Ingibjörg Finnsdóttir

Is your surname Finnsdóttir?

Research the Finnsdóttir family

Ingibjörg Finnsdóttir's Geni Profile

Records for Ingibjörg Finnsdóttir

2,476 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Ingibjörg Finnsdóttir

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Austrått, Ørland, Sør-Trøndelag, Norge
Death: Died in Orkney Islands, UK
Place of Burial: Dunfermline (since moved), Fife, Fife, United Kingdom
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Finn Arnesson, Jarl of Halland and Bergjlot (Thorborg) Halfdansdottir
Wife of Thorfinn 'The Black' Sigurdsson, II Jarl of Orkney and Malcolm III, 'Canmore', King of Scots
Mother of Pål Thorfinnsson, Jarl of Orkney; Erland Thorfinsson, Jarl of Orkney and Caithness; Dolgfinn; Bardolv Torfinnson; Duncan II, King of Scots and 2 others
Sister of Sigrid Finnsdotter

Occupation: Grevinna på Orkney och Caithness, sedan drottning i Skottland.
Managed by: Shannon Lowell Dick
Last Updated:

About Ingibjörg Finnsdóttir

Ingibiorg Finnsdottir (Standard Old Norse: Ingibjörg Finnsdóttir) was a daughter of Earl Finn Arnesson and Bergljot Halvdansdottir (Halfdansdottir), a niece of the Norwegian Kings Saint Olaf and Harald Hardraade. The dates of Ingibiorg's life are not certainly known.

Ingibiörg married twice:

1. Thorfinn Orkneyjarl

Children:

a. Paul

b. Erlend

2. Malcolm Canmore of Scotland (partner of husband uncertain, see below)

Children:

c. Duncan

d. Donald

http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingebj%C3%B8rg_Finnsdatter

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingibiorg_Finnsdottir

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORWEGIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#IngborgFinnsdM1ThorfinIIM2MalcolmIIIScot

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#ThorfinnIIdied1065B

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#MalcolmIIIdied1093B

INGIBJÖRG Finnsdatter ([1030/35]-).

Orkneyinga Saga names Earl Thorfinn´s wife as “Ingibjorg, the Earls´-Mother, daughter of Earl Finn Arnason” and niece of Kalf Arnason[30]. Snorre names "Ingebjorg, the earl-mother…a daughter of Fin Arnason" as wife of Earl Thorfin[31].

Morkinskinna records that “Thorfinn jarl [of] Orkney” was married to “Kálfr´s sister Ingibjorg Árnasdóttir” at the time Kalf Arnesson fled Norway[32]. The chronology is certainly tight for Ingibjörg to have been Kalf´s niece, if it is correct that she was already married when Kalf fled Norway, which must be dated to [1040/42] from the context in Morkinskinna. Her birth date is estimated on the basis of the estimated birth dates of her mother and her older son, both of which are restricted.

Orkneyinga Saga records that “Ingibjorg the Earls´-Mother” (widow of Thorfinn) married “Malcolm King of Scots, known as Long-neck” and that “their son was Duncan, King of Scots, father of William”[33]. There must be considerable doubt about whether this can be correct. Ingibjörg's [first] husband died in [1060/65]. King Malcolm's marriage to Queen Margaret is dated to 1070, three years after her arrival at the Scottish court. Although this provides sufficient time for the king to have married Ingebjörg, and for Ingebjörg to have died, the chronology for the birth of two sons would be tight. In addition, it is unlikely that either of these sons was born after [1065], as explained in the document SCOTLAND. If the king had really married Ingibjörg during this time, and if she had given birth to two sons, the absence of any reference to her in either Scottish or English sources is all the more surprising.

It is possible that King Malcolm's marriage to Ingibjörg (if it did take place) was more Danico, implying concubinage rather than regular marriage, but this does not change the chronological difficulties. The one puzzle which remains, if the Saga is not correct, is why the author would have fabricated this detail.

m [firstly] ([1045/50]) THORFINN "the Black" Jarl of Orkney, son of SIGURD "Digri" Jarl of Orkney and Caithness & his wife --- of Scotland ([1009]-[1060/65).

THORFINN "the Black", son of SIGURD "Digri" Jarl of Orkney and Caithness & his wife Donada of Scotland ([1009]-[1060/65], bur Birsay, Christchurch).

Orkneyinga Saga names “Earl Thorfinn” as the son of Sigurd and his wife “the daughter of Malcolm King of Scots”, adding that his father sent him to Scotland “to be fostered by the King, the boy´s maternal grandfather” when he left for Ireland, and that he was five years old when his father was killed[266]. Snorre names Thorfin as son of "Sigurd the Thick" & his wife, recording that he was five years old when his father was killed[267]. Orkneyinga Saga records that “his grandfather King Malcolm of Scotland” gave “Caithness and Sutherland…[with] the title earl” to Thorfinn and “appointed counsellors to govern with him”[268].

