Hugobert von Echternach, Count Palatine (c.645 - c.697) MP

‹ Back to von Echternach surname

Is your surname von Echternach?

Research the von Echternach family

Hugobert von Echternach, Count Palatine's Geni Profile

Records for Hugobert von Echternach

186,681 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Nicknames: "Hugobert", "Hugoberto", "Chugoberctus", "Hociobercthus"
Birthplace: Echternach
Death: Died in Laon, Picardie, France
Occupation: Senechal and Pfalzgraf, Founder of Echternach, Sénéchal, 693, Comte palatin, d'Ecternach, 697, Prince, Évêque, de Maa, Pfalzgrewve, Seneschal of Clovis IV and Count of the palace at the Merovingian court, Maire du Palais et Sénéchal, Seneschall
Managed by: Harald Sævold
Last Updated:

About Hugobert von Echternach, Count Palatine

Hugobert (also Chugoberctus or Hociobercthus) (died probably in 697) was a seneschal and a count of the palace at the Merovingian court during the reigns of Theuderic III and Childebert III. He was a grandson of the dux Theotar, and it is assumed, but not proven, that his father was a certain Chugus, who in 617 became mayor of the palace of Austrasia. The juxtaposition of names in the Vita Landiberto episcopi Traiectensis may imply a relationship between him and the family of Saint Lambert.

It has been disproven that he is one and the same with bishop Hugobert of Liège, because his wife appears in the records of Echternach in the year 698 as a widow. He was married to Irmina of Oeren, whom shortly after his death, made possible the founding of the Abbey of Echternach. He last appears in a royal charter dated 14 March 697.

Hugobert and Irmina had several daughters, including:

Plectrude, 691/717 witnessed, the first wife of Pippin of Herstal and founder of the Abbey St. Maria im Kapitol in Cologne

Adela of Pfalzel (b. ca. 660, d. ca. 735) founder of the convent Pfalzel

Reginlind, whose second marriage after the death of her husband was to the duke Theudebert of Bavaria

Chrodelind

  • possibly* Bertrada of Prüm (b. ca. 670, d. after 721), the founder of the Prüm Abbey and mother of count Caribert of Laon, who was father of Bertrada of Laon, who in turn was mother of Charlemagne.

--------------------

King of the Franks 711-716

In 711, Dagobert III succeeded to act as the next Merovingian puppet king, dominated by the Austrasian Mayor Charles Martel.

-----------------------

Dagobert III

Encyclopædia Britannica Article

born 699

died 715/716

Merovingian Frankish king who succeeded his father, Childebert III, in 711. For most of his reign the boy was dominated by Pippin II of Herstal, the Austrasian mayor of the palace.

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dagobert_III

Dagobert III (699-715) was Merovingian king of the Franks (711-715).

He was a son of Childebert III and Edonne. He succeeded his father as the head of the three Frankish kingdoms—Neustria and Austrasia, unified since Pippin's victory at Tertry in 687, and the Kingdom of Burgundy—in 711, at the age of twelve. Real power, however, still remained with the Mayor of the Palace, Pippin of Herstal, who died in 714. Pippin's death occasioned open conflict between his heirs and the Neustrian nobles who elected the mayors of the palace.

While attention was focused on combatting the Frisians in the north, areas of southern Gaul began to secede during Dagobert's brief time: Savaric, the fighting bishop of Auxerre, in 714 and 715 subjugated Orléans, Nevers, Avallon, and Tonnerre on his own account, and Eudo in Toulouse and Antenor in Provence were essentially independent magnates.

Dagobert III (699-715) was Merovingian king of the Franks (711-715). He was a son of Childebert III and Edonne. He succeeded his father as the head of the three Frankish kingdoms- Neustria and Austrasia, unified since Pippin's victory at Tertry in 687, and the Kingdom of Burgundy -in 711, at the age of twelve. Real power, however, still remained with the Mayor of the Palace, Pippin of Herstal, who died in 714.

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dagobert_III

Dagobert III (699-715) was Merovingian king of the Franks (711-715).

He was a son of Childebert III and Edonne. He succeeded his father as the head of the three Frankish kingdoms—Neustria and Austrasia, unified since Pippin's victory at Tertry in 687, and the Kingdom of Burgundy—in 711, at the age of twelve. Real power, however, still remained with the Mayor of the Palace, Pippin of Herstal, who died in 714. Pippin's death occasioned open conflict between his heirs and the Neustrian nobles who elected the mayors of the palace.

