Ingelger, count of Anjou

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Ingelger d'Anjou, comte d'Anjou

Also Known As: "Ingelgerus", "Ingelgarius", "of Anjou & Orleans", "1st Count D'anjou", "Ingelger I Count of /Orleans/", "Count", "Count of Anjou", "/Ingelgerius/"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Rennes, Brittany, France
Death: Died in Châteauneuf, Haute-Loire, Auvergne, France
Place of Burial: St. Martin, Tours, Indre-Et-Loire, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Tertullus de Gâtinais, Sénéchal of Anjou; Tertullus; Petronelle d'Auxerre, Countess of Anjou and Petronilla
Husband of Adelais d'Amboise and Melinda de Buscancois
Father of Foulques I "the Red", count of Anjou; NN d'Anjou; Landry De Dreux; Adele de Dreux; Gerloc and 1 other

Occupation: Count of Anjou, Comte d'Anjou, Viscomte d'Orleans, Vicomte with possessions around Orleans and Angers, Vicegreve, Vizconde de Angers y Oléans, Viscount of Angers
Managed by: Jean Paul Ancey
Last Updated:

About Ingelger, count of Anjou

Ingelger (Ingelerus) was the first Count d'Anjou, the title granted to him in 9th Century. It is generally believed his parents were Tertullus and Petronilla. He was born in Renne. He inherited his father's land about 877. He was closely associated with Louis II and Louis III of France. He married Adelais in Orleans. He was buried in the church of Saint-Martin at Châteauneuf-sur-Sarthe. He was succeeded by his son Fulk the Red. This is a summary from the sources below.

         --added by Maria Edmonds-Zediker, Curator, 10/5/10

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm The creation of the "march" of Anjou is probably dated to the early 860s, as a measure to control the Bretons.

INGELGER (-[888], bur Châteauneuf, église Saint-Martin). The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Ingelgerius" as son of "Tertullus nobilem dux" & his wife. Tertullus is no more convincing than Tortulfus as the name of a figure in north-west France during the mid-9th century. As is the case with his supposed father, it is possible that Tertullus was not a historical person. m PETRONILLA, daughter of --- Duke of Burgundy & his wife ---. The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records the marriage of "Tertullus nobilem dux" and "ducis Burgundiæ filiam nomine Petronillam. Thus the supposition that Tertullus and Petronilla

Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks gave him "a piece of a fief in the castle of Landonense". He was installed as viscount of the city of Orléans by Louis II "le Bègue" King of the West Franks, and appointed royal representative at Tours. The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records the burial of "Ingelgerius" at "ecclesia beati Martini Castrinovi"

m ADELAIS, niece of ADALHARD Bishop of Tours and of RAINO Bishop of Angers, daughter of ---. The Historia Comitum Andegavorum records that Ingelgerius married "Rursus Adelardus et Raymo ambo germani fratres, Turonensium et Andegavensium pontifices, neptem suam Aelindis" and that her dowry consisted of "alodiis suis…Ambazio, Busenciaco et Castellione"

http://en.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/567416 Ingelger I Count of Anjou and Orléans (845 - 888) was a viscount who held territory around Orléans and Angers at the end of the 9th century. [cite news|url=http://www.american-pictures.com/genealogy/persons/per00884.htm|publisher=American-Pictures.com|title=Ingelger I Count of Anjou and Orleans|date=24 October 2007] The son of Tertullus (or Tertulle) and Petronilla (whose grandfather was Holy Roman Emperor Charlemagne), [cite news|url=http://www.american-pictures.com/genealogy/persons/per00986.htm#0|publisher=American-Pictures.com|title=Petronilla Princess of Holy Roman Empire|date=24 October 2007] he was born in Anjou and christened at St Martin, Tours. His son Fulk became the first count of Anjou. After Robert the Strong, he directed the resistance to the Norman invasions on the Loire. Ingeleger eventually died at the age of 43 in Tours.

