Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk

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Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, Surety of the Magna Carta

Also Known As: "3rd Earl of Norfolk", "Le bigod"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Thetford, Norfolk, England
Death: Died in Thetford, Norfolk, England
Place of Burial: Thetford Church, Thetford, Norfolk, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Roger le Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk and Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk (Royal Mistress of Henry II)
Husband of Maud Marshal
Father of Isabel Fitzgeoffrey; Matilda le Bigod; Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk; Hugh Bigod; Sir Ralph Bigod and 3 others
Brother of Margery Bigod; William Bigod; Mary FitzRobert Bigod; Thomas Le Bigod; Alice (Adeliza) le Bigod and 5 others
Half brother of William Longespée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury

Occupation: Third Earl of Norfolk, Earl of Norfolk
Managed by: Ofir Friedman
Last Updated:

About Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk

please note that some sources (links) listed the last name as le Bigod

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Links:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_Bigod,_3rd_Earl_of_Norfolk

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=53045321

http://histfam.familysearch.org/getperson.php?personID=I2464&tree=Nixon

http://www.mathematical.com/bigodhugh1186.html

http://thepeerage.com/p462.htm#i4613

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http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#HughBigodNorfolkdied1177A

HUGH Bigod, son of ROGER Bigod of Earsham, Suffolk & his [second] wife Adelise de Tosny ([1095]-1177 before 9 Mar). “Willielmus Bigot, dapifer regis Anglorum” donated property to Thetford Priory, for the souls of “patris mei Rogerii Bigoti et matris meæ Adelidis” and for the salvation of “fratris mei Hugonis et sororum mearum”, by undated charter dated to the reign of King Henry I[948]. The Complete Peerage states that he was William’s brother “presumably of the half-blood”, the basis for the statement being explained on the previous page[949]. He succeeded his [half-]brother in 1120 as Lord of Framlingham, Suffolk. "…Hug Bigoto…" subscribed the charter date [3/10] Jun 1123 under which Henry I King of England granted the lands of "Edrici fil Chetelli" to "Walto de Gloec"[950]. King Stephen created him Earl of Norfolk in [Dec 1140/Jan 1141]. The Chronicle of Ralph of Coggeshall records the death in 1177 of "comes Hugo Bigod, vir magnificus"[951]. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1177 of "Hugo Bigot comes" and that he was succeeded by "Rogerius filius eius"[952].

m firstly (annulled) as her first husband, JULIANE de Vere, daughter of AUBREY de Vere Lord of Hedingham & his wife Adelisa de Clare (-after 1185). “Rogerus Bigot comes Norfolchiæ” donated property to Colne priory, for the souls of “Hugone Bigot fratris mei et comitissæ Julianæ matris meæ et Idæ uxoris meæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Hugone Bigot filio meo…”[953]. The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Duvercurt” held by “comitissa Juliana…soror comitis Albrici”[954]. She married secondly Walkelin Maminot. The Complete Peerage says that “for the souls of her father and mother and of her husbands Hugh Bigoth and Walkelin Maminot she granted Begham Abbey land in Brockley” but does not quote the original[955]. According to the Complete Peerage, she was still living in 1185, citing a grant by “Juliana comitissa” at Dovercourt to Colne Priory, witnessed by “Alberico comite et Alberico filius eius”, adding “which being notified to Gilbert Bishop of London was not later than 1189”[956].

