Hugh Lawson (c.1705 - 1772) MP

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Birthdate:
Birthplace: Ulster, Northern Ireland
Death: Died in Rowan, North Carolina
Occupation: Planter. Judge. Member of Virginia Assembly.
Managed by: Erica Howton, (c)
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Hugh Lawson

Hugh Lawson (son of John Lawson, Jr. and Mary McConnell) was born 1705 in Ulster, Ireland, and died 1772. He married May or Mary? Moore, daughter of Charles Moore and "Miss Barry".  He is buried in Bakers Graveyard, 5 m. NE of Beatties Ford on the Catawba in Rowan County, North Carolina.

Notes

from http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/p/a/l/Rene-Palmer/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0116.html

  • In the year 1727, John, Roger and Hugh, the 3 sons of John and Mary (McConnell) Lawson, came to America on the "George and Anne."
  • Upon his arrival in America, he settled in Pennsylvania first. He married May or Mary, the daugther or Charles Moore. After several years he went to Brunswick County, Viriginia; thence to Lunnenberg. In 1750, he had gone to Augusta County, Virginia. In 1759, records show he bought land in Salisbury, North Carolina and was known as Hugh Lawson, Planter. He owned land on both sides of Davis Creek. Hugh was known as an early settler of North Carolina.
  • In Lunnenburg, in 1746, Hugh ws a judge in the Quorum Court. This sounds more imposing than the Justice Court, but it is the same thing. It is not considered Colonial Service in Virginia.
  • Hunter, in his "Sketches of North Carolina" says 'Hugh Lawson's old family mansion five miles east of Beatteis Ford of the Catawha River has long since disappeared and the plow now runs smoothly over its site. The only tablet to the memory of this early settler of North Carolina who is buried in Bakers Graveyard firve miles northeast of Beatties Ford on the Catawha River, is a rough slate rock about one foot high and and nine inches broad, on which are rudely chiseled the initials HL.'
  • from http://telstarbob.net/lgen1822.htm

Source: IMMIGRANT ANCESTORS, The Compendium of American Genealogy, VII - Frederick Virkus

After this event, we have records only on Hugh Lawson. Hugh, settled in Chester Co., PA Moved to Lunenburg Co., VA about 1743. Judge of the first Court of the County, JP, Became a Member of Virginia Assembly May 5, 1746. Virginia Historical Magazine, Vol. X p321, Records Joseph Habersham DAR - 400, 534, 587

It has become customary among genealogical writers on the Lawson family to say that Hugh Lawson first settled in Pennsylvania, from whence he came to VA with brothers John and Roger. One who has traced his connecting lines back, however, states that he and his brothers were cousins, some degrees removed, from the early VA emigrants, Rowland and Epaproditus Lawson and Christopher Lawson. The exact statement of Mrs. Caroline Belle Price on this matter is: "The record of Epaproditus Lawson and Rowland Lawson, of VA, shows that their ancestor, Sir Henry Lawson of 'Brough Hall' (in England) was the father of their cousin Capt. John Lawson, from whom Col. Hugh Lawson descended". Mrs. Price further says: "Hugh Lawson married Mary Moore, daughter of Charles Moore and Margaret Barry."

Source: THE MECKLENBURG SIGNERS AND THEIR NEIGHBORS - Worth S Ray (p.449)

Hugh moved to Rowan County, NC. Was there from 1759 to 1772. He was the grantee in a deed of record in Salisbury made by the Agent of the Earl of Granville in 1759, conveying to him 350 acres of land. Will made 9/20/1764 and probated in Rowan County, NC in 1772. Buried in Bakers Graveyard, two miles west of Center Church; in Iredell CO, NC

The name of Hugh Lawson on the early tythe lists of VA, and the records show that he was one of the tythe takers for Lunenburg Co, in the years 1748, 1749 and as late as 1752, after which time he had probably removed to the upper part of Mecklenburg Co, near the supposed l between the present Mecklenburg and Rowan Co. Dr. Hunter in his sketches says that he built a fine home on Davidson's Creek and owned lands on both sides of the stream. See map on page 380 of these notes for its location. When Hugh Lawson died his will was proven in Rowan Co, though it is well known that he was buried in Baker's Graveyard near Cowan's Ford in Mecklenburg Co.

Source: THE MECKLENBURG SIGNERS AND THEIR NEIGHBORS - Worth S Ray (p.485)

Charles Moore, Deed. Charles Moore of Tyron Co, deed to his son in law Andrew Barry, a blacksmith, to land on both sides of Tyger River, on Lawson's Creek, bounded by the lands of Hugh Lawson. (This land was below the of the present NC, SC, but at that time was considered a part of Tryon Co). The deed was executed between 1762 and 1779, which was the life-time of Tryon County. It shows that Hugh Lawson owned lands in upper SC at the time of his death, which adjoined lands belonging to Charles Moore, Lawson's wife having been Mary Moore, a sister of Charles moore, and the daughter of a Charles Moore and his wife Margaret Barry, the parents of Prof. Charles Moore.

Source: THE MECKLENBURG SIGNERS AND THEIR NEIGHBORS - Worth S Ray (p.321)

Genealogy Notes Pertaining to Census Records of Mecklenburg County - District No.7

Between Cowan's Ford and Beattie's Ford, on the Catawba, and a short distance from the old river itself, as attempted to be portrayed on the map, is the burial place of that early religious patriot and missionary Rev. John Thomson, known as Baker's Graveyard. In this place also sleep the last remains of Mary Price, sister of Major John Davidson; Hugh Lawson, father in law of Hugh Barry and Samuel Baker. Up to some fifty years ago there were crude head and foot stones, on one of which was carved the initials "H-L" marking the grave of Hugh Lawson. Now the spot is a shambles, yielding at last to the ravages of centuries, its enclosing stone fence torn down to build a highway for the modern, speeding generations. The stately oaks, under which Rev. John Thomson delivered his stirring pioneer sermons between 1751 and 1753, no longer spread their sacred foliage to the Catawba breezes, but there are still signs of unmistakable import that they once marked the hallowed spot, now passing into the oblivian of forgotten history.

[Rev. John Thomson, father in law of Samuel Baker; Hugh Lawson, father in law of Hugh Barry.]

Source: THE MECKLENBURG SIGNERS AND THEIR NEIGHBORS - Worth S Ray (p.372)

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Col. Hugh Lawson's Timeline

1705
1705
Ulster, Northern Ireland
1729
1729
Age 24
North Carolina
1730
May, 1730
Age 25
Brunswick, Virginia
1730
Age 25
1733
1733
Age 28
1739
1739
Age 34
Mecklenburg, NC
1742
1742
Age 37
Rowan County, NC, USA
1772
November, 1772
Age 67
Rowan, North Carolina