Through his most senior descendant Geoffrey Plantagenet, father of Henry II of England, Ingelger was a direct ancestor of the House of Plantagenet, a powerful European royal house. The house is sometimes called the "First House of Anjou" and would rule the Kingdom of England, Lordship of Ireland, Principality of Wales, Duchy of Normandy, Duchy of Aquitaine, Duchy of Brittany and others, as well as claiming the Kingdom of France.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IngelgerIngelger (or Ingelgarius) (died 888) was a Frankish nobleman, who stands at the head of the Plantagenet dynasty. Later generations of his family believed he was the son of Tertullus (Tertulle) and Petronilla.[1] He was born in Rennes. Around 877 he inherited his father Tertullus's lands in accordance with the Capitulary of Quierzy which Charles the Bald had issued. His father's holdings from the king included Château-Landon in beneficium, and he was a casatus in the Gâtinais and Francia. Contemporary records refer to Ingelger as a miles optimus, a great military man.[2] Later family tradition makes his mother a relative of Hugh the Abbot,[3] an influential counselor of both Louis II and Louis III of France, from whom he received preferment. By Louis II Ingelger was appointed viscount of Orléans, which city was under the rule of its bishops at the time.[2] At Orléans Ingelger made a matrimonial alliance with one of the leading families of Neustria, the lords of Amboise. He married Adelais, whose maternal uncles were Adalard, Archbishop of Tours, and Raino, Bishop of Angers. Later Ingelger was appointed prefect (military commander) at Tours, then ruled by Adalard.[2] At some point Ingelger was appointed Count of Anjou, at a time when the county stretched only as far west as the Mayenne River. Later sources credit his appointment to his defence of the region from Vikings,[4] but modern scholars have been more likely to see it as a result of his wife's influential relatives.[2] He was buried in the church of Saint-Martin at Châteauneuf-sur-Sarthe. He was succeeded by his son Fulk the Red.[4]

There are no sources to this story, but it does describe life in the 9th Century. http://books.google.com/books?id=_vjYdZL9OjMC&pg=PA51&lpg=PA51&dq=Ingelger&source=bl&ots=c6yqlANMml&sig=-76VIqzaIzSc9lpSrmeDOxqyc-Q&hl=en&ei=nZKrTO_GMc3Iswbuoqi4BA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CEUQ6AEwCTgU#v=onepage&q=Ingelger&f=false The Art of Duelling By "A Traveller" The wife of the Count of Gatinois was accused of murder when her husband was found dead in her bed. The accuser, Gontran, a relative of the late Count, was one of the most noted and skilled swordsmen in the court of King Lewis le Begue. The king set a trial by combat between Gontran and any who would defend the widow. The widow had a teenaged godson, Ingelger, a great favorite at the court. Ingelger pleaded with the king to allow him to defend his godmother. The king tried to dissuade him due to youth and inexperience. The boy persisted. On the day of the trial, both men showed up, suited up in armor and on horseback. Ingelbar parried a thrust from Gontran's lance and sunk his own through the body of Gontran. He then got off his horse, cut off Gontran's head and presented it to the king. According to the story, his godmother was so thankful she gave him the manor of Landon.

-------------------- From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Anjou: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#_Toc256354719

INGELGER, son of [TERTULLUS & his wife Petronilla of Burgundy] (-[888], bur Châteauneuf, église Saint-Martin).

Foulque I "le Roux" Comte d´Anjou names "Ingelgerio genitore meo…" in a charter dated to [929/30][34].

There is doubt whether the other references to Ingelger which follow accurately reflect the historical reality of his life. The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Ingelgerius" as son of "Tertullus nobilem dux" & his wife[35]. The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Ingelgerius…iuvenis filius Tortulfi"[36]. The Chronico Turonensi names "Ingelgerius comes Andergavensis" as "nepos Hugonis Ducis Burgundiæ"[37].

Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks gave him "a piece of a fief in the castle of Landonense".

He was installed as viscount of the city of Orléans by Louis II "le Bègue" King of the West Franks, and appointed royal representative at Tours. The Historia Comitum Andegavorum records that Louis II "le Bègue" King of the West Franks, therefore dated to [877/79], granted "dimidium Andegavis comitatum" to "Ingelgerius"[38].

The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that Ingelger died from "focositatem, phthisim et hydropisim"[39].

