Henry Watkins, I (1585 - 1658)

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Birthplace: Talgarth, Brecon, Brecknockshire, South Wales, UK
Death: Died in Malvern Hills, Accomack, Virginia, United States
Cause of death: Birth.possibly.1660
Managed by: Steve Poland
Last Updated:

About Henry Watkins, I

A LIST OF NAMES OF THE LIVING IN VIRGINIA,
  February the 16th, 1623

At the Eastern Shore:

Henry Wattkins Peregree Wattkins Daniell Wattkins

_______________________________________

Henry Watkins of Wales was in Accomack Co., VA before 1621 and settled on the Eastern Shore. In 1614 the earliest Eastern Shore coloney was "Dale's Gift," land which was said to have been bought by Sir Thomas Dale, High Marshall of Virginia, from the Indians as a private venture. Sir Thomas Dale died in 1619 and his wife. Lady Dale, undoubtedly carried on his plans. Henry Watkins was overseer of the Dale Plantation. ! Henry Watkins of the Old Plantation was one of the first Burgesses to represent the Eastern Shore. He and Captain John Wilcocks, Commander of Accomack, represented the Eastern Shore at the 1623 Assembly. He was one of the signers, 3 July 1624, of a petition of the Governor and Assembly of Virginia to the King as to the true state of the plantation. Jamestown had no record of the patent for the Dale Plantation, but king James I recognized the right to the land and his successor granted a patent. The plantation became a Virginia company plantation by 1632, known as Plantation of Accomack. .

! Henry had two brothers, Peregrin and Daniel. They came to Accomack Co. in 1621. Peregrin came aboard the ship GEORGE, he was 20 years old. Daniel came aboard the ship, CHARLES, to James City Co., VA. It is assumed that Daniel was the younger of the brothers. A muster was taken in 1624 and all three brothers was on the eastern shore. A new census was taken of Eastern Shore inhabitants in 1625, and the only Watkins listed was Peregrin..

! The issue of Henry Watkins of Wales are John born abt 1636 and lived in , Lower Norfolk, VA when he grew up, Henry born 1637 died 1714 at Malver Hills. Henrico Co.,VA, Lewis born 1640 and resided in Henrico Co. Va when he grew up and his descendants went to New Kent Co.,Va, and Thomas born about 1642 went to Mattipnoi River, King William Co., Va.

In February 1624, Accomack Plantation was represented at a stormy session of the General Assembly. Captain John Wilcox, overseer of the Company land, and HENRY WATKINS, overseer for Lady Dale, were the Burgesses. King James I had annulled the charter of the Virginia Company and only a decree of the highest court in England was needed to make the annulment final. The fate of the representative government which had functioned for almost five years was unknown. The King had never favored it and some members of the Virginia Company who sought Royal favors had criticized it. This Assembly was also concerned about the ownership of land in fee simple when the charter was annulled. Some existing laws were strengthened and additional ones were passed to make this government more closely conform to the English Parliament. After the General Assembly of 1624 adjourned, Burgesses Wilcox and WATKINS returned to Accomack Plantation to explain the laws to the people. At the census at this time there were 79 men, women and church. The charter of the Virginia Company was annulled on June 24, 1624, and Virginia became England's first Crown Colony. A church was built on the Secretary's land. After the harvest was finished in the fall of 1624, the rest of the Company tenants were transferred to Elizabeth City. The census of 1625 shows 51 people.

_______________________________

Honorable Henry Watkins Information:

Henry Watkins of Henrico City" by J M Allen, 1985: Gateway Press. Excerpt from

1-Henry Watkins [1585-?} 2-Henry Watkins [1637/8-c1714/5] m Katherine Pride 3-Edward Watkins [c1665-c1771] 4-John Watkins [c1710-1765] m Phoebe Hancock 5-Henry Watkins [1758-1829] m Elizabeth Hudson Clay>> 6-John Watkins [1785-1845] m Catherine T Milton 7-Thomas Bodley Watkins [1835-1903] m Annie Bell McMurty 8-Jane Worley Watkins [1885-1964] m George Marcus Allen

Henry I Watkins was overseer of Dale Plantation. He had brothers Peregrin and Daniel.

