Hugues "the Great", duke of the Franks

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Hugues "Magnus" de Paris, duc des Francs

Nicknames: "Hugues Capet", "Hugh", "Hugo", "le Grand", "den Store", "the Great", "le Blanc", "l'Abbé", "Magnus", "Hugh le Grand", ""The Great""
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Paris, Paris, Île-de-France, France
Death: Died in Dourdan, Ile-de-France, France
Place of Burial: Basilique Saint Denis, Saint-Denis, Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Robert I, King of France and Béatrice de Vermandois
Husband of Æthelhild, Nun at Wilton; Raingarde; Eadhilde of Wessex; Hedwige of Saxony and Judith du Maine
Father of Heribert, évêque d'Auxerre; Hugues Capet, roi des Francs; Emma de France; Eudes, duc de Bourgogne; Henri I le Grand, duc de Bourgogne and 1 other
Half brother of Emma de France; Liegarde de France; Adela de France; Emma de France and Adèle de France

Occupation: Duc des Francs 922-956, de Bourgogne, d'Aquitaine, Comte de Paris, Marquis de Neustrie 922-956, Duke of the Franks, Greve av Paris och Orléans, Regent 0954, duc de bourgogne, d aquitaine, des francs comptes de paris, duc des francs, compte de paris
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Hugues "Magnus" de Paris, duc des Francs

From the English Wikipedia page on Hugh the Great (with references to additional material on the French Wikipedia page :

Hugh the Great (898 – 16 June 956) was duke of the Franks and count of Paris, son of King Robert I of France (with Beatrice de Vermandois) and nephew of King Odo.

He was born in Paris, Ile-de-France, France. His eldest son was Hugh Capet who became King of France in 987. His family is known as the Robertians.

(French Wikipedia notes that he was the Count of Paris, Marquis of Neustria 923-956, Duke of the Franks 936-956, and Comte d'Auxerre 954-956, and was a forefather of the Capets. He was sometimes called Hugh the White because of his pale complexion - he was a powerful figure in the Kingdom of West Francia.)

Hugh's first wife was Eadhild, daughter of Edward the Elder, king of England, and sister of King Athelstan. At the death of his step-brother King Rudolph (Raoul), duke of Burgundy, in January 936, Hugh was in possession of nearly all the region between the Loire and the Seine, corresponding to the ancient Neustria, with the exception of the territory ceded to the Normans in 911.

He took a very active part in bringing Louis IV (d'Outremer, who had followed his mother in exile to England) from the Kingdom of England in 936, but in the same year Hugh married Hedwige of Saxony (sister of d'Ogive, Louis' mother), a daughter of Henry the Fowler of Germany and Matilda of Ringelheim, and soon quarrelled with Louis.

(He had sought an advantage over Herbert II de Vermandois in his struggle for hegemony in West Francia. Louis IV was crowned on Sunday, June 19, 936, by Artaud, Archbishop of Rheims, in the abbey church of St-Vincent de Laon, his hometown and Carolingian stronghold. A month later, July 25, 936, Louis IV gave Hugh the title of Dux Francorum, or Duke of the Franks - a title that was explained in a document from December 26 that same year in which Louis IV stated that Hugh was "in all our regina the second after us," equal to a viceroy position or a Merovingian Mayor of the Palace.)

(In July 937, he became a lay abbot of St-Germain d'Auxerre and champion of Autun, two major powers in the principality of Burgundy. He also increased his power by challenging the legitimacy of Hugh the Black to proclaim himself Prince of Burgundy, a position he thought he inherited from his brother, King Raoul. However, the young King sought to free himself of the overbearing Hugh, and took up arms to fight, joining forces with Herbert de Vermandois and William Longsword, Duke of Normandy. In 940, Louis IV was defeated near Rheims.)

Hugh even paid homage to the Emperor Otto the Great, and supported him in his struggle against Louis. When Louis fell into the hands of the Normans in 945, he was handed over to Hugh, who released him in 946 only on condition that he should surrender the fortress of Laon (after consultation with Thibaud de Blois, and under considerable pressure from the Emperor).

(In 946, he settled the estate of Herbert de Vermandois, dividing it among his children - Hugh's nephews - and weakening the power of that dynasty.At the Synod of Ingelheim in 948, the third in a series after Verdun and Mouzon, Louis IV succeeded at getting the Archbishop of Rheims to excommunicate Hugh the Great.)

At the council of Ingelheim (948) Hugh was condemned, under pain of excommunication, to make reparation to Louis. It was not, however, until 950 that the powerful vassal became reconciled with his suzerain and restored Laon. But new difficulties arose, and peace was not finally concluded until 953.

On the death of Louis IV, Hugh was one of the first to recognize Lothair as his successor, and, at the intervention of Queen Gerberga, was instrumental in having him crowned. In recognition of this service Hugh was invested by the new king with the duchies of Burgundy (his suzerainty over which had already been nominally recognized by Louis IV) and Aquitaine. But his expedition in 955 to take possession of Aquitaine was unsuccessful.

In the same year, however, Giselbert, duke of Burgundy, acknowledged himself his vassal and betrothed his daughter to Hugh's son Otto. At Giselbert's death (8 April 956) Hugh became effective master of the duchy, but died soon afterwards, on the 16 or 17 June 956, in Dourdan.

In the Divine Comedy Dante meets the soul of Duke Hugh in Purgatory, lamenting the avarice of his descendants.

French Wikipedia:

From Raingarde, his concubine, he had Herbert or Heribert (d. 996), who became Bishop of Auxerre.

He married a daughter of Roger du Maine in 914, and then to Eadhilda or Edith of Wessex, daughter of Edward the Elder, in 926, and finally to Hedwig of Saxony (922-965) daughter of Henry I l'Oiseleur in 937, the latter of which gave him:

1. Beatrice, who married Frederic I, Comte de Bar and Duc de Haute-Lotharingie

2. Hugues Capet, King of the Franks in 987 (OUR ANCESTOR)

3. Emma, who married Richard I, Duc de Normandie

4. Otton and Eudes-Henri, ducs of Bourgogne.

References

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica, Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

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Hugues le Grand[1], né vers 898, mort à Dourdan en 956, comte de Paris, marquis de Neustrie de 923 à 956, puis duc des Francs à partir de 936, comte d'Auxerre de 954 à sa mort.