Orkneyinga Saga records that Thorfinn unsuccessfully claimed a share of Orkney from his half-brother Einar after the death of their brother Somerled, but that “when Earl Thorfinn came of age” he reasserted his claim and a settlement was reached through the intervention of their brother Brusi[269]. Assuming that he came of age when around 15 years old, this event would be dated to [1023/24]. This suggested age of majority appears confirmed by a later passage in Orkneyinga Saga which records that “at fifteen [Thorfinn] began leading raiding expeditions abroad”[270]. He succeeded [1030] as sole Jarl of Orkney. He disputed the succession of Duncan I King of Scotland in 1034, joined forces with Macbeth Mormaer of Moray, and obtained dominion over the whole of northern Scotland after the latter's accession in 1040[271]. Having given 1/3 of Orkney to his nephew Ragnvald II in 1036, he expelled the latter in 1046 and became sole Jarl once more. Orkneyinga Saga records the death of Thorfinn “towards the end of the reign of Harald Sigurdarson” (who was killed in 1066) and his burial “at Christchurch, Birsay” which he had built[272]. His date of death is not consistent with the birth of Duncan II King of Scotland, son of Thorfinn's wife by her second marriage, in 1060, unless Thorfinn repudiated his wife before he died.

m ([1045/50]) [as her first husband,] INGIBJÖRG Finnsdatter, daughter of FINN Arnesson [later Jarl of Halland in Denmark] & his wife Bergliot Halfdansdatter ([1030/35]-).

Orkneyinga Saga names Earl Thorfinn´s wife as “Ingibjorg, the Earls´-Mother, daughter of Earl Finn Arnason” and niece of Kalf Arnason[273]. Snorre names "Ingebjorg, the earl-mother…a daughter of Fin Arnason" as wife of Earl Thorfin[274]. Morkinskinna records that “Thorfinn jarl [of] Orkney” was married to “Kálfr´s sister Ingibjorg Árnasdóttir” at the time Kalf Arnesson fled Norway[275]. The chronology is certainly tight for Ingibjörg to have been Kalf´s niece, if it is correct that she was already married when Kalf fled Norway, which must be dated to [1040/42] from the context in Morkinskinna. Her birth date is estimated on the basis of the estimated birth dates of her mother and her older son, both of which are restricted. Orkneyinga Saga records that “Ingibjorg the Earls´-Mother” (widow of Thorfinn) married “Malcolm King of Scots, known as Long-neck” (Malcolm III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland) and that “their son was Duncan, King of Scots, father of William”[276]. There must be considerable doubt about whether this can be correct. Ingibjörg's [first] husband died in [1060/65]. King Malcolm's marriage to Queen Margaret is dated to 1070, three years after her arrival at the Scottish court. Although this provides sufficient time after the death of her first husband for the king to have married Ingebjörg, and for Ingebjörg to have died, the chronology for the birth of two sons would be tight. In addition, it is unlikely that either of these sons was born after [1065], as explained in the document SCOTLAND. If the king had really married Ingibjörg during this time, and if she had given birth to two sons, the absence of any reference to her in either Scottish or English sources is all the more surprising. It is possible that King Malcolm's marriage to Ingibjörg (if it did take place) was more Danico, implying concubinage rather than regular marriage, but this does not change the chronological difficulties. The one puzzle which remains, if the Saga is not correct, is why the author would have fabricated this detail.

Thorfinn & his wife had [three or more] children:

1. PAUL Thorfinnsson (-in prison Bergen 1098). Orkneyinga Saga names “Paul and…Erlend” as the two sons of Jarl Thorfinn and his wife who survived childhood[277]. He succeeded his father in [1065] as Joint Jarl of Orkney, jointly with his brother. He may have fought with his father at Stamford Bridge 1066[278]. He was deposed and imprisoned in 1098 by Magnus "Barelegs" King of Norway, and died in Bergen according to Snorre[279].

