Hugues Magnus, comte de Vermandois

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Hugues I 'le Grand' de Vermandois (Capet), comte de Vermandois

Also Known As: "'le Grand'", "the Great Duke of France and Burgandy", "The Great", "the Great", "le Grand", "Le Grand", "Magnus", ""The /Great"/", "Хюго Вермандоа (Капетинги)", "Hugh of Vermandois", "Mangus", ""The Great" /de Vermandois/", "Count of Vermandois", "Hugh Magnus", "/Le Gra...", "T", "Co..."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Vermandois, Normandy, France
Death: Died in Tarsus, Mersin Province, Turkey (Asia Minor)
Cause of death: Succumbed to an arrow wound in the knee
Place of Burial: St. Paul's Church, Tarsus, Mersin Province, Turkey (Asia Minor)
Immediate Family:

Son of Henri I, roi de France and Anne de Kiev reine consort de France
Husband of Adelard de Vermandois (Hairless) and Adèle (Countess) de Vermandois, comtesse de Vermandois et Valois
Father of Isabel (Elisabeth) de Vermandois; Mathilde Maud/Matilda de Vermandois; Henri de Vermandois, Seigneur de Chaumont-en-Vexin; Beatrice de Vermandois; Agnès de Vermandois and 6 others
Brother of Emma Capet de France, Princesse; Philippe I, roi de France and Robert Capet de France, (mort jeune)
Half brother of Infant Capet

Occupation: Comte de Vermandois, Valois, et Crepy; Head of the French Contingent in the First Crusade; Crusader Knight in the "Crusade of the Faint-hearted", Herre till Chamont-en-Vexin, 1087 greve av Vermandois, greve av Vermandois, Count of Vermandois
Managed by: Pam Wilson
Last Updated:

About Hugues Magnus, comte de Vermandois

Note regarding his name: Sources show that Hugues Magnus was a compound name. See below for details.

Wikipedia

From the English Wikipedia page of Hugh I, Count of Vermandois:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_I,_Count_of_Vermandois

French Wikipedia: (1057-1102)

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugues_Ier_de_Vermandois

Hugh I (1053 – October 18, 1101), called Magnus or the Great, was a younger son of Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev and younger brother of Philip I.

He was in his own right Count of Vermandois, but an ineffectual leader and soldier, great only in his boasting.

Indeed, Steven Runciman is certain that his nickname Magnus (greater or elder), applied to him by William of Tyre, is a copyist's error, and should be Minus (younger), referring to Hugh as younger brother of the King of France.

In early 1096 Hugh and Philip began discussing the First Crusade after news of the Council of Clermont reached them in Paris. Although Philip could not participate, as he had been excommunicated, Hugh was said to have been influenced to join the Crusade after an eclipse of the moon on February 11, 1096.

That summer Hugh's army left France for Italy, where they would cross the Adriatic Sea into territory of the Byzantine Empire, unlike the other Crusader armies who were travelling by land. On the way, many of the soldiers led by fellow Crusader Emicho of Flonheim joined Hugh's army after Emicho was defeated by the Hungarians (under King Coloman I "The Booklover" at Moson fortress), whose land he had been pillaging.

Hugh crossed the Adriatic from Bari in Southern Italy, but many of his ships were destroyed in a storm off the Byzantine port of Dyrrhachium.

Hugh and most of his army was rescued and escorted to Constantinople, where they arrived in November 1096. Prior to his arrival (he would be the first to arrive in Constantinople), Hugh sent an arrogant, insulting letter to Eastern Roman Emperor Alexius I Comnenus, according to the Emperor's biography by his daughter (the Alexiad), demanding that Alexius meet with him:

"Know, O King, that I am King of Kings, and superior to all, who are under the sky. You are now permitted to greet me, on my arrival, and to receive me with magnificence, as befits my nobility."[1]

Alexius was already wary of the armies about to arrive, after the unruly mob led by Peter the Hermit had passed through earlier in the year ("The People's Crusade"). Alexius kept Hugh in custody in a monastery until Hugh swore an oath of vassalage to him.

After the Crusaders had successfully made their way across Seljuk territory and, in 1098, captured Antioch, Hugh (and Baldwin of Hainault were) sent back to Constantinople to appeal for reinforcements from Alexius (Baldwin mysteriously vanishes in an ambush along the way). Alexius was uninterested in sending an expedition to claim the city so late in summer. (This triggers off a series of arguments in Antioch, where Bohemund asserts that Alexius had violated his oath to assist the crusades, and therefore, the city by rights was his. This argument, and an outbreak of typhus, ties up the Crusaders for the remainder of the year.)

Hugh, instead of returning to Antioch to help plan the siege of Jerusalem, went back to France. There he was scorned for not having fulfilled his vow as a Crusader to complete a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and Pope Paschal II threatened to excommunicate him.

Hugh joined the minor Crusade of 1101 ("The Crusade of the Faint-Hearted," alongside William IX of Aquitaine and Welf I, Duke of Bavaria, and accompanied by Ida of Austria, mother of Leopold III of Austria). Half of this army was allowed to set sail from Constantinople for Palestine, while the other half marched overland, reaching Heraclea by September. Hugh was wounded in battle with the Turks (ambushed by Kilij Arslan) in September, and died of his wounds on October 18 in Tarsus. (Their group continued eastward under William of Nevers and Raymond of Toulouse, arriving at Jerusalem in Easter 1102. Kilij Arslan later establishes his capital at Konya after his victories over the "Crusade of the Faint-Hearted.")