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From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on France Capetian Kings:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#_Toc154136998

HUGUES “le Grand”, son of ROBERT I King of France & his second wife Béatrix de Vermandois [Carolingian] ([898]-Dourdan, Essonne 16 Jun 956, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

The Historia Francorum Senonensis names "Hugo Magnus" as son of "Robertus princeps [et] sororem Herberti"[78]. "Rodbertum fratrem Odonis regis, qui erat pater Hugonis postea Francorum ducus" is named in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[79]. Rodulfus Glaber names "Hugo filius Rotberti, Parisiorum comitis", commenting on the obscurity of his ancestry[80].

He was recognised by the king as heir to his father’s lands in 914. He declined the succession to the throne of France on the death of his father in 923, when his brother-in-law Raoul Duke of Burgundy was elected king.

Abbot of Saint-Martin de Tours: "l´abbé Hugues" granted "la ville de Mons…dans le pays de Melun" to "la reine Emma sa sœur, fille du roi Robert" by charter dated 926[81].

On the death of King Raoul, Hugues once more declined the succession, instead negotiating the return from England of the Carolingian Prince Louis, son of Charles III “le Simple”, who was his wife's nephew and whom he installed as King Louis IV.

Hugo rector Abbatiæ sancti Martini" names "genitoris nostri Rotberti quondam regis ac genitricis nostræ domnæ Beatricis" in a charter dated 26 Mar 931[82]. "Hugues abbé de Saint-Martin" donated "son alleu de Lachy…dans le comté de Meaux", inherited from "comte Aledramnus", to Tours Saint-Martin by charter dated 14 Sep 937 which names "sa femme Havis"[83].

The position of power acquired by Hugues is confirmed by the title dux francorum/Duc des Francs used in charters dated 25 Jul 936 and 25 Dec 936[84], and the king's references to him as “notre second dans tous nos royaumes”. Disputes between Hugues and the king quickly followed.

On the death of King Louis IV in 954, Hugues was confirmed as Duc des Francs. He was granted lordship over Burgundy and Aquitaine[85]. He only succeeded in subjugating the former, succeeding Duke Giselbert as Duke of Burgundy in Apr 956.

The Historia Francorum Senonensis records the death "XVI Kal Iul apud Drodingam villam" of "Hugo Magnus dux Francorum" and his burial "in basilica beati Dyonisii martiris Parisius"[86]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XVI Kal Jul" of "Hugo dux Francorum"[87]. The Obituaire de Notre-Dame de Paris records the death "XV Kal Jul" of "Hugo dux Francorum"[88]. The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 16 Jun of "Hugo comes"[89].

m firstly ([914]) [JUDITH] du Maine, daughter of ROGER Comte du Maine & his wife Rothilde [Carolingian] (before 900-925).

The marriage of Hugues Comte de Paris with the daughter of Roger Comte du Maine is deduced from Flodoard naming "Rothildis, amitæ suæ [regis Karoli], socrus autem Hugonis" when recording that the king deprived her of "abbatiam…Golam" [Chelles] in favour of his favourite Hagano, the context dictating that "Hugonis" was "Hugo filius Rotberti"[90]. The source which names her father has not yet been identified, but it appears reasonably certain from the sources quoted in the document MAINE that Rothilde's husband was Roger.

She is named Judith in Europäische Stammtafeln[91] but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified.

According to Settipani her name is not known[92].

m secondly ([926]) EADHILD, daughter of EDWARD I "the Elder" King of Wessex & his second wife Ælfleda (-937). At the time of the couple's betrothal, her future husband sent sumptuous gifts to King Athelstan, including spices, jewels, richly caparisoned horses, three holy relics and a gold crown[95].

m thirdly ([9 May/14 Sep] 937) HEDWIG of Germany, daughter of HEINRICH I King of Germany & his second wife Mathilde [Immedinger] ([922]-9 Jan [958 or after 965]).

Mistress (1): RAINGARDA [Ringare], daughter of ---. The Historia Episcoporum Autissiodorensium names "Heribertus Francigena filius Hugonis Ducis cognomento Magni ex concubina Raingarda"[101].

Duke Hugues & his [second/third] wife had one child:

1. Beatrix (d. 23 September 1003, married Comte Frederic, Duke of Upper Lotharingia)

Duke Hugues & his third wife had four children:

1. Hugues (b. c.940, d. 24 October 996 at Villa Les Juifs, near Prasville, Eure-et-Loire, buried Eglise de l'Abbaye Royale de St-Denis, First King of France, OUR ANCESTOR)

2. Emma (b. c.943, d. after 18 March 968, married as first wife Richard I Sans Peur Comte de Normandie)

3. Otton (Eudes, b. c.945, d. 23 February 965, buried St-Germain d'Auxerre, installed by Lothaire as Duke of Burgundy)

4. Eudes (Odo, b. c.948, d. 15 October 1002 at Chateau de Poilly-sur-Saone, buried Auxerre, adopted the name of Henri when becoming Duke of Burgundy, apparently different from previous brother)

Duc Hugues "le Grand" had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1):

1. Heribert (d. 23 August 996 or after at Chateau de Toucy, buried Church of Notre Dame d'Auxerre, Bishop of Auxerre 971-996)

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From Darryl Lundy's Peerage page on Hugues of Neustria (Forrás / Source):

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10519.htm#i105190

Hugues of Neustria, Comte de Paris (1)

M, #105190, b. circa 895, d. 9 June 956

Last Edited=19 Jun 2005

Hugues of Neustria, Comte de Paris was born circa 895. He was the son of Robert I, Roi de France. (1)

He married, firstly, Eadhilda (?), daughter of Eadweard I, King of Wessex and Ælflæd (?), between 926 and 927. (2)

He married, thirdly, Hedwig von Sachsen, daughter of Heinrich I von Sachsen, Holy Roman Emperor and Mathilda von Ringelheim, before 14 September 938. (1)

He died on 9 June 956.

