Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath (1125 - 1186) MP

‹ Back to de Lacy surname

Is your surname de Lacy?

Research the de Lacy family

Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath, 4th Baron Lacy's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Related Projects

Nicknames: "Judciar de Ireland"
Place of Burial: Saint Thomas Church, Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
Birthplace: Ewyas Lacy, Herefordshire, England
Death: Died in Durrow, Laois, County Laois, Ireland
Occupation: built Trim Castle
Managed by: Margaret, (C)
Last Updated:

About Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath

Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_de_Lacy,_Lord_of_Meath

Hugo de Lacy, Tiarna na Mí http://ga.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugo_de_Lacy,_Tiarna_na_M%C3%AD

Hugues de Lacy (lord de Meath)

-----

Hugh is possibly Gilbert's brother rather than son.

"Much more is known of the actions of Hugh II than of any previous member of the family. He paid no scutage in 1164-5, so that he was probably present in person on the campaign of 1165 from Shrewsbury into North Cymru. He was in Ireland with the king from October 1171, and remained there after the king returned in April 1172. He was back in England by 29 December 1172, when he distinguished himself at the first public festival of St. Thomas at Canterbury. The archbishop was carried away by the occasion and expressed himself rather too strongly, only to be rebuked firmly by Hugh II. In the summer of 1173 he was in Normandy helping to quell the rising, and with Hugh de Beauchamp held the castle of Verneuil while it was being besieged by Louis VII in July. He spent some time during the year in Ireland, where he had acquired the old kingsom of Meath, so that from now onwards he spent a good deal of time on the west side of St. George's Channel. In the same year he had been given the city of Dublin and its castle, a grant followed five years later by his promotion to Viceroy. That post he held until 1184, although he had been deprived of Dublin castle for a short period in1181-2 as a penalty for marrying the daughter of Rory O'Connor, the last king of Connaught. At Durrow in July 1186 he had his head cut off by an Irishman while he was showing him how to use a pick, according to the graphic description in the chronicle of St. Mary, Dublin -- a commentary on his restless nature, apparently intolerant of inefficiency to the end."

--- W E Wightman, *The Lacy Family in England and Normandy, 1066-1194*, Oxford (Clarendon Press) 1966, p 190-191

......................................

In 1272 [1172?], Hugh de Lacy was granted the Liberty of Meath by Henry II who sought to limit the expansionist policies of Strongbow [Richard de Clare], whom he feared might set up an independent Anglo-Norman kingdom in Ireland. Soon after his arrival at Trim, de Lacy built a wooden castle, the spike stockade mentioned in the "Song of Dermot and the Earl"--a poem of the period. De Lacy left one of his barons, Hugh Tyrell, in charge, but when O'Connor, King of Connacht, threatened, Tyrell abandoned and burned the castle. By 1176, this wooden fortification had been replaced with a stone keep or tower. When the site was secure, the castle yard was surrounded by curtain walls and moat with a simple gate and bridge to the north. Analyses of samples of surviving structural timbers show that the keep was extended in at least two more phases and remodelled in the lifetime of Walter de Lacy, Hugh's son. Later, fore-buildings were built to protect the entrance to the keep.

[Trim Castle Visitors Guide, Duchas--The Heritage Service of Ireland] ...................................... Hugh was killed in Durrow while overseeing the building of a smaller castle. A man, who had gotten close to Hugh pulled an axe from under his cloak and lopped Hugh's head off. His body was buried at the Bective Abbey about 8 kms. from Trim Castle while his head was buried near his 1st wife in Dublin. The Cistercian Monks of Bective Abbey had hopes that the possession of Hugh's body would give them rights to Trim Castle and the extensive lands associated with it. However the king took the castle and lands until Walter came of age, at which time Richard I gave them to Walter. ...................................... Hugh de Laci was employed in the conquest of Ireland, and for his services there obtained from King Henry II, the whole county of Meath. He was subsequently constituted governor of Dublin and justice of Ireland. But incurring the displeasure of his royal master by marrying without license the king of Connaught's dau., he was divested in 1181 of the custody of the metropolis. In four years afterwards he was murdered by one Malvo Miadaich, a mean person, in revenge for the severity with which he had treated the workmen employed by him in erecting the castle of Lurhedy. He left issue, Walter, his successor; Hugh, constable of Ireland; Elayne, m. to Richard de Beaufo. [Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd, London, 1883, p. 310, Lacy, Earls of Lincoln] ..................................... Hugh de Lacy, fifth Baron Lacy by tenure, and first Lord of Meath (d 1186), one of the conquerors of Ireland, was no doubt the sone, and not, as sometimes been stated, a younger brother of Gilbert de Lacy.