Family and children

He married Adele of Vermandois, the daughter of Herbert IV, Count of Vermandois and Alice, Countess of Valois. They had nine children:

1. Matilda(1080-1130), married Ralph I of Beaugency

2. Beatrice (1082-after1144), married Hugh III of Gournay

3. Ralph I (1085-1152)

4. Elizabeth of Vermandois, Countess of Leicester (1085-1131)

5. Constance (1086-??), married Godfrey de la Ferté-Gaucher

6. Agnes (1090-1125), married Boniface of Savone

7. Henry (1091-1130), Lord of Chaumont en Vexin

8. Simon (1093-1148)

9. William (c. 1094-c.1096)

[In order originally presented on Wikipedia page:

1. Count Raoul I of Vermandois

2. Henry, senior of Chaumont-en-Vexin, (d. 1130).

3. Simon, Bishop of Noyon

4. Elizabeth de Vermandois, married Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester; William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey

5. Matilde de Vermandois, married Raoul I of Beaugency

6. Constance de Vermandois, married Godefroy de la Ferte-Gaucher

7. Agnes de Vermandois, married Margrave Boniface del Vasto. Mother of Adelaide del Vasto.

8. Beatrix de Vermandois, married Hugh III of Gournay-en-Bray

9. Emma de Vermandois)

References

1.^ http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Alexiad/Book_X chapter VII

Was He Called Hugues Magnus?

Steven Runciman is certain that his nickname Magnus (greater or elder), applied to him by William of Tyre, is a copyist's error, and should be Minus (younger), referring to Hugh as younger brother of the King of France. However, on this point Runciman appears to have been wrong.

"The byname "Magnus" with the given name Hugo in his family did not reflect an outstanding career or personal qualities, was not an error, and did not originate with William of Tyre. It has also been said incorrectly that the byname originated with a mistranslation into Latin of "le maisn", indicating only "the younger brother" (i.e. of King Philippe I); however, the doublet Hugo Magnus was traditional in the early Capetian family, and the count of Vermandois was the fourth man to bear this combined name including others who were eldest or only sons. Notably, this Hugo Magnus, count of Vermandois had a daughter Agnes who married Bonifacio I, margrave of Vasto, giving birth to a younger son by him who was named Hugo Magnus (Ugomagno) after the maternal grandfather. It seems pretty clear from the repetition over many generations that family members considered this a compound name (emphasis added), hoping that the boy would grow up to display its quality, with the second element being definitely "magnus" (great)." (Peter Stewart, soc.genealogy.medieval, Aug. 15, 2007)

Some of the sources that call him Hugues Magnus include:

  1. . Prou, Recueil des Actes de Philippe Ier, Roi de France (1059–1108) (1908): 217–221 (charter of King Philippe I of France dated 1076; charter witnessed by “Hugoni magni, fratris Philipi regis”).
  2. . Albert of Aix records that "Hugonem Magnum fratrem regis Franciæ, Drogonem et Clareboldum" were held in chains in prison by the emperor at Constantinople. Reference: Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber II, Cap. IX, p. 305. Citation courtesy of Charles Cawley.
  3. . Robert of Torigny records the death in 1102 of "Hugo Magnus apud Tarsum." Reference: Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1102, p. 124. Citation courtesy of Charles Cawley.
  4. . Bruel, Recueil des Chartes de l’Abbaye de Cluny 5 (Coll. de Docs. inédits sur l'Histoire de France 1st Ser.) (1894): 421–422 (charter dated c.1140 of Pierre, Abbot of Cluny, names Count Raoul of Perrone,

son of Hugues le Grand, brother of King Philippe I, great friend and benefactor [Comes Rodulfus de Perrona, filius Hugonis magni, fratris Philippe regis Francorum, magnus amicus et benefactor].

  1. . Monumenta Germaniae Historica Scriptorum 13 (1881): 253 (Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis: “Nunc ad Hugonem Magnum revertamur. Hugo cognomento Magnus, frater Philippi regis Francorum, de Adelaide comitissa Veromandensium genuit Radulfum comitem Veromandie et Henricum de Chauni et Simonem episcopum Noviomensem et filias.
  2. . Monumenta Germaniae Historica Scriptorum 13 (1881): 257 (De Genere Comitum Flandrensium Notæ Parisienses: "Comes Herbertus genuit Odonem et Adelam sororem. Odo fuit fatuus et indiscretus. Barones Viromandenses rogaverunt regem, ut Adelam daret Hugoni le Magne, fratri eiusdem regis; quod factum est. De predicto comite Hugone et predicta Adela uxore sua exivit comes Radulfus, Simon Noviomensis episcopus, dominus Henricus de Chaumont et quatuor filie."

(Douglas Richardson, soc.genealogy.medieval, May 12, 2012)

Was He Count of Vermandois?

Some researchers have suggested that Hugues Magnus was not Count of Vermandois (see, e.g., Douglas Richardson, soc.genealogy.medieval, May 13, 2012).

The evidence shows he was Count of Vermandois, but later in life.

Some references that do not call him Count of Vermandois include the following (from Douglas Richardson, soc.genealogy.medieval, May 13, 2012).

  1. . Annales Ordinis S. Benedicti occidentalium monachorum patriarchæ 5 (1713): 95 (charter of King Philippe I of France dated 1075; charter witnessed by “Hugues brother of the king” [Hugonis fratris regis].)
  2. . Carlier, Histoire du Duché de Valois 1 (1764): 346–352 (“Hugues le Grand commença à prendre la qualité de Comté de Crépy, avant le fin duonzième siècle.").
  3. . Gallia Christiana 10 (1751): 207 (letter of Hugh Bishop of Senlis to the Abbot of Crepy dated c.1095; letter mentions “domni Hugonis comitis de Crispeio”), 246–247 (charter of King Philippe I dated 1079;

charter witnessed by “comitis Hugonis fratris Regis”), 248 (charter of Guy, Bishop of Beauvais for church of Esserens dated 1081; charter names “Philippo rege & Hugone regis fratre de Crispeio & ejus uxoreAdela” and is witnessed by “Hugo de Crispeio” and “Adelae uxoris Hugonis de Crispeio.”).