2. ERLEND Thorfinnsson (-in prison Trondheim [Nidaros] 1098, bur Trondheim). Orkneyinga Saga names “Paul and…Erlend” as the two sons of Jarl Thorfinn and his wife who survived childhood[280]. He succeeded his father in [1065] as Joint Jarl of Orkney, jointly with his brother. Morkinskinna records that Harald III King of Norway sailed to Orkney en route for his invasion of England in 1066 and “recruited the aid of Jarl Thorfinn´s sons Páll and Erlendr”[281]. Orkneyinga Saga records that Magnus "Barelegs" King of Norway “seized the Earls, Paul and Erlend” on his arrival in Orkney, “sent them east to Norway, and made his own son Sigurd overlord of the islands with regents to govern the earldom”, adding in a later passage that Erlend “had died and been buried at Trondheim”[282]. He was deposed and imprisoned in 1098 by Magnus "Barelegs" King of Norway, and "died of sickness at Nidaros and is buried there" according to Snorre[283].

m THORA, daughter of SOMERLED Uspaksson & his wife ---. Orkneyinga Saga records that “Earl Erlend Thorfinnson” married “Thora, the daughter of Sumarlidi Ospaksson”, adding that “the mother of this Ospak was Thordis, daughter of Hall of Sida”[284]. She married secondly Sigurd of Paplay. Orkneyinga Saga records that “his mother was married…to a man called Sigurd” when her son Magnus returned to Orkney, adding that she and her second husband had a son “Hakon Karl…[and] a farm at Paplay”[285].

3. son or sons (-young). Orkneyinga Saga names “Paul and…Erlend” as the two sons of Jarl Thorfinn and his wife who survived childhood, implying that other sons died young[308].

[m secondly ([1066]) as his first wife, MALCOLM III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland, son of DUNCAN I King of Scotland & his wife Sibylla of Northumbria (1031-killed in battle near Alnwick, Northumberland 13 Nov 1093, bur Tynemouth, later transferred to Dunfermline Abbey, Fife, and later still to Escorial, Madrid).]

MALCOLM, son of DUNCAN II King of Scotland & his wife [Sibylla of Northumbria] (1031-killed in battle near Alnwick, Northumberland 13 Nov 1093[241], bur Tynemouth St Albans[242], transferred to Dunfermline Abbey, Fife[243], transferred again to Escorial, Madrid). The 12th century Cronica Regum Scottorum names "Malcolaim filii Donnchada" in one of its lists[244]. The Chronicon of Mariano Scotti records that "Moelcol…filius Donchael" succeeded Lulach in 1058[245]. The Annales Dunelmenses record that "Siwardus" put "Macbeth" to flight in 1054 and installed "Malcolmum rege" in the following year[246]. The Annals of Tigernach record that “Lulach rí Alban” was killed by “Mael-Coluimb, son of Donnchad” in 1058[247]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that Malcolm recaptured his kingdom with the help of "Siward Earl of Northumberland" and killed "Machabeus" 5 Dec 1056[248]. He succeeded in 1058 as MALCOLM III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland, crowned 25 Apr 1058 at Scone Abbey, Perthshire. Duncan cites sources which demonstrate that this nickname was first applied to King Malcolm III in the 13th century[249]. He suggests[250] that it was originally applied to King Malcolm IV who, he asserts, suffered from Paget's disease, involving a deformation of the bones particularly observable in the skull, and was later misapplied to King Malcolm III. King Malcolm supported the claim to the English crown of Edgar ætheling, whose sister he had married, and led plundering raids into England.

Florence of Worcester records that he did homage to William I King of England at Abernethy in Aug 1072[251]. The same source records that King Malcolm invaded Northumberland in 1091, but did fealty to Willam II King of England after peace was negotiated between the two kings[252]. Florence of Worcester records that "rex Scottorum Malcolmus et primogenitus filius suus Eadwardus" were killed in battle in Northumbria "die S Bricii" [13 Nov] by the army of "Rotberti Northymbrorum comitis"[253]. William of Malmesbury records that he was killed, with his son Edward, by Morael of Bamborough, steward of Robert Mowbray Earl of Northumberland, while leading a raid into England[254]. The Annals of Ulster record that "Mael Coluim son of Donnchad, over-king of Scotland, and Edward his son, were killed by the French in Inber Alda in England"[255].

[m] [firstly] ([before 1058]) ---. The identity of the mother of King Malcolm's sons Duncan and Donald is uncertain. The absence of any reference to her in Scottish sources is best explained if her relationship with the king ended before his accession in 1058. However, this is not totally consistent with the estimated birth dates of her sons as shown below. It should be noted that King Duncan II, in his charter dated 1093, makes no reference to his mother, which implies that his father's relationship with her may have been short-lived and informal.

