Ichabod Goodwin (1794 - 1882)

public profile

14

Совпадения

0 2 12
Дополнения: более полное место рождения, место погребения, отчество, место жительства, братья и сёстры и дети.

View Ichabod Goodwin's complete profile:

  • See if you are related to Ichabod Goodwin
  • Request to view Ichabod Goodwin's family tree

Поделиться

Birthdate:
Birthplace: North Berwick, ME, USA
Death: Died in Portsmouth, NH, USA
Managed by: Tammy Swingle (Tucker)
Last Updated:
показать все

Ближайшие родственники

About Ichabod Goodwin

New Hampshire's war governor, a Democrat who fitted out troops for the war at his own expense.

Ichabod Goodwin (October 8, 1794 – July 4, 1882) was the 27th governor of the state of New Hampshire from 1859 to 1861.

Goodwin was born at North Berwick, Maine and educated in South Berwick. He became a merchant in Portsmouth, New Hampshire working in the counting house of Samuel Lord, becoming master and part owner of several ships, and eventually the owner of two railroads, two banks, and a textile factory. In 1827 he married Sarah Parker Rice.

Goodwin was elected a State Representative, running as a Whig, in 1838, 1843, 1844, 1850, 1854, and 1856. In 1856 he ran, and lost, as the last Whig candidate for Governor of New Hampshire. He switched parties, becoming a Republican, and won his bid for governor in 1859, and again in 1860. He was a delegate at large from New Hampshire to the national conventions at which Henry Clay, Zachary Taylor, and Winfield Scott were nominated by the Whigs for the presidency, serving as vice-president of the first two bodies.

During his tenure, the New Hampshire legislature did away with the Courts of Common Pleas, transferring their duties to the State Supreme Court. Goodwin supported a legislative resolution opposing the extension of slavery, and an anti-immigrant act aimed at the defining of police courts' powers to suppress "intemperance." He also supported efforts to regulate railroads.

In May 1861, as the Civil War began, Goodwin responded to the first calls for soldiers by borrowing funds against his own name to equip two regiments. The legislature affirmed the Governor's action when they came into session the following month.

He died in Portsmouth; his house, the Goodwin Mansion, was relocated in order to preserve it, and stands today as a landmark. Ichabod Goodwin (October 8, 1794 – July 4, 1882) was the 27th governor of the state of New Hampshire from 1859 to 1861.

Goodwin was born at North Berwick, Maine and educated in South Berwick. He became a merchant in Portsmouth, New Hampshire working in the counting house of Samuel Lord, becoming master and part owner of several ships, and eventually the owner of two railroads, two banks, and a textile factory. In 1827 he married Sarah Parker Rice.

Goodwin was elected a State Representative, running as a Whig, in 1838, 1843, 1844, 1850, 1854, and 1856. In 1856 he ran, and lost, as the last Whig candidate for Governor of New Hampshire. He switched parties, becoming a Republican, and won his bid for governor in 1859, and again in 1860. He was a delegate at large from New Hampshire to the national conventions at which Henry Clay, Zachary Taylor, and Winfield Scott were nominated by the Whigs for the presidency, serving as vice-president of the first two bodies.

During his tenure, the New Hampshire legislature did away with the Courts of Common Pleas, transferring their duties to the State Supreme Court. Goodwin supported a legislative resolution opposing the extension of slavery, and an anti-immigrant act aimed at the defining of police courts' powers to suppress "intemperance." He also supported efforts to regulate railroads.

In May 1861, as the Civil War began, Goodwin responded to the first calls for soldiers by borrowing funds against his own name to equip two regiments. The legislature affirmed the Governor's action when they came into session the following month.

He died in Portsmouth; his house, the Goodwin Mansion, was relocated in order to preserve it, and stands today as a landmark. Ichabod Goodwin (October 8, 1794 – July 4, 1882) was the 27th governor of the state of New Hampshire from 1859 to 1861.

Goodwin was born at North Berwick, Maine and educated in South Berwick. He became a merchant in Portsmouth, New Hampshire working in the counting house of Samuel Lord, becoming master and part owner of several ships, and eventually the owner of two railroads, two banks, and a textile factory. In 1827 he married Sarah Parker Rice.

Goodwin was elected a State Representative, running as a Whig, in 1838, 1843, 1844, 1850, 1854, and 1856. In 1856 he ran, and lost, as the last Whig candidate for Governor of New Hampshire. He switched parties, becoming a Republican, and won his bid for governor in 1859, and again in 1860. He was a delegate at large from New Hampshire to the national conventions at which Henry Clay, Zachary Taylor, and Winfield Scott were nominated by the Whigs for the presidency, serving as vice-president of the first two bodies.

During his tenure, the New Hampshire legislature did away with the Courts of Common Pleas, transferring their duties to the State Supreme Court. Goodwin supported a legislative resolution opposing the extension of slavery, and an anti-immigrant act aimed at the defining of police courts' powers to suppress "intemperance." He also supported efforts to regulate railroads.

In May 1861, as the Civil War began, Goodwin responded to the first calls for soldiers by borrowing funds against his own name to equip two regiments. The legislature affirmed the Governor's action when they came into session the following month.

He died in Portsmouth; his house, the Goodwin Mansion, was relocated in order to preserve it, and stands today as a landmark. The construction of the Goodwin house corresponded almost exactly with the War of 1812. It was begun in 1811, and probably took at least three years to complete. A bricklayer by the name of James Hazeltine built the house, apparently for speculative purposes. The area where the house originally stood, on upper Islington Road, was at that time developing into an exclusive residential district. Hazeltine's venture succeeded. In 1814 he sold the house for $3,000, which undoubtedly covered his cost and included a sizable profit. The dwelling changed hands once more before it was purchased in 1832 by Ichabod Goodwin.

Sources:

показать все

Хронология Ichabod Goodwin, Governor

1794
October 8, 1794
North Berwick, ME, USA
1841
1841
Age 46
Montpelier, Washington Co., VT
1882
July 4, 1882
Age 87
Portsmouth, NH, USA
????