Ingjald Braut Onundsson (KING of Uppsala, Sweden)

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Ingjald Illråde (ill-ruler) Anundsson (Evil-doer), king in Sweden

Nicknames: "Ingjald Onundsson", "Illråde", "Ildråde", "The Ill-Advised", "/Illråde/", "Braut the Wicked", "\Braut The Wicked\", "Ingjald", "Ingjal...", "In...", "Ingjaldr `Ill-Ruler' BRAUT-ONUNDSON", "Ingiald (Ilradi) Evilheart of SWEDEN", "Ingjald `the Wicked'", "Ingjald "Braut" Onundsson..."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Uppsala, Sweden
Death: Died in Röning
Immediate Family:

Son of Braut Onund (Land Clearer) Ingvarsson and N.N. Gautdottir
Husband of Gauthild Algautsdotter, av Götaland
Father of Olaf Ingjaldsson «Tree Feller» Trätälja and Åsa Ingjaldsdotter «the Wicked» Illråde

Occupation: King of Uppsala in Sweden, Småkung i Svealland, Svitjod 640-655, Konge av Sverige, King of Uppsala
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Ingjald Illråde (ill-ruler) Anundsson (Evil-doer), king in Sweden

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingjald Ingjaldr hinn illráði or Ingjald illråde ("ill-ruler") was a legendary Swedish king of the House of Ynglings. Ingjald may have ruled sometime during the 7th century, and he was the son of the former king Anund.[1]

Ingjald is mentioned in the Ynglinga saga, Historia Norvegiæ, Hervarar saga, Upplendinga Konungum, Þorsteins saga Víkingssonar and Íslendingabók.

Ynglinga saga

Snorri Sturluson gave an extensive account on the life of Ingjald in the Ynglinga saga which is part of the Heimskringla.

Youth

The Ynglinga saga, a part of the Heimskringla relates that the viceroy of Fjädrundaland was named Ingvar and he had two sons, Alf and Agnar, who were of the same age as Ingjald. Svipdag the Blind was the viceroy of Tiundaland, the province of Uppsala where the Tings and the Yule (Midwinter) sacrifices were held (see the Temple at Uppsala).

One Midwinter, when Ingjald and Alf were six years old, many people had assembled at Uppsala for the sacrifices. Alf and Ingjald played, but Ingjald found that he was the weaker boy and became so angry that he almost started to cry. His foster-brother Gautvid led him to his foster-father Svigdag the Blind and told Svipdag about Ingjald's lack of manliness and strength. Svipdag said that it was a shame and the next day he gave Ingjald a roasted wolf's heart to eat. From that day, Ingjald became a very ferocious person and had a bad disposition.

Anund arranged a marriage for his son Ingjald with Gauthild, the daughter of the Geatish king Algaut, who was the son of Gautrek the Mild and the grandson of Gaut. Gautrek consented as he believed that Ingjald had inherited his father's disposition. Gauthild's maternal grandfather was Olof the Sharp-sighted, the king of Närke.

The deceit

Snorri Sturluson relates that when his father Anund had died, Ingjald became the king of Sweden. The kings at Uppsala were the foremost among the kings of the various provinces since Odin ruled the country, and they were the supreme chiefs of the other kingdoms since the death of Agne and Sweden was divided between Erik and Alrik. The descendants of these two kings had spread, cleared land and settled new territories, until there were several petty kings.

In honour of his own ascendance to the throne, Ingjald invited the kings, the jarls and other important men to a grand feast in a newly built hall, just as large and sumptuous as the one in Uppsala. It was called the hall of the seven kings and had seven high seats. Algaut the Geatish king of West Götaland, King Ingvar of Fjädrundaland with his two sons Agnar and Alf, King Sporsnjall of Nerike and King Sigvat of Attundaland came but not King Granmar of Södermanland. The kings filled all seven seats but one. All the prominent people of Sweden had seats, except for Ingjald's own court whom he had sent to his old hall in Uppsala.

According to the custom of the time for those who inherited kings and jarls, Ingjald rested at the footstool until the Bragebeaker was brought in. Then he was supposed to stand up, take the beaker and make solemn vows, after which he would ascend his father's high seat. However, when the beaker was brought in, he took a bull's horn and made the solemn vow that he would enlarge his own kingdom by half towards all the four quarters, towards which he pointed his horn, or die.

When all the prominent guests were drunk, he ordered Svipdag's sons, Gautvid and Hylvid, to arm themselves and their men and to leave the building. Outside, they set fire to the building which burnt down and those who tried to escape were killed.

Thus Ingjald made himself the sole ruler of the domains of the murdered kings.

Wars

Granmar won allies in his son-in-law the sea-king Hjörvard of the Ylfings and his father-in-law Högne the Geatish king of East Götaland. They successfully withstood Ingjald's invasion where Ingjald realised that the men from the provinces he had conquered were not loyal to him. After a long standstill there was peace for as long as the three kings lived. However, one night Ingjald and his men surrounded a farm where Granmar and Hjörvard were at a feast and burnt the house down. He late disposed of five more kings, and he thus earned the name Illråde (ill-ruler) as he fulfilled his promise.

Snorri Sturluson tells that it was a common saying that Ingjald killed twelve kings by deceiving them that he only wished for peace, and that he thus earned his cognomen Illråde (ill-ruler or ill-adviser).

Downfall Ingjald and his daughter Åsa

Ingjald had two children, a son Olof Trätälja and a daughter Åsa. His daughter had inherited her father's psychopathic disposition. She married king Guðröðr of Skåne. Before she murdered her husband she managed to make him kill his own brother Halfdan the Valiant, the father of the great Ivar Vidfamne.

In order to avenge his father, Ivar Vidfamne gathered a vast host and departed for Sweden, where he found Ingjald at Ræning. When Ingjald and his daughter realized that it was futile to resist, they set the hall on fire and succumbed in the flames.

Ynglingatal and Historia Norwegiae

It is interesting to note that the citation from Ynglingatal does not appear to describe Ingjald as an evil king. It calls his life a brave life frœknu fjörvi:

   Ok Ingjald
   í fjörvan trað
   reyks rösuðr
   á Ræningi,
   þá er húsþjófr
   hyrjar leistum
   goðkonung
   í gegnum steig.
   Ok sá urðr
   allri þjóðu
   sjaldgætastr
   með Svíum þótti,
   er hann sjálfr
   sínu fjörvi
   frœknu fyrstr
   um fara vildi.[1]
   With fiery feet devouring flame
   Has hunted down a royal game
   At Raening, where King Ingjald gave
   To all his men one glowing grave.
   On his own hearth the fire he raised,
   A deed his foemen even praised;
   By his own hand he perished so,
   And life for freedom did forego."[2]

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation (continuing after Anund): Post istum filius suus Ingialdr in regem sublimatur, qui ultra modum timens Ivarum cognomine withfadm regem tunc temporis multis formidabilem se ipsum cum omni comitatu suo cenaculo inclusos igne cremavit. Ejus filius Olavus cognomento tretelgia [...][2] After him his son Ingjald ascended the throne. Being abnormally terrified of King Ivar Vidfadme, at that time an object of dread to many, he shut himself up in a dining-hall with his whole retinue and burnt all its inmates to death. His son, Olav, known as Tretelgje,[...][3] -------------------- ABT 0630 - ____ OCCUPATION: Konge av Sverige

BIRTH: ABT 0630, (sønn av Svea-kongen Bröt-Anund, f. i Svitjod ca. 580) Family 1 : Gauthild av GÖTLAND +Olav Ingjaldsøn TRETELJA Kilde: nermo.org -------------------- When Ingjald was 6 years old he was playing a game with Alf (son of Kig Yngvar). The game was each to head the side of the other. Alf proved to be the stronger, Ingjald was so upsetabout this, that he cried bitterly. Gautvith (foster brother) led Ingjald to Svipdag the Blind (his foster father) and told him what had happened. The day after, Svipdag had the heart cut out of a wolf and had it steaked on a spit and gave it to Ingjald to eat. From that time he became the mostcruel anf most ill-natured of men.

After Ingjald married and was King of Uppsala, he had a great banquet (funeral feast) for the purpose of honoring his dead father King Onund. The feast was in a Hall called the Hall of Seven Kings. In it were erected seven high-seats. King Ingjald sent messengers through all of Sweden, inviting kings, earls, and other prominent men. King Algaut (Ingjald's father-in-law), King Yngvar of Fjahryndaland and his two sons, Agnar and Alf, King Sposnjall of Naeriki and King Sigverk of Attundaland. Only KIng Granmar of Suthrmannaland did not come. Six kings were asigned seats in the new hall. One high-seat that King Ingjald had erected remained empty.

All those that came were given seats in the new hall but for his own bodygaurd and all his people King Ingald had made room in the old hall. When the ceremonial beaker was brought in, King Ingjald stood up, seized a large drinking horn and made the vow that he would increase his dominion to double its size in every direction or ele die. Then he emptied the beaker.

When everyone was drunk, King Ingjald told Folkvith and Hulvith, the sons of Svipdag, to arm themselves and teir men when evening approached as planned. They went out to the new hall and put torch to it. The hall blazed up and the six kings and their followers were burned inside. Those that tried to come out were cut down. Thereupon, King Ingjald took possession of all the realms these kings has ruled and levied tribute to them.

King Granmar heard about what had happened and believed the same fate awaited him unless he took precautions. That same summer King Hjorvarth came with his fleet to Sweden and anchored in Myrkva Firth. When King Granmar learned of this,he sent messengers to invite him and all his men to a banquet. At that banquet King Hjorvath met Hildigunn, the daughter of King Granmar. The next day Hjorvarth asked Granmar for Hildigunn's hand. Granmar thought Hjorvarth's alliance could be beneficial and agreed.

That same fall King Ingjald collected a force to proceed against Granmar and Hjorvarth. He summoned troops from all of the districts hhe had taken possession of. When Granmar and Hjorvarth learned of this they collected their forces and King Hogni and his son (from East Gautland) came to their aid.

King Ingjald landed with all his army, and his forces were larger by far. A hard battle was fought, but after alittle while the chieftans Ingjald brought, took flight back to their ships. Ingjald was woundedin many places and fled to his ships. His foster father and step brothers were killed. Ingjald was angry that his troops betrayed him.

T -------------------- Ingjald illråde or Ingjaldr hinn illráði (Ingold Ill-ruler or Illready) was a legendary Swedish king of the House of Ynglings. Ingjald may have ruled sometime during the 7th century, and he was the son of the former king Anund.[1]

Ingjald is mentioned in the Ynglinga saga, Historia Norvegiæ, Hervarar saga, Upplendinga Konungum, Þorsteins saga Víkingssonar and Íslendingabók.

The deceit

Snorri Sturluson relates that when his father Anund had died, Ingjald became the king of Sweden. The kings at Uppsala were the foremost among the kings of the various provinces since Odin ruled the country, and they were the supreme chiefs of the other kingdoms since the death of Agne and Sweden was divided between Erik and Alrik. The descendants of these two kings had spread, cleared land and settled new territories, until there were several petty kings.

In honour of his own ascendance to the throne, Ingjald invited the kings, the jarls and other important men to a grand feast in a newly built hall, just as large and sumptuous as the one in Uppsala. It was called the hall of the seven kings and had seven high seats. Algaut the Geatish king of West Götaland, King Ingvar of Fjädrundaland with his two sons Agnar and Alf, King Sporsnjall of Nerike and King Sigvat of Attundaland came but not King Granmar of Södermanland. The kings filled all seven seats but one. All the prominent people of Sweden had seats, except for Ingjald's own court whom he had sent to his old hall in Uppsala.

