Heremod (Fictional)

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Heremod

Also Known As: "Hermóðr", "Heremoth.", "Heremod"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Asia or Eastern Europe
Death: (Date and location unknown)
Immediate Family:

Son of Itermon (Fictional) and Wife of Hermon
Husband of NN
Father of Sceldwea

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Heremod (Fictional)

http://heimskringla.no/wiki/Hvorledes_Norge_ble_bosatt

Everything you wanted to know about Heremod, King of Denmark:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heremod

B: -435, -300, c. -75

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Heremod

Male, #35171

Heremod||p35171.htm|Itermon||p35172.htm||||Hathra||p35173.htm||||||||||

    Heremod was the son of Itermon.1

Child of Heremod

   * Sceldwa+ 1

Citations

  1. Stuart, Roderick W. Royalty for Commoners, The Complete Known Lineage of John of Gaunt, Son of Edward III, King of England, and Queen Philippa. Fourth Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2002.
http://www.genealogy.theroyfamily.com/p35171.htm

"Itermon fathered Heremod, Heremod begat Sceldwea. Sceldwea was known as 'The Shield,' for the way he protected his people.

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Heremod (?)

M, #102655

Last Edited=19 Apr 2001

    Heremod (?) is the son of Itermon (?).

Child of Heremod (?)

-1. Sceldwa (?)+

Forrás / Source:

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10266.htm#i102655

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Name: Heremond

Given Name: Heremond

Sex: M 1 2

Father: Itermon

Marriage 1 Spouse Unknown

Children

Sceldwea (Scyld)

Sources:

Abbrev: Stevens (1998) Tithonus

Title: The line of Tithonus. In Descent from Adam.

Author: Stevens, Luke

Publication: Webpage: <http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Aegean/2444/Tithonus.htm>12/4/1998.

Abbrev: Edda

Title: The prose Edda, tales from norse mythology.

Author: Sturlasson, Snorri (Translation and introduction by A. G. Brodeur)

Publication: Mineola, NY: Dover Publications, 1916 (republ. 2006)

Page: p. 7

Lóriði

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

(Redirected from Loridi)

Jump to: navigation, search

Lóriði is the son of Thor and Sif and forefather of Norse rulers, according to the prologue of the Prose Edda. Loridi does not appear in any other instance of Norse mythology.

One should note that the author of the Prose Edda Snorri Sturluson was a christian and he used the prologue to explain how the norse pagans came to believe what they did. The prologue allowed Snorri the framework to assert that he was a christian before going on to relate the potentially heretical pagan tales of the norse gods in the Gylfaginning. Snorri posits the theory that many of the heroes from ancient city of Troy came to Scandanavia and were revered as gods and demigods.

For these reasons Lóriði should not be considered the son of the mythical Thor. Lóriði is not an actual part of the ancient norse myths.

-Near the earth's centre was made that goodliest of homes and haunts that ever have been, which is called Troy, even that which we call Turkland. This abode was much more gloriously made than others, and fashioned with more skill of craftsmanship in manifold wise, both in luxury and in the wealth which was there in abundance. There were twelve kingdoms and one High King, and many sovereignties belonged to each kingdom; in the stronghold were twelve chieftains. These chieftains were in every manly part greatly above other men that have ever been in the world. One king among them was called Múnón or Mennón; and he was wedded to the daughter of the High King Priam, her who was called Tróán; they had a child named Trór, whom we call Thor. He was fostered in Thrace by a certain war-duke called Lóríkus; but when he was ten winters old he took unto him the weapons of his father. He was as goodly to look upon, when he came among other men, as the ivory that is inlaid in oak; his hair was fairer than gold. When he was twelve winters old he had his full measure of strength; then he lifted clear of the earth ten bear-skins all at one time; and then he slew Duke Lóríkus, his foster-father, and with him his wife Lórá, or Glórá, and took into his own hands the realm of Thrace, which we call Thrúdheim. Then he went forth far and wide over the lands, and sought out every quarter of the earth, overcoming alone all berserks and giants, and one dragon, greatest of all dragons, and many beasts. In the northern half of his kingdom he found the prophetess that is called Síbil, whom we call Sif, and wedded her. The lineage of Sif I cannot tell; she was fairest of all women, and her hair was like gold. Their son was Lóridi, who resembled his father; his son was Einridi, his son Vingethor, his son Vingener, his son Móda, his son Magi, his son Seskef, his son Bedvig, his son Athra (whom we call Annarr), his son Ítermann, his son Heremód, his son Skjaldun (whom we call Skjöld), his son Bjáf (whom we call Bjárr), his son Ját, his son Gudólfr, his son Finn, his son Fríallaf (whom we call Fridleifr); his son was he who is named Vóden, whom we call Odin: he was a man far-famed for wisdom and every accomplishment. His wife was Frígídá, whom we call Frigg.