Hugues of Neustria, Comte de Paris also went by the nick-name of Hugues 'the Great'. (1)

He gained the title of Comte de Paris. He gained the title of Duc de France.

Children of Hugues of Neustria, Comte de Paris and Hedwig von Sachsen

-1. Hugues de Paris, Roi de France+ b. c 938, d. 24 Oct 996

-2. Emma de Paris b. a 942, d. 19 Mar 968

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Greve av Paris.

Hugo gifte sig med Hedwige Rikissa av Sachsen, dotter till Kejsare av det Tysk-Romerska Riket Henril I "Fågelfängaren" av TYSKLAND och Den Heliga Matilda van Reingelheim, den 14 September 937. (Hedwige Rikissa Magnusdotter föddes under 922 i Sachen, Tyskland och dog den 4 Oktober 965 i Aix-la-Chapelle, Aachen, Tyskland.)

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From the Dutch Wikipedia page on Hugo de Grote:

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugo_de_Grote

Hugo de Grote (Fontaines-en-Sologne, 897 - Dourdan, 16 juni 956) was in zijn tijd de machtigste edelman in Frankrijk. Hij weigerde tot driemaal toe om koning te worden maar gaf er de voorkeur aan om zwakkere koningen op de troon te plaatsen en direct zijn eigen belangen te kunnen behartigen.

Hugo was de zoon van Robert I van Frankrijk en Beatrix van Vermandois. Na het overlijden van zijn vader in de Slag bij Soissons in 923, werd hem de kroon aangeboden maar Hugo weigerde en zijn zwager Rudolf I van Frankrijk werd toen tot koning gekozen. Hugo was toen markgraaf van Bretagne, graaf van Parijs, Troyes, Orléans, en lekenabt van Saint-Denis, Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Marmoutier, Saint-Martin te Tours, Carmery, Villeloin. In de volgende jaren werd hij hertog van Neustrië en verwierf hij ook nog de graafschappen Autun, Auxerre, Nevers, Sens, Chalon en Mâcon. Na het kinderloos overlijden van Rudolf in 936 weigerde Hugo opnieuw de kroon maar vroeg Lodewijk IV van Frankrijk, die als kind door zijn moeder in Engeland in veiligheid was gebracht, om koning te worden. Hugo bedong voor zichzelf natuurlijk een positie van uitzonderlijke macht en invloed, onder de nieuwe koning. In 938 werd hij benoemd tot mede-hertog van Bourgondië.

Daarna kwam Hugo in conflict met Lodewijk, die probeerde een zelfstandige positie als koning te verwerven. Hugo sloot in 940 een bondgenootschap met Herbert II van Vermandois en met Willem I van Normandië, tegen Lodewijk. Ze belegerden Reims en versloegen Lodewijk toen die probeerde om de stad te ontzetten. In plaats van Lodewijk erkenden ze Otto I de Grote als koning. Uiteindelijk werd er in 942 te Visé een vrede bemiddeld door Otto en zijn zuster Gerberga van Saksen, die met Lodewijk was getrouwd. Toen de Normandiërs Lodewijk in 945 gevangennamen, droegen ze hem over aan Hugo. En die liet Lodewijk pas in 946 vrij toen die de stad Laon aan hem had afgestaan. In dat jaar gebruikte Hugo de dood van Herbert II van Vermandois om diens erfenis te versnipperen over diens kinderen, zodat geen van hen meer zo machtig zou kunnen worden als hun vader. De Universele Synode van Ingelheim dreigde Hugo in 948 met excommunicatie als hij Lodewijk niet zou compenseren. De excommunicatie is ook een korte tijd daadwerkelijk uitgesproken maar Lodewijk kreeg Laon terug en geleidlijk verzoenden Hugo en Lodewijk zich met elkaar. Na het overlijden van Lodewijk in 954 weigerde Hugo opnieuw de kroon maar steunde het regentschap van Gerberga. In ruil daarvoor werd Hugo tot hertog van Bourgondië en Aquitanië benoemd. Een expeditie naar Aquitanië om zijn gezag als hertog te vestigen mislukte, maar Bourgondië erkende hem wel als hertog.

Hugo is begraven in de abdij van Saint-Denis.

Huwelijken en kinderen

Hugo was in zijn eerste huwelijk getrouwd met Judith, dochter van Rogier van Maine. In zijn tweede huwelijk was hij getrouwd met Eadhild, een zuster van koning Athelstan van Engeland. Als derde vrouw trouwde hij 14 september 937 met Hedwig van Saksen, dochter van de Duitse koning Hendrik de Vogelaar en zuster van Otto I van Duitsland. Zij kregen de volgende kinderen:

1. Beatrix, geboren rond 938, huwde met Frederik I van Lotharingen

2. Hugo, geboren rond 940, die later onder de naam Hugo Capet Koning van Frankrijk zal worden.

3. Emma (ovl. na 968), getrouwd met Richard I van Normandië

4. Otto, geboren in 945, wordt hertog van Bourgondië en graaf van Auxerre.

5. Odo, geboren in 948, noemt zich ook wel Hendrik

Bij een minnares kreeg hij nog een zoon Herbert, die werd benoemd tot bisschop van Auxerre.

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Hugh Capet var greve av Paris, Orléans, Vexin och Le Mans och hertig av Frankrike. Hugh kallas även Hugh Magnus och ska inte förväxlas med sin stora sonsons son som också är känd som Hugh "den Store" och Hugh Magnus

Hugh Capet hade tre äktenskap. De två första är det oklart i vilken ordning, var att en dotter till greven av Maine och till Edhilda, dotter till Edward the Elder, kung av England. Hugh gift tredje till Hedwig, dotter till Henry "av Sachsen", se nedan. Hugh hade en dotter, men det är osäkert i vilken hustru:

Emma av Paris (d. 962) som gifte sig i 960 till Richard (I) "The Fearless" 3: e hertig av Normandie. Obs: Weis sägs att: "Richard I" den Fearless "... M. (2) 960 Emma... DAU. Hugh Capet (se 53-20) "Hänvisningen (53-20) är för Hugh Capet (941 till 996), den första Capatian kung Frankrike och en son Hugh "den Store". Naturligtvis kan Emma inte vara en dotter till Hugh Capet (941 till 996) när hon gifte sig med 960, Weis är felaktig och hänvisningen bör (53-19) som är Hugh "den Store". Se Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, Baltimore, 1999, 121E-20 och 53-20.