Orkneyinga Saga records that “Ingibjorg the Earls´-Mother” (Ingibjörg Finnsdatter, widow of Thorfinn "the Black" Jarl of Orkney and Caithness, daughter of Finn Arnisson [later Jarl of Halland in Denmark]) married “Malcolm King of Scots, known as Long-neck” and that “their son was Duncan, King of Scots, father of William”[256]. There must be considerable doubt about whether this can be correct. Ingibjörg's [first] husband died in [1060/65]. King Malcolm's marriage to Queen Margaret is dated to 1070, three years after her arrival at the Scottish court. Although this provides sufficient time after the death of her first husband for the king to have married Ingebjörg, and for Ingebjörg to have died, the chronology for the birth of two sons would be tight. In addition, it is unlikely that either of these sons was born after [1065], as explained in the document SCOTLAND. If the king had really married Ingibjörg during this time, and if she had given birth to two sons, the absence of any reference to her in either Scottish or English sources is all the more surprising. It is possible that King Malcolm's marriage to Ingibjörg (if it did take place) was more Danico, implying concubinage rather than regular marriage, but this does not change the chronological difficulties. The one puzzle which remains, if the Saga is not correct, is why the author would have fabricated this detail.

m [secondly] (Dunfermline Abbey 1070) MARGARET of England, daughter of EDWARD ætheling of England & his wife Agatha --- ([in Hungary] [1046/53]-Edinburgh Castle 16 Nov 1093, bur Dunfermline Abbey, Fife, transferred to Escorial, Madrid, her head bur Jesuit College, Douai).

Although Margaret's birth is often placed in [1045/46][257], a later birth would be more consistent with the "German" theory of her mother's origin (as discussed in ANGLO-SAXON KINGS). Margaret's birth as late as 1053 would still be consistent with her having given birth to four children before her daughter Edith/Matilda (later wife of Henry I King of England), whose birth is estimated to have taken place in [1079/80]. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that Margaret left England with her mother in Summer 1067 and found refuge at the court of Malcolm King of Scotland[258]. Florence of Worcester records that "clitone Eadgaro et matre sua Agatha duabusque sororibus suis Margareta et Christina" left England for Scotland, in a passage which deals with events in mid-1068[259].

Florence of Worcester records that "regina Scottorum Margareta" died from grief after learning of the death of her husband and oldest son[260]. The Annals of Ulster record that "his queen Margaret…died of sorrow for him within nine days" after her husband was killed in battle[261]. She was canonised in 1250, her feast day in Scotland is 16 Nov[262].

King Malcolm III & [his first wife] had [two] children:

1. DUNCAN ([1060/65]-murdered Monthechim/Mondynes, Kincardineshire 12 Nov 1094, bur Dunfermline Abbey, Fife).

William of Malmesbury names Duncan as illegitimate son of King Malcolm, when recording that he was knighted by William II King of England[263]. There is no indication of the identity of Duncan's mother, as explained above. His birth date is estimated on the assumption that he was a child when given as a hostage in 1072, which precludes his being the son of Queen Margaret. It is possible that he was illegitimate, although there is no indication that he was thereby excluded from succession to the throne. "Dunecanus fili regii Malcolum constans hereditarie rex Scotie" donated property to the monks of St Cuthbert for the souls of his father, "fratri mei, uxore mea et infans mei" (all unnamed), by charter dated 1093, witnessed by "Eadgari, [Etheread], Aceard, Ulf, Malcolub[264], Hormer, Heming, Ælfric, Teodbold, Earnulf"[265]. The copy in Early Scottish Charters lists the witnesses in a different order, and adds "Grentonis…Vinget"[266]. He was given as a hostage to William I King of England at Abernethy in 1072 to guarantee his father's good behaviour[267]. The Annals of Ulster record that the "French went into Scotland and brought away the son of the king of Scotland as hostage" in 1072[268], which presumably refers to Duncan as any of his half-brothers (if then born) would have been infants at the time. He was kept in Normandy.

Florence of Worcester records that Robert III "Curthose" Duke of Normandy released "Ulfam Haroldi quondam regis Anglorum filium, Dunechaldumque regis Scottorum Malcolmi filium" from custody after his father's death in Sep 1087, knighted them and allowed them to leave Normandy[269]. He joined William II King of England and remained at his court in England[270]. Florence of Worcester records that Duncan served in the army of King William II, who supported his bid to depose his uncle, and to whom Duncan swore fealty before leaving for Scotland[271]. He deposed his uncle in 1094 and proclaimed himself DUNCAN II King of Scotland[272]. Florence of Worcester records that "Dufenaldum regis Malcolmi fratrem" was elected king after his brother's death but that "filius regis Malcolmi Dunechain" expelled "patruum suum Dufenaldum"[273]. The Annals of Inisfallen record that "Domnall son of Donnchadh” killed “Donnchadh son of Mael Coluim king of Alba” in 1094 and “took the kingship of Alba”[274]. The Annals of Ulster record that "Donnchad son of Mael Coluim, king of Scotland, was treacherously killed by his own brothers Domnall and Edmond" in 1094[275].

