Pfarrer Horst Kasner

Is your surname Kasner?

Research the Kasner family

Pfarrer Horst Kasner's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Horst Kasner (Kaźmierczak), Pfarrer

Also Known As: "Der rote Kasner"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Berlin-Wedding, Berlin, Germany
Death: Died in Berlin, Berlin, Germany
Place of Burial: Templin, Ueckermark, Brandenburg, Germany
Immediate Family:

Son of Ludwig Marian Kasner and Margarethe Kasner
Husband of <private> Kasner (Jentzsch)
Father of Marcus Kasner; Irene Kasner and Dr. Angela Merkel

Managed by: Malka Mysels
Last Updated:
view all

Immediate Family

About Pfarrer Horst Kasner

Horst Kasner war ein deutscher evangelischer Theologe. Wikipedia DE Wikipedia PL Wikipedia EN

Horst Kasner "The young Merkel: Idealist's daughter", New York Times, 9/6/2005

-------------------- Horst Kasner (né Horst Kaźmierczak; born August 6, 1926 in Berlin, died September 2, 2011 in Templin) was a German Protestant theologian and father of German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

Biography

Kasner was born as Horst Kaźmierczak in 1926, the son of a policeman in the Pankow suburb of Berlin, where he was brought up. His father Ludwig Kaźmierczak (born 1896 in Posen, German Empire) - died 1959 in Berlin) was born out of wedlock to Anna Kazmierczak and Ludwik Wojciechowski.[1] Ludwig was mobilised into the German army in 1915 and sent to France, where he was taken prisoner of war and joined the Polish Haller's Army fighting on the side of Entente.[2] Together with the army he returned to Poland to fight in Polish-Ukrainian war and Polish-Soviet war.[3] After Posen had become part of Poland, Ludwig moved with his wife in 1923 to Berlin, where he served as a policeman, and changed his family name to Kasner in 1930.

Little is known about Horst Kasner's wartime service, and he was held as a prisoner of war at the age of 19. During his high school years he was a member of the Hitler Youth, with the last service position of a troop leader.[citation needed] From 1948 he studied theology, first in Heidelberg then in Hamburg. He married Herlind Jentzsch, an English and Latin teacher, born on 8 July 1928 in Danzig (now Gdańsk, Poland) as the daughter of Danzig politician Willi Jentzsch, and their daughter Angela was born in 1954.

Migration to the German Democratic Republic

Several weeks after the birth of their daughter, the family moved from Hamburg to East Berlin. The interior border was not yet completely closed, but most German migration was in the opposite direction (see also: Berlin Wall). In the first five months of 1954, 180,000 people had fled the GDR, and during the building of the border defenses between 1949 and 1961, around 2.5 million had left.

Kasner moved to the East according to the wishes of Youth Pastor Hans-Otto Wölber, the later (1964–1983) Bishop of Hamburg, who feared a shortage of pastors in the East would work against the church. Kasner found a pastor's position with the Evangelical Church in Berlin-Brandenburg and the family moved to a rectory in the village of Quitzow near Perleberg. The East German churches and Christianity at the time were characterised by oppression on account of the Eastern Socialist Party. Pastors took various positions in their willingness to cooperate with the "construction of socialism."

Pastor in Templin

Three years later in 1957, Kasner moved to the small Brandenburg town of Templin. There, at the request of Albrecht Schönherr, then General Superintendent for the Sprengel (ecclesiastical region) Eberswalde, he took a development position in the religious education office. Schönherr, in a 2004 interview indicated he made the appointment "due to the good working conditions and Kasner's abilities as a pedagogue." The location of the continuing education buildings was the Waldhof, a complex of church buildings erected outside the center of Templin, which from 1958 on, also housed a facility for the mentally handicapped.

The family bore a son Marcus on 7 July 1957, and a second daughter, Irene, on 19 August 1964.

Kasner was regarded as a religious leader and idealist who did not oppose the church governance or the policies of the Socialist party, unlike Schönherr and Hanfried Müller (members of the Weissensee Work Group (Weißenseer Arbeitskreis) standing in opposition to dominant national-conservative trend of Berlin-Brandenburg bishop Otto Dibelius). From a perspective of governance, Kasner was considered one of the more "progressive" forces. His nickname during GDR times, quoted repeatedly in the press, was "Red Kasner." He was the longtime director of the pastoral college in a key position within the Evangelical Church in Berlin-Brandenburg. All theologians were required as part of their education and training to spend some time as a vicar with their second theological examination in Templin. In this context there is little record of any pressure put on pastors to conform to the system. Theologian Richard Schröder wrote in 2004:

For me, Kasner was always trustworthy and certainly no conformist. The Pastor's College in Templin was always for us a window on the West through means of Western lecturers and Western literature. The theological speakers were not handpicked to toe the line.