Issue: 1-John who lived in Lower Norfolk 2-Lewis b 1640 lived in Henrico and descendants in New Kent 3-Thomas was of Mattiponi R, King Wm Co 4-Henry II [1637/8-1714/5] m Katherine Pride c 1658>> Issue of Henry II 1-Edward 2-Henry III [1660-Nov 1714/5 , Mary Crisp issue: 1-John m Elizabeth Sullivant or Daniels He died 1743-I need information on this family 2-Benjamin m Jane Watkins 3-Joseph m Mary Farrar 4-Henry IV 5-Stephen [d 1754+] m Judith Trabue 6-Mary [1682] 3-Mary m 1701 Nickolas Hutchins> 4-William [1667] m Elizabeth ? 5-Elizabeth [c1669] m 1692 John Bottemly 6-Rachel [c1670] m Robert Woodson-his 2nd wife 7-Thomas of Swift Creek [1680-1760] m Elizabeth Pride 8-Joseph d c1725

This early presence in Virginia of Henry I is further supported by "The Complete Book of Emigrants 1607-1660" by Peter Wilson Coldham. On page 46, the text indicated that on 28 February 1624, a Henry Watkins signed a report from the Governor and Council of Virginia at James City to the king rebutting the accusations against the plantations made by Captain Nathaniel Butler, Six thousand, not ten thousand, persons have been transported to Virginia who, for the most part, were wasted by the cruelty of Sir Thomas Smyth's government.

This same page indicates that Henry Watkins, Peregree Watkins, and Daniell Watkins were living (in 1624) at the Eastern Shore.

According to Jane Allen's text "Henry Watkins of Henrico County", Henry Watkins was in Accomack County, Virginia, before 1621 and settled on the Eastern Shore. As mentioned above, Henry was the overseer of the Dale Plantation. Sir Thomas Dale had died in 1619 and Henry made a claim against his estate for six barrels of corn.

Henry Watkins of the Old Plantation was one of the first two Burgesses to represent the Eastern Shore at the 1623 Assembly. He was one of the listed burgesses on laws and orders concluded by the General Assembly 5 March 1623/24.

On 3 July 1624 he was one of the signers of a petition of the Governor and Assembly of Virginia to the King as to the true state of the plantation.

In 1625 John Taylor made a disposition about a transaction which happened when Henry Watkins had been overseer for Lady Dale "about the tyme of our Lord 1620".

1704 Quit Rents of Virginia lists Thomas Watkins with four land holdings, 200 acres in Henrico County, 400 acres in Essex County, 190 acres in Norfolk County, and (Thomas Jr.) 125 acres in King & Queen County.

Early Virginia Families Along the James River: Thomas Watkins, 400 acs. (N.L.), Henrico Co., on N. side of the main br. of Tuckahoe (Cr.) below the Devil's Wood Yard; 16 Aug. 1715, p. 244 (Patent Book #10). 25 Shill. and Imp. of 3 pers: James Mackentush, Francis Hill, Jno. Cook. Jane Allen's text is the source of Henry's children.

Source: The Curd Family in America, The Tuttle Publishing Co.

Henry Watkins of Henrico Co., Va, presumably the immigrant ancestor was b. in 1638. He was a Quaker and member of the Society of Friends, a fact that caused him at times to clash with the ruling authorities in Virginia. In the list of heads of families in Henrico County, 1679, he is listed as head of family with three tithables and shown as living in the vicinity of Turkey Island. In 1679 he received a patent for 170 acres of land on the north side of James River in Henrico Co. adjoining land of John Lewis, Mr. Cocke, and Mr. Beauchamp, and touching the 'three runs' of Turkey Island Creek (patent book 7, p. 17). In July 1690 he purchased of Lyonel Morris 360 acres of land in Varina parish, Henrico Co., on the south side of Chickahominy Swamp, and in October of the same year he patented 60 acres of land "adjoining his own land and touching a Jane Allen's text is the source of Henry's children.run of Turkey Island Creek." In 1699 he subscribed 500 pounds of tobacco towards building the Friends meetinghouse at Curls and in 1703 he paid 50 pounds of tobacco towards finishing the building. He was the father of at least seven children and in 1692 deeded his land in Henrico to his five sons. To William, Joseph and Edward he deeded each 120 acres of land on the south side of Chickahominy Swamp, to Henry the 'track of land on which his father then lived" acreage not given, and to Thomas 200 acres on the 'three runs.

' We quote from William Clayton Torrence, "Beginnings of the Families of Henrico," as follows:

One of the most interesting families in Virginia from the point of view of economic, social and political development is the distinguished family of which Henry Watkins is the immigrant ancestor.

1704 Quit Rents of Virginia lists Henry Sr. with 100 acres in Henrico County.

Source: Henry Watkins of Henrico County, Jane Allen 1985.

That Henry Watkins was the son of Henry, born 1585 in Wales, remains to be proved. However, in 1634/35 there was a deed in which John Cawsey of Charles City County conveyed to Walter Aston acreage in Charles City near Shirly Hundred "bordering south upon a Creeke called Henry Watkins, his Creeke." A Henry Watkins, therefore, lived not more than a few miles from the home in 1679 of Henry, born 1637/8.

Henry Watkins was a small but hard working farmer. As a member of the Society of Friends, or Quakers, he clashed with the authorities.

