Henry de Wyntoun (Winton) (deceased)

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Nicknames: "Henrico de Wincestre"
Death: (Date and location unknown)
Managed by: Ian Winton
Last Updated:

About Henry de Wyntoun (Winton)

Henry de Wincester Henry De Wyntoun, of Wrychhouses (Wrighthouses) - Kept his fathers Surname of WINTON *NOTE* Later Chronicler of Scotland..... Andrew Wyntoun possibly Henry's Grandson!

Information taken from - http://www2.thesetonfamily.com:8080/directory/Descents/early_seton_descent.htm ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://www2.thesetonfamily.com:8080/cadets/Winton_Family.htm

Henry de Winton married Amy Brown of Coalston and continued the family name of Winton. Henry was one of the heroes of Otterburn, August 19, 1388. Friossart calls him :The Seigneur de Venton" (Wintoun, Francisque Michel). Sources: "The History of the House of Seytoun to the Year MDLIX", Sir Richard Maitland of Lethington, Knight, with the Continuation, by Alexander Viscount Kingston, to MDCLXXXVII. Printed at Glasgow, MDCCCXXIX. "A History of the Family of Seton during Eight Centuries" George Seton, Advocate, M.A. Oxon., etc. Two vols. Edinburgh, 1896 "An Old Family" Monsignor Seton, Call Number: R929.2 S495. From Henry de Winton was descended the famous Scottish chronicler, Andrew Wyntoun, who is credited as being Scotlands first historian.

From the Winton's of Wrychthouses stems the Scottish family of Winton, and the estate of Wrychthouses was to remain with them until it was sold to the Napier family. The estate is listed in Blaeu's Atlas of Scotland, 1654 compiled by David Buchanan, 1595-1652. The lands of the estate of Wrightshouses are found between the Water of Leith and the North Esk there are very many houses and castles of nobles worthy of mention. First between the Water of Leith and the Braid Burn, starting from the foot of the Pentland Hills and continuing the descent to the north as far as the Forth, are Swanston, Comiston, Craiglockhart, Craighouse, Braid, Plewlands, Bruntsfield, Grange, Sciennes, Wrightshouses, Merchiston, Priestfield, Dalry, Coates, Drum, Broughton, Pilrig, Restalrig, and Duddingston.

The Wrychtishousis (Wrightshouses) estate, in Edinburgh, lay to the west of the Biggar Road just to the south of Tollcross at the beginning of the district now known as Bruntsfield. The name is recorded in a charter dated 1382, but the oldest inscription noted in the walls of the mansion dated from the Seton-Winton's tenure, anno 1376. The estate was acquired by a William Napier sometime between 1390 and 1406. The origin of the name is not certain, it could be "houses of wrights or carpenters" but considering its rural location in the 14th century, nearly two miles outside the city walls, it seems unlikely. It is more likely to have been named after an owner called Wright.

I happen to feel the name wrycht, may have something to do with the word write, Wrycht in the old scottish tounge can be spelled this way. Because of Henrys Wintons decent Andrew Winton the Scottish historian and Writer or Wrychter.

http://www.archive.org/stream/scotspeeragefoun04pauluoft/scotspeeragefoun04pauluoft_djvu.txt FORRESTER, LORD FORRESTER 81 from the customs of that burgh 28 December 1379, 1 and a similar grant 4 July 1383 ; 2 a grant of a tenement in Edin- burgh ; of the hostilagia of Traquair, co. Peebles ; of the Wrychtishouses, near Edinburgh, on the resignation of Henry de Wyntoun and Amy Broun, all on 25 June 1382. 3 In

1388 he is mentioned as Deputy Chamberlain. 4 On 2 October