  1. . Academy 15 (1879): 457–458 (Letter of Bishop Ivo dated at beginning of A.D. 1096: “Ivo, Dei gratia Carnotensis episcopus, clericis Mellentis .... Perlatum est ad aures nostras quod Mellentinus comes

ducere velit in uxorem filiam Hugonis Crispeiensis comitis; quod fieri non sinit concors descretorum et canonum sanctio, dicens: (Conjunctiones consanguineorum fleri prohibemus). Horum autem consanguinitas nec ignota est, nec remota, sicut testantur et probare parati sunt praeclari viri de eadem sati prosapia. Dicunt enim quia Gualterius Albus genuit matrem Gualeranni comitis, qui genuit matrem Roberti comitis. Item supradictus Gualterius genuit Radulphum patrem alterius Radulfi, qui genuit Vermandensem comitissam, ex qua nata est uxor comitis Hugonis, cujus filiam nunc ducere vult Mellentinus comes.”).

  1. . Prou, Recueil des Actes de Philippe Ier, Roi de France (1059–1108) (1908): cxxxv (Souscriptions des frères du roi. Les frères du roi, Robert et Hugues ont souscrit quelques diplômes royaux … Quant à la

souscription d’Hugues, on la rencontre de 1067 à 1082. Dan un diplôme de 1076 on lui a donné le surnom de ‘Grand’, que les historiens lui ont conservé. Il est ordinairement qualifié simplement frère du roi; mais un diplôme de janvier 1079 fait précéder son nom du titre de comte; il était devenu en effet comte de Vermandois par mariage avec la fille d’Herbert IV.), cxciii, note 1; cxciv, note 1; 137–139 (charter of King Philippe I of France dated 1070; charter witnessed by “Hugues brother of the king” [Hugonis fratris regis].), 144–145 (charter of King Philippe I dated 1071; charter witnessed by “Hugo, frater regis.”), 192–193 (charter of King Philippe I dated 1075; charter witnessed by “Hugonis, fratris regis.”), 197–199 (charter of King Philippe I of France dated 1075; charter witnessed by “domni Hugonis, fratris regis Francorum”), 217–221 (charter of King Philippe I of France dated 1076; charter witnessed by “Hugoni magni, fratris Philipi regis”), 242–245 (charter of King Philippe I of France dated 1079; charter witnessed by “comitis Hugoni, fratris regis”), 264–266 (charter of King Philippe I of France dated 1080; charter witnessed by “Hugoni, regis fratre, de Crispeo et ejus uxore”), 271–272 (charter of King Philippe I dated 1082; charter witnessed by Hugonis, Crispeii comitis), 272–273 (charter of King Philippe I of France dated 1082; charter witnessed by “Hugonis, fratris Regis”), 333–337 (charter of King Philippe I of France dated 1094; charter witnessed by “Hugonis, fratris Philippi regis”), 442.

  1. . Migne, Patrologiae Cursus Completus 188 (1855): 515 (Orderici Vitalis: “Henricus autem, Francorum rex, Bertradam, Julii Claudii regis Russiæ filiam, uxorem duxit, quæ Philippum, et Hugonem Magnum, Crispeii comitem, peperit.”).

Nevertheless, Hugues Magnus is known to have used the title. Hugues' "wife Adela wasn't the natural heiress of Vermandois, as she had a living brother who was disinherited a year or so before the death of their father. She and Hugo [Hugues] subsequently used the lesser title "count/ess of Crepy" for around twenty years until his brother King Philippe I later confirmed Vermandois to them. The territorial designation of counts was not set in concrete and could behighly variable at the time of Hugo Magnus. There is an undated charter where the canons of Beauvais complained about the actions of Hugo, who was specifically called count of Vermandois, and from circumstantial evidence this person was more probably Hugo than his father-in-law Heribert. There isalso abrief history written at Fleury abbey a few years after Hugo's death stating that he had been given Vermandois by his brother King Philippe I -presumably this grant confirmed possession of Vermandois by right of his wife, who was not the natural heiress since her disinherited brother was still living." (Leo van de Pas, soc.genealogy.medieval, May 16, 2012)

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A narrative on Hugh's death, from Medieval History - The Crusades, XI, The Crusade of 1101:

http://www.third-millennium-library.com/MedievalHistory/CRUSADES/14.html

Near Heraclea (in early September), the crusaders came to a river where they hoped to slake their thirst. But Kilij Arslan and his allies lay in ambush among the growth along the other bank and just as the Christians drew near the water the Turks loosed a volley of arrows and charged.

Caught by surprise and weakened by hunger and thirst, the crusaders could not stand up to the fierce assault. After a desperate stand in the marshy land along the river (where their heavy equipment must have been a hindrance) the army dissolved.

Some crusaders tried vainly to hide in the marsh grass, some escaped by following the stream up to its source, and others fled into the mountains. Most of the Christians were either killed or enslaved.

Among the many women reported to have been carried off into captivity were Corba, wife of Geoffrey Burel, and Ida of Austria. Albert was not certain whether Ida had been captured or killed, but others came to believe that she had lived on in the harem of a Moslem prince to whom she bore a famous son, Zengi.

This is an early instance of what was to become a conventional literary theme; it is matched in interest — and lack of credibility — by the legend of Thiemo of Salzburg. The archbishop was carried off by a Turkish emir and being a metal worker of sorts, he was commanded to repair a certain “Mohammedan idol”. When the idol began to speak blasphemously, Thiemo broke it and for this he was martyred.

As in the previous defeats, an undue proportion of those who escaped were leaders, perhaps because of their superior horses. The bishop of Auvergne, however, walked out. Welf got away by shedding arms and armor and riding through the mountains. Two of his counts, Bernhard and Henry of Regensburg, made their way to the coast.

William IX fled with a single squire and reached Longiniada, the port for Tarsus, then ruled by Bernard the Stranger. Bernard treated them well. After a few days Tancred, learning of William’s misfortunes, sent an escort of knights to conduct him to Antioch, where the duke was lavishly entertained.

Less certain is the case of Hugh of Vermandois. He was wounded in the knee by an arrow, but escaped to Tarsus, where he died on October 18 and was buried in the church of St. Paul.