In 1660 the Virginia Assembly had passed a strict law against Quakers. They were described as:

... an unreasonable and turbulent sort of people, who daily gather together unlawful assemblies of people, teaching lies, miracles, false visions, prophecies, and doctrines teneing to disturb the peace, disorganize Society and destroy the peace, disorganize Society and destroy all laws, and government, and religion.

In June, 1684, the Courts of Henrico refused his petition for a remission of fines imposed upon him "he not appearing himself to supplicate this Court but (as ye Court Conceives) continuing still in his Quakerism."

His daughter Elizabeth also held his loyalty to his faith. At the age of 16 in April, 1685, she refused "for conscience sake" to swear to a deposition she had made. The Henrico County Court ordered her imprisonment. In June she was again brought to the bar and "still persisting in ye same obstinacy as she pretends out of conscience sake and seconding her request the court have out of their clemency in consideration of her young years remiteted her offence and releast her of her confinement."

On 21 January 1691/2, Henry Watkins conveyed 120 acres each to his sons Edward, William, Joseph, Henry, and Thomas near the Chickahominy. He also on 25 January 1691/2 made a gift of land "I now live on" to Henry Watkins and 200 acres to Thomas Watkins.

Henry made his will in November 1714, proved 7 February 1715, Henrico County, Virginia.

Jane Allen has different birth dates for nearly all of the children. She has: Edward Henry c.1660 Mary (JA has this Mary married to Nicholas Hutchins.) William c.1667 Elizabeth c.1669 Rachel c.1670 (Rachel is not included in the Curd text above.) Thomas c.1680

Here is an interesting message that contains some conflicting, but interesting information:

Area: SEgen ---------------------------------------------------------- "Msg#: 5059 Date: 03-27-95 11:16 From: Betty Harris Read: Yes Replied: No To: Wiley Jarrell Mark: Subj: PRIDE ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Henry II Watkins, [1637-Abt 1710] s/o Henry I Watkins and Alice Moslin. He m 1-Rachel Griffin Abt 1658 and had 8 ch. He married 2nd Katherine Pride Abt 1680 and perhaps the last 2 children I have for 1st marriage are Katherine Pride's. Henry was a Quaker and an ancestor of Henry Clay.

Henry Watkins first appears in Virginia records in 1664 when he is listed as one of 60 people transported as settlers by John Beachamp and Richard Cocke, Sr. Two different works caution that this does not mean this was when he was transported, or that he was even in fact transported by these gentlemen. Land rights were sometimes collected years later, collected more than once for the same person transported, collected for deceased or fictious persons or for sailors who never tarried in Virginia. But since Henry was neither a fictious nor transient person, it does establish that he came to the area no latter than this date.

In 1667, Henry Watkins helped survey the land of Richard Cooke in the area of that grant. In 1678, he testified in court concerning the Malvern Hills area lying between the James River and the Western Run, that, Mr. Rich'd Cooke Senr. desired me to goe along with him (and) Colonel Ligon to carry the chaine. He signed with his mark H .

It is possible he was working off the indenture for his passage.The Bristol Register lists a s indentured servants shipping to foreign plantations Henry Watkins, Tayler, of Talgat in th e county of Brecon, indentured 14 Nov. 1656 to Wiliam Thomas of Virginia, planter, for 3 1/ 2 years. This could be another Henry Watkins, or by device of language Mr. Thomas could have paid for the transport while Mr. Beachamp and Cooke did the transporting. Also, the indenture or transport headrights could have been sold. This early indenture process was, particularly in the southern states on tobacco plantantions, slavery with an escape clause. One author estimates that only 1/10th of these indentured servants became a substantial farmer in his own right. Another tenth might become overseers for new indentured servants, the other eight either died in servitude or drifted off to become 'poor whites'. This assessment seems a bit stiff to me. But so far, I have indentified only 3 of my more than 30 male ancestors from this period who arrived as indentured servants. The other two arrived in Philadephia, much farther north, and one of these was connected with the Quakers, and probably indentured to another of the same faith. If our Henry was from Talgarth, he was Welsh, as Talgarth is a town in the Black Mountains of Brecknockshire, South Wales. A local rebellion there in 1 655 caused Cromwell to crackdown on the area and many young men left that area in the following years.

In June 1679 Henrico Co. Court ordered the outfitting of a milita and Henry Watkins of Turkey Island district was required to fit out three men. This would indicate he was at that time a free land owner with three adult males in the household. Later in 1679, he received a grant of land for his transport of 4 persons. There is no record at that time that he failed to comply with the order to outfit men. But in 1681 his wife Elizabeth filed a complaint against a slave belonging to Thomas Cooke, stating that he had attacked her. Her husband Henry whom she described as being inclinable to the quakers would not prosecute, although, in a less than Quakerish attitude, he was said to have passed word to the assilant that he should keep off planation or else would shoot him. After her recovery, she went to the authorities , only to have the attacker and his master portray her as the cause of her own troubles.