William of Malmesbury records that King Duncan was "murdered by the wickedness of his uncle Donald"[276]. Florence of Worcester records that "Scotti regem…Dunechan" was killed in [1094][277]. The Chronicle of the Picts and Scots dated 1251 records that "Donechat mac Malcolm" was killed "a Malpeder Mackcolm comite de Merns in Monacheden" through the treachery of "Donald mac Donehat"[278]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that "Duncan, King Malcolm´s illegitimate son" was "slain at Monthechin by the Earl of Mernys…Malpetri, in Scottish, Malpedir, through the wiles of his uncle Donald" as was buried "in the island of Iona"[279].

m ([1090]) ETHELREDA of Northumberland, daughter of GOSPATRICK Earl of Northumberland & his wife Ethelreda --- (bur Dunfermline Abbey, Fife).

The Cronicon Cumbriæ records that “Waldevus filius comitis Cospatricii” enfeoffed “Waldeve filio Gileminii” with property and “Ethreda sorore sua”[280]. The Cronicon Cumbriæ records that “Ethreda sorore Waldevi patris sui” married “Doncani comes de Murrayse” and that their son “Willielmus” was succeeded by “Alanus filius Waldevi”[281]. It is assumed that Duncan was Ethelreda´s first husband and Waltheof her second husband. She married secondly Waltheof.

King Duncan II & his wife had one child:

a) WILLIAM FitzDuncan ([1091/94]-[1153/54]). His parentage is confirmed by the Chronicle of John of Fordun (Continuator - Annals) which records the rebellion of his son "Macwilliam whose real name was Donald Bane…son of William son of Duncan the bastard" against King William[282]. That William was his father's only child is shown by King Duncan's charter dated to 1093 referring to "infans mei". As the actual date of the charter is more likely to be 1094, this leaves little time for the birth of any more children before the king's murder. "…Willelmo nepote comitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1120] under which "David comes filius Malcolmi Regis Scottorum" founded the abbey of Selkirk[283]. The Cronicon Cumbriæ records that “Ethreda sorore Waldevi patris sui” married “Doncani comes de Murrayse” and that their son “Willielmus” was succeeded by “Alanus filius Waldevi”[284], suggesting that William was created Earl of Moray. Lord of Skipton and Craven, by right of his second wife.

2. DONALD ([1060/65]-killed in battle 1085). There is no indication of the name of Donald's mother. His birth date is estimated on the assumption that he was an adult when killed, and old enough to have had a son himself at that time, but this precludes his being the son of Queen Margaret. It is possible that he was illegitimate. The Annals of Ulster record that "Domnall son of Mael Coluim, king of Scotland…ended [his] life unhappily" in 1085[285].

m ---. The name of Donald's wife is not known. Donald & his wife had [one possible child]:

a) [LADHMANN (-killed in battle 1116). The Annals of Ulster record that "Ladhmann son of Domnall, grandson of the king of Scotland, was killed by the men of Moray"[286]. It is not known with certainty to whom this refers, but a son of Donald, son of King Malcolm, is the most likely possibility.]

-----------------------------------

The Orkneyinga saga reports that Malcolm married the widow of Thorfinn Sigurdsson, Ingibiorg, a daughter of Finn Arnesson. Although Ingibiorg is generally assumed to have died shortly before 1070, it is possible that she died much earlier, around 1058.[29] The Orkneyinga Saga records that Malcolm and Ingibiorg had a son, Duncan II (Donnchad mac Maíl Coluim), who was later king. Some Medieval commentators, following William of Malmesbury, claimed that Duncan was illegitimate, but this claim is propaganda reflecting the need of Malcolm's descendants by Margaret to undermine the claims of Duncan's descendants, the Meic Uilleim. Malcolm's son Domnall, whose death is reported in 1085, is not mentioned by the author of the Orkneyinga Saga. He is assumed to have been born to Ingibiorg.

Malcolm's marriage to Ingibiorg secured him peace in the north and west. The Heimskringla tells that her father Finn had been an adviser to Harald Hardraade and, after falling out with Harald, was then made an Earl by Sweyn Estridsson, King of Denmark, which may have been another recommendation for the match. Malcolm enjoyed a peaceful relationship with the Earldom of Orkney, ruled jointly by his stepsons, Paul and Erlend Thorfinnsson. The Orkneyinga Saga reports strife with Norway but this is probably misplaced as it associates this with Magnus Barefoot, who became king of Norway only in 1093, the year of Malcolm's death.