The chroniclers tell of Hugh's reenlistment in France and of his death, but nothing of his activities on crusade. The context suggests that he was with William IX at Heraclea, but the record is none too clear.

With the disaster at Heraclea the military significance of the Crusade of 1101 vanishes. Remnants of the several bands continu­ed their way to Jerusalem but in effect the crusade had become a pilgrimage.

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DUKE HUGH CREPI MAGNUS of Vermandois, Normandy, son of King Henry I and Anne (of KIEV), was born circa 1050, died in 1130 and was buried in St Paul De Tarse.

He married circa 1064, COUNTESS ADELAIDE DE VERMANDOIS of Valois, Bretagne, France, daughter of Count Herbert IV and Adela (de VEXIN), who was born circa 1050, and died on 23 Sept. 1120 in Vermandois, Normandy.

Duke of France and Burgundy, Marquis of Orleans, Count of Amiens, Chaumont,

Paris, Valois and Vermandois; leader of the 1st Crusade.

Children:

COUNTESS ISABEL (ELIZABETH)13 DE VERMANDOIS of Valois, b. circa 1081, d. on 13 Feb. 1131 in England; m. (1) ROBERT DE BEAUMONT, 1ST EARL OF LEICESTER in 1096 in France; m. (2) WILLIAM II DE WARREN, 2ND EARL OF SURREY between 1108 and 1118 in France.

MATILDE DE VERMANDOIS; m. (DR-6) RAOUL I DE BEAUGENCY in 1090.

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  Contact: Carolyn Clark Campbell  

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ID: I3476

Name: Hugh (Hugues) Magnus Duke of France &

Sex: M

Birth: 1057 in France

Death: 18 Oct 1101/1102 in Tarsus, Cilicia, Asia Minor

Burial: St. Paul Tarsus

Occupation: Duke of France and Count de Vermandois Pnc. of France

Education: Cte de Vermandois et de Valois

Religion: Sources: Roberts, Gary Boyd. "Ancestors of American Presidenannica, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Note:

Note: --Other Fields

Ref Number: +

Change Date: 3 APR 1997

Father: Henry (Henri) I King of France b: 10 MAY 1005 in Bourgogne, France 23.04.1008

Mother: Anne (Anna) of Kiev JAROSLAVNA b: 1036 in Abt 1023 of Kiev, Ukraine 1024

Marriage 1 Adelaide (or Adele) DE VERMANDOIS Cnts.of Normandy b: ABT 1062 in Vermandois, Normandy, France

Married: 1066

Children

Isabel (Elizabeth) DE VERMANDOIS Ctssof Leicester b: ABT 1081 in Vermandois, Normandy, France
Mathilda (Mahaut) DE VERMANDOIS b: ABT 1080 in France
Agnes DE VERMANDOIS
Raoul I le Vaillant DE VERMANDOIS Ct. deVermandois
Henri DE CHAUMONT sn de Chaumont
Simon DE VERMANDOIS Bp of Noyon
Guillaume DE VERMANDOIS
Beatrix DE VERMANDOIS
Constance DE VERMANDOIS

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Hugh was one of the knightly leaders of the First Crusade

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From Darryl Lundy's Peerage page on Hugh de Crepi:

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10318.htm#i103173

Hugh de Crépi, Comte de Vermandois et de Valois1

M, #103173, b. 1057, d. 18 October 1102

Last Edited=7 Feb 2005

Hugh de Crépi, Comte de Vermandois et de Valois was born in 1057. He was the son of Henri I, Roi de France and Anne of Kiev.2,3

He married Aelis de Vermandois, Comtesse de Vermandois, daughter of Heribert V, Comte de Vermandois et de Valois and Adele de Crépi, circa 1080.2

He died on 18 October 1102 at Tarsus.

Hugh de Crépi, Comte de Vermandois et de Valois was a member of the House of Capet. Hugh de Crépi, Comte de Vermandois et de Valois also went by the nick-name of Hugh 'le Grand'.3

He gained the title of Comte de Vermandois. He gained the title of Comte de Valois.

Child of Hugh de Crépi, Comte de Vermandois et de Valois and Aelis de Vermandois, Comtesse de Vermandois

1. Elizabeth de Vermandois+1 d. 17 Feb 1131

Citations

[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume VII, page 526. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

[S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 64. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.

[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 829.

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From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Northern France:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#Elisabethdied1131

HUGUES "le Maisné" de France, son of HENRI I King of France & his second wife Anna Iaroslavna of Kiev (1057-Tarsus 18 Oct 1102, bur Tarsus, Church of St Paul).

The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names (in order) "Philippum, Hugonem atque Rotbertum" as the three sons of King Henri and his wife Anna[1325].

William of Tyre records "dominus Hugo Magnus" as brother of Philippe I King of France[1326]. He succeeded as Comte de Vermandois et de Valois, by right of his wife. He left France in Aug 1096 as head of the contingent of his brother Philippe I King of France which left on the First Crusade[1327].

The Alexeiad names "a certain Hugh, brother of the king of France" when recording that he "sent an absurd message to the emperor proposing that he should be given a magnificent reception" after arriving in Constantinople[1328]. He was shipwrecked off Durazzo, but accompanied to Constantinople by the Byzantine admiral Manuel Butumites[1329].

Albert of Aix records that "Hugonem Magnum fratrem regis Franciæ, Drogonem et Clareboldum" were held in chains in prison by the emperor at Constantinople but were released after the intervention of "Baldewinus Hainaucorum comes et Heinricus de Ascha" who were sent as envoys by Godefroi de Bouillon[1330].

Albert of Aix records that "Hugo, Drogo, Willelmus Carpentarius et Clareboldus" joined the army of Godefroi de Bouillon after their release from captivity in Constantinople, dated to end 1096[1331]. He took part in the siege of Antioch in 1098. He was sent on a mission to Emperor Alexios I, but was surprised in a Turkish ambush near Nikaia but escaped with his life[1332].