The decision is missing from the court records. (Stutesman was hopeful justice was served, as a woman, I am inclided to suppose it was not.) In 1684, the court refused to release Henry from fines imposed upon him because he was continuing still in his Quakerism. The next year his 16 year old daughter Eliza refused to take an oath on her testimony in a court case based on your Quaker conscience and was thrown in jail - a place much less pleasant than today - for a month.

In 1711, William Byrd, a neighbor, wrote in his diary, I went to the militia Court. We dined all the Quakers. I told them they would certainly be fined five times a year if they did not do as their fellow subjects did. Henry prospered, his land holdings increasing and he had hired more,probably indentured help, as in 1686, a neighbor complained that Luke Williams , servant to Henry Watkins, did assult and wound him with an axe.He purchased more land and on Jan. 25, 1691/92 (old/new) gave a gift of land to each of his five sons, 120 to 3 of the s ons, 200 to the fourth son and the land on which he resided (later described as 100 acres) to his fifth son and namesake. This land was most probably on the south side of the Western Run where it joined Turkey Island Creek. (WF-20 states this is cite of one of a bloody Civil War battle, and that when he explored the area it was dense with wood and swamps.)

In 1699 Henry Watkins, Sr and Jr both contributed 500 lbs of tobacco toward the building o f a new meeting house at Curles, VA. In April 1705 a rent roll of all land in Henrico Co.listed those five, with the same amounts of land in Henrico Co. In the balance Of Virginia ther e were 12 other Watkins, in 7 other counties.

It is beleived that he was alive in Feb. 1715/16 (a year after the death of Henry Watkins, jr . overseer of Curles MM), because of a document signed with his characteristic H . Sept 15 , 1716 a Mary, widow of Henry Watkins, announced her intent to married Edward Mosby (1665-pri or to1742), so we believe he may have died sometime between Feb. and Sept. Her remarriage was recorded Oct 8, 1716.

Encyclopedia of Quaker Genealogy, Vol VI, Henrico Monthly Meeting, Page 184

6- 8-1701--Nicholas Hutchins and Mary Watkins, daughter of Henry, propose tentions of marriage. The usual committee was appointed. Henry Watkins, father of the young woman, consenting thereunto, saying he would not be their hindrance. 8- 9-1701--Nicholas Hutchins and Mary Watkins were married at a public meeting of the Friends, in Henrico County, Va.

Came from England and started the Watkins family that grew around the present town of Richmond in Henrico Co, VA. She was raped by John Long (Mulatto Jack), a slave of a neighbor. They w ere Quakers.

2. HENRY WATKINS (1. Henry 1) born Abt 1638, possibly in Talgarth, Brecknockshire, S. Wales? , occupation farmer, married (1) bef... ?1670, in ?Henrico Co. Virginia, Katherine Pride, born abt 1642, died post 1680, Henrico co?, VA, buried: Henrico co?, VA, married 2)Rachel Griffen. HENRY died 7 Feb 1714, Malvern Hills area, east Henrico Co., VA, buried: ? Turkey Island, Henrico Co., Va., Quaker, in VA by 1667. On 1 Apr 1678, testified in Henrico Co. Court th at he was aged 40 yeares. Lived near town of Glendale, VA and near the Chickahominy River & White Oak Swamps on the Western Run; Katherine: Henrico co., VA Deeds, Wills 1677-1692 p . 192 is the only mention of her name on Sep 1681 [Sources - Deeds, Wills, 1677-1692, p. 24; VA Land Patent Book # 5 p 367; Henrico Co., Va: Beginnings of its Families. Part IV, Watkins Family, Wm. Clayton Torrence, Wm & Mary Quarterly , 1st ser. Vol. XXV (1916), p. 52-57; Some Watkins Families of Va. & their Kin : John H. Stutesman, Gateway Press, Baltimore, MD, 1989 [John Hale Stutesman, 305 Spruce St., San Francisco, CA 94118

There were a number of early Quakers in colonial Virginia. Going back through a female ancestor, many of the Watkins are directly descended from Pocahontas through her son by John Rolphe.

According to Stutesman, there is no evidence connecting this Henry Watkins to the James Watkins who came to Jamestown in that settlements first Winter 1607/08, even though it is common f or VA Watkins to claim such a connection. We find him first, a landless man, in the middle 1600's in Henrico County, VA. He struggled there for a half century to aquire land so that his sons would have a better start. He took a dangerous stand for persecuted Quakerism. Virgina law, with some variations during the 17th century, provided 50 acres headright for everyone who came to settle in the colony, or to the person who paid for the transportation of the settler. In June 1664, a grant of land in Henrico County was made to Mr. John Beauchamp and Mr. Richard Cocke SR. ,for their importation of 60 people including Henry Watkins.