The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records the burial of "Ingelgerius" at "ecclesia beati Martini Castrinovi"[40].

m ADELAIS, niece of ADALHARD Bishop of Tours and of RAINO Bishop of Angers, daughter of ---.

Comte Ingelger & his wife had one son: 1. Foulques I Le Roux (b. c.888 d. August 941/942, buried Chateauneuf, eglise St-Martin, became first Comte d'Anjou 929-941/42)

From the Wikipedia page on Ingelger: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingelger

Ingelger or Ingelgarius (died 888) was a Frankish nobleman, who stands at the head of the Plantagenet dynasty. Later generations of his family believed he was the son of Tertullus (Tertulle) and Petronilla.[1] He was born in Rennes.

Around 877 he inherited his father Tertullus's lands in accordance with the Capitulary of Quierzy which Charles the Bald had issued. His father's holdings from the king included Château-Landon in beneficium, and he was a casatus in the Gâtinais and Francia. Contemporary records refer to Ingelger as a miles optimus, a great military man.[2]

Later family tradition makes his mother a relative of Hugh the Abbot,[3] an influential counselor of both Louis II and Louis III of France, from whom he received preferment. By Louis II Ingelger was appointed viscount of Orléans, which city was under the rule of its bishops at the time.[2]

At Orléans Ingelger made a matrimonial alliance with one of the leading families of Neustria, the lords of Amboise. He married Adelais, whose maternal uncles were Adalard, Archbishop of Tours, and Raino, Bishop of Angers. Later Ingelger was appointed prefect (military commander) at Tours, then ruled by Adalard.[2]

At some point Ingelger was appointed Count of Anjou, at a time when the county stretched only as far west as the Mayenne River. Later sources credit his appointment to his defence of the region from Vikings,[4] but modern scholars have been more likely to see it as a result of his wife's influential relatives.[2]

He was buried in the church of Saint-Martin at Châteauneuf-sur-Sarthe. He was succeeded by his son Fulk the Red.[4]

External links

Halphen, Louis and René Poupardin. Chroniques des Comtes d'Anjou et des Seigneurs d'Amboise. Steve Lane, trans. Paris: Picard, 1913. Part of Medieval Sourcebook.

References

1.^ The anonymous twelfth-century Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names his father as Tertullus nobilem dux, but both the name Tertullus and the title dux are unusual. Another twelfth-century source, the Chronicon Turonensis (c.1180) records that Ingelger was nepos Hugonis ducis Burgundiæ, a nephew of Hugh, Duke of Burgundy—chronologically stretched. Modern scholars are divided as to the historicity of Tertullus and Petronilla. 2.^ a b c d Bernard S. Bachrach (1993), Fulk Nerra, the Neo-Roman Consul, 987–1040: A Political Biography of the Angevin Count (Berkely: University of California Press, ISBN 0 520 07996 5), 4–5. 3.^ This man is distinct from abbot Hugh, son of Charlemagne, but the two are frequently confused, resulting in some 19th century sources erroneously naming Petronilla as granddaughter of Charlemagne. 4.^ a b Anjou: Chapter 1. Comtes d'Anjou at Foundation for Medieval Genealogy: Medieval Lands Project.

From French Wikipedia:

His name is known from a charter from 929 that mentions him as the father of Foulque I Le Roux, Comte d'Anjou. Contemporary documents reveal nothing more, and the information available about the Vicomte comes from the Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, a history of the counts of Anjoy dating from the 12th century (three centuries later).

His son was witness in a deed from 886 of the Vicomte, and took part in another act from 898. This led to the assumption that Ingelger died between these two dates. His descendants were called in France the Ingelgeriens.

References:

1. Gallica, Father Anselm - Family History and chronology of the royal house of France, as well as peerage, Grand Officer of the Crown and the royal household, and barons. Sixth Volume - Paris - 1730. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingelger -------------------- Ingelger's birth has been placed from as early as C.E. 845 to as late as C.E. 850. His death at C.E. 888 to C.E. 893.

Ingelger I Count Anjou And Orlean-4020 [Parents] was born about 845 in Of, , Anjou, France. He died about 893 in St Martin, Tours, Indre-Et-Loire, France. He was buried in St Martin, Tours, Indre-Et-Loire, France. He married Aelinde (Rescinde) De Amboise [Countess Ofanjo-4005 about 869 in Of, , , France.