He returned to France after the capture of Antioch in 1098 to raise another army which he led as part of the second wave of the First Crusade, leaving France in Mar 1101.

Robert of Torigny records the death in 1102 of "Hugo Magnus apud Tarsum"[1333]. He died from wounds received fighting the Turks near Tarsus in Asia Minor[1334].

m (after 1067) as her first husband, ADELAIS Ctss de Vermandois, de Valois et de Crépy, daughter and heiress of HERIBERT [IV] Comte de Vermandois & his wife Adelais de Valois ([1065]-28 Sep [1120/24]).

The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Adelaide comitissa Veromandensium" as wife of "Hugonem Magnum"[1335]. Her husband left her as regent in Vermandois when he left on crusade.

She married secondly (1103) as his first wife, Renaud de Clermont. "Adela…Viromandorum comitissa, filius…meus Radulphus" renounced their claim to certain serfs in favour of the abbey of Compiègne Saint-Corneille, with the consent of "filiorum meorum Radulphi, Henrici, Symonis", by charter dated 1114[1336].

In 1117, Louis VI "le Gros" King of France restored to her the county of Amiens which had been usurped by Thomas de Marle[1337].

Comte Hugues & his wife had nine children:

1. Mathilde de Vermandois (married as second wife Raoul, Seigneur de Baugency)

2. Agnes de Vermandois (b. c.1085, d. after 1127, m. as second wife Bonifacio di Saluzzo, Marchese del Vasto)

3. Constance de Vermandois (d. after 1118, m. Godefroi de la Ferte-Gaucher, Vicomte de Meaux)

4. Isabelle/Elisabeth de Vermandois (b. before 1088, d. 17 February 1131, buried Lewes, OUR ANCESTOR, m. firstly Robert de Beaumont, Comte de Meulan, secondly William de Warenne, Earl of Surrey, OUR ANCESTOR)

5. Raoul I "le Vaillant" de Vermandois (b. c.1094, d. 13 October 1152, buried St-Arnould in Crepy, succeeded as Comte de Vermandois)

6. Henri de Vermandois (d. 1130, Seigneur de Chaumont-en-Vexin)

7. Simon de Vermandois (d. 10 February 1148 in Seleukia returning from second crusade, buried Cistercian Abbey of Notre-Dame-de-l'Assomption, Ourscamp)

8. Guillaume de Vermandois (d. after 1096, parentage uncertain)

9. Beatrix de Vermandois (d. after 1144, married Hugues IV, Seigneur de Gourney-en-Bray)

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Per www.whitesvill.net/Ruth.pdf

Hugh was the first prince to leave on the First Crusade (except for Peter the Hermit's 'Peasant's Crusade' earlier that year). He set out for Italy in August 1096

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Not to be confused with:

Humbert II, surnamed the Fat, was Count of Savoy from 1080 until his death in 1103. He was the son of Amadeus II of Savoy.

He was married to Gisela of Burgundy, daughter of William I, Count of Burgundy, and had 7 children:

Amadeus III of Savoy

William, Bishop of Liège

Adelaide, (d. 1154), married to Louis VI of France

Agnes, (d. 1127), married to Archimbald VI, lord of Bourbon

Humbert

Reginald

Guy, abbey of Namur

Preceded by

Amadeus II Count of Savoy Succeeded by

Amadeus III

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Hugh I (1053 – October 18, 1101), called Magnus or the Great, was a younger son of Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev and younger brother of Philip I. He was in his own right Count of Vermandois, but an ineffectual leader and soldier, great only in his boasting. Indeed, Steven Runciman is certain that his nickname Magnus (greater or elder), applied to him by William of Tyre, is a copyist's error, and should be Minus (younger), referring to Hugh as younger brother of the King of France.

In early 1096 Hugh and Philip began discussing the First Crusade after news of the Council of Clermont reached them in Paris. Although Philip could not participate, as he had been excommunicated, Hugh was said to have been influenced to join the Crusade after an eclipse of the moon on February 11, 1096.

That summer Hugh's army left France for Italy, where they would cross the Adriatic Sea into territory of the Byzantine Empire, unlike the other Crusader armies who were travelling by land. On the way, many of the soldiers led by fellow Crusader Emicho joined Hugh's army after Emicho was defeated by the Hungarians, whose land he had been pillaging. Hugh crossed the Adriatic from Bari in Southern Italy, but many of his ships were destroyed in a storm off the Byzantine port of Dyrrhachium.

Hugh and most of his army was rescued and escorted to Constantinople, where they arrived in November of 1096. Prior to his arrival, Hugh sent an arrogant, insulting letter to Eastern Roman Emperor Alexius I Comnenus, according to the Emperor's biography by his daughter (the Alexiad), demanding that Alexius meet with him:

   "Know, O King, that I am King of Kings, and superior to all, who are under the sky. You are now permitted to greet me, on my arrival, and to receive me with magnificence, as befits my nobility."[1]

Alexius was already wary of the armies about to arrive, after the unruly mob led by Peter the Hermit had passed through earlier in the year. Alexius kept Hugh in custody in a monastery until Hugh swore an oath of vassalage to him.

After the Crusaders had successfully made their way across Seljuk territory and, in 1098, captured Antioch, Hugh was sent back to Constantinople to appeal for reinforcements from Alexius. Alexius was uninterested, however, and Hugh, instead of returning to Antioch to help plan the siege of Jerusalem, went back to France. There he was scorned for not having fulfilled his vow as a Crusader to complete a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and Pope Paschal II threatened to excommunicate him. He joined the minor Crusade of 1101, but was wounded in battle with the Turks in September, and died of his wounds in October in Tarsus.