This is not absolute proof that Henry didn't come from the Jamestown Watkins because land developers in those days were often dishonest, and names of men born in VA often appeared on headrights lists. The names of 60 people appearing on the 1664 list also appeared on the 1652 grant list submitted by Richard Cocke. Richmond stands at the falls of the James River, the limit for travel of salt water vessels. In 1673, Augustine h Herman's map of the area shows only 16 white inhabitations above the site of Richmond. In June 1679 the Henrico County Court ordered Henry Watkins to fit out 3 men in hourse and arms it is proof that at this time he was a free landowner in the Turkey Island District . There are court record that both Henry and his daughter Eliza held to the Quaker faith despite official persecution. Henry aquired a large piece of land near te western edge of settlement along the Chickahominy river and 60 acres near his old farm in the Turkey Island Creek watershed. On 25Jan1692 he divided it up between his five sons, William, Joseph, Edward, Henry, and Thomas, as a gift.

We know that ELIZABETH WATKINS Bottoms was the daughter of HENRY WATKINS. The following is found in THE HISTORY OF HENRICO COUNTY - page 65 by Louis H Manarin and Clifford Dowdey: The first Quaker missionary appeared in the colony in 1656, and the next year the Council ordered that the master of any ship bringing Quakers into the colony would be fined and would have to carry them back to England. Despite this order and repressive measures taken by the General Assembly and governor, the sect continued to grow and won many converts. In 1658 the General Assembly passed an act banishing Quakers from the colony. This act carried a fine of 10 0 pounds for anyone who received a Quaker into his home. By another act passed in 1661, anyone who failed to attend services of the established church for a period of one month would b e subject to a fine. In 1666 an act was passed imposing fines on 'refractory persons' for failure to comply with the militia laws and regulations.

HENRY WATKINS received a patent for 170 acres in Henrico in 1679 and became 'a small but apparently energetic farmer.' As a member of the Quaker sect, he suffered under the repressive acts. In 1684 his petition for remission of fines was refused because he was 'continuing still in the Quakerism.' When his wife was assaulted, he refused to prosecute the criminal because the law required actions contrary to the Quaker doctrine. His sixteen-year old daughter, EL IZABETH, refused to take the oath of allegiance to the king before the county court. her willingness to affirm her statements did not satisfy the court, and she was placed in confinement . Two months later, in June 1685, she was ordered to appear before the judges. Still ' persisting in the same obstanancy as she pretends out of conscience sake and therefore desiring to be excused and her father also humbly seconding her request the court have out of their clemency in consideration of her young years remitted her offence and released her of her confinement.'

The most prominent Quaker in the county was JOHN PLEASANTS, a planter of means and a respected member of the community. He allowed his house to be used as a meeting place for Quakers an d was warned repeatedly. The enforcement of the anti--Quaker acts came when he and his wife were indicted for living together unlawfully according to the rules of established church, which did not recognize their marriage under the Quaker doctrine. He and his wife were fined 24 0 pounds each for illicit cohabitation and 20 pounds each for every month they failed to attend services of the parish church. Additional fines were imposed of two thousand pounds of tobacco for not having their children baptized and five hundred pounds of tobacco for allowing Quaker meetings in their house. The adoption in England of the Declaration for Liberty of Conscience and Indulgence in Religious Matters of 1687 and the Tolerance Act of 1686 allowed dissenting religious groups to hold religious services openly without having to conform to the doctrines of the established church. The governor was directed to proclaim the declarations in every county, and it was to be done with the beating of drums, the firing of cannons, and expression of popular enthusiasm. The proclamation was spread on the Henrico County Minute Book in 1690. the passage of the act relieved Pleasants and his wife of the charges and nullified the fines. That same year, Pleasants set aside a parcel of land for a meetinghouse and graveyard. This meetinghouse was registered with the county court in 1692.

The recognition of dissenting religious groups did not relieve them of having to conform to requirements of the law that may have been contrary to their beliefs. In 1692 John Pleasants was elected to the House of Burgesses, but because he refused to take the oath prescribed by act of Parliament and the oath of a burgess, he 'made himself incapable of serving as a burgess for Henrico County.' Military training and preparations for military action were contrary to Quaker beliefs. By payment of a fee, a Quaker could avoid attending military muster. Alexander Makenney refused to attend the muster in 1691 because 'his conscience did not permit him to bear arms.' The sheriff took his featherbed, rug, and blanket, and Makenney appealed to the General Court. The court ruled that if he wanted his property, he would either have t o pay the fine or attend the muster. John Pleasants, John Woodson, and other Quakers from Henrico petitioned the General Assembly in 1692 for 'a new bill concerning the militia and repeal of the severall acts relateing thereto.' Although the committee considering the petition reported a proposed bill, the House did not agree to the report and ordered that it be laid aside. When John Pleasants petitioned 'in the behalfe of himselfe and Severall other Quakers in Henrico County' in October 1696, 'complaineing of the Rigour of Several Lawes against them for not bearing & providing Armes & for not appeareing at musters, and of the severity of severall of the Militia,' the House agreed to the committee's report and ordered that a bill be brought 'imposeing less fines then in the said Acts' of 166 and 1684.