Hugh Capet gift tredje circa 938 till Hedwig, dotter till Henry "av Sachsen", hertig av Sachsen, kung av Tyskland och Lorraine och hans fru St Matilda (eller Mechtilde) av Ringleheim.

Anmärkning: Den tredje äktenskap visas i 1985 fotografisk reproduktion av George Andrews Moriarty's Den Plantagenet Ancestry Kung Edward III och Drottning Phillipa sidorna 24 och 25 och i Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, Baltimore, 1999, 53-19.

Hugh och Hedwig hade följande barn:

Hugh Capet, Kung Frankrike

Beatrice, född cirka 939 som gifte sig i 954 till Frederick, Duke of Upper Lorraine.

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From the Genealogy of French in North America page on Hugues le Grand:

http://www.francogene.com/quebec--genealogy/010/010407.php

The family of Hugues le Grand de FRANCE and Hedwidge de SAXE

[10407] FRANCE (de), Hugues le Grand (Robert Ier & Béatrice de VERMANDOIS [10408]), died 956-06-17 or 956-07-01 Dourdan (Essonne : 910200), France, buried Saint-Denis (Seine-Saint-Denis : 930066), France

  • married 938 Mayence ou Ingelheim (Germany)

SAXE (de), Hedwidge (..)

1) Hugues Capet, born about 939, died 996-10-24, buried Saint-Denis (Seine-Saint-Denis : 930066), France, married 968 été Adélaïde ..

Bibliographie : Mémoires (Société généalogique canadienne-française); Histoire de la maison royale de France (Père Anselme)

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Hugo gifte sig med Hedwige Rikissa av Sachsen, dotter till Kejsare av det Tysk-Romerska Riket Henril I "Fågelfängaren" av TYSKLAND och Den Heliga Matilda van Reingelheim, den 14 September 937. (Hedwige Rikissa Magnusdotter föddes under 922 i Sachen, Tyskland och dog den 4 Oktober 965 i Aix-la-Chapelle, Aachen, Tyskland.)

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Hugo 'den store', kallades även Hugo 'den vite'. Fransk storman med titeln 'frankernas hertig', son till Robert I. Genom stora egendomar vid Seine och Loire dominerade Hugo landets politik från 940-talet till sin död. Ludvig IV stred länge om makten med Hugo och hans efterträdare Lothar tvingades ge Hugo kontrollen även över Burgund och Akvitanien.

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Född: Abt 915

Gift: 14 Sep 938

 Mainz Oder, Ingelheim, Rhineland, Germany 

Död: 16 Jun 956

 , Dourdan 

Family:

1 Hedwiga (Hartwige) Princess Germany

 Children: 
 • Hugh Capet King of France  
 • Beatrix Princess of France  
 • Emma Princess of France  
 • Otto Eudes Duke of Bourgogne  
 • Heinrich I Duke of Bourgogne  

Family:

2 Judith

Family:

3 Richelde

Family:

4 Edhilda Princess of England

Family:

5 Raingarde, [Concubine]

 Children: 
 • Herbert Hugues Bastard Bourgogne --------------------
   * BURIAL: St Denis Abbey, St Denis, Seine, France
   * BURIAL: St Denis Abbey, St Denis, Seine, France
   * BIRTH: ABT 0900, Paris, Seine, France
   * DEATH: 16 Jun 0956, Dourdan 

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Também chamado também de le Blanc(por sua pele clara) e lê Abade(por ter tido muitos mosteiros da qual ele era abade). Sua familia era chamada de Robertien. Depois da morte de seu irmão Raoul(que não tinha filhos), Hugues rejeita a coroa de Rei da França(que é aceita por Louis IV d’Outremer).

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_the_Great

Hugh the Great

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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For other uses, see Hugh the Great (disambiguation).

Hugh the Great (898 – 16 June 956) was duke of the Franks and count of Paris, son of King Robert I of France and nephew of King Odo. He was born in Paris, Ile-de-France, France. His eldest son was Hugh Capet who became King of France in 987. His family is known as the Robertians.

Hugh's first wife was Eadhild, daughter of Edward the Elder, king of England, and sister of King Athelstan. At the death of Rudolph, duke of Burgundy, in 936, Hugh was in possession of nearly all the region between the Loire and the Seine, corresponding to the ancient Neustria, with the exception of the territory ceded to the Normans in 911. He took a very active part in bringing Louis IV (d'Outremer) from the Kingdom of England in 936, but in the same year Hugh married Hedwige of Saxony, a daughter of Henry the Fowler of Germany and Matilda of Ringelheim, and soon quarrelled with Louis.

Hugh even paid homage to the Emperor Otto the Great, and supported him in his struggle against Louis. When Louis fell into the hands of the Normans in 945, he was handed over to Hugh, who released him in 946 only on condition that he should surrender the fortress of Laon. At the council of Ingelheim (948) Hugh was condemned, under pain of excommunication, to make reparation to Louis. It was not, however, until 950 that the powerful vassal became reconciled with his suzerain and restored Laon. But new difficulties arose, and peace was not finally concluded until 953.

On the death of Louis IV, Hugh was one of the first to recognize Lothair as his successor, and, at the intervention of Queen Gerberga, was instrumental in having him crowned. In recognition of this service Hugh was invested by the new king with the duchies of Burgundy (his suzerainty over which had already been nominally recognized by Louis IV) and Aquitaine. But his expedition in 955 to take possession of Aquitaine was unsuccessful. In the same year, however, Giselbert, duke of Burgundy, acknowledged himself his vassal and betrothed his daughter to Hugh's son Otto. At Giselbert's death (8 April 956) Hugh became effective master of the duchy, but died soon afterwards, on the 16 or 17 June 956, in Dourdan.