   Other marriages:
       Buscancois, Melinda De
       Gatinais, Aelinde Rescinde van

Aelinde (Rescinde) De Amboise [Countess Ofanjo-4005 [Parents] was born about 844 in Of, Tours, , France. She married Ingelger I Count Anjou And Orlean-4020 about 869 in Of, , , France.

They had the following children:

     		M 	i 	Foulques I "Le Anjou-3067 was born about 870. He died in 938. 

Ingelger or Ingelgarius (died 888) was a Frankish nobleman, who stands at the head of the Plantagenet dynasty. Later generations of his family believed he was the son of Tertullus (Tertulle) and Petronilla.

He was buried in the church of Saint-Martin at Châteauneuf -------------------- Ingelger I Count of Anjou and Orléans (845 - 888) was a viscount who held territory around Orléans and Angers at the end of the 9th century. The son of Tertullus (or Tertulle) and Petronilla (whose grandfather was Holy Roman Emperor Charlemagne), he was born in Anjou and christened at St Martin, Tours. His son Fulk became the first count of Anjou. After Robert the Strong, he directed the resistance to the Norman invasions on the Loire. Ingeleger eventually died at the age of 43 in Tours.

Through his descendant Geoffrey Plantagenet, father of Henry II of England, he is an ancestor to the present-day British royal family, including Elizabeth II, Queen of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and her son, Prince Charles, Prince of Wales.

-------------------- First Angevin Dynasty -- of counts (before 942-1214)

Under one of the sons of Robert 'the Strong' [le Fort], Anjou was entrusted to a certain Ingelger [Enjuger], who became the founder of the first Angevin dynasty. Ingelger's son Fulk [Foulque] I the Red [le Roux] rid the country of the Normans and enlarged his domains by taking part of Touraine. He died in 942, and under his successor, Fulk II 'the Good' [le Bon], the destruction caused by the preceding wars was repaired. Geoffrey [Geoffroi] I Grisegonelle [d.987], who succeeded Fulk II in about 960, began the policy of expansion that was to characterize this first feudal dynasty. He helped Hugh Capet to seize the French crown but died some months after the new king's accession (987). -------------------- Ingelger or Ingelgarius (died 888) was a Frankish nobleman, who stands at the head of the Plantagenet dynasty. Later generations of his family believed he was the son of Tertullus (Tertulle) and Petronilla.[1]

Around 877 he inherited his father Tertullus's lands in accordance with the Capitulary of Quierzy which Charles the Bald had issued. His father's holdings from the king included Château-Landon in beneficium, and he was a casatus in the Gâtinais and Francia. Contemporary records refer to Ingelger as a miles optimus, a great military man.[2]

Later family tradition makes his mother a relative of Hugh the Abbot,[3] an influential counselor of both Louis II and Louis III of France, from whom he received preferment. By Louis II Ingelger was appointed viscount of Orléans, which city was under the rule of its bishops at the time.[2] At Orléans Ingelger made a matrimonial alliance with one of the leading families of Neustria, the lords of Amboise. He married Adelais, whose maternal uncles were Adalard, Archbishop of Tours, and Raino, Bishop of Angers. Later Ingelger was appointed prefect (military commander) at Tours, then ruled by Adalard.[2]

At some point Ingelger was appointed Count of Anjou, at a time when the county stretched only as far west as the Mayenne River. Later sources credit his appointment to his defence of the region from Vikings,[4] but modern scholars have been more likely to see it as a result of his wife's influential relatives.[2] He was buried in the church of Saint-Martin at Châteauneuf. He was succeeded by his son Fulk the Red. -------------------- Ingelger or Ingelgarius (died 888) was a Frankish nobleman, who stands at the head of the Plantagenet dynasty. Later generations of his family believed he was the son of Tertullus (Tertulle) and Petronilla.