While attention was focused on combatting the Frisians in the north, areas of southern Gaul began to secede during Dagobert's brief time: Savaric, the fighting bishop of Auxerre, in 714 and 715 subjugated Orléans, Nevers, Avallon, and Tonnerre on his own account, and Eudo in Toulouse and Antenor in Provence were essentially independent magnates.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merovingian

The Merovingians (also Merovings) were a Salian Frankish dynasty that came to rule the Franks in a region (known as Francia in Latin) largely corresponding to ancient Gaul from the middle of the fifth century. Their politics involved frequent civil warfare among branches of the family. During the final century of the Merovingian rule, the dynasty was increasingly pushed into a ceremonial role. The Merovingian rule was ended in 751 when Pepin the Short formally deposed Childeric III, beginning the Carolingian monarchy.

They were sometimes referred to as the "long-haired kings" (Latin reges criniti) by contemporaries, for their symbolically unshorn hair (traditionally the tribal leader of the Franks wore his hair long, as distinct from the Romans and the tonsured clergy). The term "Merovingian" comes from medieval Latin Merovingi or Merohingi ("sons of Merovech"), an alteration of an unattested Old West Low Franconian form, akin to their dynasty's Old English name Merewīowing,[1] with the final -ing being a typical patronymic suffix.

Origins

Signet ring of Childeric I. Monnaie de Paris.

The Merovingian dynasty owes its name to the semi-legendary Merovech (Latinised as Meroveus or Merovius), leader of the Salian Franks, and emerges into wider history with the victories of his son Childeric I (reigned c.457 – 481) against the Visigoths, Saxons, and Alemanni. Childeric's son Clovis I (481 – 511) went on to unite most of Gaul north of the Loire under his control around 486, when he defeated Syagrius, the Roman ruler in those parts. He won the Battle of Tolbiac against the Alemanni in 496, at which time, according to Gregory of Tours, Clovis adopted his wife's Nicene Christian faith. He subsequently went on to decisively defeat the Visigothic kingdom of Toulouse in the Battle of Vouillé in 507. After Clovis' death, his kingdom was partitioned among his four sons, and over the next century this tradition of partition would continue. Even when several Merovingian kings simultaneously ruled their own realms, the kingdom — not unlike the late Roman Empire — was conceived of as a single entity ruled collectively by these several kings (in their own realms) among whom a turn of events could result in the reunification of the whole kingdom under a single ruler. Leadership among the early Merovingians was probably based on mythical descent and alleged divine patronage, expressed in terms of continued military success.

[edit] History

Frankish gold Tremissis, imitation of Byzantine Tremissis, mid-500s.

Coin of Chlothar II, 584-628. British Museum.

Upon Clovis' death in 511, the Merovingian kingdom included all the Franks and all of Gaul but Burgundy. To the outside, the kingdom, even when divided under different kings, maintained unity and conquered Burgundy in 534. After the fall of the Ostrogoths, the Franks also conquered Provence. After this their borders with Italy (ruled by the Lombards since 568) and Visigothic Septimania remained fairly stable.[2]

Internally, the kingdom was divided among Clovis' sons and later among his grandsons and frequently saw war between the different kings, who quickly allied among themselves and against one another. The death of one king would create conflict between the surviving brothers and the deceased's sons, with differing outcomes. Later, conflicts were intensified by the personal feud around Brunhilda. However, yearly warfare often did not constitute general devastation but took on an almost ritual character, with established 'rules' and norms.[3]

Eventually, Clotaire II in 613 reunited the entire Frankish realm under one ruler. Later divisions produced the stable units of Austrasia, Neustria, Burgundy and Aquitania.

Triens of Dagobert I and moneyer Romanos, Augaune, 629-639, gold 1.32g. Monnaie de Paris.

The frequent wars had weakened royal power, while the aristocracy had made great gains and procured enormous concessions from the kings in return for their support. These concessions saw the very considerable power of the king parcelled out and retained by leading comites and duces (counts and dukes). Very little is in fact known about the course of the seventh century due to a scarcity of sources, but Merovingians remained in power until the eighth century.

Clotaire's son Dagobert I (died 639), who had sent troops to Spain and pagan Slavic territories in the east, is commonly seen as the last powerful Merovingian King. Later kings are known as rois fainéants ("do-nothing kings"), despite the fact that only the last two kings did nothing. The kings, even strong-willed men like Dagobert II and Chilperic II, were not the main agents of political conflicts, leaving this role to their mayors of the palace, who increasingly substituted their own interest for their king's. Many kings came to the throne at a young age and died in the prime of life, weakening royal power further.

The conflict between mayors was ended when the Austrasians under Pepin the Middle triumphed in 687 in the Battle of Tertry. After this, Pepin, though not a king, was the political ruler of the Frankish kingdom and left this position as a heritage to his sons. It was now the sons of the mayor that divided the realm among each other under the rule of a single king.