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Heremod (Proto-Norse: *Harimōdaz [1], Latin form: Heremodius) is a legendary Danish king known through a short account of his exile in the Old English poem Beowulf and from appearances in some genealogies as the father of Scyld. He may be the same as one of the personages named Hermóðr in Old Norse sources. Heremod may also be identical to Lother (Latin Lotherus) in Saxo Grammaticus' Gesta Danorum (Book 1) or the same history may have been applied to two originally separate figures.

[source: http://fabpedigree.com/s028/f896609.htm]

--------------------

Everything you wanted to know about Heremod, King of Denmark:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heremod

B: -435, -300, c. -75

--------------------

Heremod

Male, #35171

Heremod||p35171.htm|Itermon||p35172.htm||||Hathra||p35173.htm||||||||||

Heremod was the son of Itermon.1

Child of Heremod

  • Sceldwa+ 1

Citations

1. Stuart, Roderick W. Royalty for Commoners, The Complete Known Lineage of John of Gaunt, Son of Edward III, King of England, and Queen Philippa. Fourth Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2002.

http://www.genealogy.theroyfamily.com/p35171.htm

"Itermon fathered Heremod, Heremod begat Sceldwea. Sceldwea was known as 'The Shield,' for the way he protected his people.

--------------------

Heremod (?)

M, #102655

Last Edited=19 Apr 2001

Heremod (?) is the son of Itermon (?).

Child of Heremod (?)

-1. Sceldwa (?)+

Forrás / Source:

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10266.htm#i102655

--------------------

born 30BC

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Heremod (Proto-Norse: *Harimōdaz, Latin form: Heremodius) is a legendary Danish king and a legendary king of the Angles who would have lived in the 2nd century and known through a short account of his exile in the Old English poem Beowulf and from appearances in some genealogies as the father of Scyld. He may be the same as one of the personages named Hermóðr in Old Norse sources. Heremod may also be identical to Lother (Latin Lotherus) in Saxo Grammaticus' Gesta Danorum (Book 1) or the same history may have been applied to two originally separate figures.

In Beowulf, after Beowulf has defeated Grendel, a bard sings the deeds of Sigmund:

       He had of all heroes the highest renown
       among races of men, this refuge-of-warriors,
       for deeds of daring that decked his name
       since the hand and heart of Heremod
       grew slack in battle. He, swiftly banished
       to join with Jutes at mercy of foes,
       to death was betrayed; for torrents of sorrow
       had lamed him too long; a load of care
       to earls and athelings all he proved.
       Oft indeed, in earlier days,
       for the warrior's wayfaring wise men mourned,
       who had hoped of him help from harm and bale,
       and had thought their sovran's son would thrive,
       follow his father, his folk protect,
       the hoard and the stronghold, heroes' land,
       home of Scyldings (Denmark).

It appears that Heremod was banished by his subjects and fled to the Jutes where he was betrayed to his death. After Beowulf has slain Grendel's dam, King Hrothgar speaks again of Heremod:

                           Was not Heremod thus
       to offspring of Ecgwela, Honor-Scyldings,
       nor grew for their grace, but for grisly slaughter,
       for doom of death to the Danishmen.
       He slew, wrath-swollen, his shoulder-comrades,
       companions at board! So he passed alone,
       chieftain haughty, from human cheer.
       Though him the Maker with might endowed,
       delights of power, and uplifted high
       above all men, yet blood-fierce his mind,
       his breast-hoard, grew, no bracelets gave he
       to Danes as was due; he endured all joyless
       strain of struggle and stress of woe,
       long feud with his folk.