Kasner took trips abroad as part of the National Front and was given the privilege of travelling to the West either by company car or private vehicle, which could be procured through Genex. On the other hand, his wife, Herlind, was forbidden to do so due to her position as a GDR teacher. A recruitment effort by the Stasi is presumed to have failed. Unlike the children in other pastors’ families, the higher education of the Kasner children was not impeded.

From the late 1960s onwards, Kasner criticised the social order of West Germany, and he did not support reunification.

Kasner's regular interlocutors in terms of church politics were Wolfgang Schnur and Clemens de Maizière, the father of the later last GDR prime minister Lothar de Maizière. Schnur, later chairman of the opposition party Democratic Awakening, was a member of the Synod (cf. general assembly) of the Evangelical Lutheran State Church of Mecklenburg and temporarily vice president of the Synod of the Evangelical Church of the Union and the Synod of the Federation of the Protestant Churches in the GDR (Bund der Evangelischen Kirchen in der DDR). He was, alongside the Synod of the Berlin-Brandenburg Church, one of the earliest members of the Christian Democratic Union in East Germany. Also negotiating alongside Kasner, Schnur, and de Maizière with the East German government from 1979 to 1988 and its state secretary for church affairs, Klaus Gysi.

After Die Wende, Kasner advocated against further military use of the so-called Bombodrom, a military allotment in northern Brandenburg and fell out of good relations with Lothar de Maizière when the latter's association with the Stasi was exposed.

Über Pfarrer Horst Kasner (Deutsch)

Horst Kasner "The young Merkel: Idealist's daughter", New York Times, 9/6/2005

Horst Kasner (* 6. August 1926 in Berlin als Horst Kazmierczak;[1] † 2. September 2011 in Berlin)[2][3] war ein deutscher evangelischer Theologe und Vater der Bundeskanzlerin Angela Merkel.

Horst Kasner wurde 1926 als Sohn des Polizeibeamten Ludwig Kazmierczak (* 1896 in Posen; † 1959 in Berlin) und dessen Ehefrau Margarete im Berliner Stadtteil Wedding geboren.

Horst Kasners Vater, Ludwig Kazmierczak, später geändert in Ludwig Kasner, war 1896 als uneheliches Kind von Anna Rychlicka Kazmierczak und Ludwig Wojciechowski in Posen geboren worden.[4] Anfang 1915, im Alter von neunzehn Jahren, wurde Ludwig Kazmierczak in die deutsche Armee eingezogen, kämpfte für das Deutsche Reich an der Westfront und geriet in französische Gefangenschaft oder desertierte.[5] Die polnische Presse veröffentlichte 2013 ein Foto, welches angeblich Kazmierczak in der Uniform der Blauen Armee zeigt (zusammen mit seiner Frau Margarete im Jahre 1919/1920),[6] welche unter französischem Kommando aus deutschen Kriegsgefangenen polnischer Herkunft gebildet wurde und von welcher zumindest einige Einheiten 1918 in Frankreich auf Seiten der Westalliierten gegen das Deutsche Reich und von 1919 bis 1921 im Polnisch-Ukrainischen Krieg und Polnisch-Sowjetischen Krieg kämpften. Es ist daher möglich, dass auch Kazmierczak gegen Deutschland gekämpft haben könnte.[7]

Anfang der 1920er Jahre siedelte Ludwig Kazmierczak, nachdem die bis nach dem Ersten Weltkrieg preußische und zum Deutschen Reich gehörende Provinz Posen 1920 polnisch geworden war, jedoch nach Berlin über. 1930 änderte Ludwig Kazmierczak seinen Nachnamen schließlich in Kasner, womit auch die Familienangehörigen diesen Nachnamen erhielten.[1][8] Ludwig Kasner war 1931 Oberwachtmeister und 1943 Hauptwachtmeister der Schutzpolizei in Berlin.[9]