Family and children

He married Adele of Vermandois, the daughter of Herbert IV, Count of Vermandois and Alice, Countess of Valois. They had nine children:

   * Matilda(1080-1130), married Ralph I of Beaugency
   * Beatrice (1082-after1144), married Hugh III of Gournay
   * Ralph I (1085-1152)
   * Elizabeth of Vermandois, Countess of Leicester (1085-1131)
   * Constance (1086-??), married Godfrey de la Ferté-Gaucher
   * Agnes (1090-1125), married Boniface of Savone
   * Henry (1091-1130), Lord of Chaumont en Vexin
   * Simon (1093-1148)
   * William (c. 1094-c.1096)

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Hugh of Vermandois

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hugh of Vermandois (1053 – October 18, 1101), was son to King Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev, and the younger brother of King Philip I of France. He was in his own right Count of Vermandois. William of Tyre called him "Hugh Magnus", Hugh the Great, but he was an ineffectual leader and soldier, great only in his boasting. Indeed, Sir Steven Runciman is certain that "Magnus" is a copyist's error, and should be "minus", "the younger" (referring to Hugh as younger brother of the King of France).

In early 1096 Hugh and Philip began discussing the First Crusade after news of the Council of Clermont reached them in Paris. Although Philip could not participate, as he had been excommunicated, Hugh was said to have been influenced to join the Crusade after an eclipse of the moon on February 11, 1096.

That summer Hugh's army left France for Italy, where they would cross the Adriatic Sea into territory of the Byzantine Empire, unlike the other Crusader armies who were travelling by land. On the way, many of the soldiers led by fellow Crusader Emicho joined Hugh's army after Emicho was defeated by the Hungarians, whose land he had been pillaging. Hugh crossed the Adriatic from Bari in Southern Italy, but many of his ships were destroyed in a storm off the Byzantine port of Dyrrhachium.

Hugh and most of his army was rescued and escorted to Constantinople, where they arrived in November of 1096. Prior to his arrival, Hugh sent an arrogant, insulting letter to Eastern Roman Emperor Alexius I Comnenus, according to the Emperor's biography by his daughter (the Alexiad), demanding that Alexius meet with him:

"Know, O King, that I am King of Kings, and superior to all, who are under the sky. You are now permitted to greet me, on my arrival, and to receive me with magnificence, as befits my nobility."

Alexius was already wary of the armies about to arrive, after the unruly mob led by Peter the Hermit had passed through earlier in the year. Alexius kept Hugh in custody in a monastery until Hugh swore an oath of vassalage to him.

After the Crusaders had successfully made their way across Seljuk territory and, in 1098, captured Antioch, Hugh was sent back to Constantinople to appeal for reinforcements from Alexius. Alexius was uninterested, however, and Hugh, instead of returning to Antioch to help plan the siege of Jerusalem, went back to France. There he was scorned for not having fulfilled his vow as a Crusader to complete a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and Pope Paschal II threatened to excommunicate him. He joined the minor Crusade of 1101, but was wounded in battle with the Turks in September, and died of his wounds in October in Tarsus.

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Hugh the Great, Duke of France and Burgundy .

Younger brother of Philip I. He was in his own right Count of Vermandois, but an ineffectual leader and soldier, great only in his boasting. Indeed, Steven Runciman is certain that his nickname Magnus (greater or elder), applied to him by William of Tyre, is a copyist's error, and should be Minus (younger), referring to Hugh as younger brother of the King of France.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_of_Vermandois

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_I,_Count_of_Vermandois

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Hugh I, called "Magnus," or "the Great," was a younger son of King Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev and younger brother of King Philip I. He was in his own right Count of Vermandois, but he was an ineffectual leader and soldier, great only in his boasting. Indeed, Steven Runciman is certain that his nickname Magnus (greater or elder), applied to him by William of Tyre, is a copyist's error, and should be Minus (younger), referring to Hugh as younger brother of the King of France.

Hugh married Adele of Vermandois, the daughter of Herbert IV of Vermandois and Adele of Valois.They had nine children, including two of our ancestors.

In early 1096 Hugh and Philip began discussing the First Crusade after news of the Council of Clermont reached them in Paris. Although Philip could not participate, since he had been excommunicated, Hugh was said to have been influenced to join the Crusade after an eclipse of the moon on February 11, 1096.

That summer Hugh's army left France for Italy, where they would cross the Adriatic Sea into territory of the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire, unlike the other Crusader armies who were traveling by land. On the way, many of the soldiers led by fellow Crusader Emicho joined Hugh's army after Emicho was defeated by the Hungarians, whose land he had been pillaging. Hugh crossed the Adriatic from Bari in Southern Italy, but many of his ships were destroyed in a storm off the Byzantine port of Dyrrhachium.

Hugh and most of his army was rescued and escorted to Constantinople, where they arrived in November of 1096. Prior to his arrival, Hugh sent an arrogant, insulting letter to Eastern Roman Emperor Alexios I Komnenus (also our ancestor), according to the Emperor's biography by his daughter (the Alexiad), demanding that Alexios meet with him:

"Know, O King, that I am King of Kings, and superior to all, who are under the sky. You are now permitted to greet me, on my arrival, and to receive me with magnificence, as befits my nobility."

Alexios was already wary of the armies about to arrive, after the unruly mob led by Peter the Hermit had passed through earlier in the year. Alexios kept Hugh in custody in a monastery until Hugh swore an oath of vassalage to him.

After the Crusaders had successfully made their way across Seljuk territory and, in 1098, captured Antioch, Hugh was sent back to Constantinople to appeal for reinforcements from Alexios. Alexios was uninterested, however, and Hugh, instead of returning to Antioch to help plan the siege of Jerusalem, went back to France. There he was scorned for not having fulfilled his vow as a Crusader to complete a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and Pope Paschal II threatened to excommunicate him. He joined the minor Crusade of 1101, but was wounded in battle with the Turks in September, and died of his wounds in October in Tarsus.

Hugh was our ancestor through two distinct descent lines--through his daughter Elizabeth (Isabel) and through his daughter Beatrice, each of whom was independently our ancestor.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_of_Vermandois for more information.