In the Divine Comedy Dante meets the soul of Duke Hugh in Purgatory, lamenting the avarice of his descendants.

[edit] References

   * This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica, Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

This page was last modified on 17 June 2010 at 22:10.

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Hugh the Great (898-16 June 956) was duke of the Franks and count of Paris, son of King Robert I of France and nephew of King Odo. He was born in Paris, Ile-de-France, France. His eldest son was Hugh Capet who became King of France in 987. His family is known as the Robertians.

Hugh's first wife was Eadhild, daughter of Edward the Elder, king of England, and sister of King Athelstan. At the death of Rudolph, duke of Burgundy, in 936, Hugh was in possession of nearly all the region between the Loire and the Seine, corresponding to the ancient Neustria, with the exception of the territory ceded to the Normans in 911. He took a very active part in bringing Louis IV (d'Outremer) from the Kingdom of England in 936, but in the same year Hugh married Hedwige of Saxony, a daughter of Henry the Fowler of Germany and Matilda of Ringelheim, and soon quarrelled with Louis.

Hugh even paid homage to the Emperor Otto the Great, and supported him in his struggle against Louis. When Louis fell into the hands of the Normans in 945, he was handed over to Hugh, who released him in 946 only on condition that he should surrender the fortress of Laon. At the council of Ingelheim (948) Hugh was condemned, under pain of excommunication, to make reparation to Louis. It was not, however, until 950 that the powerful vassal became reconciled with his suzerain and restored Laon. But new difficulties arose, and peace was not finally concluded until 953.

On the death of Louis IV, Hugh was one of the first to recognize Lothair as his successor, and, at the intervention of Queen Gerberga, was instrumental in having him crowned. In recognition of this service Hugh was invested by the new king with the duchies of Burgundy (his suzerainty over which had already been nominally recognized by Louis IV) and Aquitaine. But his expedition in 955 to take possession of Aquitaine was unsuccessful. In the same year, however, Giselbert, duke of Burgundy, acknowledged himself his vassal and betrothed his daughter to Hugh's son Otto. At Giselbert's death (8 April 956) Hugh became effective master of the duchy, but died soon afterwards, on the 16 or 17 June 956, in Dourdan.

In the Divine Comedy Dante meets the soul of Duke Hugh in Purgatory, lamenting the avarice of his descendants.

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http://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugo,_o_Grande

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From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps03/ps03_441.htm

Also called HUGH THE WHITE, French HUGUES LE GRAND, OR HUGUES LE BLANC, duke of the Franks, count of Paris, and progenitor of the Capetian kings of France. He was the most powerful man in the kingdom of France (West Francia) during the reign of Louis IV d'Outremer and the early years of King Lothair.

Son of a king (Robert I), father of another (Hugh Capet), and brother-in-law of three more (Rudolf of France, Athelstan of England, and Otto of Germany), Hugh possessed such vast territories that he could easily have assumed the crown on the death of Rudolf in 936. Preferring to work from behind the throne, he instead suggested the accession of Louis IV, son of the deposed Charles III the Simple. Louis proved no puppet, however, and his reign saw an almost constant struggle between King and Duke in which all the great magnates of France, Otto I of Germany, and the dukes of Lorraine were at one time or another involved. In 945 Louis fell into Hugh's hands and was incarcerated for a year before pressure from abroad and public opinion at home brought his release. Excommunicated by French and German councils and by the Pope, Hugh finally submitted to Louis in 951.

On the death of the King three years later, Hugh again turned down the opportunity to become king, plumping instead for Louis's young son, Lothair; but for his last two years Hugh was effectively the ruler of France

Hugh was one of the founders of the Capetian House in France. He ruled Burgundy and the heartland of France. He is buried at St. Denis. His title was Count of Paris, Orleans, Vexin and Le Mans, Duke of France ("The White Duke").

References: [AR7],[Weis1],[Theroff],[MRL],[Paget1],[RFC],[ES]

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Hugh the Great

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Hugh the Great, duke of the Franks

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Hugh the Great

(898-16 June 956) was duke of the Franks and count of Paris, son of King Robert I of France and nephew of King Odo. He was born in Paris, Ile-de-France, France. His eldest son was Hugh Capet who became King of France in 987. His family is known as the Robertians.

Hugh's first wife was Eadhild, daughter of Edward the Elder, king of England, and sister of King Athelstan. At the death of Rudolph, duke of Burgundy, in 936, Hugh was in possession of nearly all the region between the Loire and the Seine, corresponding to the ancient Neustria, with the exception of the territory ceded to the Normans in 911. He took a very active part in bringing Louis IV (d'Outremer) from the Kingdom of England in 936, but in the same year Hugh married Hedwige of Saxony, a daughter of Henry the Fowler of Germany and Matilda of Ringelheim, and soon quarrelled with Louis.

Hugh even paid homage to the Emperor Otto the Great, and supported him in his struggle against Louis. When Louis fell into the hands of the Normans in 945, he was handed over to Hugh, who released him in 946 only on condition that he should surrender the fortress of Laon. At the council of Ingelheim (948) Hugh was condemned, under pain of excommunication, to make reparation to Louis. It was not, however, until 950 that the powerful vassal became reconciled with his suzerain and restored Laon. But new difficulties arose, and peace was not finally concluded until 953.

On the death of Louis IV, Hugh was one of the first to recognize Lothair as his successor, and, at the intervention of Queen Gerberga, was instrumental in having him crowned. In recognition of this service Hugh was invested by the new king with the duchies of Burgundy (his suzerainty over which had already been nominally recognized by Louis IV) and Aquitaine. But his expedition in 955 to take possession of Aquitaine was unsuccessful. In the same year, however, Giselbert, duke of Burgundy, acknowledged himself his vassal and betrothed his daughter to Hugh's son Otto. At Giselbert's death (8 April 956) Hugh became effective master of the duchy, but died soon afterwards, on the 16 or 17 June 956, in Dourdan.

In the Divine Comedy Dante meets the soul of Duke Hugh in Purgatory, lamenting the avarice of his descendants.