From Some Watkins Families of Virginia by John Hale Stutesman:

HENRY WATKINS In June 1664, a grant of land in Henrico County was made to Mr. John Beauchamp and Mr. Richard Cocke Sr. for their importation of sixty people, including Henry Watkins. Henry Watkins held land in the Turkey Island district of eastern Henrico County, north of the James River, when a miilitia roll was taken in June 1679. In 1705, the Rent Roll of Henrico Count y described [his lands] as 100 acres. In 1737 John Watkins sold to Quaker merchant/farmer John Pleasants that tract of 100 acres in Henrico County at a place called Malborn Hills, being the Land and plantation whereon Henry Watkins, father of the said John Watkins, and Henry (Watkins) the grandfather of the said John, dwelt the last part of their lives. Henry Watkins married Catherine, who traditionally has the surname Pride, but this is not proved.

______________________________ ?"Turkey Island", Henrico County, Va., Quaker, in VA by 1667. On 1 Apr 1678, testified in Henrico County Court that he was "aged 40 yeares." Lived near town of Glendale, VA and near the Chickahominy River & White Oak Swamps on the Western Run; Katherine: Henrico County, VA Deeds, Wills 1677-1692 p. 192 is the only mention of her name on Sep 1681 [Sources - Deeds, Wills, 1677-1692, p. 24; VA Land Patent Book # 5 p 367; "Henrico County, Va: Beginnings of its Families. Part IV, Watkins Family, Wm. Clayton Torrence, "Wm & Mary Quarterly", 1st ser. Vol. XXV (1916), p. 52-57; "Some Watkins Families of Va. & their Kin": John H. Stutesman, Gateway Press, Baltimore, MD, 1989 [John Hale Stutesman, 305 Spruce St., San Francisco, CA 94118 Children by Katherine Pride: + 3. i Henry Watkins born 1660.

4. ii Elizabeth Watkins born Abt 1669, Henrico County, VA, died Aft 1684,

?Henrico County, VA, may have married John Bottom(ly) pre 1691. + 5. iii Edward Watkins born ca 1676. + 6. iv Thomas Watkins born abt 1678.

7. v Mary Watkins born ?ca 1683, Henrico County, VA, died post 1735,

?Henrico County VA, Married 2 times, 1. Nicholas Hutchins, 2. -- Holmes.

8. vi William Watkins born prior 1685, Henrico County, VA, died post 1713.
9. vii Joseph Watkins born prior 1685, Henrico County, VA, died 1723, Henrico

County, VA, Married Anne ___.

10. viii Rachel Watkins born pre 1697, Henrico County, VA, died pre 1730,

Henrico County, VA, Md. 1710/11, to Robert Woodson Jr. From: Watkins/Brynes To: "'davwat@iinet.net.au'" Subject: Watkins family traced back to early Jamestown, USA Date: Wed, 13 Aug 1997 23:21:00 -0400 Our branch of the Watkins family came over to early Jamestown. My parents, Marguerite and Gordon Watkins have the records. MargWat@aol.com There were a number of early Quakers in colonial Virginia. Going back through a female ancestor, many of the Watkins are directly descended from Pocahontas through her son by John Rolphe. Carol Watkins, MD According to Stutesman, there is no evidence connecting this Henry Watkins to the James Watkins who came to Jamestown in that settlements first Winter 1607/08, even though it is common for VA Watkins to claim such a connection. We find him first, a landless man, in the middle 1600's in Henrico County, VA. He struggled there for a half century to aquire land so that his sons would have a better start. He took a dangerous stand for persecuted Quakerism. Virgina law, with some variations during the 17th century, provided 50 acres "headright" for everyone who came to settle in the colony, or to the person who paid for the transportation of the settler. In June 1664, a grant of land in Henrico County was made to "Mr. John Beauchamp and Mr. Richard Cocke SR.",for their importation of 60 people including Henry Watkins. This is not absolute proof that Henry didn't come from the Jamestown Watkins because land developers in those days were often dishonest, and names of men born in VA often appeared on headrights lists. The names of 60 people appearing on the 1664 list also appeared on the 1652 grant list submitted by Richard Cocke. Richmond stands at the falls of the James River, the limit for travel of salt water vessels. In 1673, Augustine h Herman's map of the area shows only 16 white inhabitations above the site of Richmond. In June 1679 the Henrico CountyCourt ordered Henry Watkins to fit out 3 men in hourse and arms it is proff that at this time he was a free landowner in the "Turkey Island District". There are court record that both Henry and his daughter Eliza held to the Quaker faith despite official persecution. Henry aquired a large piece of land near te western edge of settlement along the Chickahominy river and 60 acres near his old farm in the Turkey Island Creek watershed. On 25Jan1692 he divided it up between his five sons, William, Joseph, Edward, Henry, and Thomas, as a gift.