After Pepin's long rule, his son Charles Martel assumed power, fighting against nobles and his own stepmother. His reputation for ruthlessness further undermined the king's position. During the last years of his life he even ruled without a king, though he did not assume royal dignity. His sons Carloman and Pepin again appointed a Merovingian figure-head to stem rebellion on the kingdom's periphery. However, in 751, Pepin finally displaced the last Merovingian and, with the support of the nobility and the blessing of Pope Zachary, became one of the Frankish Kings. The deposed Merovingian was sent into a monastery, bereft of his symbolic long hair. With Pepin, the Carolingians ruled the Franks as Kings.

[edit] Government and law

Merovingian Kingdoms

The Merovingian king was the master of the booty of war, both movable and in lands and their folk, and he was in charge of the redistribution of conquered wealth among his followers, though these powers were not absolute. "When he died his property was divided equally among his heirs as though it were private property: the kingdom was a form of patrimony" (Rouche 1987 p 420). Some scholars have attributed this to the Merovingians lacking a sense of res publica (engl. republic for "public matter"), but other historians have criticized this view as an oversimplification.

The kings appointed magnates to be comites (counts), charging them with defense, administration, and the judgement of disputes. This happened against the backdrop of a newly isolated Europe without its Roman systems of taxation and bureaucracy, the Franks having taken over administration as they gradually penetrated into the thoroughly Romanised west and south of Gaul. The counts had to provide armies, enlisting their milites and endowing them with land in return. These armies were subject to the king's call for military support. There were annual national assemblies of the nobles of the realm and their armed retainers which decided major policies of warmaking. The army also acclaimed new kings by raising them on its shields in a continuance of ancient practice which made the king the leader of the warrior-band. Furthermore, the king was expected to support himself with the products of his private domain (royal demesne), which was called the fisc. This system developed in time into feudalism, and expectations of royal self-sufficiency lasted until the Hundred Years' War. Trade declined with the decline and fall of the Roman Empire, and agricultural estates were mostly self-sufficient. The remaining international trade was dominated by Middle Eastern merchants, often Jewish Radanites.

Merovingian law was not universal law equally applicable to all; it was applied to each man according to his origin: Ripuarian Franks were subject to their own Lex Ripuaria, codified at a late date (Beyerle and Buchner 1954), while the so-called Lex Salica (Salic Law) of the Salian clans, first tentatively codified in 511 (Rouche 1987 p 423) was invoked under medieval exigencies as late as the Valois era. In this the Franks lagged behind the Burgundians and the Visigoths, that they had no universal Roman-based law. In Merovingian times, law remained in the rote memorisation of rachimburgs, who memorised all the precedents on which it was based, for Merovingian law did not admit of the concept of creating new law, only of maintaining tradition. Nor did its Germanic traditions offer any code of civil law required of urbanised society, such as Justinian caused to be assembled and promulgated in the Byzantine Empire. The few surviving Merovingian edicts are almost entirely concerned with settling divisions of estates among heirs.

[edit] Religion and culture

Main articles: Merovingian art and architecture and Merovingian script

Frankish gold Tremissis with Christian cross, issued by minter Madelinus, Dorestad, The Netherlands, mid-600s.

Merovingian fibulae. Cabinet des Médailles.

Merovingian culture was so thoroughly imbued with religion that Yitzhak Hen, Professor of Medieval History at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel, found that a presentation of Merovingian popular culture was essentially synonymous with Merovingian religion, which he presented through written texts.[4] Merovingian culture certainly witnessed an extensive proliferation of saints.

Christianity was brought to the Franks by monks. The most famous of these missionaries is St. Columbanus, an Irish monk who enjoyed great influence with Queen Balthild. Merovingian kings and queens used the newly forming ecclesiastical power structure to their advantage. Monasteries and episcopal seats were shrewdly awarded to elites who supported the dynasty. Extensive parcels of land were donated to monasteries to exempt those lands from royal taxation and to preserve them within the family. The family would maintain its dominance over the monastery by appointing family members as abbots. Extra sons and daughters who could not be married off were sent to monasteries so that they would not threaten the inheritance of older children. This pragmatic use of monasteries ensured close ties between elites and monastic properties.

A gold chalice from the Treasure of Gourdon.

Cover of Merovingian sarcophagus with Christian IX monogram, Musée de Saint-Germain-en-Laye.

