Honorato Lim Quisumbing (1918 - 1945)

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Birthdate:
Death: Died
Managed by: Ma. Visitacion (Vising) R. Quisumbing
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About Honorato Lim Quisumbing

Here is Dr. Honorato Quisumbing's story, this is from Ambrosio Jumangit III through their brod Bong Yogore whose parents are Rety's classmates.


mgyog3 <mgyog@aol.com> wrote: To: musigmaphi@yahoogroups.com From: "mgyog3" <mgyog@aol.com> Date: Sat, 04 Aug 2007 15:51:12 -0000 Subject: [musigmaphi] Re: Honorato Quisumbing

Brods and Sisters, Rety Quisumbing was Class 45, a classmate of my recently deceased father. He was their batch leader in Mu. I did not respond to the question right away because I wanted to speak to my Mom who I knew had many stories to tell the day that Rety died. Rety at the time was living with many others below Ward 22 in the dirt basement. My Mom (head surgical nurse of an OR) at the time was my Dad's gf and they were living below the Cancer Institute with a group of people. American troops were occupying the Nurses Home that day preparing to liberate PGH, and Japanese soldiers may have been at the PGH compound. The Americans had machine guns covering the main building and beyond.

The evening before, a shell had landed in between buildings next to the Cancer Institute, and the crater that resulted had collected water. A few brave souls had ventured out to gather the water for the people living under the basement. One of those people was Tony Sison, who told my Mom that her sister (also a nurse) had been wounded in the face with shrapnel from cement becaue of ricocheting bullets, and was bandaged up in Ward 17, but was ambulatory. Tony Sison then went back to bring back Rety and others to get water from the crater. My mom, dad, and Inday Manzanilla (another nurse) went through Ward 5, thence to Ward 17, to bring back her sister, which they did. According to my mom, there was a small gap between buildings they had to traverse going back to the Cancer Institute. When they crossed that gap, the Americans started firing with their machine guns. At that time prior to crossing, they had opened a white sheet which they had painted a red cross on like many people had done when going around PGH. However, because of the night's rain, the red cross had smeared and they realized that it now looked more like the Rising Sun than a Red Cross. There were four of them, but they crossed safely, and they got back into their shelter under the Cancer Institute.

In the meanwhile, Tony Sison, along with Rety Quisumbing, and the Padua brothers (Jigs and Cesar) were on their way back to the Cancer Institute to bring back water. These four were part of the group that made sure supplies, and water were obtained and shared by the people hiding in the basements, according to my mom. Crossing that gap, the Americans started firing again because they had launched their attack to liberate PGH. It was then that Rety was hit in the head, dying instantly. The others dragged his body back to shelter. Later, Omi Reyes and Cherry Estanislao (Rety's then girlfriend) brought back Rety's body in a gurney to the kitchen area of Ward 5. The next day, Omi and Cherry buried Rety's body in a shallow grave they scratched out beside Guazon Hall. Rety had died the day the Americans liberated PGH.


Postscript notes: - My Mom has articles a nd excerpts from newsletters around that time mentioning Rety. She will look for them, along with photos, if any. - Rety's Dad worked in the Agricultural Department of the government. He also raised orchids and was the source of orchids that my dad used to give to my mom. Other brods also got them from Rety's dad to give to their gfs at the time. - The Quisumbings were from Manila, according to my mom. - Cherry (Caridad) O'Conner might have pictures of Rety, if she kept them. - Dr. Romeo Zarco, Class 43, gave my parents post war essays describing life in PGH during the Japanese occupation which is unpublished. He is still alive, retired, in Florida and my mom will look for those essays.

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Honorato Quisumbing's Timeline

1918
1918
1945
February, 1945
Age 27