_____________________________ HENRY4 WATKINS (JAMES3, FRANCIS OF SHOTTEN2, WILLIAM1) was born 1585 in ,,Wales, and died Aft. 1655 in ,Charles City, Va. He married (1) ALICE MOSLIN (MRS. HENRY WATKINS) Abt. 1636 in ,Charles City, Va. She was born Abt. 1616 in Talgarth, Brecon, Wales, and died in ,Charles City, Va. He married (2) RACHEL (GRIFFEN) Aft. 1655 in ,Charles City, Va. She was born 1637 in Malvern Hills, Henrico, Va, and died in ,Charles City, Va. Notes for HENRY WATKINS:
! Henry Watkins of Wales was in Accomack Co., VA before 1621 and settled on the Eastern Shore. In 1614 the earliest Eastern Shore coloney was "Dale's Gift," land which was said to have been bought by Sir Thomas Dale, High Marshall of Virginia, from the Indians as a private venture. Sir Thomas Dale died in 1619 and his wife. Lady Dale, undoubtedly carried on his plans. Henry Watkins was overseer of the Dale Plantation. ! Henry Watkins of the Old Plantation was one of the first Burgesses to represent the Eastern Shore. He and Captain John Wilcocks, Commander of Accomack, represented the Eastern Shore at the 1623 Assembly. He was one of the signers, 3 July 1624, of a petition of the Governor and Assembly of Virginia to the King as to the true state of the plantation. Jamestown had no record of the patent for the Dale Plantation, but king James I recognized the right to the land and his successor granted a patent. The plantation became a Virginia company plantation by 1632, known as Plantation of Accomack. ! Henry had two brothers, Peregrin and Daniel. They came to Accomack Co. in 1621. Peregrin came aboard the ship GEORGE, he was 20 years old. Daniel came aboard the ship, CHARLES, to James City Co., VA. It is assumed that Daniel was the younger of the brothers. A muster was taken in 1624 and all three brothers was on the eastern shore. A new census was taken of Eastern Shore inhabitants in 1625, and the only Watkins listed was Peregrin. ! The issue of Henry Watkins of Wales are John born abt 1636 and lived in , Lower Norfolk, VA when he grew up, Henry born 1637 died 1714 at Malver Hills. Henrico Co.,VA, Lewis born 1640 and resided in Henrico Co. Va when he grew up and his descendants went to New Kent Co.,Va, and Thomas born about 1642 went to Mattipnoi River, King William Co., Va. More About HENRY WATKINS:
Ancestral File Number: 82H3-0C
Baptism (LDS): October 12, 1993, PROVO
Endowment (LDS): October 21, 1993, PROVO
Record Change: December 18, 2003
Sealed to parents (LDS): November 11, 1993, PROVO More About ALICE MOSLIN (MRS. HENRY WATKINS):
Baptism (LDS): August 05, 1998, PORTL
Endowment (LDS): May 07, 1999, PORTL
Record Change: November 19, 2003 More About RACHEL (GRIFFEN):
Record Change: March 31, 2001

Children of HENRY WATKINS and ALICE MOSLIN are: 5. i. HENRY5 WATKINS JR., b. ,Charles City, Va; d. 1714, Malvern Hills, Henrico, Va. 6. ii. JOHN WATKINS, b. Abt. 1638, ,Charles City, Va; d. Abt. 1677, ,Lower Norfolk, Va. iii. LEWIS WATKINS, b. 1640, ,Charles City, Va. Notes for LEWIS WATKINS:
! The book "HenryWatkins of Henrico County" by Jans McCurtry Allen-1985 Lewis resided in Henrico County, VA. His descendants went to New Kent Co. He may have been in Henrico County in 1683 (suite vs Francis Willis, 1695). More About LEWIS WATKINS:
Burial: ,Henrico, Va
Record Change: December 02, 2000 iv. THOMAS WATKINS, b. Abt. 1642, ,Charles City, Va; d. Mattiponi River, King William, Va. More About THOMAS WATKINS:
Baptism (LDS): June 04, 1999, SLAKE
Burial: Mattiponi River, King William, Va
Endowment (LDS): November 29, 2000, ALBUQ
Record Change: November 30, 2000
Sealed to parents (LDS): SUBMITTED   Generation No. 5