According to the custom of the time for those who inherited kings and jarls, Ingjald rested at the footstool until the Bragebeaker was brought in. Then he was supposed to stand up, take the beaker and make solemn vows, after which he would ascend his father's high seat. However, when the beaker was brought in, he took a bull's horn and made the solemn vow that he would enlarge his own kingdom by half towards all the four quarters, towards which he pointed his horn, or die.

When all the prominent guests were drunk, he ordered Svipdag's sons, Gautvid and Hylvid, to arm themselves and their men and to leave the building. Outside, they set fire to the building which burnt down and those who tried to escape were killed.

Thus Ingjald made himself the sole ruler of the domains of the murdered kings.

Wars

Granmar won allies in his son-in-law the sea-king Hjörvard of the Ylfings and his father-in-law Högne the Geatish king of East Götaland. They successfully withstood Ingjald's invasion where Ingjald realised that the men from the provinces he had conquered were not loyal to him. After a long standstill there was peace for as long as the three kings lived. However, one night Ingjald and his men surrounded a farm where Granmar and Hjörvard were at a feast and burnt the house down. He late disposed of five more kings, and he thus earned the name Illråde (ill-ruler) as he fulfilled his promise.

Snorri Sturluson tells that it was a common saying that Ingjald killed twelve kings by deceiving them that he only wished for peace, and that he thus earned his cognomen Illråde (ill-ruler or ill-adviser).

Downfall

Ingjald had two children, a son Olof Trätälja and a daughter Åsa. His daughter had inherited her father's psychopathic disposition. She married king Guðröðr of Skåne. Before she murdered her husband she managed to make him kill his own brother Halfdan the Valiant, the father of the great Ivar Vidfamne.

In order to avenge his father, Ivar Vidfamne gathered a vast host and departed for Sweden, where he found Ingjald at Ræning. When Ingjald and his daughter realized that it was futile to resist, they set the hall on fire and succumbed in the flames.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingjald -------------------- Levde i mitten av 600-talet. (Fornvästnordiska: Ingjaldr hinn illráði) var kung av Ynglingaätten, enligt Ynglingasagan son till Bröt-Anund. Hans historiska existens är ytterst osäker. Figuren har samma roll i det svenska väldet som Harald Hårfagre hade för det norska väldet.

Enligt sagan skall Ingjald i sin barndom ha blivit tvingad av sin fosterfar att äta ett varghjärta för att härda sin karaktär mot svaghet. Ingjald beskrivs som en grym och mycket skoningslös konung som bland annat skall ha enat Svitjod och även lagt under sig Västergötland genom att först bränna inne sex småkungar vid ett gästabud och vid ett senare tillfälle angripa och innebränna Södermanlands kung som hade avstått från att komma till gästabudet. Östergötland ska dock ha lyckats bevara sin självständighet trots Ingjalds upprepade angrepp. Ingjald får till hustru kung Algöts dotter Gauthildr (Göthild) som han har två barn med, Olof och Åsa. (Källa: Wikipedia) -------------------- Onund had a son called Ingjald, and at that time Yngvar was king of the district of Fjadryndaland. Yngvar had two sons by his wife -- the one called Alf, the other Agnar -- who were about the same age as Ingjald. Onund's district-kings were at that time spread widely over Sweden, and Svipdag the Blind ruled over Tiundaland, in which Upsal is situated, and where all the Swedish Things are held. There also were held the mid-winter sacrifices, at which many kings attended. One year at midwinter there was a great assembly of people at Upsal, and King Yngvar had also come there with his sons. Alf, King Yngvar's son, and Ingjald, King Onund's son, were there -- both about six years old. They amused themselves with child's play, in which each should be leading on his army. In their play Ingjald found himself not so strong as Alf, and was so vexed that he almost cried. His foster-brother Gautvid came up, led him to his foster-father Svipdag the Blind, and told him how ill it appeared that he was weaker and less manly than Alf, King Yngvar's son. Svipdag replied that it was a great shame. The day after Svipdag took the heart of a wolf, roasted it on the tongs, and gave it to the king's son Ingjald to eat, and from that time he became a most ferocious person, and of the worst disposition. When Ingjald was grown up, Onund applied for him to King Algaut for his daughter Gauthild. Algaut was a son of Gautrek the Mild, and grandson of Gaut; and from them Gotland (Gautland) took its name. King Algaut thought his daughter would be well married if she got King Onund's son, and if he had his father's disposition; so the girl was sent to Sweden, and King Ingjald celebrated his wedding with her in due time.

39. OF KING ONUND'S DEATH.

King Onund one autumn, travelling between his mansion-houses, came over a road called Himmenheath, where there are some narrow mountain valleys, with high mountains on both sides. There was heavy rain at the time, and before there had been snow on the mountains. A landslip of clay and stones came down upon King Onund and his people, and there he met his death, and many with him. So says Thjodolf, namely: --

"We all have heard how Jonkur's sons, Whom weapons could not touch, with stones Were stoned to death in open day, King Onund died in the same way. Or else perhaps the wood-grown land, Which long had felt his conquering hand, Uprose at length in deadly strife, And pressed out Onund's hated life."

40. THE BURNING IN UPSAL.

Then Ingjald, King Onund's son, came to the kingdom. The Upsal kings were the highest in Sweden among the many district-kings who had been since the time that Odin was chief. The kings who resided at Upsal had been the supreme chiefs over the whole Swedish dominions until the death of Agne, when, as before related, the kingdom came to be divided between brothers. After that time the dominions and kingly powers were spread among the branches of the family as these increased; but some kings cleared great tracts of forest-land, and settled them, and thereby increased their domains. Now when Ingjald took the dominions and the kingdom of his father, there were, as before said, many district-kings. King Ingjald ordered a great feast to be prepared in Upsal, and intended at that feast to enter on his heritage after King Onund his father. He had a large hall made ready for the occasion -- one not less, nor less sumptuous, than that of Upsal; and this hall was called the Seven Kings Hall, and in it were seven high seats for kings. Then King Ingjald sent men all through Sweden, and invited to his feast kings, earls, and other men of consequence. To this heirship-feast came King Algaut, his father-in-law; Yngvar king of Fjadryndaland, with his two sons, Alf and Agnar; King Sporsnjall of Nerike; King Sighvat of Aattundaland: but Granmar king of Sodermanland did not come. Six kings were placed in the seats in the new hall; but one of the high seats which Ingjald had prepared was empty. All the persons who had come got places in the new hall; but to his own court, and the rest of his people, he had appointed places at Upsal. It was the custom at that time that he who gave an heirship-feast after kings or earls, and entered upon the heritage, should sit upon the footstool in front of the high seat, until the full bowl, which was called the Brage-beaker, was brought in. Then he should stand up, take the Brage-beaker, make solemn vows to be afterwards fulfilled, and thereupon empty the beaker. Then he should ascend the high seat which his father had occupied; and thus he came to the full heritage after his father. Now it was done so on this occasion. When the full Brage-beaker came in, King Ingjald stood up, grasped a large bull's horn, and made a solemn vow to enlarge his dominions by one half, towards all the four corners of the world, or die; and thereupon pointed with the horn to the four quarters. Now when the guests had become drunk towards evening King Ingjald told Svipdag's sons, Gautvid and Hylvid, to arm themselves and their men, as had before been settled; and accordingly they went out, and came up to the new hall, and set fire to it. The hall was soon in a blaze, and the six kings, with all their people, were burned in it. Those who tried to come out were killed. Then King Ingjald laid all the dominions these kings had possessed under himself, and took scatt from them.

41. OF HJORVARD'S MARRIAGE.

When King Granmar heard the news of this treachery, he thought the same lot awaited him if he did not take care. The same summer King Hjorvard, who was called Ylfing, came with his fleet to Sweden, and went into a fjord called Myrkva-fjord. When King Granmar heard this he sent a messenger to him to invite him and all his men to a feast. He accepted it willingly; for he had never committed waste in King Granmar's dominions. When he came to the feast he was gladly welcomed. In the evening, when the full bowls went round, as was the custom of kings when they were at home, or in the feasts they ordered to be made, they sat and drank together, a man and woman with each other in pairs, and the rest of the company sat and drank all together. But it was the law among the vikings that all who were at the entertainment should drink together in one company all round. King Hjorvard's high seat was placed right opposite to King Granmar's high seat, and on the same bench sat all his men. King Granmar told his daughter Hildigunn, who was a remarkably beautiful girl, to make ready to carry ale to the vikings. Thereupon she took a silver goblet, filled it, bowed before King Hjorvard, and said, "Success to all Ylfinger: this cup to the memory of Rolf Krake" -- drank out the half, and handed the cup to King Hjorvard. He took the cup, and took her hand, and said she must sit beside him. She says that is not viking fashion to drink two and two with women. Hjorvard replies that it were better for him to make a change, and leave the viking law, and drink in company with her. Then Hildigunn sat down beside him, and both drank together, and spoke a great deal with each other during the evening. The next day, when King Granmar and Hjorvard met, Hjorvard spoke of his courtship, and asked to have Hildigunn in marriage. King Granmar laid this proposal before his wife Hilda, and before people of consequence, saying they would have great help and trust in Hjorvard; and all approved of it highly, and thought it very advisable. And the end was, that Hildigunn was promised to Hjorvard, and the wedding followed soon after; and King Hjorvard stayed with King Granmar, who had no sons, to help him to defend his dominions.

42. WAR BETWEEN INGJALD AND GRANMAR AND HJORVARD.

The same autumn King Ingjald collected a war-force, with which he intended to fall upon Granmar and Hjorvard; but when they heard it they also collected a force, and Hogne, who ruled over East Gotland, together with his son Hildur, came to their assistance. Hogne was father of Hilda, who was married to King Granmar. King Ingjald landed with his army, which was by far the most numerous. A battle began, which was very sharp; but after it had lasted a short time, the chiefs who ruled over Fjadryndaland, West Gotland, Nerike, and Aattundaland, took to flight with all the men from those countries, and hastened to their ships. This placed King Ingjald in great danger, and he received many wounds, but escaped by flight to his ships. Svipdag the Blind, Ingjald's foster-father, together with his sons, Gautvid and Hylvid, fell. Ingjald returned to Upsal, very ill-satisfied with his expedition; and he thought the army levied from those countries he had acquired by conquest had been unfaithful to him. There was great hostility afterwards between King Ingjald and King Granmar, and his son-in-law King Hjorvard; and after this had continued a long time the friends of both parties brought about a reconciliation. The king appointed a meeting, and concluded a peace. This peace was to endure as long as the three kings lived, and this was confirmed by oath and promises of fidelity. The spring after, King Granmar went to Upsal to make offering, as usual, for a steady peace. Then the foreboding turned out for him so that it did not promise him long life, and he returned to his dominions.

43. DEATH OF THE KINGS GRANMAR AND HJORVARD.

The autumn after, King Granmar and his son-in-law Hjorvard went to a feast at one of their farms in the island Sile. When they were at the entertainment, King Ingjald came there in the night with his troops, surrounded the house, and burnt them in it, with all their men. Then he took to himself all the country these kings had possessed, and placed chiefs over it. King Hogne and his son Hildur often made inroads on horseback into the Swedish dominions, and killed King Ingjald's men, whom he had placed over the kingdom which had belonged to their relation Granmar. This strife between King Ingjald and King Hogne continued for a long time; but King Hogne defended his kingdom against King Ingjald to his dying day. King Ingjald had two children by his wife -- the eldest called Aasa, the other Olaf. Gauthild, the wife of Ingjald, sent the boy to his foster-father Bove, in West Gotland, where he was brought up along with Saxe, Bove's son, who had the surname of Flette. It was a common saying that King Ingjald had killed twelve kings, and deceived them all under pretence of peace; therefore he was called Ingjald the Evil-adviser. He was king over the greater part of Sweden. He married his daughter Aasa to Gudrod king of Scania; and she was like her father in disposition. Aasa brought it about that Gudrod killed his brother Halfdan, father of Ivar Vidfavne; and also she brought about the death of her husband Gudrod, and then fled to her father; and she thus got the name also of Aasa the Evil-adviser.