Kindheit, Studium, Hochzeit

Nach der Geburt im Stadtteil Wedding wuchs Horst Kasner im Berliner Stadtteil Pankow auf. Er wurde zunächst katholisch getauft, dann aber protestantisch konfirmiert.[10]

Kasner studierte ab 1948 Evangelische Theologie, zunächst an der Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, anschließend an der Kirchlichen Hochschule Bethel[11] und der Universität Hamburg. Er heiratete die zwei Jahre jüngere Latein- und Englischlehrerin Herlind Jentzsch (* 8. Juli 1928 in Danzig). Im Juli 1954 wurde die gemeinsame Tochter Angela geboren.

Übersiedlung in die DDR

Noch 1954, einige Wochen nach der Geburt der Tochter, übersiedelte die Familie Kasner von Hamburg in die DDR. Die damaligen Wanderungsbewegungen über die noch nicht vollständig abgeriegelte innerdeutsche Grenze liefen in die umgekehrte Richtung: Allein in den ersten fünf Monaten des Jahres 1954 hatten 180.000 Menschen die DDR verlassen, zwischen 1949 und dem Mauerbau 1961 rund 2,5 Millionen. Als Gründe für den Umzug Horst Kasners werden Wünsche des Hamburger Bischofs Hans-Otto Wölber vor dem Hintergrund des damaligen Pfarrermangels innerhalb der DDR genannt, dem die westdeutschen Landeskirchen entgegenwirken wollten.[12] Für die Evangelische Kirche in Berlin-Brandenburg trat Kasner in der DDR eine Pfarrerstelle im Dorf Quitzow bei Perleberg an, die Familie wohnte im dortigen Pfarrhaus. Die Situation von Christen und Kirchen in der DDR war zum damaligen Zeitpunkt durch Bedrängung seitens der SED geprägt. Dabei zeigten einzelne Pfarrer unterschiedlich starke Bereitschaft, mit der Staatsführung zusammenzuarbeiten und beim „Aufbau des Sozialismus“ mitzuwirken.

Pastoralkolleg Templin

1957 wechselte Horst Kasner in die Kleinstadt Templin in Brandenburg. Dort übernahm er auf Wunsch von Albrecht Schönherr, der 1963 Generalsuperintendent wurde, den Aufbau eines Seminars für kirchliche Dienste, später Pastoralkolleg, eine kirchliche Weiterbildungsstelle. „Aufgrund seiner guten Voraussetzungen für das Amt und seiner Fähigkeit auch pädagogisch zu wirken“ sei Kasner nach Templin berufen worden, sagte Schönherr in einem Gespräch aus dem Jahr 2004. Der Standort der Weiterbildungsstelle war der Waldhof, ein kirchlicher Gebäudekomplex außerhalb des unmittelbaren Stadtgebietes von Templin, auf dessen Gelände ab 1958 auch geistig Behinderte untergebracht waren.

Am 7. Juli 1957 wurde der Sohn Marcus und am 19. August 1964 die zweite Tochter Irene geboren.

Horst Kasner galt als ein Kirchenmann, der nicht in Opposition zur Staatsführung und zur Kirchenpolitik der SED stand. Er war – ebenso wie Albrecht Schönherr und Hanfried Müller – Mitarbeiter im Weißenseer Arbeitskreis, der Gegenpositionen zum Bischof in Berlin-Brandenburg, Otto Dibelius, vertrat. Aus Sicht der Staatsführung gehörte Kasner zu den „progressiven“ Kräften. Sein Spitzname zu DDR-Zeiten, der auch in der Presse immer wieder zitiert wird, war dementsprechend der „rote Kasner“. Nach Rainer Eppelmann bezeichnete sich Kasner als den eigentlichen Erfinder des Begriffs Kirche im Sozialismus.[13] Er befand sich als langjähriger Leiter des Pastoralkollegs in einer Schlüsselstellung innerhalb der Evangelischen Kirche in Berlin-Brandenburg: Theologen mussten im Rahmen ihrer Weiterbildung oder während ihrer Ausbildungszeit als Vikare vor dem zweiten theologischen Examen nach Templin. In diesem Zusammenhang ist kein Druck auf Pfarrer bekannt, die – anders als Kasner – als systemkritisch galten. Richard Schröder schreibt 2004:

„Für mich gehörte Herr Kasner immer zu den vertrauenswürdigen Personen. Und jedenfalls war er kein Konformist. Das Pastoralkolleg Templin war für uns immer auch ein Fenster nach Westen, durch westliche Referenten und westliche Literatur. Die theologischen Referenten waren nicht nach Linie handverlesen.“[14]

Horst Kasner nahm an Auslandsreisen der Nationalen Front teil und verfügte neben dem Privileg von Westreisemöglichkeiten über zwei PKW: einen Dienstwagen und ein Privatfahrzeug, das über Genex beschafft worden war. Andererseits jedoch blieb seiner Frau Herlind Kasner die Tätigkeit im DDR-Schuldienst verwehrt. Ein Anwerbeversuch der Staatssicherheit gilt als gescheitert. Die Aufnahme eines Hochschulstudiums der Kinder wurde – anders als bei einigen anderen Pfarrersfamilien – nicht behindert.

Der Gesellschaftsordnung der Bundesrepublik Deutschland stand Kasner spätestens seit den 1960er Jahren kritisch gegenüber, er unterstützte die Wiedervereinigung nicht.

Ständige Gesprächspartner Kasners in Sachen SED-Kirchenpolitik waren Wolfgang Schnur und Clemens de Maizière, der Vater des späteren DDR-Ministerpräsidenten Lothar de Maizière. Schnur, der spätere Vorsitzende der Partei Demokratischer Aufbruch, war Mitglied der Synode der Evangelischen Kirche in Mecklenburg, zeitweise Vizepräsident der Synode der Evangelischen Kirche der Union (EKU) und Synodale des Bundes der Evangelischen Kirchen in der DDR. Clemens de Maizière war ebenfalls als Rechtsanwalt in der DDR tätig. Er war daneben Synodaler der Berlin-Brandenburgischen Kirche und führendes Mitglied der CDU der DDR. Der Verhandlungspartner von Clemens de Maizière, Wolfgang Schnur und Horst Kasner in der DDR-Regierung war von 1979 bis 1988 der damalige Staatssekretär für Kirchenfragen Klaus Gysi.

Nach der Wende engagierte er sich zeitweilig gegen die militärische Weiternutzung des Truppenübungsplatzes Wittstock („Bombodrom“).[15] Darüber hinaus war er Vorsitzender des sich für den Erhalt des Kirchleins im Grünen einsetzenden Fördervereins Kirche Alt Placht e.V.[16] -------------------- Horst Kasner (* 6. August 1926 in Berlin als Horst Kazmierczak;[1] † 2. September 2011 in Berlin)[2][3] war ein deutscher evangelischer Theologe und Vater der Bundeskanzlerin Angela Merkel.

Geburt

Horst Kasner wurde 1926 als Sohn des Polizeibeamten Ludwig Kazmierczak (* 1896 in Posen; † 1959 in Berlin) und dessen Ehefrau Margarete im Berliner Stadtteil Wedding geboren.

Eltern

Horst Kasners Vater, Ludwig Kazmierczak, später geändert in Ludwig Kasner, war 1896 als uneheliches Kind von Anna Rychlicka Kazmierczak und Ludwig Wojciechowski in Posen geboren worden.[4] Anfang 1915, im Alter von neunzehn Jahren, wurde Ludwig Kazmierczak in die deutsche Armee eingezogen, kämpfte für das Deutsche Reich an der Westfront und geriet in französische Gefangenschaft oder desertierte.[5] Die polnische Presse veröffentlichte 2013 ein Foto, welches angeblich Kazmierczak in der Uniform der Blauen Armee zeigt (zusammen mit seiner Frau Margarete im Jahre 1919/1920),[6] welche unter französischem Kommando aus deutschen Kriegsgefangenen polnischer Herkunft gebildet wurde und von welcher zumindest einige Einheiten 1918 in Frankreich auf Seiten der Westalliierten gegen das Deutsche Reich und von 1919 bis 1921 im Polnisch-Ukrainischen Krieg und Polnisch-Sowjetischen Krieg kämpften. Es ist daher möglich, dass auch Kazmierczak gegen Deutschland gekämpft haben könnte.[7]