Around 877 he inherited his father Tertullus's lands in accordance with the Capitulary of Quierzy which Charles the Bald had issued. His father's holdings from the king included Château-Landon in beneficium, and he was a casatus in the Gâtinais and Francia. Contemporary records refer to Ingelger as a miles optimus, a great military man.[2]

Later family tradition makes his mother a relative of Hugh the Abbot,[3] an influential counselor of both Louis II and Louis III of France, from whom he received preferment. By Louis II Ingelger was appointed viscount of Orléans, which city was under the rule of its bishops at the time.[2] At Orléans Ingelger made a matrimonial alliance with one of the leading families of Neustria, the lords of Amboise. He married Adelais, whose maternal uncles were Adalard, Archbishop of Tours, and Raino, Bishop of Angers. Later Ingelger was appointed prefect (military commander) at Tours, then ruled by Adalard.[2]

At some point Ingelger was appointed Count of Anjou, at a time when the county stretched only as far west as the Mayenne River. Later sources credit his appointment to his defence of the region from Vikings,[4] but modern scholars have been more likely to see it as a result of his wife's influential relatives.[2] He was buried in the church of Saint-Martin at Châteauneuf. He was succeeded by his son Fulk the Red.

-------------------- Ingelger I Count of Anjou and Orléans (845 - 888) was a viscount who held territory around Orléans and Angers at the end of the 9th century. The son of Tertullus (or Tertulle) and Petronilla (whose grandfather was Holy Roman Emperor Charlemagne), he was born in Anjou and Christened at St Martin Detours. His son Fulk became the first count of Anjou. After Robert the Strong, he directed the resistance to the Norman invasions on the Loire. Ingeleger eventually died at the age of 43 in Tours.

Through his descendant Geoffrey Plantagenet, father of Henry II of England, he is an ancestor to the present-day British royal family, including Elizabeth II, Queen of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and her son, Prince Charles, Prince of Wales. -------------------- Ingelger or Ingelgarius (died 888) was a Frankish nobleman, who stands at the head of the Plantagenet dynasty. Later generations of his family believed he was the son of Tertullus (Tertulle) and Petronilla.[1]

Around 877 he inherited his father Tertullus's lands in accordance with the Capitulary of Quierzy which Charles the Bald had issued. His father's holdings from the king included Château-Landon in beneficium, and he was a casatus in the Gâtinais and Francia. Contemporary records refer to Ingelger as a miles optimus, a great military man.[2]

Later family tradition makes his mother a relative of Hugh the Abbot,[3] an influential counselor of both Louis II and Louis III of France, from whom he received preferment. By Louis II Ingelger was appointed viscount of Orléans, which city was under the rule of its bishops at the time.[2] At Orléans Ingelger made a matrimonial alliance with one of the leading families of Neustria, the lords of Amboise. He married Adelais, whose maternal uncles were Adalard, Archbishop of Tours, and Raino, Bishop of Angers. Later Ingelger was appointed prefect (military commander) at Tours, then ruled by Adalard.[2]

At some point Ingelger was appointed Count of Anjou, at a time when the county stretched only as far west as the Mayenne River. Later sources credit his appointment to his defence of the region from Vikings,[4] but modern scholars have been more likely to see it as a result of his wife's influential relatives.[2] He was buried in the church of Saint-Martin at Châteauneuf. He was succeeded by his son Fulk the Red. -------------------- ngelger or Ingelgarius (died 888) was a Frankish nobleman, who stands at the head of the Plantagenet dynasty. Later generations of his family believed he was the son of Tertullus (Tertulle) and Petronilla.[1]

Around 877 he inherited his father Tertullus's lands in accordance with the Capitulary of Quierzy which Charles the Bald had issued. His father's holdings from the king included Château-Landon in beneficium, and he was a casatus in the Gâtinais and Francia. Contemporary records refer to Ingelger as a miles optimus, a great military man.[2]

Later family tradition makes his mother a relative of Hugh the Abbot,[3] an influential counselor of both Louis II and Louis III of France, from whom he received preferment. By Louis II Ingelger was appointed viscount of Orléans, which city was under the rule of its bishops at the time.[2] At Orléans Ingelger made a matrimonial alliance with one of the leading families of Neustria, the lords of Amboise. He married Adelais, whose maternal uncles were Adalard, Archbishop of Tours, and Raino, Bishop of Angers. Later Ingelger was appointed prefect (military commander) at Tours, then ruled by Adalard.[2]