44. OF INGJALD'S DEATH.

Ivar Vidfavne came to Scania after the fall of his uncle Gudrod, and collected an army in all haste, and moved with it into Sweden. Aasa had gone to her father before. King Ingjald was at a feast in Raening, when he heard that King Ivar's army was in the neighbourhood. Ingjald thought he had not strength to go into battle against Ivar, and he saw well that if he betook himself to flight his enemies would swarm around him from all corners. He and Aasa took a resolution which has become celebrated. They drank until all their people were dead drunk, and then put fire to the hall; and it was consumed, with all who were in it, including themselves, King Ingjald, and Aasa. Thus says Thjodolf: --

"With fiery feet devouring flame Has hunted down a royal game At Raening, where King Ingjald gave To all his men one glowing grave. On his own hearth the fire he raised, A deed his foemen even praised; By his own hand he perished so, And life for freedom did forego."

  • *****************************

Events in the life of Ingjaldr Önundsson

† death 1 . in Lake Mälaren, Uppsala, Sweden. ·King Ingjald was at a feast in Raening, when he heard that King Ivar's army was in the neighbourhood. Ingjald thought he had not strength to go into battle against Ivar, and he saw wellthat if he betook himself to flight his enemies would swarm around him from all corners. He and Aasa took a resolution which has become celebrated. They drank until all their people were dead drunk, and then put fire to the hall; and it was consumed, with all who were in it, including themselves, King Ingjald, and Aasa. Thus says Thjodolf: -- "With fiery feet devouring flame Has hunted down a royal game At Raening, where King Ingjald gave To all his men one glowing grave. On his own hearth the fire he raised, A deed his foemen even praised; By his own hand he perished so, And life for freedom did forego." event 1 . ·was made infamous for his treachery against his own nobles following the death of his father || "When a king died, his successor was supposed to attend the funeral feast and there sit at the foot of the throne. A huge beaker was brought in. The heir had to pledge to do some might deed of valor, and then drain the beaker to the bottom. After this ceremony, he was led to the throne and proclaimed king. When Igjald planned the funeral of his father Anund the Cultivator, he invited all the petty kings and jarls of the neighboring areas to attend the feast. There he stood up, made a vow to increase his kingdom by half on every side, and drained the beaker. He then allowed his guests to become drunk. At this point he left the hall, surrounded it with his men, and set it on fire, thus killing all his potential rivals. For his treachery he became known as Ingjald Illräde" event 1 . ·ordered a great feast to be prepared in Upsal, when Ingjald took the dominions and the kingdom of his father, and intended at that feast to enter on his heritage after King Onund his father || He had a large hall made ready for the occasion -- one not less, nor less sumptuous, than that of Upsal; and this hall was called the Seven Kings Hall, and in it were seven high seats for kings. Then King Ingjald sent men all through Sweden, and invited to his feast kings, earls, and other men of consequence. To this heirship-feast came King Algaut, his father-in-law; Yngvar king of Fjadryndaland, with his two sons, Alf and Agnar; King Sporsnjall of Nerike; King Sighvat of Aattundaland: but Granmar king of Sodermanland did not come. ... Now when the guests had become drunk towards evening King Ingjald told Svipdag's sons, Gautvid and Hylvid, to arm themselves and their men, as had before been settled; and accordingly they went out, and came up to the new hall, and set fire to it. The hall was soon in a blaze, and the six kings, with all their people, were burned in it. Those who tried to come out were killed. Then King Ingjald laid all the dominions these kings had possessed under himself, and took scatt from them. event ·is said to have been the last fey-born pagan sacrol "peace king" associated with human sacrifice in his own family event 1 . ·attending a mid-winter festival with his father, and King Yngvar had also come there with his sons. Alf, King Yngvar's son, and Ingjald, King Onund's son, were there -- both about six years old. They amused themselves with child's play, in which each should be leading on his army. In their play Ingjald found himself not so strong as Alf, and was so vexed that he almost cried. His foster-brother Gautvid came up, led him to his foster-father Svipdag the Blind, and told him how ill it appeared that he was weaker and less manly than Alf, King Yngvar's son. Svipdag replied that it was a great shame. The day after Svipdag took the heart of a wolf, roasted it on the tongs, and gave it to the king's son Ingjald to eat, and from that time he became a most ferocious person, and of the worst disposition

"Bloodline ... ", p 427-31, King in Uppsala, Sweden, 7th century

-------------------- Ingjald Illråde var ein konge av Ynglingeætta, og den siste kongen av den ætta som rådde for Sveaveldet. Soga om han finst i Ynglingesoga.

Ingjald var son av Braut-Ånund, og tok riket etter far sin.Han fekk namnet sitt av di han var hardhjarta og førde ille råd. Styret hans var så hjartelaust at ætta hans vart driven frå Sveaveldet.

Då Ingjald var liten, tapte han i ei tevling mot ein ven, og fosterfar hans, Svipdag Blinde, gav han hjartet av ein ulv å eta. Etter dette vart han hardare og meir hjartelaus enn andre menn, fortel Snorre Sturlason. Han vart gift med Gauthild, dotter av kong Algaute (i Gautland). Ho vart mor til Olav Tretelgja og Åsa Illråde. Åsa var vel så hardhuga som faren, og mot slutten av livet slog dei seg saman og fekk born, er det sagt.

Snorre fortel at Sveariket på denne tida var delt opp i mange herad med ulike heradskongar. Ingjald svor på å samle riket att, og brann seks andre kongar inne i ei gildehall. Berre ein konge kom frå det med livet, og svor hemn på Ingjald. Kong Granmar, og mågen hans, Hjørvard, gjekk til fleire slag mot Ingjald, og med tida laut Ingjald gje seg. Granmar fekk hjelp av Ivar Vidfadme, som sidan rådde for sveaveldet. Ingjald og Åsa, dotter hans, brann seg sjølve inne i ei gildehall då dei såg at all von var ute.

Sonen Olav Tretelgja laut sidan røme frå Svealand.

-------------------- Född: Abt 610 Äktenskap : Gauthild Algautsdotter

 Allmänna hänvisningar: 

Ingjaldr värdshus illráði eller Ingjald illråde (" dåligt härskare " ) var en mer eller mindre historiska svenska kungen av huset Ynglings . Han var son till Anund .

Ungdom I Heimskringla berättar att vicekung av Fjädrundaland hette Ingvar och han hade två söner, Alf och Agnar , som var i samma ålder som Ingjald . Svipdag Blind var vicekung av Tiundaland , provinsen Uppsala där Tings och Yule ( Midwinter ) offer hölls.

En midvintern, när Ingjald och Alf var sex år gammal, hade många människor samlats i Uppsala för offren. Alf och Ingjald spelade , men Ingjald fann att han var den svagare pojke och blev så arg att han nästan började gråta. Hans fosterbror Gautvid ledde honom till sin fosterfader Svigdag blinda och berättade Svipdag om Ingjald brist på manlighet och styrka. Svipdag sade att det var en skam och nästa dag han gav Ingjald en rostad varg hjärta att äta. Från den dagen blev Ingjald en mycket grym person och hade en dålig disposition.

Anund arrangerade ett äktenskap för sin son Ingjald med Gauthild , dotter till den Götiska kung Algaut , som var son till Gautrek Mild och Grand - son Gaut . Gautrek samtyckt eftersom han trodde att Ingjald hade ärvt sin fars lynne . Gauthild morfar var Olof den skarpsynt , konungen i Nerike .

Det Svek Snorre Sturlasson berättar att när hans far Anund hade dött , blev Ingjald kungen av Sverige. Kungarna i Uppsala var den främste bland kungarna i de olika provinserna sedan Oden styrde landet , och de högsta cheferna i de andra rikena sedan död Agne och Sverige delades mellan Erik och Alrik . Ättlingarna till dessa två kungar hade spridit sig , röjde och avvecklas nya territorier , till dess fanns det flera småkungar .

För att hedra hans egen ascendance på tronen , uppmanade Ingjald kungarna, jarlarna och andra viktiga män till en stor fest i en nybyggd hall , precis som stora och överdådiga som en i Uppsala. Den hette hallen av de sju kungar och hade sju höga platser. Algaut den Götiska konungen i Västra Götaland , kung Ingvar av Fjädrundaland med sina två söner , kung Sporsnjall av Nerike och kung Sighvat av Attundaland kom men inte kung Granmar av Södermanland. Kungarna fyllt alla sju platser utom en. Alla framstående svenska folket hade säten, med undantag för Ingjald egen domstol som han skickat till sin gamla hall i Uppsala.

Enligt tidens sed för dem som ärvt kungar och jarlar , vilade Ingjald på pallen tills Bragebeaker fördes i. Då han skulle stå upp , ta bägaren och gör högtidliga löften , varefter han skulle stiga upp sin fars högsätet . Men när bägaren kom in, tog han ett tjurhorn och gjorde det högtidliga löftet att han skulle utvidga sitt rike med hälften mot alla de fyra kvartalen , till vilken han riktade sitt horn , eller dö.

När alla prominenta gäster var berusade , befallde han Svipdag söner , Gautvid och Hylvid , att beväpna sig själva och sina män och att lämna byggnaden. Utanför sätter de eld på den byggnad som brann ner och de som försökte fly dödades.

Således Ingjald gjorde sig till ensam härskare över de områden av den mördade kungar.

Krig Granmar vann allierade i hans svärson havet -king Hjörvard av Ylfings och hans svärfar Hogne den Götiska kungen av östra Götaland. De motstod framgångsrikt Ingjald invasion där Ingjald insåg att männen från provinserna han hade erövrat inte var lojala mot honom. Efter en lång stillastående det var fred så länge som de tre kungarna levde. Men en natt Ingjald och hans män sourrounded en gård där Granmar och Hjörvard var på en fest och brände ner hela huset . Han sent bortskaffas fem kungar , och han alltså heta Illråde ( sjuk - härskare ) som han uppfyllde sitt löfte.

Snorre Sturlasson berättar att det var ett vanligt talesätt att Ingjald dödade tolv kungar genom att lura dem att han bara ville för fred, och att han därmed tog sin tillnamnet Illråde ( dåligt linjal eller dåligt rådgivare ).

UNDERGÅNG Ingjald hade två barn , en son Olof Trätälja och en dotter Åsa. Hans dotter hade ärvt sin fars psykopatiska sinnelag. Hon gifte sig med kung Gudröd av Skåne. Innan hon mördade sin man hon lyckades få honom att döda sin egen bror Halfdan Kind , far till den store Ivar Vidfamne .

För att hämnas sin far , samlade Ivar Vidfamne en stor mängd och gick för Sverige, där han fann Ingjald på Ränninge * gård , på ön Fogdö i Mälaren. När Ingjald och hans dotter insåg att det var lönlöst att göra motstånd , som de i hallen i brand och dukade under i lågorna. Ingjald har ofta setts som den som enade Sverige.