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Hugh I (1053 – October 18, 1101), called Magnus or the Great, was a younger son of Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev and younger brother of Philip I. He was in his own right Count of Vermandois, but an ineffectual leader and soldier, great only in his boasting. Indeed, Steven Runciman is certain that his nickname Magnus (greater or elder), applied to him by William of Tyre, is a copyist's error, and should be Minus (younger), referring to Hugh as younger brother of the King of France.

In early 1096 Hugh and Philip began discussing the First Crusade after news of the Council of Clermont reached them in Paris. Although Philip could not participate, as he had been excommunicated, Hugh was said to have been influenced to join the Crusade after an eclipse of the moon on February 11, 1096.

That summer Hugh's army left France for Italy, where they would cross the Adriatic Sea into territory of the Byzantine Empire, unlike the other Crusader armies who were travelling by land. On the way, many of the soldiers led by fellow Crusader Emicho joined Hugh's army after Emicho was defeated by the Hungarians, whose land he had been pillaging. Hugh crossed the Adriatic from Bari in Southern Italy, but many of his ships were destroyed in a storm off the Byzantine port of Dyrrhachium.

Hugh and most of his army was rescued and escorted to Constantinople, where they arrived in November of 1096. Prior to his arrival, Hugh sent an arrogant, insulting letter to Eastern Roman Emperor Alexius I Comnenus, according to the Emperor's biography by his daughter (the Alexiad), demanding that Alexius meet with him:

"Know, O King, that I am King of Kings, and superior to all, who are under the sky. You are now permitted to greet me, on my arrival, and to receive me with magnificence, as befits my nobility."

Alexius was already wary of the armies about to arrive, after the unruly mob led by Peter the Hermit had passed through earlier in the year. Alexius kept Hugh in custody in a monastery until Hugh swore an oath of vassalage to him.

After the Crusaders had successfully made their way across Seljuk territory and, in 1098, captured Antioch, Hugh was sent back to Constantinople to appeal for reinforcements from Alexius. Alexius was uninterested, however, and Hugh, instead of returning to Antioch to help plan the siege of Jerusalem, went back to France. There he was scorned for not having fulfilled his vow as a Crusader to complete a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and Pope Paschal II threatened to excommunicate him. He joined the minor Crusade of 1101, but was wounded in battle with the Turks in September, and died of his wounds in October in Tarsus.

He married Adele of Vermandois, the daughter of Herbert IV of Vermandois and Adele of Valois.They had nine children:

Count Raoul I of Vermandois

Henry, senior of Chaumont-en-Vexin, (d. 1130).

Simon, Bishop of Noyon

Elizabeth de Vermandois, married

Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester;

William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey

Matilde de Vermandois, married Raoul I of Beaugency

Constance de Vermandois, married Godefroy de la Ferte-Gaucher

Agnes de Vermandois, married Margrave Boniface del Vasto. Mother of Adelaide del Vasto.

Beatrix de Vermandois, married Hugh III of Gournay-en-Bray

Emma de Vermandois

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_of_Vermandois

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_of_Vermandois -------------------- see- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_of_Vermandois -------------------- Hugh I (1053 – October 18, 1101), called Magnus or the Great, was a younger son of Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev and younger brother of Philip I. He was in his own right Count of Vermandois, but an ineffectual leader and soldier, great only in his boasting. Indeed, Steven Runciman is certain that his nickname Magnus (greater or elder), applied to him by William of Tyre, is a copyist's error, and should be Minus (younger), referring to Hugh as younger brother of the King of France.

In early 1096 Hugh and Philip began discussing the First Crusade after news of the Council of Clermont reached them in Paris. Although Philip could not participate, as he had been excommunicated, Hugh was said to have been influenced to join the Crusade after an eclipse of the moon on February 11, 1096.

That summer Hugh's army left France for Italy, where they would cross the Adriatic Sea into territory of the Byzantine Empire, unlike the other Crusader armies who were travelling by land. On the way, many of the soldiers led by fellow Crusader Emicho joined Hugh's army after Emicho was defeated by the Hungarians, whose land he had been pillaging. Hugh crossed the Adriatic from Bari in Southern Italy, but many of his ships were destroyed in a storm off the Byzantine port of Dyrrhachium. Hugh I of Vermandois.jpg

Hugh and most of his army were rescued and escorted to Constantinople, where they arrived in November of 1096. Prior to his arrival, Hugh sent an arrogant, insulting letter to Eastern Roman Emperor Alexius I Comnenus, according to the Emperor's biography by his daughter (the Alexiad), demanding that Alexius meet with him:

   "Know, O King, that I am King of Kings, and superior to all, who are under the sky. You are now permitted to greet me, on my arrival, and to receive me with magnificence, as befits my nobility."[1]

Alexius was already wary of the armies about to arrive, after the unruly mob led by Peter the Hermit had passed through earlier in the year. Alexius kept Hugh in custody in a monastery until Hugh swore an oath of vassalage to him.

After the Crusaders had successfully made their way across Seljuk territory and, in 1098, captured Antioch, Hugh was sent back to Constantinople to appeal for reinforcements from Alexius. Alexius was uninterested, however, and Hugh, instead of returning to Antioch to help plan the siege of Jerusalem, went back to France. There he was scorned for not having fulfilled his vow as a Crusader to complete a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and Pope Paschal II threatened to excommunicate him. He joined the minor Crusade of 1101, but was wounded in battle with the Turks in September, and died of his wounds in October in Tarsus.