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Hugh the Great (898-16 June 956) was duke of the Franks and count of Paris, son of King Robert I of France and nephew of King Odo. He was born in Paris, Ile-de-France, France. His eldest son was Hugh Capet who became King of France in 987. His family is known as the Robertians.

Hugh's first wife was Eadhild, daughter of Edward the Elder, king of England, and sister of King Athelstan. At the death of Rudolph, duke of Burgundy, in 936, Hugh was in possession of nearly all the region between the Loire and the Seine, corresponding to the ancient Neustria, with the exception of the territory ceded to the Normans in 911. He took a very active part in bringing Louis IV (d'Outremer) from the Kingdom of England in 936, but in the same year Hugh married Hedwige of Saxony, a daughter of Henry the Fowler of Germany and Matilda of Ringelheim, and soon quarrelled with Louis.

Hugh even paid homage to the Emperor Otto the Great, and supported him in his struggle against Louis. When Louis fell into the hands of the Normans in 945, he was handed over to Hugh, who released him in 946 only on condition that he should surrender the fortress of Laon. At the council of Ingelheim (948) Hugh was condemned, under pain of excommunication, to make reparation to Louis. It was not, however, until 950 that the powerful vassal became reconciled with his suzerain and restored Laon. But new difficulties arose, and peace was not finally concluded until 953.

On the death of Louis IV, Hugh was one of the first to recognize Lothair as his successor, and, at the intervention of Queen Gerberga, was instrumental in having him crowned. In recognition of this service Hugh was invested by the new king with the duchies of Burgundy (his suzerainty over which had already been nominally recognized by Louis IV) and Aquitaine. But his expedition in 955 to take possession of Aquitaine was unsuccessful. In the same year, however, Giselbert, duke of Burgundy, acknowledged himself his vassal and betrothed his daughter to Hugh's son Otto. At Giselbert's death (8 April 956) Hugh became effective master of the duchy, but died soon afterwards, on the 16 or 17 June 956.

In the Divine Comedy Dante meets the soul of Duke Hugh in Purgatory, lamenting the avarice of his descendants.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_the_Great

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Laurel Logan

August 24, 2008

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_the_Great

Hugh the Great (898-16 June 956) was duke of the Franks and count of Paris, son of King Robert I of France and nephew of King Odo. He was born in Paris, Ile-de-France, France. His eldest son was Hugh Capet who became King of France in 987. His family is known as the Robertians.

Hugh's first wife was Eadhild, daughter of Edward the Elder, king of England, and sister of King Athelstan. At the death of Rudolph, duke of Burgundy, in 936, Hugh was in possession of nearly all the region between the Loire and the Seine, corresponding to the ancient Neustria, with the exception of the territory ceded to the Normans in 911. He took a very active part in bringing Louis IV (d'Outremer) from the Kingdom of England in 936, but in the same year Hugh married Hedwige of Saxony, a daughter of Henry the Fowler of Germany and Matilda of Ringelheim, and soon quarrelled with Louis.

Hugh even paid homage to the Emperor Otto the Great, and supported him in his struggle against Louis. When Louis fell into the hands of the Normans in 945, he was handed over to Hugh, who released him in 946 only on condition that he should surrender the fortress of Laon. At the council of Ingelheim (948) Hugh was condemned, under pain of excommunication, to make reparation to Louis. It was not, however, until 950 that the powerful vassal became reconciled with his suzerain and restored Laon. But new difficulties arose, and peace was not finally concluded until 953.

On the death of Louis IV, Hugh was one of the first to recognize Lothair as his successor, and, at the intervention of Queen Gerberga, was instrumental in having him crowned. In recognition of this service Hugh was invested by the new king with the duchies of Burgundy (his suzerainty over which had already been nominally recognized by Louis IV) and Aquitaine. But his expedition in 955 to take possession of Aquitaine was unsuccessful. In the same year, however, Giselbert, duke of Burgundy, acknowledged himself his vassal and betrothed his daughter to Hugh's son Otto. At Giselbert's death (8 April 956) Hugh became effective master of the duchy, but died soon afterwards, on the 16 or 17 June 956, in Dourdan.

In the Divine Comedy Dante meets the soul of Duke Hugh in Purgatory, lamenting the avarice of his descendants.

--Laurel Logan

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d. June 16/17, 956

also called HUGH THE WHITE, French HUGUES LE GRAND, OR HUGUES LE BLANC,duke of the Franks, count of Paris, and progenitor of the Capetian kings of France. He was the most powerful man in the kingdom of France (WestFrancia) during the reign of Louis IV d'Outremer and the early years of King Lothair.

Son of a king (Robert I), father of another (Hugh Capet), and brother-in-law of three more (Rudolf of France, Athelstan of England, and Otto of Germany), Hugh possessed such vast territories that he could easily have assumed the crown on the death of Rudolf in 936. Preferring to work from behind the throne, he instead suggested the accession of Louis IV, son of the deposed Charles III the Simple. Louis proved no puppet, however, and his reign saw an almost constant struggle between King and Duke in which all the great magnates of France, Otto I of Germany, and the dukes of Lorraine were at one time or another involved.In 945 Louis fell into Hugh's hands and was incarcerated for a year before pressure from abroad and public opinion at home brought his release. Excommunicated by French and German councils and by the Pope, Hugh finally submitted to Louis in 951.

On the death of the King three years later, Hugh again turned down the opportunity to become king, plumping instead for Louis's young son, Lothair; but for his last two years Hugh was effectively the ruler of France.

Copyright c 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

BIOGRAPHY: Hugh the Great was Count of Paris/Duke of France during the reign of

several of the Carolingian kings of France. His son, Hugh Capet, started

the French Capetian dynasty.

BIOGRAPHY: [Internet source: http://www.ghg.net/shetler/oldimp/513.html]

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Hugh took the title of his father, King of the Franks, but allowed the title to pass into temporary disuse. His reign was marked by a series of wars with the sons of Charles the Simple and the Emperor of Germany, Otto [Colonial and Revolutionary Lineages of America, Vol. 1, p. 358].

