Humphrey de Bohun III (II)

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Humphrey III (II) de Bohun, Lord of Hereford

Nicknames: "Constable of England"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Gloucestershire, England
Death: Died in Buried at Llanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire
Place of Burial: Llanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Humphrey II "The Great" de Bohun, 1st Baron of Trowbridge; 2nd B.of Tatterford and Maud (Matilda) d'Evreux, of Salisbury
Husband of Margaret Gloucester de Hereford
Father of Humphrey IV (III) de Bohun, Constable of England, Earl of Hereford; Margaret de Bohun; Maud Matilda; Milo de Bohun and Richard de Bohun
Brother of Maud (Matilda) de Bohun

Occupation: Lord of Hereford, Steward of England, LORD OF HEREFORD, -Note: From Charles Sterlings's "Ragains Website", Steward to King Henry I of England, He was the Constable of England and Steward of King Henry I
Managed by: Pam Wilson
Last Updated:

About Humphrey de Bohun III (II)

Humphrey II de Bohun

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humphrey_II_de_Bohun

Humphrey II de Bohun (died 1164/5) was an Anglo-Norman aristocrat, the third of his family after the Norman Conquest. He was the son and heir of Humphrey I and Maud, a daughter of Edward of Salisbury, an Anglo-Saxon landholder in Wiltshire. His father died around 1123 and he inherited an honour centred on Trowbridge, although he still owed feudal relief for this as late as 1130.

Shortly after the elder Humphrey's death, his widow and son founded the Cluniac priory of Monkton Farleigh in accordance with Humphrey's wishes. By 1130 the younger Humphrey also owed four hundred marks to the Crown for the Stewardship, which he had purchased. He appears in royal charters of Henry I towards 1135, and in 1136 he signed the charter of liberties issued by Stephen at his Oxford court.

In the civil war that coloured Stephen's reign Humphrey sided with his rival, the Empress Matilda after she landed in England in 1139. He repelled a royal army besieging his castle at Trowbridge, and in 1144 Matilda confirmed his possessions, granted him some lands, and recognised his "stewardship in England and Normandy". He consistently witnessed charters of Matilda as steward in the 1140s and between 1153 and 1157 he witnessed the charters of her son, then Henry II, with the same title.

In 1158 he appears to have fallen from favour, for he was deprived of royal demesne lands he had been holding in Wiltshire. He does not appear in any royal act until January 1164, when he was present for the promulgation of the Constitutions of Clarendon. He died sometime before 29 September 1165, when his son, Humphrey III, had succeeded him in Trowbridge. He left a widow in Margaret (died 1187), daughter Earl Miles of Hereford and Sibyl de Neufmarché .

References

Graeme White, "Bohun, Humphrey (III) de (b. before 1144, d. 1181)," Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004, accessed 20 December 2009.

---------------------------

Excerpted from Les Seigneurs de Bohon by Jean LeMelletier, Coutances: Arnaud-Bellee, 1978. http://mahan.wonkwang.ac.kr/link/med/society/class/Bohun/bohon.html

Humphrey III

Humphrey III, lord of Trowbridge and constable of England, was very close to Henry I and later Henry II. He assisted Empress Mathilda against King Stephen. Born in 1109, Humphrey died 6 April 1187. He married Margery (Marguerite, Margaret), eldest daughter of Milo of Gloucester from whom he received the heriditary right to the title of constable of England.

Milo of Gloucester (Milon, Miles Fitz Walter) inherited the title of constable of England and later that of earl of Hereford. He was the grandson of Roger de Pitres, contemporary of William the Conqueror and sheriff of Gloucester, and the son of Walter (Gautier), constable of Henry I.

Milo possessed a considerable honor from the inheritance of his father's lands in Gloucestershire and his marriage in 1121 to Sybyl, sole heiress of Bernard de Newmarch (he conquered the ancient kingdom of Brychan in Breconshire, Wales, including Talgarth, Chatellenie de Hay, Ystradvy forest, and the mini-kingdom of Brecon or Brecknock, and died in 1125. Empress Mathilda gave Bernard Abergavenny castle and St. Briavel castle.) Milo became earl of Hereford in 1141. His family should not be confused with the earls of Gloucester.

Milo died of a hunting accident on 25 December 1143, leaving four sons: Roger, who died childless in 1155; Walter, Henry, and Mahel, who all died childless before 1166. His inheritance was split among his daughters: Margery; Bertha, who married Philip de Brause; and Lucy.

Humphrey III was steward and chancellor to Henry I, perhaps following his father. He shared this post with Hugh Bigot/Bigod, Robert Haye, and Simon de Beauchamp. Sometimes he is confused with his father.