  • Ränninge nämns också på en runsten i området. De ortnamn Rällinge anses vara den moderna formen .
 Noterade händelser i hans liv var:

• Han var en kung i Filipstad , Värmlands län , Sverige.

Ingjald gift Gauthild Algautsdotter .

 Äktenskap Anmärkningar: 

Från "The Ynglinga Saga " :

" 38 . AV Ingjald de dåliga. ... När Ingjald var vuxen , ansökte Anund för honom till kung Algaut för sin dotter Gauthild . Algaut var son till Gautrek Mild , och sonson till Gaut , och från dem Gotland ( Götland ) tog sitt namn . Kung Algaut trodde att hans dotter skulle vara väl gift om hon fick kung Anund son , och om han hade sin fars sinnelag , så att flickan skickades till Sverige, och kung Ingjald firade sitt bröllop med henne i tid. "

" 43 . DÖDSFALL av kungarna Granmar OCH HJORVARD . ... Kung Ingjald hade två barn med sin hustru - den äldsta heter Aasa , den andra Olaf . Gauthild skickade hustrun till Ingjald , pojken till sin fosterfader Bove , i västra Gotland, där han växte upp tillsammans med Sachsen , Bove son, som hade efternamnet Flette . ... " 2


Källor

1 Wikipedia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/ ).

2 Snorre Sturlasson (ca 1179 till 1241 ), http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/OMACL/ ( Om 1225 ) , "Den YNGLINGA Saga " .

-------------------- Ingjald Illraade besluttede at udrydde de Fylkes- og Smaa-konger, som overalt deelte Riget, indskrænkte Kongens Anseelse og Indflydelse og forsvagede Riget ved idelige Tvistigheder. Endeel indbød han til sin Faders Gravøl og indebrændte dem der; Andre fældedes ved anden Svig. Efter aaledes at have ryddet afveien tolv Fylkeskonger, blev han Enevoldskonge over største Delen af Sverige, og udsendte nu Lagmanden Viger Spa eller den Vise forat samle alle gamle Love, som han foreente til en Slags Lovbog, kjendt under Navn af "Vigers Flockar." Imidlertid vendte Ivar Vidfadme, en skaansk Fylkeskonge, hjem fra sine Vikingstog, hvor han havde vundet Ære og Bytte. Han anfaldt Ingjald forat hevne sin Faders og de andre Kongers Død. Forat undgaae denne Hevn, indebrændte Ingjald sig selv tillige- med sine Hoffolk omtrent Aar 600 efter Christi Fødsel. Hans Søn Olaf, som ikke havde havt Deel i Faderens Laster, flyede til Wærmland, og begyndte der at opædle Landet, hvorved han erholdt Tilnavnet Trætelje, samt stiftede der et lidet Rige. Hans Efterkommere gik over til Norge, som Harald Haarfager, en Æt- ling af Ynglingastammen, siden forenede til eet Rige. -------------------- Han var den siste av Ynlingeætta i rett linje som var konge i Uppsala, han var 21. genrasjon fra Yngve-Frøy. Han drepte ange konger ved list og svik, og han fikk navnet Illråde. Han fikk mange fiender. Til slutt drakk han alle sine folk og sin datter Åsa døddrukne, stengte seg inne i en stor hall og tente på. Alle døde.

-------------------- Blev ca 55 år.

Född: omkring 600 Badelunda Död: 655

Noteringar Sveakung 640 - 655. Son till Bröt-Anund. Den siste sveakonungen av Skilfingaätten (Yngre Ynglingaätten). Han uppfostrades av Svipdag blinde som påstås ha givit honom ett varghjärta att äta, vilket sedan skulle förklara varför Ingjald blev så grym. På sin fars gravöl svor Ingjald att han skulle vidga riket åt alla håll. Det gjorde han genom att bjuda in sju underlydande kungar av vilka sex kom. Alla blev innebrända i "Sjukungarssalen" i G:a Uppsala. Offren var: kung Algöt (Ingkalds svärfar), kung Yngvar från Fjärdhundraland samt dennes två söner Agnar och Alf, kung Spersnjall från Närke och kung Sigverk från Attundaland. Ingjald lade deras riken direkt under sig och deras män, som nu saknade ledare, följde honom direkt. Kung Granmar av Södermanland hade inte kommit till det makabra gästabudet och därför red nu kung Ingjald och hans män ner och anföll honom och även han innebrändes. Gift med Göthild, dotter till kung Algöt av Västergötland (denne var i sin tur son till kung Götrik den milde av Västergötland som var son till kung Götrik av Västergötland) . Göthilds mor hette Ålof och var dotter till kung Olav den synske av Närke. Deras dotter Åsa var lika grym som sin far. Hon gifte sig med kung Gudröd av Skåne och övertalade honom att dräpa sin bror Halvdan Snälle. Straxt därefter lät hon även mörda sin man Gudröd. Men halvdan Snälle hade en son, Ivar Vidfamne (se nedan), som med en stark flotta överföll kung Ingjald och hans dotter Åsa på Räninge kungsgård. Både far och dotter brändes inne. Enligt tradition höglagd i Ingjaldshögen vid Rällinge på Fogdön i Mälaren, men den graven har visat sig varaalldeles för ung. Troligen ligger han i den sk Uppsa kulle i Rönöbygden. Efter Ingljald Illråde upphörde kungamakten att gå från far till son inom Ynglingaätten. Ingjald hade även en son, Olof Trätälja, som blev kung av Värmland och sedan gav upphov till den norska grenen av Ynglingaätten som Harald Hårfager, norska rikets enare, sex generationer senare tillhörde.

-------------------- The Ynglinga saga, a part of the Heimskringla relates that the viceroy of Fjädrundaland was named Ingvar and he had two sons, Alf and Agnar, who were of the same age as Ingjald. Svipdag the Blind was the viceroy of Tiundaland, the province of Uppsala where the Tings and the Yule (Midwinter) sacrifices were held (see the Temple at Uppsala).

One Midwinter, when Ingjald and Alf were six years old, many people had assembled at Uppsala for the sacrifices. Alf and Ingjald played, but Ingjald found that he was the weaker boy and became so angry that he almost started to cry (which was strange because people named Ingjald where known to be stronger than average) . His foster-brother Gautvid led him to his foster-father Svipdag the Blind and told Svipdag about Ingjald's lack of manliness and strength. Svipdag said that it was a shame and the next day he gave Ingjald a roasted wolf's heart to eat. From that day, Ingjald became a very ferocious person and had a bad disposition.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingjald -------------------- Ingjaldr hinn illráði or Ingjald illråde ("ill-ruler") was a legendary Swedish king of the House of Ynglings. Ingjald may have ruled sometime during the 7th century, and he was the son of the former king Anund.

Ingjald is mentioned in the Ynglinga saga, Historia Norvegiæ, Hervarar saga, Upplendinga Konungum, Þorsteins saga Víkingssonar and Íslendingabók.

The Ynglinga saga, a part of the Heimskringla relates that the viceroy of Fjädrundaland was named Ingvar and he had two sons, Alf and Agnar, who were of the same age as Ingjald. Svipdag the Blind was the viceroy of Tiundaland, the province of Uppsala where the Tings and the Yule (Midwinter) sacrifices were held (see the Temple at Uppsala).

One Midwinter, when Ingjald and Alf were six years old, many people had assembled at Uppsala for the sacrifices. Alf and Ingjald played, but Ingjald found that he was the weaker boy and became so angry that he almost started to cry. His foster-brother Gautvid led him to his foster-father Svigdag the Blind and told Svipdag about Ingjald's lack of manliness and strength. Svipdag said that it was a shame and the next day he gave Ingjald a roasted wolf's heart to eat. From that day, Ingjald became a very ferocious person and had a bad disposition.

Anund arranged a marriage for his son Ingjald with Gauthild, the daughter of the Geatish king Algaut, who was the son of Gautrek the Mild and the grandson of Gaut. Gautrek consented as he believed that Ingjald had inherited his father's disposition. Gauthild's maternal grandfather was Olof the Sharp-sighted, the king of Närke.

Snorri Sturluson relates that when his father Anund had died, Ingjald became the king of Sweden. The kings at Uppsala were the foremost among the kings of the various provinces since Odin ruled the country, and they were the supreme chiefs of the other kingdoms since the death of Agne and Sweden was divided between Erik and Alrik. The descendants of these two kings had spread, cleared land and settled new territories, until there were several petty kings.

In honour of his own ascendance to the throne, Ingjald invited the kings, the jarls and other important men to a grand feast in a newly built hall, just as large and sumptuous as the one in Uppsala. It was called the hall of the seven kings and had seven high seats. Algaut the Geatish king of West Götaland, King Ingvar of Fjädrundaland with his two sons Agnar and Alf, King Sporsnjall of Nerike and King Sigvat of Attundaland came but not King Granmar of Södermanland. The kings filled all seven seats but one. All the prominent people of Sweden had seats, except for Ingjald's own court whom he had sent to his old hall in Uppsala.

According to the custom of the time for those who inherited kings and jarls, Ingjald rested at the footstool until the Bragebeaker was brought in. Then he was supposed to stand up, take the beaker and make solemn vows, after which he would ascend his father's high seat. However, when the beaker was brought in, he took a bull's horn and made the solemn vow that he would enlarge his own kingdom by half towards all the four quarters, towards which he pointed his horn, or die.

When all the prominent guests were drunk, he ordered Svipdag's sons, Gautvid and Hylvid, to arm themselves and their men and to leave the building. Outside, they set fire to the building which burnt down and those who tried to escape were killed.

Thus Ingjald made himself the sole ruler of the domains of the murdered kings.

Granmar won allies in his son-in-law the sea-king Hjörvard of the Ylfings and his father-in-law Högne the Geatish king of East Götaland. They successfully withstood Ingjald's invasion where Ingjald realised that the men from the provinces he had conquered were not loyal to him. After a long standstill there was peace for as long as the three kings lived. However, one night Ingjald and his men surrounded a farm where Granmar and Hjörvard were at a feast and burnt the house down. He late disposed of five more kings, and he thus earned the name Illråde (ill-ruler) as he fulfilled his promise.

Snorri Sturluson tells that it was a common saying that Ingjald killed twelve kings by deceiving them that he only wished for peace, and that he thus earned his cognomen Illråde (ill-ruler or ill-adviser).

Ingjald had two children, a son Olof Trätälja and a daughter Åsa. His daughter had inherited her father's psychopathic disposition. She married king Guðröðr of Skåne. Before she murdered her husband she managed to make him kill his own brother Halfdan the Valiant, the father of the great Ivar Vidfamne.

In order to avenge his father, Ivar Vidfamne gathered a vast host and departed for Sweden, where he found Ingjald at Ræning. When Ingjald and his daughter realized that it was futile to resist, they set the hall on fire and succumbed in the flames.