m secondly as her first husband, GUNDRED, daughter of --- (-[1200/08]). Documents show that “Gundred, widow of Hugh Earl of Norfolk”, disputed her husband’s inheritance after his death in favour of her son Hugh[957]. She married secondly, as his second wife, Roger de Glanville. A charter of King Henry II confirmed donations to Bungay Nunnery by “Rogeri de Glanvill et Gundredæ comitissæ uxoris meæ” of property at Bungay[958]. It is probably a safe conclusion that Roger de Glanville’s “countess Gundred” was the widow of the earl of Norfolk as no other countess of this name has been identified at that time in England. According to The Complete Peerage[959], she was “apparently” Gundred of Warwick, daughter of Roger Earl of Warwick & his wife Gundred de Warenne of Surrey. This parentage is deduced from a charter under which "Willelmus de Lancastre" donated pasture rights in "feodum meum in Lonisdale et in Aumundernesse" to Leicester, St Mary de Pré, with the consent of "Willelmi filii mei et heredis et Gundree uxoris mee", for the souls of "…Gilberti patris mei et Godithe matris mee et Jordani filii mei et Margarete filia Comitisse", by charter dated to [1156/60], witnessed by "Willelmo filio meo et herede, Gundr fil Comitisse…"[960]. The Complete Peerage makes the assumption that “Gundrede uxoris mee” and “Comitisse” in this document refer to the same person[961]. A charter of King Henry II which records that “primus Willielmum de Lancaster, baronem de Kendale, qui prius vocabatur de Tailboys” married “Gundredam comitissam Warwic”[962], certainly suggests that this assumption is probably correct, but the question is not entirely without doubt. However, greater problems arise when attempting to link the supposed daughter of Roger Earl of Warwick with these two marriages. The Complete Peerage cites a series of documents based on which, it suggests, the link is a reasonable assumption[963]. However, on closer examination, the only one of these documents which provides any indication of a connection is the Red Book of the Exchequer, in which the 1166 return of William Earl of Warwick (Gundred’s supposed brother) shows that he had received Bungay (subject of the donation in the charter quoted above) in exchange from the Earl of Leicester[964]. However, this provides only circumstancial evidence regarding the link and, if this is the only indication available, it cannot safely be concluded that the link is proved beyond all doubt. The safest position is therefore to show Gundred’s parentage as unproven.

Earl Hugh & his first wife had one child:

1. ROGER Bigod (-1221 before 2 Aug). Robert of Torigny records the death in 1177 of "Hugo Bigot comes" and that he was succeeded by "Rogerius filius eius"[965]. He was recognised as Earl of Norfolk 25 Nov 1189. The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Rogerus Bigod" paying "lxii l xii s vi d" in Norfolk, Suffolk[966]. “Rogerus Bigot comes Norfolchiæ” donated property to Colne priory, for the souls of “Hugone Bigot fratris mei et comitissæ Julianæ matris meæ et Idæ uxoris meæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Hugone Bigot filio meo…”[967]. The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[968]. m IDA, daughter of ---. The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[969]. “Rogerus Bigot comes Norfolchiæ” donated property to Colne priory, for the souls of “Hugone Bigot fratris mei et comitissæ Julianæ matris meæ et Idæ uxoris meæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Hugone Bigot filio meo…”[970]. She was mistress ([1175/76] of Henry II King of England, and mother of William Longespee Earl of Salisbury. The relationship is confirmed by two documents. Firstly, William Longespee refers to his mother as "comitissa Ida, mater mea" and "Ida comitissa, mater mea" in two charters[971]. Secondly, a list of hostages captured at the battle of Bouvines in 1214 includes "Rad[ulfus] Bigot frater comitis Salesbir[iensis]"[972]. Roger & his wife had [seven] children:

a) HUGH Bigod (-[11/18] Feb 1225). The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[973]. “Rogerus Bigot comes Norfolchiæ” donated property to Colne priory, for the souls of “Hugone Bigot fratris mei et comitissæ Julianæ matris meæ et Idæ uxoris meæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Hugone Bigot filio meo…”[974]. He succeeded his father in 1221 as Earl of Norfolk.

b) WILLIAM Bigod . The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[975].

c) JOHN Bigod . The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[976].

d) RALPH Bigod (-after 1214). The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[977]. A list of hostages captured at the battle of Bouvines in 1214 includes "Rad[ulfus] Bigot frater comitis Salesbir[iensis]"[978].

e) ROGER Bigod (-1230). “Rogerus Bigot, filius comitis Rogeri Bigot” granted property to “Willelmo Russell filio Waldras” by charter dated to [1190/1220][979].

f) BASILIA . The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[980].

g) MARY Bigod . The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[981]. A mid-15th century manuscript records that "Ranulphum filium Roberti" married "Maria filia Rogeri Bigod comitis Norfolk"[982]. m RANDULF FitzRobert Lord of Middleham, son of ROBERT FitzRalph & his wife Heloise de Glanville.

h) MARGERY Bigod . The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[983]. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Margeria de Hastinges" holding one knight’s fee "in Torp" in Lancashire in [1210/12][984]. m WILLIAM de Hastings, son of WILLIAM de Hastings & his first wife Matilda Banaster

.

i) IDA . The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[985].

j) [ALICE Bigod (-after 1214). According to the Complete Peerage, the second wife of Aubrey was “apparently” the daughter of Roger, but it cites no primary source on which this is based, suggesting that “it may be derived from the Book of Colne Priory” without further explanation[986]. m (after 1207) as his second wife, AUBREY de Vere Earl of Oxford, son of AUBREY de Vere Earl of Oxford & his third wife Agnes de Essex ([1163 or later]-1214 before Oct, bur Colne Priory).]