Numerous Merovingians who served as bishops and abbots, or who generously funded abbeys and monasteries, were rewarded with sainthood. The outstanding handful of Frankish saints who were not of the Merovingian kinship nor the family alliances that provided Merovingian counts and dukes, deserve a closer inspection for that fact alone: like Gregory of Tours, they were almost without exception from the Gallo-Roman aristocracy in regions south and west of Merovingian control. The most characteristic form of Merovingian literature is represented by the Lives of the saints. Merovingian hagiography did not set out to reconstruct a biography in the Roman or the modern sense, but to attract and hold popular devotion by the formulas of elaborate literary exercises, through which the Frankish Church channeled popular piety within orthodox channels, defined the nature of sanctity and retained some control over the posthumous cults that developed spontaneously at burial sites, where the life-force of the saint lingered, to do good for the votary.[5]

The vitae et miracula, for impressive miracles were an essential element of Merovingian hagiography, were read aloud on saints’ feast days. Many Merovingian saints, and the majority of female saints, were local ones, venerated only within strictly circumscribed regions; their cults were revived in the High Middle Ages, when the population of women in religious orders increased enormously. Judith Oliver noted five Merovingian female saints in the diocese of Liège who appeared in a long list of saints in a late thirteenth-century psalter-hours.[6]

Baptistry of St. Jean, Poitiers

The characteristics they shared with many Merovingian female saints may be mentioned: Regenulfa of Incourt, a seventh-century virgin in French-speaking Brabant of the ancestral line of the dukes of Brabant fled from a proposal of marriage to live isolated in the forest, where a curative spring sprang forth at her touch; Ermelindis of Meldert, a sixth-century virgin descended from Pepin I, inhabited several isolated villas; Begga of Andenne, the mother of Pepin II, founded seven churches in Andenne during her widowhood; the purely legendary "Oda of Amay" was drawn into the Carolingian line by spurious genealogy in her thirteenth-century vita, which made her the mother of Arnulf, Bishop of Metz, but she has been identified with the historical Saint Chrodoara;[7] finally, the widely-venerated Gertrude of Nivelles, sister of Begga in the Carolingian ancestry, was abbess of a nunnery established by her mother. The vitae of six late Merovingian saints that illustrate the political history of the era have been translated and edited by Paul Fouracre and Richard A. Gerberding, and presented with Liber Historiae Francorum, to provide some historical context.[8]

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dagobert_III

--------------------

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dagobert_III

Dagobert III (699 - 715) was een Merovingische koning van de Franken tussen 711 en 715.

Dagobert III was de zoon van Childebert III en Edonne. In 711 volgde hij zijn vader op als koning van Austrasië, Neustrië en Bourgondië. Omdat hij toen slechts 12 jaar oud was, berustte de echte leiding bij zijn hofmeier Pepijn van Herstal tot deze in 714 overleed. Diens vrouw, Plectrude, wilde vermijden dat de koning zelf enige macht verwierf, en nam dus de rol van haar overleden echtgenoot als hofmeier over. Daarna regeerde de buitenechtelijke zoon van Pepijn van Herstal, Karel Martel.

Als koning werd Dagobert III in 715 opgevolgd door Chilperik II.

-------------------- Prince Bavarois

Sénéchal de Bavière -------------------- Sources point to Martin Laon as son of Hugobert

http://www.geni.com/profile/index/5478004983960120317#/tab/overview

this parental link removed by me, Henn Sarv -------------------- Occupation: Prince of Bavaria -------------------- http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~havens5/p31262.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Count_palatine -------------------- Titel: Prins av Bayern -------------------- Hugobert (also Chugoberctus or Hociobercthus) (died probably in 697) was a seneschal and a count of the palace at the Merovingian court during the reigns of Theuderic III and Childebert III. He was a grandson of the dux Theotar, and it is assumed, but not proven, that his father was a certain Chugus, who in 617 became mayor of the palace of Austrasia. The juxtaposition of names in the Vita Landiberto episcopi Traiectensis may imply a relationship between him and the family of Saint Lambert.

It has been disproven that he is one and the same with bishop Hugobert of Liège, because his wife appears in the records of Echternach in the year 698 as a widow. He was married to Irmina of Oeren, whom shortly after his death, made possible the founding of the Abbey of Echternach. He last appears in a royal charter dated 14 March 697.

view all 17

Hugobert von Echternach, Count Palatine's Timeline

620
620
620
Liege, Austrasia
645
645
Echternach
650
650
Age 5
Heristal, Liege, Belgium
660
660
Age 15
667
667
Age 22
France
685
685
Age 40
Liege, Liege, Walloon Region, Belgium
687
687
Age 42
France
690
690
Age 45
Laon, Picardie, France
697
March 14, 697
Age 52
Laon, Picardie, France