Hugh Calkins, Sr., Deacon

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Hugh Calkins, Sr., Deacon

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Chepstow, Monmouth, Wales
Death: Died in Norwich, New London, Connecticut, United States
Place of Burial: Old Cemetary, Norwich, New London Co., Connecticut
Immediate Family:

Son of Rowland William Calkins and Ellen Calkins
Husband of ANN EATON and Ann Sarah Calkins
Father of MARY CAULKINS; Sarah Hough; Rebecca Calkins; John Hugh Calkins, I; David Calkins and 4 others
Brother of Elizabeth Calkins; William Calkins and Peter Calkins

Managed by: Patricia Norton Chong
Last Updated:

About Hugh Calkins, Sr., Deacon

“Hugh Calkins was a radical, in religion a non-conformist, and living in the troublous times of Charles, the First, soon became satisfied that there were safer countires than England and Wales—for men who wished to worship God according to the dicatates of their own consciences. Accordingly, he with his wife, Ann, and John, their son, then four years old, joined a body of emigrants called the ‘Welch Conspany,’ and with their pastor, Rev. Richard Blinman, embarked and came to America, about 1638 or 1640. They settled first at Green’s Harbor (now Marshfield) in New Plymouth colony, but religious dissentions arising, Mr. Blinman, Hugh Calkins and others removed to Gloucester. Hugh Calkins became one of the first board of selectmen, and in 1650 was chosen deputy to the general court of Massachusetts Bay colony. He was chosen again in 1651, but for some reason he and others removed in that year to Connecticut colony, some say to Saybrook, but he could not have remained there long, as he was soon in New London. The Connecticut colonial records show that Hugh Calkins was deputy at the general court from New London, May 20 1652. In all, he served twelve times as deputy from New London. By order of the general court, held October 3, 1654, Hugh and another were appointed a committee for enlisting men to fight the Naragansett Indians. The records also show that he was a deputy magistrate. In 1660 he again changed his residence to the place where the city of Norwich now stands, then a wilderness and owned by the Mohegan Indians. Just previously a treaty had been concluded, by and between the celebrated major Mason and others with the Mohegan chiefs, by which a tract of land nine miles square around Norwich was ceded to the whites, for the sum of seventy pounds sterling. Hugh and his son, John, were of the thirty-five original proprietors. Hugh appears in the colonial records as a deputy from Norwich to the general court, ten times. He was an active worker there in all measures for the public good; and also at home constantly identified with public interests. He was a deacon in the first churcth built in Norwich.”39

Freeman 27 Dec 1642 in Gloucester, selectman 1643-48, rep. 1650-52. In New London, selectman, rep., and town clerk. In Norwich, first deacon, rep.2

Hugh was a Welchman who came to this country about 1640, stopped at Marshfield for a short season, then removed to Lynn, Mass., thence to New London about 1652, and finally to Norwich, Conn., about 1659.40

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Christened on April 8, 1603.

He came with his wife and four children in Welch Colony under Rev. Richard Blinman in 1640 to Green Harbor Cape Ann Mass at the request of Gov. Winslow.

After 5 yers, finding the climate too bleak for farming the party moved to New London Conn.

He was made Freeman at Salem Mass Dec. 27-1642 and " " " " " Lynn " " " 1648

He was Representative to Mass court fro Glouchester 1650--1652 but left without finishing his term.

Deputy 12 times from New London to Conn Assembly May 1652 to 1660. And from Norwich CT to all Legislatures from Mar 1663 to 1671

Selectman at New London until he moved to Norwich

On war comm. New London May 1653 to Oct 1654

1st Deacon of Norwich Church

All of the towns where he lived, honored him with positions in public affairs--Comm. of consultation fortifying, drafting soldiers and surveying for which task he apparently had been trained for in England

( copied from manuscript by Mrs. John T. Barbrick {Leanora Lucille Calkin

s}) TRC

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3326304&id=I672168305

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Deacon Hugh Calkins. Born ca 1600 in prob. Chepstow, Monmouthshire. Hugh died in Jun 1690 in Norwich, CT.

“Hugh Calkins was a radical, in religion a non-conformist, and living in the troublous times of Charles, the First, soon became satisfied that there were safer countires than England and Wales—for men who wished to worship God according to the dicatates of their own consciences. Accordingly, he with his wife, Ann, and John, their son, then four years old, joined a body of emigrants called the ‘Welch Conspany,’ and with their pastor, Rev. Richard Blinman, embarked and came to America, about 1638 or 1640. They settled first at Green’s Harbor (now Marshfield) in New Plymouth colony, but religious dissentions arising, Mr. Blinman, Hugh Calkins and others removed to Gloucester. Hugh Calkins became one of the first board of selectmen, and in 1650 was chosen deputy to the general court of Massachusetts Bay colony. He was chosen again in 1651, but for some reason he and others removed in that year to Connecticut colony, some say to Saybrook, but he could not have remained there long, as he was soon in New London. The Connecticut colonial records show that Hugh Calkins was deputy at the general court from New London, May 20 1652. In all, he served twelve times as deputy from New London. By order of the general court, held October 3, 1654, Hugh and another were appointed a committee for enlisting men to fight the Naragansett Indians. The records also show that he was a deputy magistrate. In 1660 he again changed his residence to the place where the city of Norwich now stands, then a wilderness and owned by the Mohegan Indians. Just previously a treaty had been concluded, by and between the celebrated major Mason and others with the Mohegan chiefs, by which a tract of land nine miles square around Norwich was ceded to the whites, for the sum of seventy pounds sterling. Hugh and his son, John, were of the thirty-five original proprietors. Hugh appears in the colonial records as a deputy from Norwich to the general court, ten times. He was an active worker there in all measures for the public good; and also at home constantly identified with public interests. He was a deacon in the first churcth built in Norwich.”39

