Hugh de Courtenay, 2nd Earl of Devon (1303 - 1377) MP

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Birthplace: Okehampton, Devon, England
Death: Died in Exeter, Devon, England
Managed by: Roger Stephen Douthitt
Last Updated:

About Hugh de Courtenay, 2nd Earl of Devon

Hugh Courtenay Earl of Devon (M) http://www.powderham.co.uk/history/historyofcastle.ashx

b. 12 July 1303, d. 2 May 1377, #905

    Hugh Courtenay Earl of Devon was born on 12 July 1303. He was the son of Hugh Courtenay Earl of Devon and Agnes St. John. Hugh Courtenay Earl of Devon married Lady Margaret Bohun, daughter of Humphrey Bohun Earl of Hereford and Princess Elizabeth (?), on 11 August 1325. Hugh Courtenay Earl of Devon died on 2 May 1377 at age 73.
    Children of Hugh Courtenay Earl of Devon and Lady Margaret Bohun:
   Sir Philip Courtenay   d. c 1406
   William Courtenay Archbishop of Canterbury   d. 31 Jul 1396
   Thomas Courtenay
   Edward Courtenay+   d. b 1372
   John Courtenay
   Piers Courtenay   d. c 1409
   Humphrey Courtenay
   Elizabeth Courtenay   d. 7 Aug 1395
   Hugh Courtenay   b. bt 22 Mar 1326 - 1327, d. b 2 Sep 1349 

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_Courtenay,_2nd_Earl_of_Devon

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Hugh was Earl of England, Knight of the Garter

Sir Hugh (12 July 1303 — 2 May 1377), 10th Earl of Devon, a founding Knight of the Garter. He married Margaret de Bohun, daughter of Humphrey, 4th Earl of Hereford, and 3rd Earl of Essex by Princess Elizabeth of Rhuddlan, daughter of King Edward Longshanks by Eleanor of Castile.

Hugh Courtenay was the 10th Earl of Devon in England, born on 12 July 1303, probably in Devon. His parents were Hugh, the 1st Courtenay Earl of Devon by Agnes de St John, daughter of Sir John St John of Basing. He was destined to become a great soldier in the Hundred years war in service of King Edward III. On 11 August 1327, still only 23 years old he was made knight banneret, and joined the elite group of knights who protected the King's body. He was made a founding knight of the Noble Order of the Garter in 1344 on its investiture at Windsor Castle, . Courtenay fought with the heroes of Crecy on 26 August 1346 in the famous of the encounters in France. The victory formed the basis for Courtenay's inclusion as a Knight of the Garter in 1348, by personal invitation of the King himself.

Courtenay was summoned to Parliament on the assumption of Edward III to full authority over the usurper Roger Mortimer. The writ issued on 23 April 1337 described him as Hugoni de Courteney juniori styled as Lord Courteney. Two years later he defended the coasts of Cornwall with some distinction from the invasion fleet of France. On the death of his father, Hugh the following year he was granted livery and extensive land ownership in Devon. He was probably present at the Battle of Neville's Cross, in which Henry Percy and Ralph Neville utterly defeated the Scots King David II on 17 October 1346. As the second Courtenay Earl he was honoured in the jousting tournament that took place at Lichfield, one of the many in celebration of Crecy, on 9 April 1347, in which the King himself also took part. As a Knight of the Garter he was given special permission to build the White Friars at Fleet Street, London, which became an impressive religious house near the Palace of Whitehall. Following the completion of this project he returned to Devon, on appointment as Joint Warden of Devon and Cornwall in 1352. In 1361 he and his wife benefited from the will of her deceased brother, Earl of Hereford, greatly increasing his land holdings.

According to which account is read, Courtenay made an important contribution to the outcome of the Battle of Poitiers. The Black Prince had sent the baggage train under Courtenay to the rear. A wise manoeuvre in the event as the long trail of wagons and carts blocked the narrow bridge and the Frenchmen's escape route. The Prince was afraid of a flanking move behind his position over the river, and to the rear. This did not occur; which was as well since the route Courtenay took was the long way round and he played little part in the battle as a result. He was a veteran of sixty by this period. He retired with a full pension from the King. In 1373 he was appointed Chief Warden of the Forest of Devon.

After a full career he died at Exeter on 2 May 1377. He was buried in Exeter Cathedral. He was examined for probate on 28 Jan 1391.