At some point Ingelger was appointed Count of Anjou, at a time when the county stretched only as far west as the Mayenne River. Later sources credit his appointment to his defence of the region from Vikings,[4] but modern scholars have been more likely to see it as a result of his wife's influential relatives.[2] He was buried in the church of Saint-Martin at Châteauneuf. He was succeeded by his son Fulk the Red.[4]

[edit] External links

   * Halphen, Louis and René Poupardin. Chroniques des Comtes d'Anjou et des Seigneurs d'Amboise. Steve Lane, trans. Paris: Picard, 1913. Part of Medieval Sourcebook.

[edit] References

  1. ^ The anonymous twelfth-century Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names his father as Tertullus nobilem dux, but both the name Tertullus and the title dux are unusual. Another twelfth-century source, the Chronicon Turonensis (c.1180) records that Ingelger was nepos Hugonis ducis Burgundiæ, a nephew of Hugh, Duke of Burgundy—chronologically stretched. Modern scholars are divided as to the historicity of Tertullus and Petronilla.
  2. ^ a b c d Bernard S. Bachrach (1993), Fulk Nerra, the Neo-Roman Consul, 987–1040: A Political Biography of the Angevin Count (Berkely: University of California Press, ISBN 0 520 07996 5), 4–5.
  3. ^ This man is distinct from abbot Hugh, son of Charlemagne, but the two are frequently confused, resulting in some 19th century sources erroneously naming Petronilla as granddaughter of Charlemagne.
  4. ^ a b Anjou: Chapter 1. Comtes d'Anjou at Foundation for Medieval Genealogy: Medieval Lands Project.

-------------------- Ingelger or Ingelgarius (died 888) was a Frankish nobleman, who stands at the head of the Plantagenet dynasty. Later generations of his family believed he was the son of Tertullus (Tertulle) and Petronilla.[1]

Around 877 he inherited his father Tertullus's lands in accordance with the Capitulary of Quierzy which Charles the Bald had issued. His father's holdings from the king included Château-Landon in beneficium, and he was a casatus in the Gâtinais and Francia. Contemporary records refer to Ingelger as a miles optimus, a great military man.[2]

Later family tradition makes his mother a relative of Hugh the Abbot,[3] an influential counselor of both Louis II and Louis III of France, from whom he received preferment. By Louis II Ingelger was appointed viscount of Orléans, which city was under the rule of its bishops at the time.[2] At Orléans Ingelger made a matrimonial alliance with one of the leading families of Neustria, the lords of Amboise. He married Adelais, whose maternal uncles were Adalard, Archbishop of Tours, and Raino, Bishop of Angers. Later Ingelger was appointed prefect (military commander) at Tours, then ruled by Adalard.[2]

At some point Ingelger was appointed Count of Anjou, at a time when the county stretched only as far west as the Mayenne River. Later sources credit his appointment to his defence of the region from Vikings,[4] but modern scholars have been more likely to see it as a result of his wife's influential relatives.[2] He was buried in the church of Saint-Martin at Châteauneuf. He was succeeded by his son Fulk the Red.[4]

[edit] External links

   * Halphen, Louis and René Poupardin. Chroniques des Comtes d'Anjou et des Seigneurs d'Amboise. Steve Lane, trans. Paris: Picard, 1913. Part of Medieval Sourcebook.

[edit] References

  1. ^ The anonymous twelfth-century Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names his father as Tertullus nobilem dux, but both the name Tertullus and the title dux are unusual. Another twelfth-century source, the Chronicon Turonensis (c.1180) records that Ingelger was nepos Hugonis ducis Burgundiæ, a nephew of Hugh, Duke of Burgundy—chronologically stretched. Modern scholars are divided as to the historicity of Tertullus and Petronilla.
  2. ^ a b c d Bernard S. Bachrach (1993), Fulk Nerra, the Neo-Roman Consul, 987–1040: A Political Biography of the Angevin Count (Berkely: University of California Press, ISBN 0 520 07996 5), 4–5.
  3. ^ This man is distinct from abbot Hugh, son of Charlemagne, but the two are frequently confused, resulting in some 19th century sources erroneously naming Petronilla as granddaughter of Charlemagne.
  4. ^ a b Anjou: Chapter 1. Comtes d'Anjou at Foundation for Medieval Genealogy: Medieval Lands Project.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingelger" Categories: House of Ingelger | Counts of Anjou | 84 -------------------- According to www.aragon10.free-online.co.uk/charlemagne.htm, Ingelger's mother was Petronille de France, daughter of Hugues "l'Abbe" de St. Quentin, who was son of Charlemagne.