Hugh de Lacy is said to have had a dispute with Joce de Dinan as to certain lands in Herefordshire in 1154. He was in possession of his father's lands before 1163, and in 1165-6 held fifty-eight and three-quarters knight's fees, and had nine tenants without knight service. In October 1171 he went over to Ireland with Henry II, and early in 1172 was sent to receive the submission of Roderic, king of Connaught. Before Henry's departure about the end of March Lacy was granted Meath by the service of fifty knights and with almost royal authority; he was also put in charge of Dublin Castle. Later in the year Lacy arranged a meeting with Tiernan O'Rourke to take place at Tlachtgha, now called the Hill of Ward, near Athboy in Meath. The meeting ended in a quarrel, which both parties attributed to the treachery of the other; Tiernan was slain, and Hugh only escaped with difficulty. Lacy seems to have left Dublin in charge of Earl Richard de Clare by the king's orders, and to have commenced securing Meath by the erection of castles. Amongh these was the castle of Trim, which was put in charge of Hugh Tyrel. After this, Lacy went back to England. On 29 Dec 1172 he was at Canterbury, where, according to a story preserved by Giraldus, he reproved Archbishop Richard for his boastful langmacge. Next year he was fighting for Henry in France, and held Verneuil against Louis VII for a month; but at the end of that time the town was forced to capitulate. Hugh de Lacy is mentioned as one of those who were sent by the king with his treasure to Jerusalem in May 1177. Another version names Henry de Lacy, and in any case it cannot be our Hugh, who was at the same time sent over to Ireland as procurator-general, Richard de Clare having died shortly before. The grant of Meath was now confirmed, with the addition of Offelana, Offaly, Kildare, and Wicklow. As governor of Ireland Lacy secured Leinster and Meath by building numerous castles, while he maintained peace and good order by making it his first care to preserve the native Irish in possession of their lands. by his liveral and just conduct he won the hearts of the Irish; but his friendly relations with the native chiefs soon led to an accusation that he intended to seize the sovereignty of the island for himself. The author of the 'Gesta Henrich' however, says that Lacy lost his favour with Henry in consequence of complaints of his injustice by the Irish. In 1181, he was recalled from his government for having married the daughter of Roderic, king of Connaught, without leave. But in the following winter Hugh was sent back, though with a condjutor in the person of one of the royal clerks, Robert of Shrewsbury. When, early in 1185, Henry sent his son John over to Ireland, the young earl complained to his father that Hugh would not permit the Irish to pay tribute. This led to fresh disgrace, but Hugh remained in Ireland, and occupied himself as before with castle-building. He had erected a castle at Durrow, in what is now King's County, and on 25 July 1186 had gone out to view it, when 'one of the men of Teffia, a yought named Gilla-gan-inathar O'Meyey, approached him, and with an axe severed his head from his body.' The murderer was a foster-son of Sinnach O'Caharny, or 'the Fox,' chief of Teffia, by whose instigation he is said to have done the deed. A later story described him as one of the labourers on the castle, but there does not appear to be any authority for this older than Holinshed. William of Newburgh says that Henry was very glad at Hugh's death, and repeats the story that he had aspired to obtain the crown of Ireland for himself. Certainly Lacy had made himself formidable to the royal authority, and Earl John was promptly sent over to Ireland to take possession of his lands.