-------------------- Ingjald "Braut" Onundsson King Of Uppsala 1 Birth: 661 in , , Uppsala, Sweden 2 3 Death: Sex: M Father: Onund "Braut" Ingvarsson King Of Sweden b. About 638 in , , , Sweden Mother: Onund Ingvarsson b. About 643 in , , , Sweden

   

Spouses & Children

  
  

Gauthild Algautsdotter (Wife) b. About 664 in , , , Sweden 1 2 3 Marriage: Abt 681 in (, , Värmland, Sweden) 6 Nov 2004 14:29 Children: Aasa Ingjaldsdotter b. About 684 in , , Värmland, Sweden Olaf Ingjaldsson King Of Värmland b. About 682 in , , Värmland, Sweden Hrolf Ingjaldsson b. About 700 in (, Dyflinni, Ulster, Ireland)

 

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Name Suffix: King of Uppsala REFN: HWS8573 Ancestral File Number:FLHG-Z5 OBJE: C:\LEGACY\PICTURES\c_crown.gifCHAN20 Mar 2001


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  Sources    
  
  

 lbert F. Schmuhl, "Title: "Royal Lines & Adamic Genealogy: Genealogical Research of A

lbert F. Schmuhl, "Author: Schmuhl, Albert F. Publication: e-mail documentation, March 1997, Albert F. Schmuhl, Americ a Online Posting: Genealogy Forum Title: "FamilySearch® Ancestral Fileâ„¢ v4.19" Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Publication: 3 Feb 2001

Title: "Genealogical Research of Kirk Larson" Author: Larson, Kirk Publication: Personal Research Works including Bethune & Hohenlohe Desce ndants, 1981-2001, Kirk Larson, Private Library Title: "Héraldique européenne" Author: Arnaud Bunel Publication: Coats of Arms for European Royalty and Nobility (http://www .heraldique-europeenne.org, Arnaud Bunel, 1998) , Internet"Armigerous" (ahr-MIJ-ehr-us) adjective

Bearing or entitled to bear heraldicarms.

The reason the notion of a family crest was brought into th e languagewas that those who were armigerous (entitled to bear arms) used to put their crest or achieveme


-------------------- King Sweden

  1. Note: Another Yngling king in Sweden was Ingjald Illrade. From his saga, we learn something about how kings were chosen. When a king died, his successor was supposed to attend the funeral feast and there sit at the foot of the throne. A huge horn beaker was brought in. The heir had to pledge to do some mighty deed of valor, and then drain the beaker to the bottom. After this ceremony, he was led to the throne and proclaimed king.
   When Ingjald planned the funeral of his father Anund the Cultivator, he invited all the petty king and jarls (earls) of the neighboring areas to attend the feast. There he stood up, made a vow to increase his kingdom by the half on every side, and drained the beaker. He then allowed his guests to drink until they became intoxicated. At this point, he left the hall, surrounded it with his men, set it on fire, and thus killed all his potential rivals. The people hated him for his treachery, and named him Ingjald Illrade, or ill-ruler.
   King Ingjald is said to have been the last king of the Yngling dynasty to rule in Sweden. According to the sagas, he died about 600 AD, by setting fire to his palace on Lake Malaren and thus destroying both himself and his daughter. It was a fitting end for a man who had murdered his vassals by that very method.
  1. Note: In Swede, Ingjald Illrade was succeeded by Ivar Vidfamne (Wide Reacher). Ivar started a new dynasty, called Ivarska after himself.
  2. Note: The line of the ill-ruling Ingjald, however, did not die out. His son Olof Tretelgia (Olaf Tree-Hewer) escaped to Norway, where he became the progenitor of the Norwegian Yngling kings.
  3. Note: [Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flanders, and Kiev]

-------------------- Dead drunk during a feast he put a fire to the hall; consumed with all who were at the party. -------------------- Onund had a son called Ingjald, and at that time Yngvar was king of the district of Fjadryndaland. Yngvar had two sons by his wife -- the one called Alf, the other Agnar -- who were about the same age as Ingjald. Onund's district-kings were at that time spread widely over Sweden, and Svipdag the Blind ruled over Tiundaland, in which Upsal is situated, and where all the Swedish Things are held. There also were held the mid-winter sacrifices, at which many kings attended. One year at midwinter there was a great assembly of people at Upsal, and King Yngvar had also come there with his sons. Alf, King Yngvar's son, and Ingjald, King Onund's son, were there -- both about six years old. They amused themselves with child's play, in which each should be leading on his army. In their play Ingjald found himself not so strong as Alf, and was so vexed that he almost cried. His foster-brother Gautvid came up, led him to his foster-father Svipdag the Blind, and told him how ill it appeared that he was weaker and less manly than Alf, King Yngvar's son. Svipdag replied that it was a great shame. The day after Svipdag took the heart of a wolf, roasted it on the tongs, and gave it to the king's son Ingjald to eat, and from that time he became a most ferocious person, and of the worst disposition. When Ingjald was grown up, Onund applied for him to King Algaut for his daughter Gauthild. Algaut was a son of Gautrek the Mild, and grandson of Gaut; and from them Gotland (Gautland) took its name. King Algaut thought his daughter would be well married if she got King Onund's son, and if he had his father's disposition; so the girl was sent to Sweden, and King Ingjald celebrated his wedding with her in due time.

39. OF KING ONUND'S DEATH.

King Onund one autumn, travelling between his mansion-houses, came over a road called Himmenheath, where there are some narrow mountain valleys, with high mountains on both sides. There was heavy rain at the time, and before there had been snow on the mountains. A landslip of clay and stones came down upon King Onund and his people, and there he met his death, and many with him. So says Thjodolf, namely: --

"We all have heard how Jonkur's sons, Whom weapons could not touch, with stones Were stoned to death in open day, King Onund died in the same way. Or else perhaps the wood-grown land, Which long had felt his conquering hand, Uprose at length in deadly strife, And pressed out Onund's hated life."

40. THE BURNING IN UPSAL.

Then Ingjald, King Onund's son, came to the kingdom. The Upsal kings were the highest in Sweden among the many district-kings who had been since the time that Odin was chief. The kings who resided at Upsal had been the supreme chiefs over the whole Swedish dominions until the death of Agne, when, as before related, the kingdom came to be divided between brothers. After that time the dominions and kingly powers were spread among the branches of the family as these increased; but some kings cleared great tracts of forest-land, and settled them, and thereby increased their domains. Now when Ingjald took the dominions and the kingdom of his father, there were, as before said, many district-kings. King Ingjald ordered a great feast to be prepared in Upsal, and intended at that feast to enter on his heritage after King Onund his father. He had a large hall made ready for the occasion -- one not less, nor less sumptuous, than that of Upsal; and this hall was called the Seven Kings Hall, and in it were seven high seats for kings. Then King Ingjald sent men all through Sweden, and invited to his feast kings, earls, and other men of consequence. To this heirship-feast came King Algaut, his father-in-law; Yngvar king of Fjadryndaland, with his two sons, Alf and Agnar; King Sporsnjall of Nerike; King Sighvat of Aattundaland: but Granmar king of Sodermanland did not come. Six kings were placed in the seats in the new hall; but one of the high seats which Ingjald had prepared was empty. All the persons who had come got places in the new hall; but to his own court, and the rest of his people, he had appointed places at Upsal. It was the custom at that time that he who gave an heirship-feast after kings or earls, and entered upon the heritage, should sit upon the footstool in front of the high seat, until the full bowl, which was called the Brage-beaker, was brought in. Then he should stand up, take the Brage-beaker, make solemn vows to be afterwards fulfilled, and thereupon empty the beaker. Then he should ascend the high seat which his father had occupied; and thus he came to the full heritage after his father. Now it was done so on this occasion. When the full Brage-beaker came in, King Ingjald stood up, grasped a large bull's horn, and made a solemn vow to enlarge his dominions by one half, towards all the four corners of the world, or die; and thereupon pointed with the horn to the four quarters. Now when the guests had become drunk towards evening King Ingjald told Svipdag's sons, Gautvid and Hylvid, to arm themselves and their men, as had before been settled; and accordingly they went out, and came up to the new hall, and set fire to it. The hall was soon in a blaze, and the six kings, with all their people, were burned in it. Those who tried to come out were killed. Then King Ingjald laid all the dominions these kings had possessed under himself, and took scatt from them.

41. OF HJORVARD'S MARRIAGE.

When King Granmar heard the news of this treachery, he thought the same lot awaited him if he did not take care. The same summer King Hjorvard, who was called Ylfing, came with his fleet to Sweden, and went into a fjord called Myrkva-fjord. When King Granmar heard this he sent a messenger to him to invite him and all his men to a feast. He accepted it willingly; for he had never committed waste in King Granmar's dominions. When he came to the feast he was gladly welcomed. In the evening, when the full bowls went round, as was the custom of kings when they were at home, or in the feasts they ordered to be made, they sat and drank together, a man and woman with each other in pairs, and the rest of the company sat and drank all together. But it was the law among the vikings that all who were at the entertainment should drink together in one company all round. King Hjorvard's high seat was placed right opposite to King Granmar's high seat, and on the same bench sat all his men. King Granmar told his daughter Hildigunn, who was a remarkably beautiful girl, to make ready to carry ale to the vikings. Thereupon she took a silver goblet, filled it, bowed before King Hjorvard, and said, "Success to all Ylfinger: this cup to the memory of Rolf Krake" -- drank out the half, and handed the cup to King Hjorvard. He took the cup, and took her hand, and said she must sit beside him. She says that is not viking fashion to drink two and two with women. Hjorvard replies that it were better for him to make a change, and leave the viking law, and drink in company with her. Then Hildigunn sat down beside him, and both drank together, and spoke a great deal with each other during the evening. The next day, when King Granmar and Hjorvard met, Hjorvard spoke of his courtship, and asked to have Hildigunn in marriage. King Granmar laid this proposal before his wife Hilda, and before people of consequence, saying they would have great help and trust in Hjorvard; and all approved of it highly, and thought it very advisable. And the end was, that Hildigunn was promised to Hjorvard, and the wedding followed soon after; and King Hjorvard stayed with King Granmar, who had no sons, to help him to defend his dominions.

42. WAR BETWEEN INGJALD AND GRANMAR AND HJORVARD.

The same autumn King Ingjald collected a war-force, with which he intended to fall upon Granmar and Hjorvard; but when they heard it they also collected a force, and Hogne, who ruled over East Gotland, together with his son Hildur, came to their assistance. Hogne was father of Hilda, who was married to King Granmar. King Ingjald landed with his army, which was by far the most numerous. A battle began, which was very sharp; but after it had lasted a short time, the chiefs who ruled over Fjadryndaland, West Gotland, Nerike, and Aattundaland, took to flight with all the men from those countries, and hastened to their ships. This placed King Ingjald in great danger, and he received many wounds, but escaped by flight to his ships. Svipdag the Blind, Ingjald's foster-father, together with his sons, Gautvid and Hylvid, fell. Ingjald returned to Upsal, very ill-satisfied with his expedition; and he thought the army levied from those countries he had acquired by conquest had been unfaithful to him. There was great hostility afterwards between King Ingjald and King Granmar, and his son-in-law King Hjorvard; and after this had continued a long time the friends of both parties brought about a reconciliation. The king appointed a meeting, and concluded a peace. This peace was to endure as long as the three kings lived, and this was confirmed by oath and promises of fidelity. The spring after, King Granmar went to Upsal to make offering, as usual, for a steady peace. Then the foreboding turned out for him so that it did not promise him long life, and he returned to his dominions.

43. DEATH OF THE KINGS GRANMAR AND HJORVARD.

The autumn after, King Granmar and his son-in-law Hjorvard went to a feast at one of their farms in the island Sile. When they were at the entertainment, King Ingjald came there in the night with his troops, surrounded the house, and burnt them in it, with all their men. Then he took to himself all the country these kings had possessed, and placed chiefs over it. King Hogne and his son Hildur often made inroads on horseback into the Swedish dominions, and killed King Ingjald's men, whom he had placed over the kingdom which had belonged to their relation Granmar. This strife between King Ingjald and King Hogne continued for a long time; but King Hogne defended his kingdom against King Ingjald to his dying day. King Ingjald had two children by his wife -- the eldest called Aasa, the other Olaf. Gauthild, the wife of Ingjald, sent the boy to his foster-father Bove, in West Gotland, where he was brought up along with Saxe, Bove's son, who had the surname of Flette. It was a common saying that King Ingjald had killed twelve kings, and deceived them all under pretence of peace; therefore he was called Ingjald the Evil-adviser. He was king over the greater part of Sweden. He married his daughter Aasa to Gudrod king of Scania; and she was like her father in disposition. Aasa brought it about that Gudrod killed his brother Halfdan, father of Ivar Vidfavne; and also she brought about the death of her husband Gudrod, and then fled to her father; and she thus got the name also of Aasa the Evil-adviser.