Familly and Children

He married Adele of Vermandois, the daughter of Herbert IV, Count of Vermandois and Alice, Countess of Valois. They had nine children:

   * Matilda(1080–1130), married Ralph I of Beaugency
   * Beatrice (1082 – after1144), married Hugh III of Gournay
   * Ralph I (1085–1152)
   * Elizabeth of Vermandois, Countess of Leicester (1085–1131)
   * Constance (born 1086, date of death unknown), married Godfrey

-------------------- Hugh I, Count of Vermandois Hugh I (1053 - October 18, 1101), called Magnus or the Great, was a younger son of Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev and younger brother of Philip I. He was in his own right Count of Vermandois, but an ineffectual leader and soldier, great only in his boasting. Indeed, Steven Runciman is certain that his nickname Magnus (greater or elder), applied to him by William of Tyre, is a copyist's error, and should be Minus (younger), referring to Hugh as younger brother of the King of France. In early 1096 Hugh and Philip began discussing the First Crusade after news of the Council of Clermont reached them in Paris. Although Philip could not participate, as he had been excommunicated, Hugh was said to have been influenced to join the Crusade after an eclipse of the moon on February 11, 1096. That summer Hugh's army left France for Italy, where they would cross the Adriatic Sea into territory of the Byzantine Empire, unlike the other Crusader armies who were travelling by land. On the way, many of the soldiers led by fellow Crusader Emicho joined Hugh's army after Emicho was defeated by the Hungarians, whose land he had been pillaging. Hugh crossed the Adriatic from Bari in Southern Italy, but many of his ships were destroyed in a storm off the Byzantine port of Dyrrhachium. Hugh and most of his army were rescued and escorted to Constantinople, where they arrived in November of 1096. Prior to his arrival, Hugh sent an arrogant, insulting letter to Eastern Roman Emperor Alexius I Comnenus, according to the Emperor's biography by his daughter (the Alexiad), demanding that Alexius meet with him: "Know, O King, that I am King of Kings, and superior to all, who are under the sky. You are now permitted to greet me, on my arrival, and to receive me with magnificence, as befits my nobility."[1] Alexius was already wary of the armies about to arrive, after the unruly mob led by Peter the Hermit had passed through earlier in the year. Alexius kept Hugh in custody in a monastery until Hugh swore an oath of vassalage to him. After the Crusaders had successfully made their way across Seljuk territory and, in 1098, captured Antioch, Hugh was sent back to Constantinople to appeal for reinforcements from Alexius. Alexius was uninterested*(see below), however, and Hugh, instead of returning to Antioch to help plan the siege of Jerusalem, went back to France. There he was scorned for not having fulfilled his vow as a Crusader to complete a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and Pope Paschal II threatened to excommunicate him. He joined the minor Crusade of 1101, but was wounded in battle with the Turks in September, and died of his wounds in October in Tarsus. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_I,_Count_of_Vermandois -------------------- Hugh I of Vermandois (1057 – October 18, 1101),[1] called Magnus or the Great, was a younger son of Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev and younger brother of Philip I. He was in his own right Count of Vermandois, but an ineffectual leader and soldier, great only in his boasting. Indeed, Steven Runciman is certain that his nickname Magnus (greater or elder), applied to him by William of Tyre, is a copyist's error, and should be Minus (younger), referring to Hugh as younger brother of the King of France.[2]

In early 1096 Hugh and Philip began discussing the First Crusade after news of the Council of Clermont reached them in Paris. Although Philip could not participate, as he had been excommunicated, Hugh was said to have been influenced to join the Crusade after an eclipse of the moon on February 11, 1096.

That summer Hugh's army left France for Italy, where they would cross the Adriatic Sea into territory of the Byzantine Empire, unlike the other Crusader armies who were travelling by land. On the way, many of the soldiers led by fellow Crusader Emicho joined Hugh's army after Emicho was defeated by the Hungarians, whose land he had been pillaging. Hugh crossed the Adriatic from Bari in Southern Italy, but many of his ships were destroyed in a storm off the Byzantine port of Dyrrhachium.

Hugh and most of his army were rescued and escorted to Constantinople, where they arrived in November 1096. Prior to his arrival, Hugh allegedly sent an arrogant, insulting letter to Eastern Roman Emperor Alexius I Comnenus. According to the Emperor's biography written by his daughter Anna Comnena (the Alexiad), he demanded that Alexius meet with him: "Know, O King, that I am King of Kings, and superior to all, who are under the sky. You are now permitted to greet me, on my arrival, and to receive me with magnificence, as befits my nobility."[3] Alexius was already wary of the armies about to arrive, after the unruly mob led by Peter the Hermit had passed through earlier in the year. Alexius kept Hugh in custody in a monastery until Hugh swore an oath of vassalage to him.

After the Crusaders had successfully made their way across Seljuk territory and, in 1098, captured Antioch, Hugh was sent back to Constantinople to appeal for reinforcements from Alexius. Alexius was uninterested,[4] however, and Hugh, instead of returning to Antioch to help plan the siege of Jerusalem, went back to France. There he was scorned for not having fulfilled his vow as a Crusader to complete a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and Pope Paschal II threatened to excommunicate him. He joined the minor Crusade of 1101, but was wounded in battle with the Turks in September, and died of his wounds in October in Tarsus.

Family and children[edit]

He married Adelaide of Vermandois, the daughter of Herbert IV, Count of Vermandois and Alice, Countess of Valois. They had nine children: Mathilde (1080–1130), married Raoul I of Beaugency Elizabeth of Vermandois, Countess of Leicester (1081–1131) Beatrice (1082 – after 1144), married Hugh III of Gournay Ralph I (1085–1152) Constance (born 1086, date of death unknown), married Godfrey de la Ferté-Gaucher Agnes (1090–1125), married Boniface del Vasto Henry (1091–1130), seigneur of Chaumont en Vexin Simon (1093–1148) William (c. 1094 – c. 1096)

Ancestry[edit]

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Hugues Magnus, comte de Vermandois's Timeline

1057
1057
Vermandois, Normandy, France
1064
1064
Age 7
Valois, Bretagne, France
1075
1075
Age 18
Valois, Bretagne, France
1080
1080
Age 23
Valois, Bretagne, France
1082
1082
Age 25
Saint-Quentin, (Present département de l'Aisne), Vermandois (Present Picardie), France
1085
1085
Age 28
Valois, Picardy, France
1085
Age 28
Saint-Quentin, (Present département de l'Aisne), Vermandois (Present Picardie), France
1085
Age 28
Vermandois (present Picardie), France
1085
Age 28
1085
Age 28
Vermandois (present Picardie), France