Hugo (b. - c.500) MP

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Hugo, Rex Francorum's Geni Profile

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Death: Died
Occupation: rex Francorum
Managed by: Ben M. Angel
Last Updated:

About Hugo

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Italy Kings:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ITALY,%20Kings%20to%20962.htm#Theodemirdied474B

AMALAFRIDA (-murdered [523/25]).

Iordanes names "Amalfridam germanam suam [Theoderici]" as the mother of "Theodehadi" and wife of "Africa regi Vandalorum…Thrasamundo"[235].

Emperor Zeno used her as ambassador to her half-brother in 487 to thwart his attack on Constantinople[236].

Her second marriage was arranged by her half-brother, Theodoric King of Italy, as part of his efforts to foster the support of the Vandals. Amalafrida's dowry was Lilybæum in western Sicily[237].

After the death of her husband, she unsuccessfully protested his successor's withdrawal of support from her brother, but she was outmanœuvred and killed[238].

m firstly [HUGO ---] (-before 500).

The Widukindi Res Gestæ Saxonicæ names "Huga rex Francorum…unicam filiam Amalbergam" who married "Irminfredo regi Thuringorum"[239], but there is no indication to whom "Huga rex Francorum" could refer.

m secondly ([500]) THRASAMUND, King of the Vandals, son of [GENTO the Vandal or GELIMER the Vandal] (before 460-523).

Amalafrida & her first husband had two children:

a) THEODAHAD (-murdered Dec 536).

Iordanes names "Amalfridam germanam suam [Theoderici]" as the mother of "Theodehadi qui postea rex fuit" but does not name his father[240].

Disappointed in not succeeding his uncle King Theodoric, Theodahad acquired considerable private estates in Tuscany "where he led a retired life at home" according to Jordanes[241]. He was planning to sell this "kingdom" to the emperor, in return for retirement in Constantinople and an annual pension, when his cousin Queen Amalasuintha recalled him and appointed him co-regent in 534[242].

Procopius records that “Theodatus, filius Amalafridas sororis Theoderici” possessed "agrorum Tusciæ" and planned to deliver "Tusciam in Iustiniani Augusti potestatem"[243]. In a later passage, Procopius records that “Theodatus” was appointed regent by "Amalasuntha"[244].

He arrested the Queen end-534 and imprisoned her on an island in Lake Bolsena[245], assuming the title THEODAHAD King of Italy. Iordanes records that "Theodahadum consobrinum suum" succeeded Athalric, appointed by the latter's mother whom Theodahad killed soon after his accession[246].

After the Queen's murder, Emperor Justinian ordered a two-pronged attack against Sicily and Dalmatia in revenge. Theodahad repelled the initial threat in Dalmatia in 536, but an imperial fleet occupied Split and Dubrovnik. The forces in Sicily, under Belisarius, moved into mainland Italy, occupied Naples.

Theodahad marched as far as Rome to meet the invaders, but was murdered while trying to escape back to Ravenna[247].

m GUDELIVA, daughter of ---. The primary source which names the wife of Theodahad has not so far been identified. Theodahad & his wife had two children.

b) AMALABERGA .

Iordanes names "Amalabergam" as the daughter of "Amalfridam germanam suam [Theoderici]" and records her marriage to "Thuringorum regi…Herminefredo"[252]. “Theodericus rex” wrote to “Herminafrido Regi Thuringorum” granting him “neptis” in marriage[253]. Procopius records that “Hermenefrido Thoringorum regi” married "Theoderici…Amelobergam, Amalafridæ sororis suæ filiam"[254]. The Widukindi Res Gestæ Saxonicæ names "Huga rex Francorum…unicam filiam Amalbergam" who married "Irminfredo regi Thuringorum"[255].

Gregory of Tours calls Amalaberg, wife of Hermanfrid, a "wicked and cruel woman" who sowed the seeds of civil war between her husband and his brother Baderic[256]. She escaped to Ravenna with her children after the Franks attacked Thuringia and killed her husband[257].

m ([510]) HERMANFRED, King of the Thuringians, son of --- (-534).

References:

[235] Iordanes Getarum, MGH Auct. ant. V.1, p. 132.

[236] Wolfram, H. (1998) History Of The Goths (Berkeley, California), p. 278.

[237] Wolfram (1998), p. 308.

[238] Wolfram (1998), p. 308.

[239] Widukindi Res Gestæ Saxonicæ I.9, MGH SS III, p. 420.

[240] Iordanes Getarum, MGH Auct. ant. V.1, p. 132.

[241] Jordanes, LIX, p. 51.

[242] Jordanes, LIX, p. 51, and Wolfram (1998), p. 333.

[243] Procopius, Vol. II, De Bello Gothico I.3, pp. 16-17.

[244] Procopius, Vol. II, De Bello Gothico I.4, p. 23.

[245] Jordanes, LIX, p. 51, and Wolfram (1998), p. 338.

[246] Iordanes Romanorum, MGH Auct. ant. V.1, p. 48.

[247] Wolfram (1998), pp. 339-41.

[252] Iordanes Getarum, MGH Auct. ant. V.1, p. 132.

[253] RHGF IV, p. 8.

[254] Procopius, Vol. II, De Bello Gothico I.12, p. 65.

[255] Widukindi Res Gestæ Saxonicæ I.9, MGH SS III, p. 420.

[256] Thorpe, L. (trans.) (1974) Gregory of Tours: The History of the Franks (Penguin) III.4, p. 164.

[257] Wolfram (1998), p. 320.

--------------------------

From People and Identity in Ostrogothic Italy 489-554:

http://books.google.com/books?id=7ndeDi_fwq0C&pg=PA450&vq=eusebia&dq=people+and+identity+in+ostrogothic+italy+%22489+554%22&sig=JutSxo0EK4syKdIKGPleEbqBv5s#v=onepage&q=eusebia&f=false

Anonymous, d. c.500

First husband of Amalafrida, the sister of Theodoricus. He was the father of Theodahadus and of Amalaberga, hence grandfather of Amalafridas, Theudegisclus and Theudenantha. He was presumably not one of Theodoric's many diplomatic family alliances, since Theodahad was already an adult by 507/511, so the marriage had probably taken place before Theodoric and his family came to Italy. He was therefore presumably someone from the Balkans, who probably identified himself as a goth, and who probably had a Germanic name (since no Latin name appears among his children or grandchildren). Given the possible dates, Amalafrida might have married him upon her return to Theodoric from the retinue of the Empress Ariadne in c.487 (on this event, see PLRE2: 63 and Wolfram, Goths, p.278.