44. OF INGJALD'S DEATH.

Ivar Vidfavne came to Scania after the fall of his uncle Gudrod, and collected an army in all haste, and moved with it into Sweden. Aasa had gone to her father before. King Ingjald was at a feast in Raening, when he heard that King Ivar's army was in the neighbourhood. Ingjald thought he had not strength to go into battle against Ivar, and he saw well that if he betook himself to flight his enemies would swarm around him from all corners. He and Aasa took a resolution which has become celebrated. They drank until all their people were dead drunk, and then put fire to the hall; and it was consumed, with all who were in it, including themselves, King Ingjald, and Aasa. Thus says Thjodolf: --

"With fiery feet devouring flame Has hunted down a royal game At Raening, where King Ingjald gave To all his men one glowing grave. On his own hearth the fire he raised, A deed his foemen even praised; By his own hand he perished so, And life for freedom did forego."

  • *****************************

Events in the life of Ingjaldr Önundsson

† death 1 . in Lake Mälaren, Uppsala, Sweden. ·King Ingjald was at a feast in Raening, when he heard that King Ivar's army was in the neighbourhood. Ingjald thought he had not strength to go into battle against Ivar, and he saw wellthat if he betook himself to flight his enemies would swarm around him from all corners. He and Aasa took a resolution which has become celebrated. They drank until all their people were dead drunk, and then put fire to the hall; and it was consumed, with all who were in it, including themselves, King Ingjald, and Aasa. Thus says Thjodolf: -- "With fiery feet devouring flame Has hunted down a royal game At Raening, where King Ingjald gave To all his men one glowing grave. On his own hearth the fire he raised, A deed his foemen even praised; By his own hand he perished so, And life for freedom did forego." event 1 . ·was made infamous for his treachery against his own nobles following the death of his father || "When a king died, his successor was supposed to attend the funeral feast and there sit at the foot of the throne. A huge beaker was brought in. The heir had to pledge to do some might deed of valor, and then drain the beaker to the bottom. After this ceremony, he was led to the throne and proclaimed king. When Igjald planned the funeral of his father Anund the Cultivator, he invited all the petty kings and jarls of the neighboring areas to attend the feast. There he stood up, made a vow to increase his kingdom by half on every side, and drained the beaker. He then allowed his guests to become drunk. At this point he left the hall, surrounded it with his men, and set it on fire, thus killing all his potential rivals. For his treachery he became known as Ingjald Illräde" event 1 . ·ordered a great feast to be prepared in Upsal, when Ingjald took the dominions and the kingdom of his father, and intended at that feast to enter on his heritage after King Onund his father || He had a large hall made ready for the occasion -- one not less, nor less sumptuous, than that of Upsal; and this hall was called the Seven Kings Hall, and in it were seven high seats for kings. Then King Ingjald sent men all through Sweden, and invited to his feast kings, earls, and other men of consequence. To this heirship-feast came King Algaut, his father-in-law; Yngvar king of Fjadryndaland, with his two sons, Alf and Agnar; King Sporsnjall of Nerike; King Sighvat of Aattundaland: but Granmar king of Sodermanland did not come. ... Now when the guests had become drunk towards evening King Ingjald told Svipdag's sons, Gautvid and Hylvid, to arm themselves and their men, as had before been settled; and accordingly they went out, and came up to the new hall, and set fire to it. The hall was soon in a blaze, and the six kings, with all their people, were burned in it. Those who tried to come out were killed. Then King Ingjald laid all the dominions these kings had possessed under himself, and took scatt from them. event ·is said to have been the last fey-born pagan sacrol "peace king" associated with human sacrifice in his own family event 1 . ·attending a mid-winter festival with his father, and King Yngvar had also come there with his sons. Alf, King Yngvar's son, and Ingjald, King Onund's son, were there -- both about six years old. They amused themselves with child's play, in which each should be leading on his army. In their play Ingjald found himself not so strong as Alf, and was so vexed that he almost cried. His foster-brother Gautvid came up, led him to his foster-father Svipdag the Blind, and told him how ill it appeared that he was weaker and less manly than Alf, King Yngvar's son. Svipdag replied that it was a great shame. The day after Svipdag took the heart of a wolf, roasted it on the tongs, and gave it to the king's son Ingjald to eat, and from that time he became a most ferocious person, and of the worst disposition

"Bloodline ... ", p 427-31, King in Uppsala, Sweden, 7th century

References: [RFC] -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingjald -------------------- Ingjald illråde or Ingjaldr hinn illráði (Ingold Ill-ruler or Ill-ready) was a legendary Swedish king of the House of Ynglings. Ingjald may have ruled in the 7th century, and he was the son of the former king Anund.[1]

Ingjald is mentioned in the Ynglinga saga, Historia Norvegiæ, Hervarar saga, Upplendinga Konungum, Þorsteins saga Víkingssonar and

-------------------- From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps11/ps11_146.htm

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Onund had a son called Ingjald, and at that time Yngvar was king

of the district of Fjadryndaland. Yngvar had two sons by his

wife -- the one called Alf, the other Agnar -- who were about the

same age as Ingjald. Onund's district-kings were at that time

spread widely over Sweden, and Svipdag the Blind ruled over

Tiundaland, in which Upsal is situated, and where all the Swedish

Things are held. There also were held the mid-winter sacrifices,

at which many kings attended. One year at midwinter there was a

great assembly of people at Upsal, and King Yngvar had also come

there with his sons. Alf, King Yngvar's son, and Ingjald, King

Onund's son, were there -- both about six years old. They amused

themselves with child's play, in which each should be leading on

his army. In their play Ingjald found himself not so strong as

Alf, and was so vexed that he almost cried. His foster-brother

Gautvid came up, led him to his foster-father Svipdag the Blind,

and told him how ill it appeared that he was weaker and less

manly than Alf, King Yngvar's son. Svipdag replied that it was a

great shame. The day after Svipdag took the heart of a wolf,

roasted it on the tongs, and gave it to the king's son Ingjald to

eat, and from that time he became a most ferocious person, and of

the worst disposition. When Ingjald was grown up, Onund applied

for him to King Algaut for his daughter Gauthild. Algaut was a

son of Gautrek the Mild, and grandson of Gaut; and from them

Gotland (Gautland) took its name. King Algaut thought his

daughter would be well married if she got King Onund's son, and

if he had his father's disposition; so the girl was sent to

Sweden, and King Ingjald celebrated his wedding with her in due

time.

39. OF KING ONUND'S DEATH.

King Onund one autumn, travelling between his mansion-houses,

came over a road called Himmenheath, where there are some narrow

mountain valleys, with high mountains on both sides. There was

heavy rain at the time, and before there had been snow on the

mountains. A landslip of clay and stones came down upon King

Onund and his people, and there he met his death, and many with

him. So says Thjodolf, namely: --

"We all have heard how Jonkur's sons,

Whom weapons could not touch, with stones

Were stoned to death in open day,

King Onund died in the same way.

Or else perhaps the wood-grown land,

Which long had felt his conquering hand,

Uprose at length in deadly strife,

And pressed out Onund's hated life."

40. THE BURNING IN UPSAL.

Then Ingjald, King Onund's son, came to the kingdom. The Upsal

kings were the highest in Sweden among the many district-kings

who had been since the time that Odin was chief. The kings who

resided at Upsal had been the supreme chiefs over the whole

Swedish dominions until the death of Agne, when, as before

related, the kingdom came to be divided between brothers. After

that time the dominions and kingly powers were spread among the

branches of the family as these increased; but some kings cleared

great tracts of forest-land, and settled them, and thereby

increased their domains. Now when Ingjald took the dominions and

the kingdom of his father, there were, as before said, many

district-kings. King Ingjald ordered a great feast to be

prepared in Upsal, and intended at that feast to enter on his

heritage after King Onund his father. He had a large hall made

ready for the occasion -- one not less, nor less sumptuous, than

that of Upsal; and this hall was called the Seven Kings Hall, and

in it were seven high seats for kings. Then King Ingjald sent

men all through Sweden, and invited to his feast kings, earls,

and other men of consequence. To this heirship-feast came King

Algaut, his father-in-law; Yngvar king of Fjadryndaland, with his

two sons, Alf and Agnar; King Sporsnjall of Nerike; King Sighvat

of Aattundaland: but Granmar king of Sodermanland did not come.

Six kings were placed in the seats in the new hall; but one of

the high seats which Ingjald had prepared was empty. All the

persons who had come got places in the new hall; but to his own

court, and the rest of his people, he had appointed places at

Upsal. It was the custom at that time that he who gave an

heirship-feast after kings or earls, and entered upon the

heritage, should sit upon the footstool in front of the high

seat, until the full bowl, which was called the Brage-beaker, was

brought in. Then he should stand up, take the Brage-beaker, make

solemn vows to be afterwards fulfilled, and thereupon empty the

beaker. Then he should ascend the high seat which his father had

occupied; and thus he came to the full heritage after his father.

Now it was done so on this occasion. When the full Brage-beaker

came in, King Ingjald stood up, grasped a large bull's horn, and

made a solemn vow to enlarge his dominions by one half, towards

all the four corners of the world, or die; and thereupon pointed

with the horn to the four quarters. Now when the guests had

become drunk towards evening King Ingjald told Svipdag's sons,

Gautvid and Hylvid, to arm themselves and their men, as had

before been settled; and accordingly they went out, and came up

to the new hall, and set fire to it. The hall was soon in a

blaze, and the six kings, with all their people, were burned in

it. Those who tried to come out were killed. Then King Ingjald

laid all the dominions these kings had possessed under himself,

and took scatt from them.

41. OF HJORVARD'S MARRIAGE.

When King Granmar heard the news of this treachery, he thought

the same lot awaited him if he did not take care. The same

summer King Hjorvard, who was called Ylfing, came with his fleet

to Sweden, and went into a fjord called Myrkva-fjord. When King

Granmar heard this he sent a messenger to him to invite him and

all his men to a feast. He accepted it willingly; for he had

never committed waste in King Granmar's dominions. When he came

to the feast he was gladly welcomed. In the evening, when the

full bowls went round, as was the custom of kings when they were

at home, or in the feasts they ordered to be made, they sat and

drank together, a man and woman with each other in pairs, and the

rest of the company sat and drank all together. But it was the

law among the vikings that all who were at the entertainment

should drink together in one company all round. King Hjorvard's

high seat was placed right opposite to King Granmar's high seat,

and on the same bench sat all his men. King Granmar told his

daughter Hildigunn, who was a remarkably beautiful girl, to make

ready to carry ale to the vikings. Thereupon she took a silver

goblet, filled it, bowed before King Hjorvard, and said, "Success

to all Ylfinger: this cup to the memory of Rolf Krake" -- drank

out the half, and handed the cup to King Hjorvard. He took the

cup, and took her hand, and said she must sit beside him. She

says that is not viking fashion to drink two and two with women.