In genealogies Heremod appears as son of Itermon son of Hratha son of Hwala or Gwala who may be the same as the Ecgwela mentioned in the passage just cited. Heremod is also the father of Scyld in most of these genealogies. See Sceafa for a fuller treatment.

The Beowulf poet may have followed the same tradition, knowing a tale in which in the driving out of Heremod, Heremod's young son and heir Scyld somehow ended up placed in a ship which was set adrift.

In the Annales Ryenses and Saxo Grammatics' Gesta Danorum (Book 1) Skjöld, that is Scyld, is preceded by a king named Lother, not one name Heremod. But what we are told of Lother fits closely with what the Beowulf poet says of Heremod. Saxo relates that King Dan left two sons behind, Humbli and Lother. Then:

   Humbli was elected king at his father's death, thus winning a novel favour from his country; but by the malice of ensuing fate he fell from a king into a common man. For he was taken by Lother in war, and bought his life by yielding up his crown; such, in truth, were the only terms of escape offered him in his defeat. Forced, therefore, by the injustice of a brother to lay down his sovereignty, he furnished the lesson to mankind, that there is less safety, though more pomp, in the palace than in the cottage. Also, he bore his wrong so meekly that he seemed to rejoice at his loss of title as though it were a blessing; and I think he had a shrewd sense of the quality of a king's estate. But Lother played the king as insupportably as he had played the soldier, inaugurating his reign straightway with arrogance and crime; for he counted it uprightness to strip all the most eminent of life or goods, and to clear his country of its loyal citizens, thinking all his equals in birth his rivals for the crown. He was soon chastised for his wickedness; for he met his end in an insurrection of his country; which had once bestowed on him his kingdom, and now bereft him of his life.

Saxo then turns to Lother's son Skjöld.

That Lother seems in this account to have been killed immediately may be compression of a longer narrative. J. R. R. Tolkien in his Finn and Hengest (p. 58) provides a variant version found in the Scondia Illustrata by Johannes Messenius (Stockholm, 1700) which likely relies on lost sources rather than on Messenius' poor memory. Tolkien translates from Messenius' Latin:

   ... therefore Lotherus, King of the Danes, bereft of his wealth because of his excessive tyranny, and defeated, fled into Jutia.

Tolkien points out that Beowulf was unknown at the time and so could not have influenced Messenius to imagine Lotherus fleeing to Jutland. The story then becomes quite strange. The king placed on the Danish throne in place of Lotherus is Baldr. Lotherus returns from exile, kills Baldr and then is himself killed by Odin. It looks as though Lother has been confused with Höðr.

Lother might also be identical with the puzzling god Lóðurr. Commentators sometimes suggest Lóðurr is identical to Loki, and of course in the Icelandic texts that have come down to us it is Loki who is Baldr's real slayer, with Höðr/Hother being only a tool in Loki's plot. -------------------- Heremod

Heremod (Proto-Norse: *Harimōdaz [1], Latin form: Heremodius) is a legendary Danish king known through a short account of his exile in the Old English poem Beowulf and from appearances in some genealogies as the father of Scyld. He may be the same as one of the personages named Hermóðr in Old Norse sources. Heremod may also be identical to Lother (Latin Lotherus) in Saxo Grammaticus' Gesta Danorum (Book 1) or the same history may have been applied to two originally separate figures.

http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/Heremod -------------------- Heremod (Proto-Norse: *Harimōdaz [1], Latin form: Heremodius) is a legendary Danish king and a legendary king of the Angles who would have lived in the 2nd century and known through a short account of his exile in the Old English poem Beowulf and from appearances in some genealogies as the father of Scyld. He may be the same as one of the personages named Hermóðr in Old Norse sources. Heremod may also be identical to Lother (Latin Lotherus) in Saxo Grammaticus' Gesta Danorum (Book 1) or the same history may have been applied to two originally separate figures.

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Heremod (Fictional)'s Timeline

-35
-35
Asgard,Asia East,,Europe
459
459
Asia or Eastern Europe
????
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