Hugh married Margaret daughter of Humphrey De Bohun, Earl of Hereford and of Essex by Elizabeth of Rhuddlan, and a granddaughter of King Edward I of England on 11 August 1325, when he moved into Powderham Castle, although his father was still living. He had been promised to Margaret by contract since 27 September 1314.

(Wikipedia)

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Earl of Devon

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Hugh de Courtenay, 10th Earl of Devon

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hugh Courtenay was the 10th Earl of Devon in England, born on 12 July 1303, probably in Devon. His parents were Hugh, the 1st Courtenay Earl of Devon by Agnes de St John, daughter of Sir John St John of Basing. He was destined to become a great soldier in the Hundred years war in service of King Edward III. On 11 August 1327, still only 23 years old he was made knight banneret, and joined the elite group of knights who protected the King's body. He was made a founding knight of the Noble Order of the Garter in 1344 on its investiture at Windsor Castle. Courtenay fought with the heroes of Crecy on 26 August 1346 in the famous of the encounters in France. The victory formed the basis for Courtenay's inclusion as a Knight of the Garter in 1348, by personal invitation of the King himself.[1].

Courtenay was summoned to Parliament on the assumption of Edward III to full authority over the usurper Roger Mortimer. The writ issued on 23 April 1337 described him as Hugoni de Courteney juniori styled as Lord Courteney. Two years later he defended the coasts of Cornwall with some distinction from the invasion fleet of France. On the death of his father, Hugh the following year he was granted livery and extensive land ownership in Devon. He was probably present at the Battle of Neville's Cross, in which Henry Percy and Ralph Neville utterly defeated the Scots King David II on 17 October 1346. As the second Courtenay Earl he was honoured in the jousting tournament that took place at Lichfield, one of the many in celebration of Crecy, on 9 April 1347, in which the King himself also took part. As a Knight of the Garter he was given special permission to build the White Friars at Fleet Street, London, which became an impressive religious house near the Palace of Whitehall. Following the completion of this project he returned to Devon, on appointment as Joint Warden of Devon and Cornwall in 1352. In 1361 he and his wife benefited from the will of her deceased brother, Earl of Hereford, greatly increasing his land holdings.

According to which account is read, Courtenay made an important contribution to the outcome of the Battle of Poitiers.[2] The Black Prince had sent the baggage train under Courtenay to the rear. A wise manoeuvre in the event as the long trail of wagons and carts blocked the narrow bridge and the Frenchmen's escape route. The Prince was afraid of a flanking move behind his position over the river, and to the rear. This did not occur with any great effect; which was as well since the route Courtenay took was the long way round and he played little part in the battle as a result of the defensive positions. The French cavalry was cut down by the archers, and then two deep lines of defence of stakes and ditches. He was a veteran of sixty by this period. He retired with a full pension from the King. In 1373 he was appointed Chief Warden of the Forest of Devon.

After a full career he died at Exeter on 2 May 1377. He was buried in Exeter Cathedral. He was examined for probate on 28 Jan 1391.

Hugh married Margaret daughter of Humphrey De Bohun, Earl of Hereford and of Essex by Elizabeth of Rhuddlan, and a granddaughter of King Edward I of England on 11 August 1325, when he moved into Powderham Castle, although his father was still living. He had been promised to Margaret by contract since 27 September 1314.

They had a large family which included

Sir Hugh, Born: 22 March 1327, Died: 1 September 1349. He married Elizabeth de Vere, daughter of John, 7th Earl of Oxford.

Robert of Moreton.

Sir Edward of Goodrington, Born: 1329, Haccombe, Devon, Died: 20 September 1372. He married Emmeline Dawney, daughter of Sir John Dawney of Madfordferry.

William the Archbishop of Canterbury, Born: 1342, Died: 31 July 1396, Maidstone, Kent.

Sir Philip of Powderham Castle, Born: c.1342, Died: 29 July 1406. Married Ann Wake, daughter of Sir Thomas Wake by Alice Pateshull.

Sir Peter of Hardington-Mandeville, Born: in Somerset, Died: 2 Feb 1405. Married Margaret Clyvedon, daughter of John de Clyvedon by Elizabeth.

Margaret married John Cobham, 3rd Lord Cobham.

Elizabeth, Died: 7 August 1395, married Sir Andrew Luttrell of Chilton, [Thorverton], Devon.

Catherine, Died: 31 December 1399, married Sir Thomas de Engaine, 2nd Lord Engaine.

Joane, married Sir John Cheverston.