Hjorvard replies that it were better for him to make a change,

and leave the viking law, and drink in company with her. Then

Hildigunn sat down beside him, and both drank together, and spoke

a great deal with each other during the evening. The next day,

when King Granmar and Hjorvard met, Hjorvard spoke of his

courtship, and asked to have Hildigunn in marriage. King Granmar

laid this proposal before his wife Hilda, and before people of

consequence, saying they would have great help and trust in

Hjorvard; and all approved of it highly, and thought it very

advisable. And the end was, that Hildigunn was promised to

Hjorvard, and the wedding followed soon after; and King Hjorvard

stayed with King Granmar, who had no sons, to help him to defend

his dominions.

42. WAR BETWEEN INGJALD AND GRANMAR AND HJORVARD.

The same autumn King Ingjald collected a war-force, with which he

intended to fall upon Granmar and Hjorvard; but when they heard

it they also collected a force, and Hogne, who ruled over East

Gotland, together with his son Hildur, came to their assistance.

Hogne was father of Hilda, who was married to King Granmar. King

Ingjald landed with his army, which was by far the most numerous.

A battle began, which was very sharp; but after it had lasted a

short time, the chiefs who ruled over Fjadryndaland, West

Gotland, Nerike, and Aattundaland, took to flight with all the

men from those countries, and hastened to their ships. This

placed King Ingjald in great danger, and he received many wounds,

but escaped by flight to his ships. Svipdag the Blind, Ingjald's

foster-father, together with his sons, Gautvid and Hylvid, fell.

Ingjald returned to Upsal, very ill-satisfied with his

expedition; and he thought the army levied from those countries

he had acquired by conquest had been unfaithful to him. There

was great hostility afterwards between King Ingjald and King

Granmar, and his son-in-law King Hjorvard; and after this had

continued a long time the friends of both parties brought about a

reconciliation. The king appointed a meeting, and concluded a

peace. This peace was to endure as long as the three kings

lived, and this was confirmed by oath and promises of fidelity.

The spring after, King Granmar went to Upsal to make offering, as

usual, for a steady peace. Then the foreboding turned out for

him so that it did not promise him long life, and he returned to

his dominions.

43. DEATH OF THE KINGS GRANMAR AND HJORVARD.

The autumn after, King Granmar and his son-in-law Hjorvard went

to a feast at one of their farms in the island Sile. When they

were at the entertainment, King Ingjald came there in the night

with his troops, surrounded the house, and burnt them in it, with

all their men. Then he took to himself all the country these

kings had possessed, and placed chiefs over it. King Hogne and

his son Hildur often made inroads on horseback into the Swedish

dominions, and killed King Ingjald's men, whom he had placed over

the kingdom which had belonged to their relation Granmar. This

strife between King Ingjald and King Hogne continued for a long

time; but King Hogne defended his kingdom against King Ingjald to

his dying day. King Ingjald had two children by his wife -- the

eldest called Aasa, the other Olaf. Gauthild, the wife of

Ingjald, sent the boy to his foster-father Bove, in West Gotland,

where he was brought up along with Saxe, Bove's son, who had the

surname of Flette. It was a common saying that King Ingjald had

killed twelve kings, and deceived them all under pretence of

peace; therefore he was called Ingjald the Evil-adviser. He was

king over the greater part of Sweden. He married his daughter

Aasa to Gudrod king of Scania; and she was like her father in

disposition. Aasa brought it about that Gudrod killed his

brother Halfdan, father of Ivar Vidfavne; and also she brought

about the death of her husband Gudrod, and then fled to her

father; and she thus got the name also of Aasa the Evil-adviser.

44. OF INGJALD'S DEATH.

Ivar Vidfavne came to Scania after the fall of his uncle Gudrod,

and collected an army in all haste, and moved with it into

Sweden. Aasa had gone to her father before. King Ingjald was at

a feast in Raening, when he heard that King Ivar's army was in

the neighbourhood. Ingjald thought he had not strength to go

into battle against Ivar, and he saw well that if he betook

himself to flight his enemies would swarm around him from all

corners. He and Aasa took a resolution which has become

celebrated. They drank until all their people were dead drunk,

and then put fire to the hall; and it was consumed, with all who

were in it, including themselves, King Ingjald, and Aasa. Thus

says Thjodolf: --

"With fiery feet devouring flame

Has hunted down a royal game

At Raening, where King Ingjald gave

To all his men one glowing grave.

On his own hearth the fire he raised,

A deed his foemen even praised;

By his own hand he perished so,

And life for freedom did forego."

  • *****************************

Events in the life of Ingjaldr Önundsson

† death 1 .

in Lake Mälaren, Uppsala, Sweden.

·King Ingjald was at a feast in Raening, when he heard that King Ivar's army was in the neighbourhood. Ingjald thought he had not strength to go into battle against Ivar, and he saw wellthat if he betook himself to flight his enemies would swarm around him from all corners. He and Aasa took a resolution which has become celebrated. They drank until all their people were dead drunk, and then put fire to the hall; and it was consumed, with all who were in it, including themselves, King Ingjald, and Aasa. Thus says Thjodolf: -- "With fiery feet devouring flame Has hunted down a royal game At Raening, where King Ingjald gave To all his men one glowing grave. On his own hearth the fire he raised, A deed his foemen even praised; By his own hand he perished so, And life for freedom did forego."

event 1 .

·was made infamous for his treachery against his own nobles following the death of his father || "When a king died, his successor was supposed to attend the funeral feast and there sit at the foot of the throne. A huge beaker was brought in. The heir had to pledge to do some might deed of valor, and then drain the beaker to the bottom. After this ceremony, he was led to the throne and proclaimed king. When Igjald planned the funeral of his father Anund the Cultivator, he invited all the petty kings and jarls of the neighboring areas to attend the feast. There he stood up, made a vow to increase his kingdom by half on every side, and drained the beaker. He then allowed his guests to become drunk. At this point he left the hall, surrounded it with his men, and set it on fire, thus killing all his potential rivals. For his treachery he became known as Ingjald Illräde"

event 1 .

·ordered a great feast to be prepared in Upsal, when Ingjald took the dominions and the kingdom of his father, and intended at that feast to enter on his heritage after King Onund his father || He had a large hall made ready for the occasion -- one not less, nor less sumptuous, than that of Upsal; and this hall was called the Seven Kings Hall, and in it were seven high seats for kings. Then King Ingjald sent men all through Sweden, and invited to his feast kings, earls, and other men of consequence. To this heirship-feast came King Algaut, his father-in-law; Yngvar king of Fjadryndaland, with his two sons, Alf and Agnar; King Sporsnjall of Nerike; King Sighvat of Aattundaland: but Granmar king of Sodermanland did not come. ... Now when the guests had become drunk towards evening King Ingjald told Svipdag's sons, Gautvid and Hylvid, to arm themselves and their men, as had before been settled; and accordingly they went out, and came up to the new hall, and set fire to it. The hall was soon in a blaze, and the six kings, with all their people, were burned in it. Those who tried to come out were killed. Then King Ingjald laid all the dominions these kings had possessed under himself, and took scatt from them.

event

·is said to have been the last fey-born pagan sacrol "peace king" associated with human sacrifice in his own family

event 1 .

·attending a mid-winter festival with his father, and King Yngvar had also come there with his sons. Alf, King Yngvar's son, and Ingjald, King Onund's son, were there -- both about six years old. They amused themselves with child's play, in which each should be leading on his army. In their play Ingjald found himself not so strong as Alf, and was so vexed that he almost cried. His foster-brother Gautvid came up, led him to his foster-father Svipdag the Blind, and told him how ill it appeared that he was weaker and less manly than Alf, King Yngvar's son. Svipdag replied that it was a great shame. The day after Svipdag took the heart of a wolf, roasted it on the tongs, and gave it to the king's son Ingjald to eat, and from that time he became a most ferocious person, and of the worst disposition

"Bloodline ... ", p 427-31, King in Uppsala, Sweden, 7th century

-------------------- Roi de Uppland -------------------- Ingjald illråde or Ingjaldr hinn illráði (Ingold Ill-ruler or Ill-ready) was a legendary Swedish king of the House of Ynglings. Ingjald may have ruled in the 7th century, and he was the son of the former king Anund.[1]

Ingjald is mentioned in the Ynglinga saga, Historia Norvegiæ, Hervarar saga, Upplendinga Konungum, Þorsteins saga Víkingssonar and Íslendingabók.

Ynglinga saga

Snorri Sturluson gave an extensive account on the life of Ingjald in the Ynglinga saga which is part of the Heimskringla.

Youth

The Ynglinga saga, a part of the Heimskringla relates that the viceroy of Fjädrundaland was named Ingvar and he had two sons, Alf and Agnar, who were of the same age as Ingjald. Svipdag the Blind was the viceroy of Tiundaland, the province of Uppsala where the Tings and the Yule (Midwinter) sacrifices were held (see the Temple at Uppsala).

One Midwinter, when Ingjald and Alf were six years old, many people had assembled at Uppsala for the sacrifices. Alf and Ingjald played, but Ingjald found that he was the weaker boy and became so angry that he almost started to cry (which was strange because people named Ingjald where known to be stronger than average). His foster-brother Gautvid led him to his foster-father Svipdag the Blind and told Svipdag about Ingjald's lack of manliness and strength. Svipdag said that it was a shame and the next day he gave Ingjald a roasted wolf's heart to eat. From that day, Ingjald became a very ferocious person and had a bad disposition.

Anund arranged a marriage for his son Ingjald with Gauthild, the daughter of the Geatish king Algaut, who was the son of Gautrek the Mild and the grandson of Gaut. Gautrek consented as he believed that Ingjald had inherited his father's disposition. Gauthild's maternal grandfather was Olof the Sharp-sighted, the king of Närke.

The deceit

Snorri Sturluson relates that when his father Anund had died, Ingjald became the king of Sweden. The kings at Uppsala were the foremost among the kings of the various provinces since Odin ruled the country, and they were the supreme chiefs of the other kingdoms since the death of Agne and Sweden was divided between Erik and Alrik. The descendants of these two kings had spread, cleared land and settled new territories, until there were several petty kings.

In honour of his own ascendance to the throne, Ingjald invited the kings, the jarls and other important men to a grand feast in a newly built hall, just as large and sumptuous as the one in Uppsala. It was called the hall of the seven kings and had seven high seats. Algaut the Geatish king of West Götaland, King Ingvar of Fjädrundaland with his two sons Agnar and Alf, King Sporsnjall of Nerike and King Sigvat of Attundaland came but not King Granmar of Södermanland. The kings filled all seven seats but one. All the prominent people of Sweden had seats, except for Ingjald's own court whom he had sent to his old hall in Uppsala.

According to the custom of the time for those who inherited kings and jarls, Ingjald rested at the footstool until the Bragebeaker was brought in. Then he was supposed to stand up, take the beaker and make solemn vows, after which he would ascend his father's high seat. However, when the beaker was brought in, he took a bull's horn and made the solemn vow that he would enlarge his own kingdom by half towards all the four quarters, towards which he pointed his horn, or die.

When all the prominent guests were drunk, he ordered Svipdag's sons, Gautvid and Hylvid, to arm themselves and their men and to leave the building. Outside, they set fire to the building which burnt down and those who tried to escape were killed.

Thus Ingjald made himself the sole ruler of the domains of the murdered kings.

Wars

Granmar won allies in his son-in-law the sea-king Hjörvard of the Ylfings and his father-in-law Högne the Geatish king of East Götaland. They successfully withstood Ingjald's invasion where Ingjald realised that the men from the provinces he had conquered were not loyal to him. After a long standstill there was peace for as long as the three kings lived. However, one night Ingjald and his men surrounded a farm where Granmar and Hjörvard were at a feast and burnt the house down. He late disposed of five more kings, and he thus earned the name Illråde (ill-ruler) as he fulfilled his promise.