5. HENRY5 WATKINS JR. (HENRY4, JAMES3, FRANCIS OF SHOTTEN2, WILLIAM1) was born in ,Charles City, Va, and died 1714 in Malvern Hills, Henrico, Va. He married KATHERINE PRIDE 1658 in ,Henrico, Va, daughter of JOHN PRIDE and ELIZABETH HOLCOMBE. She was born 1642 in Curles, Henrico, Va. Notes for HENRY WATKINS JR.:
! Henry Watkins, Jr. was born 1637/1638 in Charles City Co., VA. per the book, "Henry Watkins of Henrico Counry" compiled by Jane McMurtry Allen - 1985. There is a lot of confusion about Henry Watkins of Henrico Co., VA. I believe there were two or maybe three Henry Watkins of Henrico County born about the same time. Jane in her book has started with Henry Watkins, of South Wales. This Henry was first of the Eastern Shore, then settled in Charles City Co, VA ! Ref: Media Research Bureau, 1607-1608, Washington, DC-1800 states that the early Watkins started with Francis Watkins of Shotten, Wales born about 1562, his son James born about 1586 in Shotten, Wales came over on the ship PHOENIX in 1608 with Captain John Smith of Jamestown, had a son, Edward born 1611 in Henrico Co.,VA had a son Henry born 1637 in Henrico Co, Va who was a Quaker, married Katherine. ! Ref: THE REGISTER OF THE KENTUCKY STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY; Frankfort, Kentucky, Vol 7, No. 21- 1909 states that the James Watkins that came with Capt John Smith had a son Henry; Henry I. His son, Henry II, had a son Henry Watkins III who married Mary Crisp. Henry III was a burgess and owned "Marbvern Hill" (Trabue Family). ! Ref: OUR KIN by W.H. and Edna Anderson Manning states that there was a Thomas Watkins born 1600 emigrated to Virginia in 1635 on the ship "Constance" the Captain was Clement: married Faith. They had four sons: Richard born abt 1635 died 1681, Henry born 1637 moved to Henrico Co. in 1675 bought land, Turkey Island, had relationship to Senator Henry Clay (Great great grandson), William born abt 1639 died 1703, Thomas born abt 1645 died 1717. So it looks like I have three choices for a starting point. More About HENRY WATKINS JR.:
Ancestral File Number: 82H2-X2
Baptism (LDS): January 27, 1934
Burial: 1714, Varina Parish, Henrico, Va
Endowment (LDS): May 02, 1935, ARIZO
Record Change: October 18, 2000
Sealed to parents (LDS): March 12, 1968, IFALL More About KATHERINE PRIDE:
Ancestral File Number: 8J3F-GV
Baptism (LDS): May 05, 1995, WASHI
Endowment (LDS): July 13, 1995, WASHI
Record Change: October 18, 2000
Sealed to parents (LDS): February 28, 1996, ATLAN

Children of HENRY WATKINS and KATHERINE PRIDE are: 7. i. HENRY6 WATKINS III, b. 1660, Malvern Hills, Henrico, Va; d. ,Henrico, Va. 8. ii. WILLIAM WATKINS, b. 1667, Malvern Hills, Henrico, Va; d. ,,Va. 9. iii. ELIZABETH WATKINS, b. Abt. 1669, Malvern Hills, Henrico, Va; d. Aft. 1710, ,Henrico, Va. 10. iv. RACHEL WATKINS, b. 1670, Malvern Hills, Henrico, Va; d. Bef. February 1728/29, ,Henrico, Va. 11. v. EDWARD WATKINS, b. 1676, Malvern Hills, Henrico, Va; d. March 25, 1771, Swift Creek, Cumberland, Va. 12. vi. THOMAS WATKINS, b. 1680, Malvern Hills, Henrico, Va; d. 1760, Swift Creek, Cumberland, Va. 13. vii. MARY WATKINS, b. 1682, Malvern Hills, Henrico, Va; d. August 02, 1736, ,Henrico, Va. 14. viii. JOSEPH WATKINS, b. 1684, Malvern Hills, Henrico, Va; d. 1723, ,Henrico, Va.  

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Henry Watkins, I's Timeline

1585
1585
Brecon, Brecknockshire, South Wales, UK
1615
1615
Age 30
1617
1617
Age 32
1617
Age 32
1636
1636
Age 51
Henrico, VA, USA
1637
1637
Age 52
Talgarth, Brecknockchire, South Wales, Wales
1637
Age 52
United States
1640
1640
Age 55
3, Charles City, VA, USA
1642
1642
Age 57
1658
1658
Age 73
Malvern Hills, Accomack, Virginia, United States