

Item. I give and bequeath to the five younger children, viz.: William, Hancock, Betsey, Anne, and Charles, the plantation wheron John Baswell now lives . . . including Bishops Neck and to the utmost extent of my land towards Brewer's, and also 4000 acres on the Potomac, also two plantations before bequeathed to my wife, after her death be divided between them . . . also the rest of my cattle, hogs, corn, household stuffs . . . upon said plantations (for the benefit of the listed children) . . . but the said land only to be divided among the male children (Lee, Edmunds 62-63).

Item. My will is that my horses, mares, and colts be equally divided in two parts, one whereof to be and belonging to my three eldest children, and the other to my five youngest, and shall be sold as they increase toward raising money for their portions, and in case any of the three eldest children die before they come to the age of 18 years, that then his or their portion come to the survivors or survivor of them, and in case they all died that the whole personal estate equally to return to the five youngest children, but the land only to the male children, and if the five youngest children die before they come to the age aforesaid or the females married, then their parts to be divided among the three eldest or survivors of survivor of them (Lee, Edmunds 62-63).

Henry LEE II , (1730-1787), of “Leesylvania”, Prince William County, Virginia. Henry II, was the Third Son of Captain Henry Lee I, Westmoreland County, and Mary BLAND, (1704-1764), whose mother was a Great-Aunt of President Thomas Jefferson.

Edward I of England Edward I , also known as Edward Longshanks, was King of England from 1272 to 1307. The first son of Henry III, Edward was involved early in the political intrigues of his father's reign, which included an outright rebellion by the English Barons. In 1259 he briefly sided with a baronial...

John of Brienne John of Brienne was a French nobleman who became John I King of Jerusalem by marriage, and was later invited to become John I Latin Emperor of Constantinople.... Henry was born at “Lee Hall,” in 1729, settled in Prince William County, living at “Leesylvania”, near the town of Dumfries. He served as a Justice Of The Peace in that County and first in Commission. In addition, he was Commissioned as a Burgess, in 1758, where he served on and off, until 1772. He was a Member Of The Convention, from 1774-1776. Henry Lee served as County Lieutenant for Prince William, and was active in the duties of that Office during the American Revolution. Henry also served as a Member of The State Senate, in 1780. Henry’s Will was dated August 10, 1787, and was Probated: in Prince William County, on October 01 of the same year. Marriage:Henry married Lucy Grymes (1734-1792), Called "The Lowland Beauty". She was very fair. Her eyes were blue and her hair exceptionally blonde, soft and light as a baby's. According to local Tradition, she was one of the Virginia Beauties so adored by General George Washington George Washington George Washington was the commander of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War and served as the first President of the United States of America...

(1732-1799), in his early youth. To her legend also ascribes his schoolboy verses, and many have surmised that when in later years, Washington so favored her Son, "Harry", it was because of his tender memories of the Boy's Mother.

"Leesylvania Leesylvania State Park Leesylvania State Park is located in the southeastern part of Prince William County, Virginia. The land was donated in 1978 by philanthropist Daniel K. Ludwig.-History:...

" was located between Neabsco Creek and Powell Creek in Prince William Co., Virginia. It had a magnificent view up the Potomac River. It was the Ancestral Home of Robert E. Lee's Branch of the Lee Family, where his Grandparents, Henry Lee II, and Lucy Grymes lie buried. The Plantation Home burned about 1790. The Estate was sold to Henry Fairfax, in 1825, whose family lived there in a home which may have pre-dated the Lee residence. The Fairfax home burned in 1910 and the ruins of the walls and a chimney are all that remain.

Lucy was the daughter of Hon. Charles Grymes (1693-1743) (twice related to President George Washington George Washington George Washington was the commander of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War and served as the first President of the United States of America...

) and Frances Jennings (great-aunt of Edmund Randolph Edmund Randolph Edmund Jenings Randolph was an American attorney, Governor of Virginia, Secretary of State, and the first United States Attorney General.-Biography:...

). Charles was Of the Estate "Morattico", in Richmond County, Virginia. Charles GRYMES was Sheriff of Richmond County, and a Member of The Council from 1724-1725. Children: Maj. Gen. Henry LEE, III, "Light Horse Harry", (1756-1818), Governor of Virginia. Henry married: Matilda Lee (1766-1790), daughter of Hon. Philip Ludwell Lee, Sr., Esq. (1727-1775) and Elizabeth Steptoe (1743-1789), who married secondly, Philip Richard Fendall I, Esq. (1734-1805). Anne Hill Carter (1773-1829), daughter of Hon. Charles Carter, Sr. (1737-1802) of "Shirley", and his second wife, Anne Butler Moore (1756). Hon. Charles LEE, Charles Lee (Attorney General) Charles Lee was an American lawyer from Virginia. He served as United States Attorney General from 1795 until 1801. (1758-1815), U.S. Attorney General. Charles married:

   1. 1.  Anne Lee (1770-1804), daughter of Richard Henry Lee

Richard Henry Lee Richard Henry Lee was an American statesman from Virginia best known for the motion in the Second Continental Congress calling for the colonies' independence from Great Britain. His famous resolution of June 1776 led to the United States Declaration of Independence, which Lee signed...

(1732-1794) and his second wife, Anne (Gaskins) Pinckard.

2. Margaret Christian (Scott) Peyton (1783-1843), widow of Yelverton Peyton (1771-1802). Margaret was the daughter of Rev. John Scott (1747-1785) and Elizabeth Gordon. Richard Bland LEE, I, (1761-1827) of "Sully", who married Elizabeth "Eliza" Collins (1768-1858), daughter of Stephen Collins and Mary Parish.