Anfang der 1920er Jahre siedelte Ludwig Kazmierczak, nachdem die bis nach dem Ersten Weltkrieg preußische und zum Deutschen Reich gehörende Provinz Posen 1920 polnisch geworden war, jedoch nach Berlin über. 1930 änderte Ludwig Kazmierczak seinen Nachnamen schließlich in Kasner, womit auch die Familienangehörigen diesen Nachnamen erhielten.[1][8] Ludwig Kasner war 1931 Oberwachtmeister und 1943 Hauptwachtmeister der Schutzpolizei in Berlin.[9]

Kindheit, Studium, Hochzeit

Nach der Geburt im Stadtteil Wedding wuchs Horst Kasner im Berliner Stadtteil Pankow auf. Er wurde zunächst katholisch getauft, dann aber protestantisch konfirmiert.[10]

Kasner studierte ab 1948 Evangelische Theologie, zunächst an der Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, anschließend an der Kirchlichen Hochschule Bethel[11] und der Universität Hamburg. Er heiratete die zwei Jahre jüngere Latein- und Englischlehrerin Herlind Jentzsch (* 8. Juli 1928 in Danzig). Im Juli 1954 wurde die gemeinsame Tochter Angela geboren.

Übersiedlung in die DDR

Noch 1954, einige Wochen nach der Geburt der Tochter, übersiedelte die Familie Kasner von Hamburg in die DDR. Die damaligen Wanderungsbewegungen über die noch nicht vollständig abgeriegelte innerdeutsche Grenze liefen in die umgekehrte Richtung: Allein in den ersten fünf Monaten des Jahres 1954 hatten 180.000 Menschen die DDR verlassen, zwischen 1949 und dem Mauerbau 1961 rund 2,5 Millionen. Als Gründe für den Umzug Horst Kasners werden Wünsche des Hamburger Bischofs Hans-Otto Wölber vor dem Hintergrund des damaligen Pfarrermangels innerhalb der DDR genannt, dem die westdeutschen Landeskirchen entgegenwirken wollten.[12] Für die Evangelische Kirche in Berlin-Brandenburg trat Kasner in der DDR eine Pfarrerstelle im Dorf Quitzow bei Perleberg an, die Familie wohnte im dortigen Pfarrhaus. Die Situation von Christen und Kirchen in der DDR war zum damaligen Zeitpunkt durch Bedrängung seitens der SED geprägt. Dabei zeigten einzelne Pfarrer unterschiedlich starke Bereitschaft, mit der Staatsführung zusammenzuarbeiten und beim „Aufbau des Sozialismus“ mitzuwirken.

Pastoralkolleg Templin

1957 wechselte Horst Kasner in die Kleinstadt Templin in Brandenburg. Dort übernahm er auf Wunsch von Albrecht Schönherr, der 1963 Generalsuperintendent wurde, den Aufbau eines Seminars für kirchliche Dienste, später Pastoralkolleg, eine kirchliche Weiterbildungsstelle. „Aufgrund seiner guten Voraussetzungen für das Amt und seiner Fähigkeit auch pädagogisch zu wirken“ sei Kasner nach Templin berufen worden, sagte Schönherr in einem Gespräch aus dem Jahr 2004. Der Standort der Weiterbildungsstelle war der Waldhof, ein kirchlicher Gebäudekomplex außerhalb des unmittelbaren Stadtgebietes von Templin, auf dessen Gelände ab 1958 auch geistig Behinderte untergebracht waren.

Am 7. Juli 1957 wurde der Sohn Marcus und am 19. August 1964 die zweite Tochter Irene geboren.

Horst Kasner galt als ein Kirchenmann, der nicht in Opposition zur Staatsführung und zur Kirchenpolitik der SED stand. Er war – ebenso wie Albrecht Schönherr und Hanfried Müller – Mitarbeiter im Weißenseer Arbeitskreis, der Gegenpositionen zum Bischof in Berlin-Brandenburg, Otto Dibelius, vertrat. Aus Sicht der Staatsführung gehörte Kasner zu den „progressiven“ Kräften. Sein Spitzname zu DDR-Zeiten, der auch in der Presse immer wieder zitiert wird, war dementsprechend der „rote Kasner“. Nach Rainer Eppelmann bezeichnete sich Kasner als den eigentlichen Erfinder des Begriffs Kirche im Sozialismus.[13] Er befand sich als langjähriger Leiter des Pastoralkollegs in einer Schlüsselstellung innerhalb der Evangelischen Kirche in Berlin-Brandenburg: Theologen mussten im Rahmen ihrer Weiterbildung oder während ihrer Ausbildungszeit als Vikare vor dem zweiten theologischen Examen nach Templin. In diesem Zusammenhang ist kein Druck auf Pfarrer bekannt, die – anders als Kasner – als systemkritisch galten. Richard Schröder schreibt 2004:

„Für mich gehörte Herr Kasner immer zu den vertrauenswürdigen Personen. Und jedenfalls war er kein Konformist. Das Pastoralkolleg Templin war für uns immer auch ein Fenster nach Westen, durch westliche Referenten und westliche Literatur. Die theologischen Referenten waren nicht nach Linie handverlesen.“[14]

Horst Kasner nahm an Auslandsreisen der Nationalen Front teil und verfügte neben dem Privileg von Westreisemöglichkeiten über zwei PKW: einen Dienstwagen und ein Privatfahrzeug, das über Genex beschafft worden war. Andererseits jedoch blieb seiner Frau Herlind Kasner die Tätigkeit im DDR-Schuldienst verwehrt. Ein Anwerbeversuch der Staatssicherheit gilt als gescheitert. Die Aufnahme eines Hochschulstudiums der Kinder wurde – anders als bei einigen anderen Pfarrersfamilien – nicht behindert.

Der Gesellschaftsordnung der Bundesrepublik Deutschland stand Kasner spätestens seit den 1960er Jahren kritisch gegenüber, er unterstützte die Wiedervereinigung nicht.

Ständige Gesprächspartner Kasners in Sachen SED-Kirchenpolitik waren Wolfgang Schnur und Clemens de Maizière, der Vater des späteren DDR-Ministerpräsidenten Lothar de Maizière. Schnur, der spätere Vorsitzende der Partei Demokratischer Aufbruch, war Mitglied der Synode der Evangelischen Kirche in Mecklenburg, zeitweise Vizepräsident der Synode der Evangelischen Kirche der Union (EKU) und Synodale des Bundes der Evangelischen Kirchen in der DDR. Clemens de Maizière war ebenfalls als Rechtsanwalt in der DDR tätig. Er war daneben Synodaler der Berlin-Brandenburgischen Kirche und führendes Mitglied der CDU der DDR. Der Verhandlungspartner von Clemens de Maizière, Wolfgang Schnur und Horst Kasner in der DDR-Regierung war von 1979 bis 1988 der damalige Staatssekretär für Kirchenfragen Klaus Gysi.

Nach der Wende engagierte er sich zeitweilig gegen die militärische Weiternutzung des Truppenübungsplatzes Wittstock („Bombodrom“).[15] Darüber hinaus war er Vorsitzender des sich für den Erhalt des Kirchleins im Grünen einsetzenden Fördervereins Kirche Alt Placht e.V.[16]

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horst_Kasner

About Pfarrer Horst Kasner (Polski)

Horst Kasner (né Horst Kaźmierczak; born August 6, 1926 in Berlin, died September 2, 2011 in Templin) was a German Protestant theologian and father of German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

Biography

Kasner was born as Horst Kaźmierczak in 1926, the son of a policeman in the Pankow suburb of Berlin, where he was brought up. His father Ludwig Kaźmierczak (born 1896 in Posen, German Empire) - died 1959 in Berlin) was born out of wedlock to Anna Kazmierczak and Ludwik Wojciechowski.[1] Ludwig was mobilised into the German army in 1915 and sent to France, where he was taken prisoner of war and joined the Polish Haller's Army fighting on the side of Entente.[2] Together with the army he returned to Poland to fight in Polish-Ukrainian war and Polish-Soviet war.[3] After Posen had become part of Poland, Ludwig moved with his wife in 1923 to Berlin, where he served as a policeman, and changed his family name to Kasner in 1930.

Little is known about Horst Kasner's wartime service, and he was held as a prisoner of war at the age of 19. During his high school years he was a member of the Hitler Youth, with the last service position of a troop leader.[citation needed] From 1948 he studied theology, first in Heidelberg then in Hamburg. He married Herlind Jentzsch, an English and Latin teacher, born on 8 July 1928 in Danzig (now Gdańsk, Poland) as the daughter of Danzig politician Willi Jentzsch, and their daughter Angela was born in 1954.