We can follow Humphrey III in the entourage of King Henry I by the documents he signed at Arques and Dieppe (1131), various English towns (1131-1133), in Normandy at Rouen (1133 & 1134), and at Argentan (about the same time).

When Steven of Blois, earl of Mortain, grandson of William the Conqueror and Adele, was crowned king of England after Henry I died (1135), Humphrey kept his duties as steward presiding over charters. Two were written at Evreux in 1137. One concerned infractions against God; the other gave land in Bramford (Suffolk) to St. Mary d'Evreux. In 1139 Empress Mathilda arrived in Sussex with her her half-brother, Robert of Gloucester, to reclaim the inheritance of his father. Humphrey, at the instigation of his father-in-law, Milo de Gloucester, rallied with Mathilda and defended Trowbridge against King Steven.

During the troublesome years of the anarchy that followed, Humphrey passionately fought with Mathilda's loyal and true followers. He witnessed Milo being named earl of Hereford in recognition of his (Milo's) services on 25 July 1141.

Humphrey's signature is found on several documents in many English villages.

After initial success, the Battle of Winchester (1141) marked a turnaround and Humphrey was taken prisoner.

In 1143 in Devizes (Wiltshire), Mathilda reinstated possession of lands and the office of chancellor of England to Henry in a written document. She also gave him new wealth and land: Melchesam, Boczam, Malmesbury, and Stokes-Wiltshire. (Humphrey had been relieved of his duties after the reign of Henry I.)

Humphrey signed a document of Prince Henry in 1149/1150 at Devizes and another in 1150/1151 at Argentan.

In 1150 Trowbridge Castle was taken by Stephen.

When the abbey church of Montebourg was dedicated in 1152, Humphrey consented to the gift of the church of St. Gregoire de Catz by Ildebert de Catz and Steven de Magneville.

After the death of his father, Geoffrey Plantagenet (1153), Henry was in England leading the army. Henry made an agreement with Stephen when Eustache, Stephen's son, died, whereby Henry would succeed him to the throne when he died (the next year). Henry II then confirmed Humphrey's inheritances in England and Normandy and his titles.

Because of his role as lord chancellor and his signatures on numerous documents, we are able to account for Humphrey's whereabouts. He was in England with the king (1153-1154); in Normandy (1156) at Argentan, Falaise, and Quevilly (1174); with his peers in Chinon (1170-1173); back in England (between 1174-1179); and again in Normandy at Valognes, Cherbourg, and Bonneville-sur-Touques (1180 & 1182).

In January 1164 Humphrey was one of the barons summoned to the Council of Clarendon where the constitutions were drawn up.

In April 1173 when Prince Henry rebelled against his father, King Henry II, Humphrey stood by the king. With Richard de Lucy he invaded Scotland in an attack against King William the Lion who supported Prince Henry and the destruction of the bishop's palace at Durham. Humphrey and company burned Berwick and penetrated deeply into Scotland. But when they learned of the landing of Robert de Beaumont (earl of Leicester and friend of Prince Henry) in Suffolk (29 September 1173), they made a truce with William the Lion and marched against Beaumont. Humphrey battled with the help of the peasants and was taken prisoner with his wife at Fornham St. Geneviere near Bury St. Edmond (Suffolk) on 16 October 1173. The prisoners were taken to Falaise castle.

The 1st of December 1174/5 in Falaise, Humphrey witnessed a peace accord between Henry II and William the Lion recognizing the sovereigncy of England over Scotland.

Humphrey's fortune considerably increased with the death of his father- in-law, Milo of Gloucester, who without male heirs left a third of his wealth to each daughter. Humphrey also inherited the position of constable of England that was held by his father-in-law. In 1166 Humphrey inherited 3 1/2 parts of a knight's fees (rent) from his grandfather's provinces and 9 1/2 parts "de novo." His wife received 17 parts from Milo's provinces and 3 3/4 parts of her brothers' land.

He kept in Normandy a part of the inheritance from Humphrey I, particulary land at Carentan and Pont D'Ouve. A document confirmed the gifts of his ancestors and the men of the Bohon priory. Among the witnesses of this act were Enjuger de Bohon, Robert of Bohon priory, duchess Margaret, and Henry de Bohon.

A letter from Humphrey de Bohon to the men of Normandy and England stated that Humphrey and his son gave to the Blanchelande Abbey the title of Moulin de Biard with Pont D'Ouve.

In 1181 with Alexander de Bohon he witnessed the foundation of Barbery Abbey.

Across the Channel Humphrey founded the priory of Monkton Farley (Wiltshire) with his wife, supported by the Lewes Abbey. Near the beautiful forests and streams in England, his rich endowment provided them with a large yearly income. Among the benefactors associated with this foundation are Mathilda de Bohon (his mother), Ildebert de Catz (Chaz), Robert de Carentan, and his vassals; among the witnesses were William de Beuzeville and Humphrey de St. Vigor.