Mary "Mollie" LEE, (1764-1827), who married Philip Richard Fendall I, Esq. (1734-1805), his third wife. Philip was the son of Benjamin Fendall I, Esq. (1708-1764) and his first wife, Eleanor Lee (1710-1759). Theodorick LEE, (1766-1849) of "Eckington", who married Catherine Hite (1766-1849). Edmund Jennings LEE, I, (1772-1843), who married Sally LEE, (1775-1837), daughter of Richard Henry Lee Richard Henry Lee Richard Henry Lee was an American statesman from Virginia best known for the motion in the Second Continental Congress calling for the colonies' independence from Great Britain. His famous resolution of June 1776 led to the United States Declaration of Independence, which Lee signed...

, (1732-1794) and Anne (Gaskins) Pinckard. Lucy LEE, (1774), who never married. Anne LEE, (1776-1857), who married William Byrd PAGE, I, (1768-1812), son of Mann Page Mann Page Mann Page was an American lawyer and planter from Spotsylvania County, Virginia. He was a delegate for Virginia in the Continental Congress in 1777. He was the brother of Virginia Governor John Page....

(1742-1787) and Mary Mason Selden (1754-1787).

Added By Patricia McMahan-Chambers.

-------------------- (1729-1787) of “Leesylvania”, Prince William Co., Virginia. Henry II, was the third son of Capt. Henry Lee I (1691-1747) of “Lee Hall”, Westmoreland County, and his wife, Mary Bland (1704-1764), whose mother was a great-aunt of President Thomas Jefferson and descended once from King John of England, twice from King Edward I of England, once from King Jean de Brienne of Jerusalem, twice from King Edward III of England and once from King Pedro I of Castile [1] [2]. Henry was born at “Lee Hall” in 1729, settled in Prince William County, living at “Leesylvania”, near the town of Dumfries. He served as a Justice of the Peace in that county and first in commission. In addition he was commissioned as a Burgess in 1758, where he served on and off until 1772. He was a member of the Convention from 1774-1776. Mr. Lee served as County Lieutenant for Prince William, and was active in the duties of that office during the Revolution. Henry also served as a member of the State Senate in 1780. Henry’s will was dated August 10, 1787, and was probated in Prince William County on October 1 of the same year.Henry married Lucy Grymes (1734-1792), nicknamed "The Lowland Beauty" [3] [4]. She was very fair. Her eyes were blue and her hair exceptionally blonde, soft and light as a baby's. According to local tradition, she was one of the Virginia beauties adored by Gen. George Washington (1732-1799) in his early youth. To her legend also ascribes his schoolboy verses, and many have surmised that when in after years Washington so favored her son "Harry", it was because of his tender memories of the boy's mother.

"Leesylvania" was located between Neabsco Creek and Powell Creek in Prince William Co., Virginia. It had a magnificent view up the Potomac River. It was the ancestral home of Robert E. Lee's branch of the family where his grandparents, Henry Lee II and Lucy Grymes lie buried. The plantation home burned about 1790. The estate was sold to Henry Fairfax in 1825, whose family lived there in a home which may have pre-dated the Lee residence. The Fairfax home burned in 1910 and the ruins of the walls and a chimney are all that remain.

Lucy was the daughter of Hon. Charles Grymes (1693-1743) (twice related to President George Washington) and Frances Jennings (great-aunt of Edmund Randolph). Charles was of the estate "Morattico", in Richmond County, Virginia. He was Sheriff of Richmond County, and a member of the Council from 1724-1725.

--------------------

The Papers of George Washington: Revolutionary War Series, 13 Pages: 632-632

Dover Feby 21st 78

This country does not answer our excpectation with respect to waggons. Consequently the conveyance of the salt provision &c. collected at this place will not be so expidetious as could be wished. A drove of cattle from seventy to an hundred head, will set out tomorrow from Middletown. We do business very regularly visiting in our route each & every farm, & taking with us every article necessary for an army. Very little discontent prevails among the inhabitants, & that only from among the notoriously disaffected. This state is void of all government, therefore we can meet with no aid from the civil. They have a form, but there is no spirit or energy. The situation of the country, the want of government & the artifice of the friends to the British army renders these lower counties an asylum to deserters from the continental army. Several officers are now here on the business of apprehending deserters, but tho’ very active they meet with little success because they have no aid from government. The Assembly is now convened at this place, the active & spirited members wish a letr to the House from your Excelly on this head: they think many good consequences would result from it. I am informed that there cannot be less than <______&rt; hund’d deserters who live on <______&rt; fruits of their labor in this country. Some men of power and influence encourage the abominable practice by their private countenance.

Perhaps, if your Excellency would address the Legislature on the subject, at the same time furnish me with directions and authority to apprehend & deliver to Provost, such persons as are notoriously guilty of this high crime against the interest of the States great advantages might accrue to the army. I am convinced it would encourage the recruiting service.

I must again beg that your Excellency will order a proper person with money to pay those persons with whom I must contract debts in the execution of my commission. I have promised the people that they shall be paid & shall be much distressed if my promise is not fulfilled. I have the honor to be with most perfect respect, your Excellency’s most obt servant

Heny Lee jr Capt. L.D.

view all 17

Henry Giles Lee, II's Timeline

1729
1729
Westmoreland, Virginia
1753
December 1, 1753
Age 24
USA
December 1, 1753
Age 24
Married, Lucy, Grymes
1753
Age 24
VA, USA
1755
1755
Age 26
Virginia
1756
January 29, 1756
Age 27
Dumfries, Prince William, VA, USA
1756
Age 27
1758
1758
Age 29
Leesylvania Plantation, Prince William, Virginia
1761
January 20, 1761
Age 32
Prince William, Virginia
1764
July 9, 1764
Age 35
Westmoreland, CO, VA