Migration to the German Democratic Republic

Several weeks after the birth of their daughter, the family moved from Hamburg to East Berlin. The interior border was not yet completely closed, but most German migration was in the opposite direction (see also: Berlin Wall). In the first five months of 1954, 180,000 people had fled the GDR, and during the building of the border defenses between 1949 and 1961, around 2.5 million had left.

Kasner moved to the East according to the wishes of Youth Pastor Hans-Otto Wölber, the later (1964–1983) Bishop of Hamburg, who feared a shortage of pastors in the East would work against the church. Kasner found a pastor's position with the Evangelical Church in Berlin-Brandenburg and the family moved to a rectory in the village of Quitzow near Perleberg. The East German churches and Christianity at the time were characterised by oppression on account of the Eastern Socialist Party. Pastors took various positions in their willingness to cooperate with the "construction of socialism."

Pastor in Templin

Three years later in 1957, Kasner moved to the small Brandenburg town of Templin. There, at the request of Albrecht Schönherr, then General Superintendent for the Sprengel (ecclesiastical region) Eberswalde, he took a development position in the religious education office. Schönherr, in a 2004 interview indicated he made the appointment "due to the good working conditions and Kasner's abilities as a pedagogue." The location of the continuing education buildings was the Waldhof, a complex of church buildings erected outside the center of Templin, which from 1958 on, also housed a facility for the mentally handicapped.

The family bore a son Marcus on 7 July 1957, and a second daughter, Irene, on 19 August 1964.

Kasner was regarded as a religious leader and idealist who did not oppose the church governance or the policies of the Socialist party, unlike Schönherr and Hanfried Müller (members of the Weissensee Work Group (Weißenseer Arbeitskreis) standing in opposition to dominant national-conservative trend of Berlin-Brandenburg bishop Otto Dibelius). From a perspective of governance, Kasner was considered one of the more "progressive" forces. His nickname during GDR times, quoted repeatedly in the press, was "Red Kasner." He was the longtime director of the pastoral college in a key position within the Evangelical Church in Berlin-Brandenburg. All theologians were required as part of their education and training to spend some time as a vicar with their second theological examination in Templin. In this context there is little record of any pressure put on pastors to conform to the system. Theologian Richard Schröder wrote in 2004:

For me, Kasner was always trustworthy and certainly no conformist. The Pastor's College in Templin was always for us a window on the West through means of Western lecturers and Western literature. The theological speakers were not handpicked to toe the line.

Kasner took trips abroad as part of the National Front and was given the privilege of travelling to the West either by company car or private vehicle, which could be procured through Genex. On the other hand, his wife, Herlind, was forbidden to do so due to her position as a GDR teacher. A recruitment effort by the Stasi is presumed to have failed. Unlike the children in other pastors’ families, the higher education of the Kasner children was not impeded.

From the late 1960s onwards, Kasner criticised the social order of West Germany, and he did not support reunification.

Kasner's regular interlocutors in terms of church politics were Wolfgang Schnur and Clemens de Maizière, the father of the later last GDR prime minister Lothar de Maizière. Schnur, later chairman of the opposition party Democratic Awakening, was a member of the Synod (cf. general assembly) of the Evangelical Lutheran State Church of Mecklenburg and temporarily vice president of the Synod of the Evangelical Church of the Union and the Synod of the Federation of the Protestant Churches in the GDR (Bund der Evangelischen Kirchen in der DDR). He was, alongside the Synod of the Berlin-Brandenburg Church, one of the earliest members of the Christian Democratic Union in East Germany. Also negotiating alongside Kasner, Schnur, and de Maizière with the East German government from 1979 to 1988 and its state secretary for church affairs, Klaus Gysi.

After Die Wende, Kasner advocated against further military use of the so-called Bombodrom, a military allotment in northern Brandenburg and fell out of good relations with Lothar de Maizière when the latter's association with the Stasi was exposed.

Horst Kasner (ur. 6 sierpnia 1926 w Berlinie jako Horst Kazmierczak, zm. 2 września 2011 tamże) – niemiecki teolog protestancki i ojciec niemieckiej kanclerz Angeli Merkel.

Ojcem Horsta był Ludwig Kazmierczak, policjant niemiecki, urodzony 1896 w Poznaniu, zmarły w 1959 w Berlinie. Był on synem Polki Anny Kazmierczak i Ludwika Wojciechowskiego.