Humphrey died 6 April 1187. He was buried at the Lanthony Abbey (Gloucestershire) founded by his father-in-law.

He had a son, Humphrey IV, and a daughter Margaret, first wife of Waleran, earl of Warwick.

-------------------------------

from tudorplace.com:

Humphrey De BOHUN (Steward of England)

Born: ABT 1120

Died: 6 Apr 1187

Notes: Baron De Bohun, Lord of Hereford. Steward and Sewer to King Henry I, and he supported Henry in the rebellion of 1173. At the instigation of Milo, his father-in-law, he espoused the cause of the Empress Maud and her son, against King Stephen, and so faithfully maintained his allegiance that the empress, by her special charter, granted him the office of Steward and Sewer, both in Normandy and in England. In the 20th year of Henry II, this Humphrey accompanied Richard De Lacy, Justice of England, into Scotland, with a powerful army to waste that country; and was one of the witnesses to the accord made by King William of Scotland and King Henry II. as to the subjection of that kingdom to the crown of England

Father: Humphrey "The Great" De BOHUN (2º B. Bohun of Taterford)

Mother: Matilda De EVREUX

Married: Margery of GLOUCESTER (b. ABT 1126 - d. 1187) (dau. of Milo of Gloucester, E. Hereford and Lord High Constable of England)

Children:

1. Humphrey De BOHUN (Constable of England)

2. Margery De BOHUN

--------------------

Steward to Henry I.

--------------------

Humphrey de Bohun - was born about 1120 in Gloucestershire, England and died on 6 Apr 1187 in England .

Humphrey married Margaret de Gloucester about 1149 in Gloucestershire, England. Margaret was born about 1126 in Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.

Humphrey - The name of Bohun suggests Hereford. Unfortunately, Hereford Castle no longer exists. It was built in 1048, and apparently consisted of a moat and bailey. The mound has been leveled to the ground, but the bailey is outlined by high banks. One report has it that all that remains is a platform and a piece of a ditch.


The Castle was once situated near the present Bishop's Palace. It was seriously battered in an attack in 1055, but it was restored, and was again in use in 1067. The site which it now occupies is a public garden, gay with shrubbery and flowers. An ornamental lake indicates where once was the moat, but the outlines of the walls are shown only by grass covered ridges.

Children: (Quick Family Chart)

i. Humphrey de Bohun was born about 1143 in Gloucestershire, England and died in 1182 . See #2. below.

  • Humphrey III de Bohun

born about 1120 Hereford, Herefordshire, England

died 6 April 1187

father:

  • Humphrey II "The Great" de Bohun

born 1087 Hereford, Herefordshire, England

died 1129 Wiltshire, England

mother:

  • Maud (Mathilda or Mahaut) d'Evreux

born about 1089/1100 Evereux, France

died 1142

siblings:

Maud Bohun born about 1118 Hereford, Herefordshire, England

spouse:

  • Margaret de Gloucester

born about 1126 Gloucester, England

died England

children:

  • Maud de Bohun born 1142
  • Humphrey IV de Bohun Earl of Hereford

born about 1150 Hereford, Herefordshire, England

died 1182

Margaret de Bohun born about 1146 died 1196

biographical and/or anecdotal:

notes or source:

LDS

ancestry.com

--------------------

Humphrey was Lord of Trowbridge and Constable of England.

He followed the entourage of King Henry I, and appears in documents he signed in 1131 at Arques and Dieppe, Normandy, France. He was steward and chancellor to Henry I.

He rallied with Mathilda, at the instigation of his father-in-law, Milo de Gloucester, and defended Trowbridge against King Steven in 1139. He was taken prisoner at the Battle of Winchester when Matilda's fortunes reversed in 1141.

He was a witness where Miles of Gloucester, Earl of Hereford, and Constable of England created Earl of Hereford by the Empress Maud on 25 July 1141.

He signed a document of Prince Henry between 1150 and 1151 at Argentan, France.

He consented to the gift of the church of St. Gregoire de Catz by Ildebert de Catz and Steven de Magneville in 1152. He was with the King between 1153 and 1154 in England. He saw his inheritances in England and Normandy and his titles confirmed by the newly crowned King Henry II.

He was one of the barons summoned to the Council of Clarendon where the constitutions were drawn up in 1164.

He inherited 3 1/2 parts of a knight's fees (rent) from his grandfather's provinces and 9 1/2 parts "de novo" in 1166.

He was at Argentan, Falaise, and Quevilly in 1174 in Normandy, France. He was back in England between 1174 and 1179.