SOURCES: Wikipedia.org -------------------- Comte d'Anjou et d'Orléans. -------------------- Ingelger I Count of Anjou and Orléans (845 - 888) was a viscount who held territory around Orléans and Angers at the end of the 9th century. The son of Tertullus (or Tertulle) and Petronilla (whose grandfather was Holy Roman Emperor Charlemagne), he was born in Anjou and christened at St Martin, Tours. His son Fulk became the first count of Anjou. After Robert the Strong, he directed the resistance to the Norman invasions on the Loire. Ingeleger eventually died at the age of 43 in Tours.

Through his most senior descendant Geoffrey Plantagenet, father of Henry II of England, Ingelger was a direct ancestor of the House of Plantagenet, a powerful European royal house. The house is sometimes called the First House of Anjou and would rule the Kingdom of England, Lordship of Ireland, Principality of Wales, Duchy of Normandy, Duchy of Aquitaine, Duchy of Brittany and others, as well as claiming the Kingdom of France.

-------------------- Source: Dan Pomerleau, Leo van de Pas -------------------- From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search

Ingelger or Ingelgarius (died 888) was a Frankish nobleman, who stands at the head of the Plantagenet dynasty. Later generations of his family believed he was the son of Tertullus (Tertulle) and Petronilla.[1]

Around 877 he inherited his father Tertullus's lands in accordance with the Capitulary of Quierzy which Charles the Bald had issued. -------------------- Ingelger I Count of Anjou and Orléans (845 - 888) was a viscount who held territory around Orléans and Angers at the end of the 9th century. The son of Tertullus (or Tertulle) and Petronilla (whose grandfather was Holy Roman Emperor Charlemagne), he was born in Anjou and Christened at St Martin Detours. His son Fulk became the first count of Anjou. After Robert the Strong, he directed the resistance to the Norman invasions on the Loire. Ingeleger eventually died at the age of 43 in Tours.

Through his descendant Geoffrey Plantagenet, father of Henry II of England, he is an ancestor to the present-day British royal family, including Elizabeth II, Queen of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and her son, Prince Charles, Prince of Wales. -------------------- Ingelger or Ingelgarius (died 888) was a Frankish nobleman, who stands at the head of the Plantagenet dynasty. Later generations of his family believed he was the son of Tertullus (Tertulle) and Petronilla.[1] He was born in Rennes.

Around 877 he inherited his father Tertullus's lands in accordance with the Capitulary of Quierzy which Charles the Bald had issued. His father's holdings from the king included Château-Landon in beneficium, and he was a casatus in the Gâtinais and Francia. Contemporary records refer to Ingelger as a miles optimus, a great military man.[2]

Later family tradition makes his mother a relative of Hugh the Abbot,[3] an influential counselor of both Louis II and Louis III of France, from whom he received preferment. By Louis II Ingelger was appointed viscount of Orléans, which city was under the rule of its bishops at the time.[2] At Orléans Ingelger made a matrimonial alliance with one of the leading families of Neustria, the lords of Amboise. He married Adelais, whose maternal uncles were Adalard, Archbishop of Tours, and Raino, Bishop of Angers. Later Ingelger was appointed prefect (military commander) at Tours, then ruled by Adalard.[2]

At some point Ingelger was appointed Count of Anjou, at a time when the county stretched only as far west as the Mayenne River. Later sources credit his appointment to his defence of the region from Vikings,[4] but modern scholars have been more likely to see it as a result of his wife's influential relatives.[2] He was buried in the church of Saint-Martin at Châteauneuf. He was succeeded by his son Fulk the Red.[4]

[edit] External links Halphen, Louis and René Poupardin. Chroniques des Comtes d'Anjou et des Seigneurs d'Amboise. Steve Lane, trans. Paris: Picard, 1913. Part of Medieval Sourcebook. -------------------- Ingelger or Ingelgarius (died 888) was a Frankish nobleman, who stands at the head of the Plantagenet dynasty. Later generations of his family believed he was the son of Tertullus (Tertulle) and Petronilla.