Snorri Sturluson tells that it was a common saying that Ingjald killed twelve kings by deceiving them that he only wished for peace, and that he thus earned his cognomen Illråde (ill-ruler or ill-adviser).

Downfall

Ingjald had two children, a son Olof Trätälja and a daughter Åsa. His daughter had inherited her father's psychopathic disposition. She married king Guðröðr of Skåne. Before she murdered her husband she managed to make him kill his own brother Halfdan the Valiant, the father of the great Ivar Vidfamne.

In order to avenge his father, Ivar Vidfamne gathered a vast host and departed for Sweden, where he found Ingjald at Ræning. When Ingjald and his daughter realized that it was futile to resist, they set the hall on fire and succumbed in the flames.

Ynglingatal and Historia Norwegiae

It is interesting to note that the citation from Ynglingatal does not appear to describe Ingjald as an evil king. It calls his life a brave life frœknu fjörvi:

   Ok Ingjald
   í fjörvan trað
   reyks rösuðr
   á Ræningi,
   þá er húsþjófr
   hyrjar leistum
   goðkonung
   í gegnum steig.
   Ok sá urðr
   allri þjóðu
   sjaldgætastr
   með Svíum þótti,
   er hann sjálfr
   sínu fjörvi
   frœknu fyrstr
   um fara vildi.[1]

   With fiery feet devouring flame
   Has hunted down a royal game
   At Raening, where King Ingjald gave
   To all his men one glowing grave.
   On his own hearth the fire he raised,
   A deed his foemen even praised;
   By his own hand he perished so,
   And life for freedom did forego."[2]

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation (continuing after Anund):

Post istum filius suus Ingialdr in regem sublimatur, qui ultra modum timens Ivarum cognomine withfadm regem tunc temporis multis formidabilem se ipsum cum omni comitatu suo cenaculo inclusos igne cremavit. Ejus filius Olavus cognomento tretelgia [...][2]

After him his son Ingjald ascended the throne. Being abnormally terrified of King Ivar Vidfadme, at that time an object of dread to many, he shut himself up in a dining-hall with his whole retinue and burnt all its inmates to death. His son, Olav, known as Tretelgje,[...][3] -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingjald Ingjaldr hinn illráði or Ingjald illråde ("ill-ruler") was a legendary Swedish king of the House of Ynglings. Ingjald may have ruled sometime during the 7th century, and he was the son of the former king Anund.[1]

Ingjald is mentioned in the Ynglinga saga, Historia Norvegiæ, Hervarar saga, Upplendinga Konungum, Þorsteins saga Víkingssonar and Íslendingabók.

Ynglinga saga

Snorri Sturluson gave an extensive account on the life of Ingjald in the Ynglinga saga which is part of the Heimskringla.

Youth

The Ynglinga saga, a part of the Heimskringla relates that the viceroy of Fjädrundaland was named Ingvar and he had two sons, Alf and Agnar, who were of the same age as Ingjald. Svipdag the Blind was the viceroy of Tiundaland, the province of Uppsala where the Tings and the Yule (Midwinter) sacrifices were held (see the Temple at Uppsala).

One Midwinter, when Ingjald and Alf were six years old, many people had assembled at Uppsala for the sacrifices. Alf and Ingjald played, but Ingjald found that he was the weaker boy and became so angry that he almost started to cry. His foster-brother Gautvid led him to his foster-father Svigdag the Blind and told Svipdag about Ingjald's lack of manliness and strength. Svipdag said that it was a shame and the next day he gave Ingjald a roasted wolf's heart to eat. From that day, Ingjald became a very ferocious person and had a bad disposition.

Anund arranged a marriage for his son Ingjald with Gauthild, the daughter of the Geatish king Algaut, who was the son of Gautrek the Mild and the grandson of Gaut. Gautrek consented as he believed that Ingjald had inherited his father's disposition. Gauthild's maternal grandfather was Olof the Sharp-sighted, the king of Närke.

The deceit

Snorri Sturluson relates that when his father Anund had died, Ingjald became the king of Sweden. The kings at Uppsala were the foremost among the kings of the various provinces since Odin ruled the country, and they were the supreme chiefs of the other kingdoms since the death of Agne and Sweden was divided between Erik and Alrik. The descendants of these two kings had spread, cleared land and settled new territories, until there were several petty kings.

In honour of his own ascendance to the throne, Ingjald invited the kings, the jarls and other important men to a grand feast in a newly built hall, just as large and sumptuous as the one in Uppsala. It was called the hall of the seven kings and had seven high seats. Algaut the Geatish king of West Götaland, King Ingvar of Fjädrundaland with his two sons Agnar and Alf, King Sporsnjall of Nerike and King Sigvat of Attundaland came but not King Granmar of Södermanland. The kings filled all seven seats but one. All the prominent people of Sweden had seats, except for Ingjald's own court whom he had sent to his old hall in Uppsala.

According to the custom of the time for those who inherited kings and jarls, Ingjald rested at the footstool until the Bragebeaker was brought in. Then he was supposed to stand up, take the beaker and make solemn vows, after which he would ascend his father's high seat. However, when the beaker was brought in, he took a bull's horn and made the solemn vow that he would enlarge his own kingdom by half towards all the four quarters, towards which he pointed his horn, or die.

When all the prominent guests were drunk, he ordered Svipdag's sons, Gautvid and Hylvid, to arm themselves and their men and to leave the building. Outside, they set fire to the building which burnt down and those who tried to escape were killed.

Thus Ingjald made himself the sole ruler of the domains of the murdered kings.

Wars

Granmar won allies in his son-in-law the sea-king Hjörvard of the Ylfings and his father-in-law Högne the Geatish king of East Götaland. They successfully withstood Ingjald's invasion where Ingjald realised that the men from the provinces he had conquered were not loyal to him. After a long standstill there was peace for as long as the three kings lived. However, one night Ingjald and his men surrounded a farm where Granmar and Hjörvard were at a feast and burnt the house down. He late disposed of five more kings, and he thus earned the name Illråde (ill-ruler) as he fulfilled his promise.

Snorri Sturluson tells that it was a common saying that Ingjald killed twelve kings by deceiving them that he only wished for peace, and that he thus earned his cognomen Illråde (ill-ruler or ill-adviser).

Downfall Ingjald and his daughter Åsa

Ingjald had two children, a son Olof Trätälja and a daughter Åsa. His daughter had inherited her father's psychopathic disposition. She married king Guðröðr of Skåne. Before she murdered her husband she managed to make him kill his own brother Halfdan the Valiant, the father of the great Ivar Vidfamne.

In order to avenge his father, Ivar Vidfamne gathered a vast host and departed for Sweden, where he found Ingjald at Ræning. When Ingjald and his daughter realized that it was futile to resist, they set the hall on fire and succumbed in the flames.

Ynglingatal and Historia Norwegiae

It is interesting to note that the citation from Ynglingatal does not appear to describe Ingjald as an evil king. It calls his life a brave life frœknu fjörvi:

  Ok Ingjald
  í fjörvan trað
  reyks rösuðr
  á Ræningi,
  þá er húsþjófr
  hyrjar leistum
  goðkonung
  í gegnum steig.
  Ok sá urðr
  allri þjóðu
  sjaldgætastr
  með Svíum þótti,
  er hann sjálfr
  sínu fjörvi
  frœknu fyrstr
  um fara vildi.[1]
  With fiery feet devouring flame
  Has hunted down a royal game
  At Raening, where King Ingjald gave
  To all his men one glowing grave.
  On his own hearth the fire he raised,
  A deed his foemen even praised;
  By his own hand he perished so,
  And life for freedom did forego."[2]

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation (continuing after Anund): Post istum filius suus Ingialdr in regem sublimatur, qui ultra modum timens Ivarum cognomine withfadm regem tunc temporis multis formidabilem se ipsum cum omni comitatu suo cenaculo inclusos igne cremavit. Ejus filius Olavus cognomento tretelgia [...][2] After him his son Ingjald ascended the throne. Being abnormally terrified of King Ivar Vidfadme, at that time an object of dread to many, he shut himself up in a dining-hall with his whole retinue and burnt all its inmates to death. His son, Olav, known as Tretelgje,[...][3] -------------------- ABT 0630 - ____ OCCUPATION: Konge av Sverige

BIRTH: ABT 0630, (sønn av Svea-kongen Bröt-Anund, f. i Svitjod ca. 580) Family 1 : Gauthild av GÖTLAND +Olav Ingjaldsøn TRETELJA Kilde: nermo.org -------------------- When Ingjald was 6 years old he was playing a game with Alf (son of Kig Yngvar). The game was each to head the side of the other. Alf proved to be the stronger, Ingjald was so upsetabout this, that he cried bitterly. Gautvith (foster brother) led Ingjald to Svipdag the Blind (his foster father) and told him what had happened. The day after, Svipdag had the heart cut out of a wolf and had it steaked on a spit and gave it to Ingjald to eat. From that time he became the mostcruel anf most ill-natured of men.

After Ingjald married and was King of Uppsala, he had a great banquet (funeral feast) for the purpose of honoring his dead father King Onund. The feast was in a Hall called the Hall of Seven Kings. In it were erected seven high-seats. King Ingjald sent messengers through all of Sweden, inviting kings, earls, and other prominent men. King Algaut (Ingjald's father-in-law), King Yngvar of Fjahryndaland and his two sons, Agnar and Alf, King Sposnjall of Naeriki and King Sigverk of Attundaland. Only KIng Granmar of Suthrmannaland did not come. Six kings were asigned seats in the new hall. One high-seat that King Ingjald had erected remained empty.

All those that came were given seats in the new hall but for his own bodygaurd and all his people King Ingald had made room in the old hall. When the ceremonial beaker was brought in, King Ingjald stood up, seized a large drinking horn and made the vow that he would increase his dominion to double its size in every direction or ele die. Then he emptied the beaker.

When everyone was drunk, King Ingjald told Folkvith and Hulvith, the sons of Svipdag, to arm themselves and teir men when evening approached as planned. They went out to the new hall and put torch to it. The hall blazed up and the six kings and their followers were burned inside. Those that tried to come out were cut down. Thereupon, King Ingjald took possession of all the realms these kings has ruled and levied tribute to them.

King Granmar heard about what had happened and believed the same fate awaited him unless he took precautions. That same summer King Hjorvarth came with his fleet to Sweden and anchored in Myrkva Firth. When King Granmar learned of this,he sent messengers to invite him and all his men to a banquet. At that banquet King Hjorvath met Hildigunn, the daughter of King Granmar. The next day Hjorvarth asked Granmar for Hildigunn's hand. Granmar thought Hjorvarth's alliance could be beneficial and agreed.

That same fall King Ingjald collected a force to proceed against Granmar and Hjorvarth. He summoned troops from all of the districts hhe had taken possession of. When Granmar and Hjorvarth learned of this they collected their forces and King Hogni and his son (from East Gau -------------------- Bjöd på fester och avlivade sina gäster vid flera tillfällen. Till sist brände han sig själv inne, hellre än att t

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Ingjald Braut Onundsson (KING of Uppsala, Sweden)'s Timeline

660
660
Uppsala, Sweden
660
Sweden
681
681
Age 21
Varmland,,,Sweden
682
682
Age 22
Värmland, Sweden
684
684
Age 24
Värmland, Sweden
685
685
Age 25
Röning
734
734
Age 25
1905
December 19, 1905
Age 25
December 19, 1905
Age 25
December 19, 1905
Age 25