Hugh de Lacy (son of Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath), 1st Earl of Ulster (1162 - 1242)

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Birthplace: Ewias Lacy, Herefordshire, England
Death: Died in Franciscan Friars Convent, Carrickfergus, Ireland
Managed by: Judith (Judy) A. Loubris
Last Updated:

About Hugh de Lacy (son of Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath), 1st Earl of Ulster

Alternative Birthplace: Ulster, Eire, Ireland

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_de_Lacy,_1st_Earl_of_Ulster

Hugh de Lacy, 1st Earl of Ulster (~1176 – after December 26, 1242) was the younger son of Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath. He was created Earl of Ulster in 1205 by King John of England.

Career

He erected a motte in the 1180s in Carlow, on the site of which Carlow Castle was built in the 13th century.[1] Excavations at Carlow Castle in 1996, found the remains of a series of post-holes inside a curving ditch, running under the walls of the towered keep and therefore pre-dating it. The remains of a corn-drying kiln were found to the north of this. These features were interpreted as representing the remains of the first castle here, whose defences and buildings seem to have been constructed of earth and timber. A reinterpretation of the historical sources suggests that this primary timber castle was built in the early 1180s by Hugh de Lacy for John de Clahull.[2]

In 1199, King John of England authorized de Lacy to wage war on John de Courcy. Hugh captured de Courcy in 1204.[3] An account of his capture appears in the Book of Howth. He granted Drogheda its charter. He continued the conquest of the north-eastern over-kingdom of Ulaid as part of the Norman invasion of Ireland in the 12th century, following de Courcy's success of De Courcy. The Earldom of Ulster was based around the modern counties of Antrim and Down.

He married Emmeline de Riddlesford, the daughter of Walter de Riddlesford about 1242. They had no issue. It was Emmeline's second marriage. Her first husband was Stephen Longespee, grandson of Henry II of England, by whom she had two daughters.[4]

The earldom became extinct at de Lacy's death.

References

  1. ^ "Carlow Castle". Carlow Town.com. Retrieved 2007-12-09.
  2. ^ "Carlow Castle, Carlow". Excavations.ie. Retrieved 2007-12-09.
  3. ^ Mac Annaidh, Séamus, ed. (2001). Illustrated Dictionary of Irish History. Dublin: Gill and Macmillan. ISBN 0717135365.
  4. ^ Stephen, Sir Leslie et al (1909) The Dictionary of National Biography, Volume 11 Oxford University Press, pg 379

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http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/13/24707.htm

Hugh DE LACY 1st Earl of Ulster

   * Born: Abt 1176, Ulster, Eire
   * Married (1): Abt 1195 
   * Died: Before 26 Dec 1242, Franciscan Friars Convent, Carrickfergus, Ireland
  General Notes:
   HUGH DE LACY, 4th son of Hugh DE LACY, LORD OF MEATH, by his 1st wife, Rose, daughter of [---] DE MONMOUTH, was born circa 1176. From 1195 he was an ally, but from 1201 the enemy, of John de Curcy. On 31 August 1204 Hugh and his elder brother Walter were promised 8 cantreds of John de Curcy's lands in Ulster and on 13 November following, this grant was confirmed by charter. Being granted a safe-conduct to visit England in March 1205, he was given, on 2 May, the land of Ulster to be held by the same service as that done by John de Curcy; and on 29 May this grant was confirmed, on which date (or earlier) he was created EARL OF ULSTER. He was probably Justiciar of Ireland for a short time in 1208; but when William de Briouze fled to Ireland in 1210, where he was sheltered by the Lacys, Hugh fled to Scotland with William's wife and children after his capture. During the years 1211-19 he participated in the Albigensian Crusade. In September 1221 the King gave him and his retinue safe-conduct to return to England; and in December 1222 the lands which he had obtained from his brother Walter, together with those which he had obtained through his wife, were restored to him by King Henry. These efforts by the Crown to come to terms with Hugh failed. In the autumn of 1223 he invaded Ireland, attacked Meath, besieged Carrickfergus and demolished the castle of Coleraine; and it was not until October-November 1224 that William (Marshal), Earl of Pembroke, the newly appointed Justiciar [IRL], was able to make peace with him. In May 1226 Hugh's lands were granted to his brother Walter, and it was not until 20 April 1227 that he finally recovered his estates. He was loyal to the King during the rest of his life. In the conflict with Richard (Marshal), Earl of Pembroke, in 1234 he fought with Richard de Burgh on the King's side and he accompanied de Burgh in 1235 on his expedition to conquer Connaught. He was summoned to England to confer with the King in May 1234 and April 1237. When peace was made with Scotland in 1237, he was ordered to release all Scots goods in Ulster; and in 1238 he led a force into Tyrone and Donegal to dethrone Donnell MacLoughlin and place Brian O'Neill in control. Numerous churches benefited by his grants. 5077 
  Marriage Information:
   Hugh married Lesceline DE VERDUN, daughter of Bertram DE VERDUN of Alton and Roesia DE WINDSOR, about 1195 5077. (Lesceline DE VERDUN was born about 1178 in Alton, Cheadle, Staffordshire, England 5078 and died before 1234 in Ulster, Eire.)
  Marriage Information:
   Hugh also married Emmeline DE RIDDLESFORD, daughter of Walter DE RIDELISFORD and Annora DE VITRE. (Emmeline DE RIDDLESFORD was born about 1223 in Ulster, Eire and died in 1276.)

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Hugh de Lacy, 1st Earl of Ulster (~1176 – after December 26, 1242), was the younger son of Hugh de Lacy, and founded the Earldom of Ulster.

He erected a motte in the 1180s in Carlow, on the site of which Carlow Castle was built in the 13th century.[1] Excavations at Carlow Castle in 1996, found the remains of a series of post-holes inside a curving ditch, running under the walls of the towered keep and therefore pre-dating it. The remains of a corn-drying kiln were found to the north of this. These features were interpreted as representing the remains of the first castle here, whose defences and buildings seem to have been constructed of earth and timber. A reinterpretation of the historical sources suggests that this primary timber castle was built in the early 1180s by Hugh de Lacy for John de Clahull.[2]

In 1199, King John authorized de Lacy to wage war on John de Courcy. Hugh captured de Courcy in 1203. An account of his capture appears in the Book of Howth. He granted Drogheda its charter. He continued the conquest of the east of the province of Ulster during the Norman invasion of Ireland in the 12th century, following the success of De Courcy (died 1219). He founded the Earldom of Ulster based around the modern counties of Antrim and Down.

References:

^ "Carlow Castle". Carlow Town.com. http://www.carlowtown.com/info_tosee.asp. Retrieved 2007-12-09.

^ "Carlow Castle, Carlow". Excavations.ie. http://www.excavations.ie/Pages/Details.php?Year=&County=Carlow&id=1943. Retrieved 2007-12-09.

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Hugh de Lacy, 1st Earl of Ulster's Timeline

1162
1162
Ewias Lacy, Herefordshire, England
1194
1194
Age 32
Ulster, Ireland
1195
1195
Age 33
1234
1234
Age 72
Ulster, Ireland
1242
December 26, 1242
Age 81
Franciscan Friars Convent, Carrickfergus, Ireland
????
????
????
1st husband 2nd wife