Hernan Martín Serrano (1607 - 1685) MP

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Nicknames: ""el Mozo"", "Hernando"
Birthplace: San Gabriel del Yungue, Rio Arriba, Provincia de Nuevo México, Reino de Nueva España
Death: Died in Santa Fé, Provincia de Nuevo México, Reino de Nueva España
Managed by: Ben M. Angel
Last Updated:

About Hernan Martín Serrano

From the Hispanic Genealogical Research Center of New Mexico's Great New Mexico Pedigree Database:

http://www.hgrc-nm.org/surnames/GNMPD.html/d0093/g0009381.html#I1241

Hernan MARTIN SERRANO [347] [348]

  • BET 1606 AND 1607 - AFT OCT 1685
  • PROPERTY: a manufacturing shop (weaving) using Indian laborers, BET 1660 AND 1670, Santa Fe, Santa Fe County, New Mexico [353]
  • BIRTH: BET 1606 AND 1607, San Gabriel del Yunque, New Mexico [349] [350] [351]
  • EVENT: that he was a meztizo, a soldier, a citizen of Santa Fe and was 25 years old, made statement: 25 SEP 1632, Santa Fe, Santa Fe County, New Mexico [352]
  • EVENT: that his wife was Ysabel Monuera and that he was 56 years old and a citizen and native of Santa Fe, made statement: 7 MAR 1662, Santa Fe, Santa Fe County, New Mexico [354]
  • EVENT: passed muster: 2 OCT 1680, La Salineta, New Mexico [355]
  • DEATH: AFT OCT 1685
  • Father: Hernan MARTIN SERRANO
  • Mother: Ines

Family 1 : Ysavel MONUERA

  • 1. Jose MARTIN SERRANO
  • 2. +Juan MARTIN SERRANO
  • 3. Maria MARTIN SERRANO
  • 4. +Ynes MARTIN SERRANO

Family 2 : Maria de MADRID

Footnotes

  • [347] [S4] HERENCIA--Quarterly Journal of HGRC-NM, PAGE: Vol. 3; Iss 2; April 1995; pg. 1
  • [348] [S799] ORIGINS OF NM FAMILIES, PAGE: pg. 72, 373
  • [349] He gave his age as 27 in 1635, as 40 in 1641 and as over 38 in 1642
  • [350] [S141] ORIGINS OF NM FAMILIES, BEYOND
  • [351] [S799] ORIGINS OF NM FAMILIES, PAGE: pg. 72
  • [352] [S141] ORIGINS OF NM FAMILIES, BEYOND
  • [353] [S141] ORIGINS OF NM FAMILIES, BEYOND
  • [354] [S141] ORIGINS OF NM FAMILIES, BEYOND
  • [355] [S650] Spanish Archives of New Mexico II

---

Ben M. Angel notes: San Gabriel de Yungue, or San Gabriel de Ouinge, was a Tewa pueblo that had been taken over by the Spanish in 1598. It apparently served as the capital of New Mexico until Santa Fe took over this duty in 1610. It is located not far from where the Spanish established San Juan de los Caballeros, which later took on the name Ohkay Owingeh. There does appear to be a connection between the names Ouinge or Yungue and Owingeh, but I can't state authoritatively what that is. There is a distance of 3 kilometers between Ohkay Owingeh and Alcalde. -------------------- Hernán fathered a son by a Tano Indian woman named Doña Inés. Because of a lack of records, it is not certain if Hernán remarried after the death of his first wife or if his relations with Doña Inés were outside of marriage. In either case, Doña Inés apparently resided at the camp of Santa Fe when she gave birth to Hernán Martín Serrano, el mozo (the younger), who gave his birthplace as Santa Fe in later years.

Hernán the younger was distinctively nuevomejicano. From his paternal heritage he acquired Spanish customs and language as well as the Roman Catholic faith and the tradition of honor in service to the Crown. From his maternal heritage he acquired Indian languages and familiarity with a region that his maternal ancestors had occupied for centuries. He may very well have had relatives among the Tano Indians of the Pueblo of San Cristóbal with whom he interacted. Not surprisingly, Hernán remained a resident of his birthplace for many decades, until August 1680.

As one of the earliest businessmen of the Villa de Santa Fe, Hernán owned and operated an obraje, a textile-manufacturing shop. In all likelihood, wool was the primary material woven into textile products such as stockings, pants and shirts. These items were either sold to local residents or sent on wagons for trade in towns of New Spain. Some of the wool probably came from sheep raised by his brother, Luis, at the family estancia in the area of Chimayó known as La Cañada. Indications are that Indians worked for Hernán and were paid for their services, as required by law.

Hernán resided in Santa Fe until the Pueblo Revolt of August 1680 forced him, his wife, children and grandchildren to flee the homeland of his ancestors for safety at El Paso. His last known recorded testimony occurred in October 1685.

During his lifetime, Hernán married at least three women. By his first wife, Isabel de Monuera, he had a daughter, María, and apparently two sons, Juan and José. María Martín Monuera married Bartolomé de Ledesma. A widower by 1664, Hernán then married María de Madrid. It is not certain if they had any children. At an advanced age, Hernán married Josefa de la Asención González, with whom he had as many as eight children: Matéo, Andrés, Tomasa, María, Ana, Margarita, Manuela and Gertrudis. Several of these children returned to New Mexico after it was restored through negotiations between Diego de Vargas and Pueblo Indian leaders in 1692.

Links

The Palace of the Governors in the Seventeenth Century New Mexico

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Hernan Martín Serrano's Timeline

1607
1607
San Gabriel del Yungue, Rio Arriba, Provincia de Nuevo México, Reino de Nueva España
1624
1624
Age 17
Santa Fé, Nuevo México, Nueva España
1625
1625
Age 18
1630
1630
Age 23
Santa Fé, Nuevo México, Nueva España
1634
1634
Age 27
Santa Fé, Provincia de Nuevo México, Virreinato de Nueva España
1643
1643
Age 36
Santa Fé, Nuevo México, Nueva España
1644
1644
Age 37
Santa Fé, Nuevo México, Nueva España
1664
1664
Age 57
1685
October, 1685
Age 78
Santa Fé, Provincia de Nuevo México, Reino de Nueva España
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