He witnessed a peace accord between Henry II and William the Lion recognizing the sovereignty of England over Scotland between 1 December 1174 and 1175. He was at Valognes, Cherbourg, and Bonneville-sur-Touques between 1180 and 1182 in Normandy.

He died on 6 April 1187 at the age of 78 years. He was buried in Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, England.

See "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p377.htm#i7132 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm )

--------------------

3rd Baron de Bohun and Lord Steward to King Henry I -------------------- He was Dapifer to Henry I and was Lord of Hereford and Bard de Bohun. -------------------- Humphrey de Bohun - was born about 1120 in Gloucestershire, England and died on 6 Apr 1187 in England . Humphrey married Margaret de Gloucester about 1149 in Gloucestershire, England. Margaret was born about 1126 in Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.

Humphrey - The name of Bohun suggests Hereford. Unfortunately, Hereford Castle no longer exists. It was built in 1048, and apparently consisted of a moat and bailey. The mound has been leveled to the ground, but the bailey is outlined by high banks. One report has it that all that remains is a platform and a piece of a ditch.


The Castle was once situated near the present Bishop's Palace. It was seriously battered in an attack in 1055, but it was restored, and was again in use in 1067. The site which it now occupies is a public garden, gay with shrubbery and flowers. An ornamental lake indicates where once was the moat, but the outlines of the walls are shown only by grass covered ridges. -------------------- He was born between 1012 & 1168, and died between 1070 and 1278. He married Margaret of Hereford of Wigmore, Herfordshire, England, UK, daughter of Miles, Earl an Sibyl (de Neufmarche (Gloucester, who died in 1146.

son ; Baron Humphery IV, who died in 1182m Married Margaret Huntingdon -------------------- Humphrey II de Bohun (3rd Earl of Hereford) (died 1164/5) was an Anglo-Norman aristocrat, the third of his family after the Norman Conquest. He was the son and heir of Humphrey I and Maud, a daughter of Edward of Salisbury, an Anglo-Saxon landholder in Wiltshire. His father died around 1123 and he inherited an honour centred on Trowbridge, although he still owed feudal relief for this as late as 1130.

Shortly after the elder Humphrey's death, his widow and son founded the Cluniac priory of Monkton Farleigh in accordance with Humphrey's wishes. By 1130 the younger Humphrey also owed four hundred marks to the Crown for the Stewardship, which he had purchased. He appears in royal charters of Henry I towards 1135, and in 1136 he signed the charter of liberties issued by Stephen at his Oxford court.

In the civil war that coloured Stephen's reign Humphrey sided with his rival, the Empress Matilda after she landed in England in 1139. He repelled a royal army besieging his castle at Trowbridge, and in 1144 Matilda confirmed his possessions, granted him some lands, and recognised his "stewardship in England and Normandy". He consistently witnessed charters of Matilda as steward in the 1140s and between 1153 and 1157 he witnessed the charters of her son, then Henry II, with the same title.

In 1158 he appears to have fallen from favour, for he was deprived of royal demesne lands he had been holding in Wiltshire. He does not appear in any royal act until January 1164, when he was present for the promulgation of the Constitutions of Clarendon. He died sometime before 29 September 1165, when his son, Humphrey III, had succeeded him in Trowbridge. He left a widow in Margaret (died 1187), daughter Earl Miles of Hereford and Sibyl de Neufmarché . -------------------- Humphrey de Bohun was steward and sewer to King Henry I. This feudal lord m. Margery, dau. of Milo de Gloucester, Earl of Hereford, Lord High Constable of England, and sister and co-heiress of Mable, last Earl of Hereford of that family. At the instigation of which Milo, he espoused the cause of the Empress Maud (Matilda) and her son against King Stephen, and so faithfully maintained his allegiance that the empress, by her especial charter, granted him the office of steward and sewer, both in Normandy and England. In the 20th Henry II, this Humphrey accompanied Richard de Lacy (justice of England) into Scotland with a powerful army to waste that country; and was one of the witnesses to the accord made by William, King of Scots, and King Henry as to the subjection of that kingdom to the crown of England. He d. 6 April 1187, and was survived by his son, Henry de Bohun, 1st Earl of Hereford. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, London, 1883, p. 57, Bohun, Earls of Hereford, Earls of Essex, Earls of Northampton, and High Constables of England]

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Humphrey de Bohun III (II)'s Timeline

1120
1120
Gloucestershire, England
1140
1140
Age 20
1140
Age 20
1140
Age 20
1142
1142
Age 22
Warwick, Warwickshire, England
1143
1143
Age 23
Gloucestershire,England
1149
1149
Age 29
Of, , Gloucestershire, England
1150
1150
Age 30
1187
April 6, 1187
Age 67
Buried at Llanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire
1187
Age 67
Llanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, England