Freeman 27 Dec 1642 in Gloucester, selectman 1643-48, rep. 1650-52. In New London, selectman, rep., and town clerk. In Norwich, first deacon, rep.2

Hugh was a Welchman who came to this country about 1640, stopped at Marshfield for a short season, then removed to Lynn, Mass., thence to New London about 1652, and finally to Norwich, Conn., about 1659.40

In 1627 Hugh married Ann [Calkins] in England. Born ca 1605. Ann died in Jun 1688 in Norwich, CT.

Their children include:

933 i.  Sarah Calkins (31 Jul 1626-16 Oct 1683) 
934 ii.  Mary Calkins (ca 1629-23 Nov 1717) 
935 iii.  Rebecca Calkins (Died young) (-14 Jan 1651) 
936 iv.  John Calkins (ca 1634-8 Jan 1703) 
937 v.  David Calkins (3 Nov 1639-25 Nov 1717) 
938 vi.  Deborah Calkins (18 Mar 1645-25 Nov 1717) 

-------------------- “Hugh Calkins (or Caulkins*) was one of a body of emigrants, called the Welsh Company, that came to New England in 1640, from Chepstow in Monmouthshire, on the border of Wales, with their minister, the Rev. Mr. Blinman. The larger portion of this company settled first at Marsh- field, but soon transferred their residence to Gloucester, upon the rough promontory of Cape Ann. From thence, after eight years of experiment, most of them removed to New London, hoping probably to find lands more arable and productive, and allured also by affectionate attachment to Mr. Blinman, whom Mr. Winthrop had invited to his plantation. “Hugh Calkins was, in 1650, deputy from Gloucester to the General Court of Massachusetts, and chosen again in 1651, but removing early in that year to New London, the vacancy was filled by another election. “While living at New London, he was chosen twelve times deputy to the Connecticut Assembly, (the elections being semi-annual.) and was one of the townsmen, or select-men, invariably, from 1652 till he removed to Norwich. “From Norwich he was deputy at ten sessions of the Legislature, between March, 1663, and October, 1671, and was one of the first deacons of the Norwich church. At each of the three towns in which he was an early settler and proprietor, he was largely employed in public business, being usually appointed one of committees for consultation, for fortifying, drafting soldiers, settling difficulties, and particularly for surveying lands and determining boundaries. These offices imply a considerable range of information, as well as activity and executive talent, yet he seems to have had no early education, uniformly making only a bold H for his signature. “In a deposition made in 1672, he stated that he was then 72 years of age. The year 1600 may therefore be taken as the date of his birth. Of his wife, we only know that her name was Ann. Six children have been traced, four of whom were probably born before the emigration to this country.” “Hugh Calkins was a radical, in religion a non-conformist, and living in the troublous times of Charles, the First, soon became satisfied that there were safer countires than England and Wales—for men who wished to worship God according to the dicatates of their own consciences. Accordingly, he with his wife, Ann, and John, their son, then four years old, joined a body of emigrants called the ‘Welch Conspany,’ and with their pastor, Rev. Richard Blinman, embarked and came to America, about 1638 or 1640. They settled first at Green’s Harbor (now Marshfield) in New Plymouth colony, but religious dissentions arising, Mr. Blinman, Hugh Calkins and others removed to Gloucester. Hugh Calkins became one of the first board of selectmen, and in 1650 was chosen deputy to the general court of Massachusetts Bay colony. He was chosen again in 1651, but for some reason he and others removed in that year to Connecticut colony, some say to Saybrook, but he could not have remained there long, as he was soon in New London. The Connecticut colonial records show that Hugh Calkins was deputy at the general court from New London, May 20 1652. In all, he served twelve times as deputy from New London. By order of the general court, held October 3, 1654, Hugh and another were appointed a committee for enlisting men to fight the Naragansett Indians. The records also show that he was a deputy magistrate. In 1660 he again changed his residence to the place where the city of Norwich now stands, then a wilderness and owned by the Mohegan Indians. Just previously a treaty had been concluded, by and between the celebrated major Mason and others with the Mohegan chiefs, by which a tract of land nine miles square around Norwich was ceded to the whites, for the sum of seventy pounds sterling. Hugh and his son, John, were of the thirty-five original proprietors. Hugh appears in the colonial records as a deputy from Norwich to the general court, ten times. He was an active worker there in all measures for the public good; and also at home constantly identified with public interests. He was a deacon in the first churcth built in Norwich.”

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Hugh Calkins, Sr., Deacon's Timeline

1600
1600
Chepstow, Monmouthshire, Wales
1600
Chepstow, Monmouthshire, Wales
1600
Chepstow, Monmouthshire, Wales
1603
April 8, 1603
Chepstow, Monmouth, Wales
1626
July 31, 1626
Age 23
Chepstow, Monmouthshire, England
1631
November 9, 1631
Age 28
Chepstow, Monmouth, Eng.
1634
1634
Age 30
Monmouthshire, Chepstow, England
1639
November 3, 1639
Age 36
Glouchester, Essex, Ma
1640
1640
Age 36
Gloucester, Essex, MA
1640
Age 36
From Monmouthshire to New England