Other children: John, Thomas, a clerk, Humphrey, Anne and Matilda.

[edit]Notes

^ By Douglas Richardson, Kimball G. Everingham, Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families (2005), p. 236.

^ Sumption, vol.2, for Sir Edward's presence at the battle, Rymer Foedera, III, i, 325, as cited by Hewitt, The Black Prince's Exp 1355-7 (1958)

Browning, Charles H., Americans of Royal Descent, 6th ed. 1905, p. 105-108

G E Cockayne, Complete Peerage of Great Britain and Ireland revised edition, (London 1937). vol. III, p.329

[edit]Sources

Ian Mortimer, Edward III (London 2007).

W M Ormrod, The Reign of Edward III (Tempus Publishing 1999).

Nigel Saul, (ed.) The Oxford History of Medieval England (OUP 1997).

Jonathan Sumption, The Hundred Years War, 2 vols, Vol.1: Trial by Battle, vol.2: Trial by Fire (Faber 1999).

Scott L. Waugh, England in the Reign of Edward III (CUP 1991)

Anthony Tuck, Crown and Nobility: England 1272-1461: political conflict in late medieval England, 2nd ed., (Blackwell 1999).

Name: Hugh de Courtenay

Prefix: Sir

Given Name: Hugh

Surname: de Courtenay

Suffix: 2nd Earl of Devon, K. G.

Sex: M

_UID: A7122AFA5118D811BE490080C8C142CC4D7B

Change Date: 6 Nov 2004

Note: Earl of Devon

Birth: 12 JUL 1303

Death: 2 MAY 1377

Father: Hugh de Courtenay b: 14 SEP 1275 in Okehampton, Devonshire, England

Mother: Agnes de St. John b: ABT 1279

Marriage 1 Margaret de Bohun b: 1 FEB 1310 in Tynemouth, Northumberland, England

Married:

Children

Margaret Courtenay b: ABT 1326
Phillip de Courtenay b: 1340
Elizabeth de Courtenay b: 1333
Edward de Courtenay b: 1328

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Birth: Jul. 12, 1303

Death: May 2, 1377

English Aristocracy. Born the son of Sir Hugh de Courtenay, 1st Earl of Devon and Agnes de St. John. He married Margaret de Bohun in August 1325 and with her had ten children. He was invested as a Knight Banneret in 1327. He succeeded to the title of 2nd Lord Courtenay in April 1337 during his father's lifetime. In 1339 he repulsed a French raid on Cornwall, and succeeded to the title of 2nd Earl of Devon the following year. He held the office of Joint Warden of Devon and Cornwall in 1352 and the office of Chief Warden of Devon in 1373. He died four years later at age 73.

(bio by: Iola) 

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Burial:

Exeter Cathedral

Exeter

Devon, England


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"Sir Hugh de Courtenay (12 July 1303 – 2 May 1377) was the 10th Earl of Devon and 2nd Baron Courtenay. He played an important role in the Hundred Years War in the service of King Edward III. His chief seat was Tiverton Castle."

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Links:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_de_Courtenay,_2nd_Earl_of_Devon

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=8867

http://histfam.familysearch.org/getperson.php?personID=I3667&tree=EuropeRoyalNobleHous

http://histfam.familysearch.org/getperson.php?personID=I438&tree=Nixon

http://histfam.familysearch.org/getperson.php?personID=I2518&tree=PagetHeraldicBaronag

http://thepeerage.com/p10696.htm#i106958

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Citations / Sources:

[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 344. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage

[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 84. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.

[S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, pages 1122-1124. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.

[S1850] Medieval Lands: A Prosopography of Medieval European Noble and Royal Families, Charles Cawley, (http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/), England, Earls - creations 1067-1122 [accessed 28 Jun 2006].

[S39] Medieval, royalty, nobility family group sheets (filmed 1996), Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Family History Department. Medieval Family History Unit, (Manuscript. Salt Lake City, Utah : Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1996), FHL film 1553977-1553985..

[S630] Pedigree and Progress, Wagner, Anthony, (Published by Phillimore & Co. Ltd. London and Chichester, 1975), FHL 942 D2war., p. 161.

[S67] #205 Baronagium Genealogicum, Or, the Pedigrees of the English Peers, Deduced from the Earliest Times, of Which There Are Any Attested Accountes Including, as Well Collateral as Lineal Descents (1764-1784), Segar, Sir William, (6 volumes. [London]: Engraved and printed for the author, [1764-1784].), Volumes 1-4 FHL microfilm 164,680; volume 5 FHL mi., vol. 3 p. 275.