--------------------

Ingibiorg Finnsdottir (Standard Old Norse: Ingibjörg Finnsdóttir) was a daughter of Earl Finn Arnesson and Bergljot Halvdansdottir (Halfdansdottir), a niece of the Norwegian Kings Saint Olaf and Harald Hardraade.[1] The dates of Ingibiorg's life are not certainly known.

She married Thorfinn Sigurdsson, Earl of Orkney. The Orkneyinga Saga claims that Kalf Arnesson, Ingibiorg's uncle, was exiled in Orkney after her marriage to Thorfinn. This was during the reign of Magnus the Good, son of Saint Olaf, who ruled from 1035 to 1047, and probably before the death of Harthacanute in 1042.[2] Thorfinn and Ingibiorg had two known sons, Paul and Erlend, who fought in Harald Hardraade's ill-fated invasion of the Kingdom of England in 1066.[3]

Ingibiorg remarried after Thorfinn's death (date unknown).[4] Her second husband was Malcolm III (Máel Coluim mac Donnchada), the King of Scots. Whatever the exact date of the marriage, Malcolm and Ingibiorg had at least one son, and probably two. The Orkneyinga Saga tells us that Duncan II of Scotland (Domnall mac Mail Coluim') was their son,[5] and it is presumed that the "Domnall son of Máel Coluim, King of Scotland" whose death in 1085 is reported by the Annals of Ulster was their son.[6]

Ingibiorg is presumed to have died in around 1069 as Malcolm married Margaret, sister of Edgar Ætheling, in about 1070.[7] It may be, however, that she died before Malcolm became king, as an Ingeborg comitissa appears in the Liber Vitae Ecclesiae Dunelmensis, a list of those monks and notables from whom prayers were said at Durham, alongside persons known to have died around 1058.[8] If Ingibiorg was never Queen, it would help to explain the apparent ignorance of her existence displayed by Scots chroniclers.[9]

Notes

^ Saga of Harald Sigurdsson, c. 45; Orkneyinga Saga, c. 34, says that Ingibiorg was a cousin of Thora, Harald Hardraade's wife and mother of Olaf III of Norway.

^ Kalf's exile is in the Saga of Magnus the Good, c. 14, Harthacanute's death, c. 17; Orkneyinga Saga, c. 25, offers no information which could be used to date the marriage.

^ Orkneyinga Saga, c. 34; Saga of Harald Sigurdsson, c. 83.

^ Orkneyinga Saga, c. 32, says that he "died towards the end of the reign of Harald [Hardraade]". Harald reigned for twenty years. See also Duncan, p. 42, who suggests Thorfinn died in the early 1050s.

^ Orkneyinga Saga, c. 34.

^ Annals of Ulster, 1085.2; Oram, David I, pp. 22–23; Duncan, p. 55.

^ Thus Oram, pp. 23–23.

^ Duncan, pp. 42–43. Note that "c. 1085" on the first line of p. 43 is evidently an error for "c. 1058".

^ A death in 1058 would also sit with Orderic Vitalis's belief that Malcolm was betrothed to Margaret in 1059; Duncan, p. 43.

References

Anon., Orkneyinga Saga: The History of the Earls of Orkney, tr. Hermann Pálsson and Paul Edwards. Penguin, London, 1978. ISBN 0-14-044383-5

Duncan, A.A.M., The Kingship of the Scots 842–1292: Succession and Independence. Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, 2002. ISBN 0-7486-1626-8

Oram, Richard, David I: The King Who Made Scotland. Tempus, Stroud, 2004. ISBN 0-7524-2825-X

Snorri Sturluson, Heimskringla: History of the Kings of Norway, tr. Lee M. Hollander. Reprinted University of Texas Press, Austin, 1992. ISBN 0-292-73061

--------------------

Ingebjørg Finnsdatter

Fra Wikipedia, den frie encyklopedi

Gå til: navigasjon, søk

Ingebjørg Finnsdatter (født uvisst, død ca. 1070) var datter av Finn Arnesson og vokste opp på Austrått. Hun ble først gift i 1038 med Torfinn, jarl av Orknøyene (1009–1064?) siden med den skotske kongen Malcolm III. I skotsk historie kjennes hun under forvanskingen Ingibiorg.

Torfinn og Ingebjørg fikk sønnene Pål og Erlend, som begge ble jarler under morens formynderskap. Erlend fikk sønnen Magnus, som er Orkøyenes nasjonalhelgen.

Malcolm III Canmore (1031–1093) regnes som stamfar til en sentral kongeætt i skotsk historie, Canmoredynastiet. Hans far Duncan I ble drept av Mac Bethad mac Findláich, bedre kjent som Macbeth av Skottland, og Malcolm hevner faren i 1057. Året etter drepte han Macbeths stesønn Lulach, og ble skotsk enekonge.