Earl Hugh & his second wife had two children:

2. HUGH Bigod . Documents show that “Gundred, widow of Hugh Earl of Norfolk”, disputed her husband’s inheritance after his death in favour of her son Hugh[987]. “Rogerus Bigot comes Norfolchiæ” donated property to Colne priory, for the souls of “Hugone Bigot fratris mei et comitissæ Julianæ matris meæ et Idæ uxoris meæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Hugone Bigot filio meo…”[988].

3. WILLIAM Bigod . The Complete Peerage names “Hugh and William” as the two sons of Earl Hugh by his second marriage, citing the 1190/91 Pipe Roll[989]. [990]m MARGARET, daughter and heiress of ROBERT de Sutton, of Bures, Essex & his wife ---. Bracton records a claim, dated 1220, by "Walterus de Verdun" against "abbatem de Meaudona" for "aduocacionem ecclesie de Langedona" granted by "Robertus de Sutton" to "Willelmo de Bigod in maritagium cum filia sua"[991].

Sources

  • [948] Dugdale Monasticon V, Thetford Priory, Norfolk, II, p. 148.
  • [949] CP IX 579 footnote c, and 578 footnote a.
  • [950] Ancient Charters (Round), Part I, 10, p. 18.
  • [951] Radulphi de Coggeshall, Chronicon Anglicanum, p. 19.
  • [952] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 66.
  • [953] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Colne Priory, Essex, XV, p. 102.
  • [954] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli VIII, Essex, Hundredum de Tendringe, p. 38.
  • [955] CP IX 585 footnote c, citing Stowe MS 924 [excerpts from Cartularies, anno 1627], ff. 61 d, 61, 74 d.
  • [956] CP IX 585 footnote d, citing Rotuli de Dominabus, p. 71, and Cartulary of Colne Priory, Cole’s Transcript, B.M. Add. MSS. 5860, no. 21 – on p. 227.
  • [957] CP IX 586 footnote b, citing Gesta Henrici, Vol. I, p. 144, and Carta Regis Rolls, Vol. I, p. 93.
  • [958] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Bungay Nunnery, Suffolk, I, p. 338.
  • [959] CP IX 585.
  • [960] Farrer, W. (ed.) (1902) The Lancashire Pipe Rolls, also Early Lancashire Charters (Liverpool), Lancashire Chartulary, Series XVI, Charter IV, p. 393.

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Hugh was the eldest son of Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk, and Ida de Tosny. For a short time he was also the 3rd earl of Norfolk. In 1215 he was one of the twenty-five sureties of Magna Carta of King John. He succeeded to his father's estates (including Framlingham Castle) in 1221 but died in his early forties in 1225. In late 1206 or early 1207, Hugh was married to Maud Marshal the daughter of Sir William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke. Together they had the following children: Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk, born c. 1209. Died childless. Hugh Bigod (1211-1266), Justiciar of England. Married Joan de Stuteville, by whom he had issue. Isabel Bigod (c. 1212- 1250), married firstly, Gilbert de Lacy, by whom she had issue; she married secondly, John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere, by whom she had issue, including Maud FitzJohn, and Joan FitzJohn who married Theobald le Botiller, and from whom descended the Irish Earls of Ormond. Ralph Bigod (born c. 1215)


Hugh Bigod (c. 1182 – 1225) was a member of the powerful early Norman Bigod family and was for a short time the 3rd Earl of Norfolk.

Contents

 [hide] 1 Origins

2 Career 3 Marriage & progeny 4 Death 5 Hugh Bigod in fiction 6 Ancestry 7 References 8 External links

Origins[edit]


Arms used by Hugh Bigod, as heir to the earldoms of Norfolk and Suffolk, and as recorded during the signing of Magna Charta

He was born c. 1182, the eldest son of Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk by his wife Ida de Tosny.

Career[edit]

In 1215 he was one of the twenty-five sureties of Magna Carta of King John. He succeeded to his father’s estates (including Framlingham Castle) in 1221.