[S207] #235 The History and Antiquities of the County of Buckingham (1847), Lipscomb, George, (Four volumes. London: J. & W. Robins, 1847), FHL book Q 942.575 H2Li; FHL microfilms 990,261-99., vol. 1 p. 468, 472.

[S724] #536 A Genealogical History of the Noble and Illustrious Family of Courtenay in Three Parts (1735), Cleaveland, Ezra, ([Durham] England: Edw. Farley, 1735), FHL book Q 929.242 C835c; FHL microfilm 924,607 it., pt. 3 book 1 p. 113.

[S161] #651 The Parochial and Family History of the Deanery of Trigg Minor, in the County of Cornwall (1873-1879), Maclean, John, (3 volumes. London: Nichols & Son, 1873-1879), FHL book 942.37 K2ma; FHL microfilm 90,276., vol. 2 p. 188.

[S163] #687 The Dormant and Extinct Baronage of England, or, an Historical and Genealogical Account of the Lives, Public Employments, and Most Memorable Actions of the English Nobility Who Have Flourished from the Norman Conquest to the Year 1806 (1807-1837), Banks, Thomas Christopher, (4 volumes. London: J. White, 1807-1837), FHL book 942 D22ban., vol. 1 p. 293.

[S25] #798 The Wallop Family and Their Ancestry, Watney, Vernon James, (4 volumes. Oxford: John Johnson, 1928), FHL book Q 929.242 W159w; FHL microfilm 1696491 it., vol. 1 p. 214, vol. 2 p. 233, 373, 512.

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[S827] #1949 A View of Devonshire in MDCXXX: with a Pedigree of Most of its Gentry (1845), Westcote, Thomas, (Exeter: W. Roberts, 1845), FHL book 942.35 D2w; FHL microfilm 990,089 item 2., p. 571.

[S33] #242 [1883 edition] A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire (New edition, 1883, reprint 1962), Burke, Sir John Bernard, (New edition. 1883. Reprint, London: Harrison and Sons, 1962), FHL book 942 D22bug 1883., vol. 4 p. 141.

[S276] #662 The Genealogists' Magazine: Official Organ of the Society of Genealogists (1928-), Society of Genealogists (London), (London: Society of Genealogists, 1928-), FHL book 942 B2gm; FHL microfilm 176,665., vol. 6 p. 613.

[S97] #665 The Genealogist (1877-1922), (Old Series, 7 volumes, 1877-1883. New Series, 38 volumes, 1884-1922. London: George Bell, 1877-1922), FHL book 942 B2gqm; see FHL catalog for list of vo., n.s. vol. 34 p. 29.

[S219] #1027 The Victoria History of Berkshire (1906-1927), Ditchfield, Peter Hampson, (The Victoria History of the Counties of England [Series]. 4 volumes. London: A. Constable, 1906-1927), FHL book Q 942 H2vbe; FHL microfilms 896,764-896,7., vol. 4 p. 372.

[S1246] #1853 [1386-1421] The House of Commons 1386-1421 (1993), Roskell, John Smith, (The History of Parliament [Series]. Stroud, Gloucestershire: Alan Sutton Pub. Ltd., c1993 http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org), FHL book 942 D3hp., vol. 2 p. 670.

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[S983] Notes and gleanings - v. 1-2 (1888-1889), (1988-1889), 942.3 B2na v. 1-2 1888-1889., vol. 2 p. 55.

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[S162] #653 The Visitations of the County of Devon: Comprising the Herald's Visitations of 1531, 1564, & 1620 (1895), Vivian, J. L. (John Lambrick), (Exeter: For the author by H.S. Eland, [1895]), FHL book 942.35 D23v; FHL microfilm 873,760., p. 244.

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Hugh de Courtenay, 2nd Earl of Devon's Timeline

1303
July 12, 1303
Okehampton, Devon, England
1325
August 11, 1325
Age 22
1326
March 22, 1326
Age 22
Exeter, Devonshire, England
1329
1329
Age 25
Exeter, Devonshire, England
1332
1332
Age 28
Exeter, Devonshire, England
1333
1333
Age 29
Exeter, Devon, England
1333
Age 29
England
1335
1335
Age 31
Godlington, Cornwell, England
1339
1339
Age 35
Of, Exeter, Devonshire, England
1339
Age 35
Exeter, Devonshire, England