Malcolm og Ingebjørg fikk sønnene Duncan og Donald. Duncan II ble konge etter sin far. Etter Ingebjørgs død giftet Malcolm seg (i 1067?) med den engelske kongsdatteren Margaret, som senere ble helgenforklart som Den hellige Margaret av Skottland.

Mye av dette er riktignok bare sannsynlige sannheter, ikke absolutt dokumentert. Mange skotske historikere mener at Dronning Ingibiorg må ha vært datter av Ingebjørg jarlemor, for å få årstallene til å gå opp.

--------------------

He [Thorfinn] m., before 1038, Ingibiorg, dau. of Finn Arnesson (d.p. 1062), of Yriar in Austratt, Lenderman under Norway, later Jarl of Halland under Denmark (circa 1051), by Begliot, dau. of Halfdan Sigurdsson (b. p. 995), brother of King Harald

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingibiorg_Finnsdottir

Ingibiorg Finnsdottir (Standard Old Norse: Ingibjörg Finnsdóttir) was a daughter of Earl Finn Arnesson and Bergljot Halvdansdottir (Halfdansdottir), a niece of the Norwegian Kings Saint Olaf and Harald Hardraade.[1] The dates of Ingibiorg's life are not certainly known.

She married Thorfinn Sigurdsson, Earl of Orkney. The Orkneyinga Saga claims that Kalf Arnesson, Ingibiorg's uncle, was exiled in Orkney after her marriage to Thorfinn. This was during the reign of Magnus the Good, son of Saint Olaf, who ruled from 1035 to 1047, and probably before the death of Harthacanute in 1042.[2] Thorfinn and Ingibiorg had two known sons, Paul and Erlend, who fought in Harald Hardraade's ill-fated invasion of the Kingdom of England in 1066.[3]

Ingibiorg remarried after Thorfinn's death (date unknown).[4] Her second husband was Malcolm III (Máel Coluim mac Donnchada), the King of Scots. Whatever the exact date of the marriage, Malcolm and Ingibiorg had at least one son, and probably two. The Orkneyinga Saga tells us that Duncan II of Scotland (Domnall mac Mail Coluim') was their son,[5] and it is presumed that the "Domnall son of Máel Coluim, King of Scotland" whose death in 1085 is reported by the Annals of Ulster was their son.[6]

Ingibiorg is presumed to have died in around 1069 as Malcolm married Margaret, sister of Edgar Ætheling, in about 1070.[7] It may be, however, that she died before Malcolm became king, as an Ingeborg comitissa appears in the Liber Vitae Ecclesiae Dunelmensis, a list of those monks and notables from whom prayers were said at Durham, alongside persons known to have died around 1058.[8] If Ingibiorg was never Queen, it would help to explain the apparent ignorance of her existence displayed by Scots chroniclers.[9]

-------------------- Finnsdottir, död Ingibiorg Earls Mor: BEF 1070. Far: Arnasson, Finn, Jarl av Halland. Mor: Halfdansdottir, Bergljot (Thorborg). Gift BEF 1038 till Sigurdsdon, Torfinn Svarta av Orkney, Jarl av Orkney. Barn 1: Thorfinnson, Paul I av Orkney, earl av Orkney. Barn 2: Thorfinnsson, Erlend II, earl av Orkney. Gift ABT 1066 till Malcolm III Caennmor av Skottland, kung av Skottland. Barn 3: Duncan II av Skottland, kung av Skottland, född ABT 1060. Barn 4: Malcolm. Barn 5: Donald. (Register över Royal genealogiska data, Hull, England)

Striden mellan Torfinn och Malcolm ingen tvekan fortsatte till hans död den tidigare (1064), när hans änka Ingeborg, mor till hans två söner och efterträdare Paul och Erlend, gift Malcolm, som uppenbarligen tyder på att en fred måste ha ingåtts . Att de unga jarlarna fortsatte att hålla Sudreys, verkar därför mest sannolikt, vilket åtminstone är det mest naturliga sättet att redovisa utseende Godred Crowan, när vi lär nedan, i den norska armén på Stamfordbridge. (Chronicle of Man och Sudreys konstaterar 1-2)