He married firstly, Judith du Maine, daughter of Rodgar du Maine, Comte du Maine and Rothildis des Francs, in 914; His 1st [Christian Settipani & Patrick van Kerrebrouck, La Prehistoire des Capetiens 481-987, Premiere partie: Merovingians, Carolingians et Robertiens (Villeneuve d'Ascq: Editions Christian, 1993), pg. 410].

Duke of Franks in Neustria, Frankish Kingdoms, between 923 and 16 June 956 Transcribed by Douglas J. Potter The Catholic Encyclopedia, I-XIV (New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1908-1912), XV:Archdiocese of Tours and Christian Settipani & Patrick van Kerrebrouck, La Prehistoire des Capetiens 481-987, Premiere partie: Merovingians, Carolingians et Robertiens (Villeneuve d'Ascq: Editions Christian, 1993), pg. 408].

Lay-Abbot of St. Martin's in Tours, between 923 and 16 June 956 [Transcribed by Douglas J. Potter The Catholic Encyclopedia, I-XIV (New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1908-1912), XV:Archdiocese of Tours].

He was was chartered in 939. -------------------- Great Duke of Burgundy -------------------- Hugues Magnus Capet Duke of France

M, b. circa 898, d. 17 June 956

Father Robert I Capet De Morvais, King of West Franks, Marquis De Neustra b. 866, d. 15 Jun 923

Mother Bâeatrice de Vermandois b. c 880, d. Mar 931

Hugues Magnus Capet Duke of France|b. c 898\nd. 17 Jun 956|p124.htm#i92235|Robert I Capet De Morvais, King of West Franks, Marquis De Neustra|b. 866\nd. 15 Jun 923|p124.htm#i92237|Bâeatrice de Vermandois|b. c 880\nd. Mar 931|p261.htm#i92238|Robert (Rupert Iv) Capet "The Strong", Marquis De Neustra|b. b 836\nd. 15 Sep 866|p124.htm#i92253|Adelaide De Tours, De Aquitane|b. bt 822 - 824|p1.htm#i92254|||||||

Last Edited 20 Sep 2006

Birth* Hugues Magnus Capet Duke of France was born circa 898 in Isle de France, France.

He was the son of Robert I Capet De Morvais, King of West Franks, Marquis De Neustra and Bâeatrice de Vermandois.

Marriage* Hugues Magnus Capet Duke of France married Hedwige (Hartwige) Princess of the Germans before 14 September 938 in Mainz Oder, Ingelheim, Rhineland, Germany.

Death* Hugues Magnus Capet Duke of France died on 17 June 956 in Dourdan, Isle de France, France.

Burial* He was buried in Abbaye de St. Denis, St. Denis, Isle de France, France.

Family

Hedwige (Hartwige) Princess of the Germans b. circa 922, d. 10 May 965

Children

   * Hugues Capet King of France+ b. c 939, d. 24 Oct 996
   * Bâeatrice Capet Princess of France b. 939, d. 23 Aug 987
   * Emma Capet Princess of France b. 943, d. 19 Mar 968
   * Otto Eudes Capet Duke of Burgundy b. 944, d. 22 Feb 965
   * Henri I Capet Duke of Burgundy b. 946, d. 15 Oct 1001

-------------------- Hugo 'den store', kallades även Hugo 'den vite'. Fransk storman med titeln 'frankernas hertig', son till Robert I. Genom stora egendomar vid Seine och Loire dominerade Hugo landets politik från 940-talet till sin död. Ludvig IV stred länge om makten med Hugo och hans efterträdare Lothar tvingades ge Hugo kontrollen även över Burgund och Akvitanien.

Källa: Bra Böcker. --------------------

    Hugues of Neustria, Comte de Paris was born circa 895. He was the son of Robert I, Roi de France.1 He married, firstly, Eadhilda (?), daughter of Eadweard I, King of Wessex and Ælflæd (?), between 926 and 927.2 He married, thirdly, Hedwig von Sachsen, daughter of Heinrich I von Sachsen, Holy Roman Emperor and Mathilda von Ringelheim, before 14 September 938.1 He died on 9 June 956.
    Hugues of Neustria, Comte de Paris also went by the nick-name of Hugues 'the Great'.1 He gained the title of Comte de Paris. He gained the title of Duc de France.

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10519.htm#i105190

-------------------- Hugo, o Grande (895 — 19 de Junho de 956) foi duque dos francos e conde de Paris. Era filho do segundo casamento do rei Roberto I da França, com Beatriz de Vermandois, e sobrinho do rei Odo. Seu filho mais velho, Hugo Capeto, tornar-se-ia rei da França em 987. Sua família é conhecida como os Robertinos.

Em 923, quando seu pai morreu, Hugo recusou o trono da França, sendo seu cunhado, Raul, duque da Borgonha, eleito rei. Quando este faleceu, em 936, Hugo era dono de quase toda a região entre o Loire e o Sena, a área da antiga Nêustria, com exceção do território cedido aos normandos, em 911. Recusando-se a suceder ao trono novamente, empenhou-se em trazer Luís IV de volta da Inglaterra. Todavia, ele e o novo rei logo vieram a se desentender, e Hugo chegou até a prestas homenagem a Oto I, imperador desde 936, e o apoiou na contenda com Luís. Quando este caiu nas mãos dos normandos, em 945, ele foi entregue a Hugo, que o libertou, em 946, porém, sob a condição de que lhe fosse dada a fortaleza de Laon. No conselho de Ingelheim, dois anos depois, Hugo foi condenado sob pena de excomunhão como reparação para Luís. Apenas em 950 que o poderoso vassalo reconciliou-se com seu suserano, devolvendo-lhe Laon. Mas novas dificuldades surgiram, e as negociações de paz só se concluíram em 953.

À morte de Luís, em 954, Hugo foi o primeiro a reconhecer Lotário como o sucessor, e, por intermédio da rainha Gergerga, foi instrumental para sua coroação. Em reconhecimento por seu serviço, Hugo foi investido pelo novo rei com os ducados da Borgonha (sua soberania sobre a qual já fora nominalmente reconhecida por Luís IV) e da Aquitânia. Todavia, sua expedição para tomar posse da Aquitânia, em 955, fracassou. No mesmo ano, Gilberto,duque da Borgonha, reconheceu a suserania de Hugo, e deu a filha em casamento ao Oto, filho de Hugo. À morte de Gilberto, em abril de 956, Hugo se tornou o mestre efetivo do ducado, mas ele próprio morreu logo depois, em Dourdan.