Around 877 he inherited his father Tertullus's lands in accordance with the Capitulary of Quierzy which Emperor Charles the Bald (also our ancestor) had issued. His father's holdings from the Emperor included Château-Landon in beneficium, and he was a casatus in the Gâtinais and Francia. Contemporary records refer to Ingelger as a miles optimus, a great military man.

Later family tradition makes his mother a relative of Hugh the Abbot, an influential counselor of both Louis II and Louis III of France, from whom he received preferment. By Louis II Ingelger was appointed viscount of Orléans, which city was under the rule of its bishops at the time. At Orléans Ingelger made a matrimonial alliance with one of the leading families of Neustria, the lords of Amboise. He married Adelais, whose maternal uncles were Adalard, Archbishop of Tours, and Raino, Bishop of Angers. Later Ingelger was appointed prefect (military commander) at Tours, then ruled by Adalard.

At some point Ingelger was appointed Count of Anjou, at a time when the county stretched only as far west as the Mayenne River. Later sources credit his appointment to his defense of the region from Vikings, but modern scholars have been more likely to see it as a result of his wife's influential relatives.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingelger for more information. -------------------- Ingelger I Count of Anjou and Orléans (845 - 888) was a viscount who held territory around Orléans and Angers at the end of the 9th century. The son of Tertullus (or Tertulle) and Petronilla (whose grandfather was Holy Roman Emperor Charlemagne), he was born in Anjou and Christened at St Martin Detours. His son Fulk became the first count of Anjou. After Robert the Strong, he directed the resistance to the Norman invasions on the Loire. Ingeleger eventually died at the age of 43 in Tours.

Through his descendant Geoffrey Plantagenet, father of Henry II of England, he is an ancestor to the present-day British royal family, including Elizabeth II, Queen of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and her son, Prince Charles, Prince of Wales. -------------------- From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps05/ps05_200.htm

"A semi-legendary soldier of fortune who carved out an estate for himself in the Loire valley. His son, Fulk the Red, built effectively on his foundation and became count of Anjou by 941."{-"The Plantagenet Chronicles," ed. by Elizabeth Hallam (N.Y.:Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1986, p.19).} Ingelgerius is thought to be the first Count of Anjou.

References: [RFC],[AR7] -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingelger -------------------- Vicomte d'Angers -------------------- •Name: Ingelar d'Anjou 1 2 •Sex: M •Title: Count of Anjou & Orleans •Birth: ABT 850 in Anjou, France 3 2 •Death: 893 in Saint Martin, Tours, Indre-et-Loire, France 4 5 •Burial: UNKNOWN Saint Martin, Tours, Indre-et-Loire, France

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingelger

Around 877 he inherited his father Tertullus's lands in accordance with the Capitulary of Quierzy which Charles the Bald had issued. His father's holdings from the king included Château-Landon in beneficium, and he was a casatus in the Gâtinais and Francia. Contemporary records refer to Ingelger as a miles optimus, a great military man.[2]

Father: Tertullus b: 821 in Rennes, Anjou, Francia (France) Mother: Petronilla De Paris b: 825 in Rhineland, Prussia

Marriage 1 Adele De Gâtinais b: 844 in Tours, France •Married: 878 in France 3 2

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=monicap&id=I05150

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Ingelger, count of Anjou's Timeline

850
850
Rennes, Brittany, France
869
869
Age 19
France
870
870
Age 20
Anjou, Isere, Rhone-Alpes, France
875
875
Age 25
France
879
879
- present
Age 29
Count of Anjou
888
888
Age 38
St. Martin, Tours, Indre-Et-Loire, France
894
894
Age 44
France
899
899
Age 49
Châteauneuf, Haute-Loire, Auvergne, France
909
909
Age 49
France?
????