Marriage & progeny[edit]

In late 1206 or early 1207, Hugh married Maud Marshal (1192 - 27 March 1248), daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1147–1219), Marshal of England, by his wife Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke. They had four, or possibly five, children: Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk (c. 1209-1270), died without progeny. Hugh Bigod (1211–1266), Justiciar of England. Married Joan de Stuteville, by whom he had issue. Isabel Bigod (c. 1212- 1250), married twice: Firstly to Gilbert de Lacy, by whom she had issue; Secondly to John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere, by whom she had issue, including Maud FitzJohn, and Joan FitzJohn who married Theobald le Botiller, and from whom descended the Irish Earls of Ormond.

Ralph Bigod (born c. 1215)

Contrary to the assertion of Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, there is no evidence for a fourth son called Simon Bigod. A man of that name appears as a witness to one of Earl Hugh's charters (Morris, HBII 2), but as the eighteenth name in a list of twenty, suggesting no close connection to the main branch of the family. He is also named among the knights who surrendered to King John at Framlingham Castle in 1216. He was a probably a descendant of Hugh or William Bigod, half-brothers to Earl Roger II Bigod.

Death[edit]

Hugh died on 18 Feb 1225. Very soon after Hugh's death, his widow Maud re-married William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey.

Hugh Bigod in fiction[edit]

Hugh Bigod and his wife [Mahelt] are the main characters in Elizabeth Chadwick's To Defy a King. They also appear as secondary characters in novels chronicling their parents such as The Time of Singing (UK: Sphere, 2008) published in the USA as For the King's Favor; The Greatest Knight; and The Scarlet Lion.

Ancestry[edit] Family links:

Parents:
 Roger Bigod (1144 - 1220)

Spouse:
 Maud Marshal De Warenne (1192 - 1248)

Children:
 Isabel Bigod (1210 - 1250)*
 Ralph Bigod (1215 - 1260)*

-------------------- Hugh Bigod (c. 1182 – 1225) was a member of the powerful early Norman Bigod family and was for a short time the 3rd Earl of Norfolk.

He was born c. 1182, the eldest son of Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk by his wife Ida de Tosny.

In 1215 he was one of the twenty-five sureties of Magna Carta of King John. He succeeded to his father’s estates (including Framlingham Castle) in 1221.

In late 1206 or early 1207, Hugh married Maud Marshal (1192 - 27 March 1248), daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1147–1219), Marshal of England, by his wife Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke. They had four, or possibly five, children:

  • Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk (c. 1209-1270), died without progeny.
  • Hugh Bigod (1211–1266), Justiciar of England. Married Joan de Stuteville, by whom he had issue.
  • Isabel Bigod (c. 1212- 1250), married twice:

Firstly to Gilbert de Lacy, by whom she had issue;

Secondly to John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere, by whom she had issue, including Maud FitzJohn, and Joan FitzJohn who married Theobald le Botiller, and from whom descended the Irish Earls of Ormond.

  • Ralph Bigod (born c. 1215)

Contrary to the assertion of Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, there is no evidence for a fourth son called Simon Bigod. A man of that name appears as a witness to one of Earl Hugh's charters (Morris, HBII 2), but as the eighteenth name in a list of twenty, suggesting no close connection to the main branch of the family. He is also named among the knights who surrendered to King John at Framlingham Castle in 1216. He was a probably a descendant of Hugh or William Bigod, half-brothers to Earl Roger II Bigod.

Hugh died on 18 Feb 1225. Very soon after Hugh's death, his widow Maud re-married William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey. -------------------- Hugh BIGOD Birth 1175 in Norfolk, England Death Feb 1223/24 in England

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Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk's Timeline

1186
1186
Thetford, Norfolk, England
1206
1206
Age 20
Norfolk, England
1210
1210
Age 24
Pembroke,Pembrokeshire,Wales
1212
November 1, 1212
Age 26
Thetford, Norfolk, , England
1212
Age 26
Framlingham Castle, Thetford, Suffolk, England
1214
1214
Age 28
Thetford, Norfolk, England
1214
Age 28
Thetford, Norfolk, England
1215
1215
Age 29
Thetford,Norfolk,England
1215
Age 29
was a Magna Carta surety
1218
1218
Age 32
of Thetford,Norfolk or Framlingham,Suffolk