Lacy was buried at Durrow, but in 1195 his body was removed to the abbey of Bective in Meath, and his head to St Thomas's Church at Dublin. Afterwards a controversy arose between the canons of St Thomas and the monks of Bective, with ended in 1205 in the removal of the body to Dublin, where it was interred, together with the head, in the tomb of De Lacy's first wife. Giraldus describes Lacy as a swarth man, with small black sunken eyes, a flat nose, and an ugly scar on his check; muscular in body, but small and ill-made. he was a man of resolute character; for temperance a very Frenchman, careful in private affairs, and vigilant in public business. Despite his experience in military matters he sustained many reverses in his campaigns. He was lax in his morality, and avarisious, but eager beyond measure for honour and renown. Hugh was a benefactor of Lanthony Abbey, and also of many churches in Ireland, including the abbey of Trim. Hugh's first wife was Rose or Roysya de Monemne (Monmouth); by her he had two sons, Walter (d 1241) and Hugh, both of whom are noticed separately, and also a daughter, Elayne, who married Richard de Beaufo. By the daughter of Roderic O'Connor whose name is also given as Rose, he had a son William (called Gorm or 'Blue'), who acted in close connection with his half-borthers. William de Lacy took a prominent part in the resistance to William Marshal in 1224, and was killed fighting against Cathal O'Reilly in 1233. He married a daughter of Llewelyn, prince of North Cymru. Pierce Oge Lacy, the famous rebel of Elizabeth's time, was eighteenth in descent from him, and from him also descend the Lynches of Galway. Hugh had another son, Gilbert, who was alive in 1222, and two daughters, one married ot Geoffrey de Marisco, and the other to William FitzAlan, but by which wife is not clear. The daughter of the king of Connaught was alive in 1224; whe had at least two other sons, Thomas and Henry, whose surname is given as Blund. Since William de Lacy is also sometimes called LeBlund, they may have been brothers of the whole blood. [Dictionary of National Biography XI: 376-7]

----------------

Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath (died 25 July 1186, Durrow, Leinster) was granted the lands of the Kingdom of Meath by Henry II in 1172 under the Norman Invasion of Ireland. He began construction on Castle Kileen in County Meath in 1181.

-----

Hugh de Lacy, 1st lord of Meath http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/371762/Hugh-de-Lacy-1st-lord-of-Meath

Hugh de Lacy's murder at Durrow in 1186 http://www.offalyhistory.com/articles/360/1/Hugh-de-Lacy039s-murder-at-Durrow-in-1186/Page1.html

--------------------

Lord of Meath

Of Trim Castle, Co Meath

--------------------

Hugh de Lacy (before 1135 – July 25, 1186, Durrow, Leinster) was the great-grandson of Walter de Lacy of the Norman Conquest. In 1172, County Meath was granted by Henry II of England to Hugh de Lacy. He was the 1st Lord of Meath. You can follow the pedigree up to the Earls of Meath. Hugh de Lacy and his son Walter de Lacy (before 1170 – 1241) built Trim Castle and Kilkea Castle. Hugh de Lacy was killed while supervising the construction of a Motte castle at Durrow, Co. Offaly in 1186 at the instigation of Sinnagh (the Fox) and O'Breen (see Annals of the Four Masters, 1186.5). De Lacy was initially buried at Durrow Abbey. In 1195, the archbishops of Cashel and Dublin disinterred him and buried his body in Bective Abbey in County Meath and his head in St. Thomas’s Abbey in Dublin. In 1205, his body was also interred in St. Thomas's Abbey.

--------------------

  • Lord of Meath
  • Earl of Lincoln and Ulster

--------------------

Hugh de Lacy (before 1135 – July 25, 1186, Durrow, Leinster) was the great-grandson of Walter de Lacy of the Norman Conquest. In 1172, County Meath was granted by Henry II of England to Hugh de Lacy. He was the 1st Lord of Meath. Hugh de Lacy and his son Walter de Lacy (before 1170 – 1241) built Trim Castle and Kilkea Castle. Hugh de Lacy was killed while supervising the construction of a Motte castle at Durrow, Co. Offaly in 1186 at the instigation of Sinnagh (the Fox) and O'Breen (see Annals of the Four Masters, 1186.5). De Lacy was initially buried at Durrow Abbey. In 1195, the archbishops of Cashel and Dublin disinterred him and buried his body in Bective Abbey in County Meath and his head in St. Thomas’s Abbey in Dublin. In 1205, his body was also interred in St. Thomas's Abbey.

Better here: http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/371762/Hugh-de-Lacy-1st-lord-of-Meath

view all 34

Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath, 4th Baron Lacy's Timeline

1120
1120
England
1125
1125
Ewyas Lacy, Herefordshire, England
1144
1144
Age 19
England
1162
1162
Age 37
Ewias Lacy, Herefordshire, England
1167
1167
Age 42
Ewyas Harold, Herefordshire, England
1170
1170
Age 45
Ewias Lacy, Herefordshire, England
1172
1172
Age 47
Ewias Lacy, Hertfordshire, England
1173
1173
Age 48
Of, Ewias Lacy, Herefordshire, England
1178
1178
Age 53
Ewias Lacy, Herefordshire, England
1180
1180
Age 55
Ewias Lacy, Herefordshire, England