Torfinn, när bara barn, hade placerats av honom över Sutherland och Caithness: år 1030, om att hans halvbror, Brusi, bifogade han Orkneyöarna till sitt rike. Han beskrivs som stout och stark, men mycket ful, svår, och grym, men en mycket finurlig man. Duncan I, som regerade från AD. 1034-1040, försökte beröva honom sitt grevskap, men själv var besegrad, bland hans nederlag följdes av hans mord i smedens Bothy, nära Elgin, i händerna på Macbeth, som efterträdde honom, och regerade från 1040 till 58. Torfinn sägs ha haft en stor Riki i Irland, och ha utvidgat sitt rike från Thinrso Shcerry till Dublin, och att ha utkrävde tribut och övertagit befogenheter de tidigare kungarna av Dublin. Han dog omkring 1064. Hans söner var i slaget vid Stamford Bridge i 1066, och fly från slakt, ledde en fredlig och obemärkt existens som gemensamma Jarls i norra hem. Ingebiorge, änka efter Thiorfinn, gift Malcolm III, som regerade från 1058 till 93. -Robertson, i. 98, 127, och 161-2. (Chronicle of Man och Sudreys, konstaterar 1-2, Fotnot 53) Bar

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Finnsdottir, Ingibiorg Earls Mother Died: BEF 1070. Father: Arnasson, Finn, Jarl of Halland. Mother: Halfdansdottir, Bergliot (Thorborg). Married BEF 1038 to Sigurdsdon, Thorfinn the Black of Orkney, Jarl of Orkney. Child 1: Thorfinnson, Paul I of Orkney, Earl of Orkney. Child 2: Thorfinnsson, Erlend II, Earl of Orkney. Married ABT 1066 to Malcolm III Caennmor of Scotland, King of Scotland. Child 3: Duncan II of Scotland, King of Scotland, b. ABT 1060. Child 4: Malcolm. Child 5: Donald. (Directory of Royal Genealogical Data, Hull, England)

The strife between Thorfinn and Malcolm no doubt continued till the death of the former (1064), when his widow Ingebjorg, the mother of his two young sons and successors Paul and Erlend, married Malcolm, which evidently indicates that a peace must have been concluded. That the young earls continued to keep the Sudreys, seems therefore most likely ; this, at least, is the most natural way to account for the appearance of Godred Crowan, as we learn hereafter, in the Norwegian army at Stamfordbridge. (Chronicle of Man and the Sudreys, notes 1-2)

Thorfinn, when a mere child, had been placed by him over Sutherland and Caithness: In 1030, on the death of his half brother, Brusi, he annexed the Orkneys to his dominions. He is described as stout and strong, but very ugly; severe, and cruel, but a very clever man. Duncan I, who reigned from AD. 1034-1040, attempted to deprive him of his earldom, but was himself defeated, amid his defeat was followed by his assassination in the smith's bothy, near Elgin, at the hands of Macbeth, who succeeded him, and reigned from 1040-58. Thorfinn is said to have held a large Riki in Ireland, and to have extended his kingdom from Thinrso Shcerry to Dublin, and to have exacted tribute and assumed the prerogatives of the earlier kings of Dublin. He died about 1064. His sons were at the battle of Stamford Bridge in 1066, and escaping from the slaughter, led a peaceful and inglorious existence as joint jarls in their northern home. Ingebiorge, the widow of Thiorfinn, married Malcolm III, who reigned from 1058-93. -Robertson, i. 98, 127, and 161-2. (Chronicle of Man and the Sudreys, notes 1-2, fotnot 53) Bar

http://www.espell.se/saga/pb5386847.html

-------------------- Also mother of Heth Edelrad

------------------

Ingibjórg Finnsdóttir was the king of Norway, Magnus II Haraldson's, first cousin once removed. Magnus II Haraldson, King of Norway → Harald III Sigurdsson «Hard ruler» Hardråde his father → Halvdan Sigurdsson his brother → Bergjlot (Thorborg) Halfdansdottir his daughter → Ingibjórg Finnsdóttir her daughter x --------------------

Notes widow of Earl Thorfinn II of Orkney when she married Malcolm III.


Sources [S386] Macdonald genealogy, Roddy Macdonald of the Clan Donald Society of Edinburgh, (http://www.clandonald.org.uk/genealogy.htm), /genealogy/d0002/g0000006.html#I2629 (Reliability: 3)

[S370] Kings & Queens, Neil Grant, (pub 2003 by HarperCollinsPublishers Hammersmith London W6 8JB), p12 (Reliability: 3)

view all 13

Ingibjörg Finnsdóttir's Timeline

1030
1030
Ørland, Sør-Trøndelag, Norge
1035
1035
Age 5
1045
1045
Age 15
Atholl,,Perth,Scotland
1049
1049
Age 19
Orkney, Birsay, Scotland
1050
1050
Age 20
Orkney, Orkney Islands, Scotland
1059
1059
Age 29
Athol, Perth, Scotland
1059
Age 29
of, Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland
1059
Age 29
Atholl, perthshire, scotland
1062
1062
Age 32
Atholl, Perth, Scotland
1065
1065
Age 35
Atholl, Perth, Scotland