Ludwig Kazmierczak został zmobilizowany do armii niemieckiej i wysłany do Francji w czasie I wojny światowej, gdzie prawdopodobnie dostał się do niewoli[1]. We Francji dołączył do organizowanej przez generała Hallera polskiej armii, wraz z którą wrócił do Polski. W jej szeregach – służył albo w 1. pułku strzelców, albo w 1. pułku artylerii – możliwe że walczył też w wojnie polsko-ukraińskiej i polsko-bolszewickiej[2][3].

W roku 1923 roku Ludwig przeniósł do Berlina, gdzie podjął służbę jako policjant, zmienił również nazwisko na Kasner w 1930 roku. W roku 1931 awansował do stopnia sierżanta, a w 1943 do stopnia sierżanta w policji bezpieczeństwa pełniąc służbę w Berlinie.

Niewiele wiadomo na temat wojennej służby Horsta Kasnera. W wieku 19 lat trafił do niewoli.

Po wojnie w roku 1948 podjął studia teologiczne najpierw w Heidelbergu, a następnie w Hamburgu. Ożenił się z Herlindą Jentzsch, nauczycielką angielskiego i łaciny, urodzoną w dniu 8 lipca 1928 w Gdańsku. W związku tym urodziła się w roku 1954 córka Angela Dorothea. Dziadkowie Angeli Merkel i jej matka do 1936 roku mieszkali w Elblągu, a następnie przeprowadzili się do Hamburga.

W roku 1954, kilka tygodni po urodzeniu córki oraz otrzymaniu stopnia doktorskiego[4], rodzina pastora Kasnera przeniosła się z Hamburga do NRD[5], gdzie zamieszkała w wiejskiej plebanii we wsi Quitzow koło Perleberga. Decyzję opuszczenia zachodnich Niemiec i wyjazd do NRD widział Kasner jako ewangeliczną służbę i przywiązanie do kościoła Jezusa Chrystusa, a nie jako wybór drogi do socjalizmu[6].

W roku 1957 Horst Kasner przeniósł się wraz z rodziną do miejscowości Templin w Brandenburgii, gdzie na polecenie władz kościelnych rozpoczął tworzenie seminarium dla pastorów, a następnie przez 30 lat kierował w małej wspólnocie parafialnej ośrodkiem kształcenia ewangelickich wikarych[7]. Odmówił uczestniczenia i kandydowania do gremiów kierowniczych EKU (Evangelische Kirche der Union) w NRD ze względu na niejasność statutu Związku[8]. W pracy społecznej związany był z panelem dyskusyjnym Weißenseer Arbeitskreise kierowanym i założonym przez pastora Hanfrieda Müllera w berlińskiej dzielnicy Weißensee[9]. To nieformalne stowarzyszenie pod hasłem „Kirche im Sozialismus” skupiało środowiska, które gotowe były do współpracy z władzami komunistycznymi[10].

W swoich publikacjach z okresu NRD polemizował przede wszystkim z pracami innego teologa protestanckiego Manfreda Jusuttisa[11].

W dniu 7 lipca 1957 przyszedł na świat syn Horsta Marcus, a 19 sierpnia 1964 druga córka Irene. Dzieci pastora konfirmowane były w templińskiej farze. Kuzyn Horsta Kasnera mieszka do dziś w Poznaniu, tu też zachowała się część rodzinnych pamiątek w tym zdjęcia.

Pastor Horst Kasner zmarł 2 września 2011, przeżył 85 lat, uroczystości pogrzebowe odbyły się 10 września 2011 w templińskim kościele pw. Marii Magdaleny[12]. Był intelektualnym przywódcą kościoła Brandenburgii i Berlina, którego Stasi próbowała nakłonić do współpracy, ale bezskutecznie[13].

http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horst_Kasner

view all

Pfarrer Horst Kasner's Timeline

1926
August 6, 1926
Berlin-Wedding, Berlin, Germany
1950
1950
Age 23
1954
July 17, 1954
Age 27
Hamburg, Deutschland
1957
July 7, 1957
Age 30
Templin, Brandenburg, Germany
1964
August 19, 1964
Age 38
Templin, Brandenburg, Germany
2011
September 2, 2011
Age 85
Berlin, Berlin, Germany
September 10, 2011
Age 85
Templin, Ueckermark, Brandenburg, Germany