Casou por 3 vezes, a primeira em 922 com Judite do Maine, filha de Roger do Maine, de quem não teve filhos.

O segundo casamento foi em 926 com Edhilda de Inglaterra, filha do rei Eduardo, o Velho, de quem igualmente não teve filhos.

O terceiro casamento aconteceu em 937 com Hedwige da Saxônia (filha de Henrique I da Germânia "o Passarinheiro" e sua segunda esposa Matilde de Ringelheim "Santa Matilde"), de quem teve 5 filhos:

  1. Beatriz da França (939 —?), casada com Frederico I, duque da Alta-Lorena.
  2. Hugo I, rei da França (895 — 16 de Junho de 956), mais conhecido como "Hugo Capeto", casou com Adelaide da Aquitânia.
  3. Ema de Paris (943 — 966), casou-se em 960 com Ricardo I, Duque da Normandia, de quem foi a primeira esposa. Não tiveram filhos.
  4. Otão de França, duque da Borgonha (945 —?), casou com Luitegarda de Borgonha.
  5. Odo-Henrique, Duque da Borgonha, "o Grande", duque da Baixa Borgonha (946 — 1002), casou primeira vez com Gerberga de Chalon (ou Mâcon), casou segunda vez com Gersenda da Gasconha e casou terceira vez com Matilde de Chalon, Senhora de Donzy.

Fora do casamento, foi pai de:

  1. Heriberto, bispo de Auxerre

in: Wikipédia, a enciclopédia livre <http://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugo,_o_Grande>

-------------------- Leo: Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: 1961. -------------------- Hugh the Great (898 – 16 June 956) was the Duke of the Franks and Count of Paris.

He was the son of King Robert I of France and Béatrice of Vermandois, daughter of Herbert I, Count of Vermandois.[1] He was born in Paris, Île-de-France, France. His eldest son was Hugh Capet who became King of France in 987.[2] His family is known as the Robertians.[3]

In 922 the barons of western Francia, after revolting against the Carolingian king Charles the Simple (who fled his kingdom under their onslaught), elected Robert I, Hugh's father, as King of Western Francia.[4] At the death of Robert I, in battle at Soissons in 923, Hugh refused the crown and it went to his brother-in-law, Rudolph of France.[4] Charles, however, sought help in regaining his crown from his cousin Herbert II, Count of Vermandois, who instead of helping the king imprisoned him.[4] Herbert then used his prisoner as an advantage in pressing his own ambitions, using the threat of releasing the king up until Charles' death in 929.[5] From then on Herbert II of Vermandois struggled with king Rudolph and his vassal Hugh the Great.[4] Finally Rudolph and Herbert II came to an agreement in 935.[4]

At the death of Rudolph, King of Western Francia, in 936, Hugh was in possession of nearly all of the region between the Loire and the Seine, corresponding to the ancient Neustria, with the exceptions of Anjou and of the territory ceded to the Normans in 911.[6] He took a very active part in bringing Louis IV (d'Outremer) from the Kingdom of England in 936.[7] In 937 Hugh married Hedwige of Saxony, a daughter of Henry the Fowler of Germany and Matilda of Ringelheim, and soon quarrelled with Louis.[8]

In 938 King Louis IV began attacking fortresses and lands formerly held by members of his family, some held by Herbert II of Vermandois.[9] In 939 king Louis attacked Hugh the Great and William I, Duke of Normandy, after which a truce was concluded lasting until June.[10] That same year Hugh, along with Herbert II of Vermandois, Arnulf I, Count of Flanders and Duke William Longsword paid homage to the Emperor Otto the Great, and supported him in his struggle against Louis.[11] When Louis fell into the hands of the Normans in 945, he was handed over to Hugh in exchange for their young duke Richard.[12] Hugh released Louis IV in 946 on condition that he should surrender the fortress of Laon.[13] In 948 at a church council at Ingelheim the bishops, all but two being from Germany, condemned and excommunicated Hugh in absentia, and returned Archbishop Artauld to his see at Reims.[14] Hugh's response was to attack Soissons and Reims while the excommunication was repeated by a council at Trier.[14] Hugh finally relented and made peace with Louis IV, the church and his brother-in-law Otto the Great.[14]

On the death of Louis IV, Hugh was one of the first to recognize Lothair as his successor, and, at the intervention of Queen Gerberga, was instrumental in having him crowned.[14] In recognition of this service Hugh was invested by the new king with the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine.[15] In the same year, however, Giselbert, duke of Burgundy, acknowledged himself his vassal and betrothed his daughter to Hugh's son Otto-Henry.[15] On 16 June 956 Hugh the Great died in Dourdan.[1]

Family[edit]

Hugh married first, in 922, Judith, daughter of Roger Comte du Maine & his wife Rothilde.[1] She died childless in 925.[1]

Hugh's second wife was Eadhild, daughter of Edward the Elder, king of the Anglo-Saxons, and sister of King Æthelstan.[1] They married in 926 and she died in 938, childless.[1]

Hugh's third wife was Hedwig of Saxony, daughter of Henry the Fowler and Matilda of Ringelheim She and Hugh had: Beatrice married Frederick I, Duke of Upper Lorraine.[a][1] Hugh Capet.[16] Emma.(c. 943-aft. 968).[16] Otto, Duke of Burgundy, a minor in 956.[15] Odo-Henry I, Duke of Burgundy (d. 1002).[15]



      
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Hugues "the Great", duke of the Franks's Timeline

898
898
Paris, Paris, Île-de-France, France
922
922
Age 24
France
926
926
Age 28
Europe
936
936
Age 38
936
Age 38
France (Duke of Franks - Count of Paris
938
September 14, 938
Age 40
Mainz Oder, Ingelheim, France

Married before said date.

938
Age 40
Mainz Oder Ingelheim, Germany
940
940
Age 42
943
943
Age 45
945
945
Age 47