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Irby Morgan

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Jan. 10, 1819 Huntsville Madison County Alabama
Death: Died in Nashville Davidson County Tennessee
Place of Burial: Mount Olivet Cemetery Nashville Davidson County Tennessee
Immediate Family:

Son of George Washington Morgan and Mary Frances Morgan
Husband of Julia Ann Morgan (deMoville) and Julia Ann Morgan
Father of Robert F Morgan
Brother of Mary Catherine Chilton; Musidora Sayer; Lucy Ann Morgan; Gen. John T. Morgan (CSA), U.S. Senator; Elivira Frances Chilton and 3 others
Half brother of Sarah Elizabeth Henslee

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Irby Morgan

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=pv&GRid=33935533&PIpi=23119596

Irby Morgan was a mercantile leader in Nashville. During the War between the States he established a percussion cap manufactory. He also procured a half million yards of gray wool for the Confederacy, for less than 20% of the market cost. He enlisted as a private in the 51st Regiment Alabama Cavalry (Partisan Rangers), under his brother's command, John T. Morgan.

This regiment served under General N.B. Forrest, and later under General Joseph Wheeler. Private Morgan refused an appointment as a Divisional Quartermaster, and remained a private to the end of the war. "He carried to the grave a bullet from a gun of the enemy." (This portrait and information are from the CONFEDERATE VETERAN, Vol. 2, No. 7 (July 1894), p. 194, and additional information from the CONFEDERATE MILITARY HISTORY - ALABAMA, pp. 280-83, 427-33.)


Confederate Veteran July 1894.

MR. IRBY MORGAN.

A very remarkable man was Irby Morgan, whose picture, an excellent likeness, is given herewith.

Mr. Morgan was for many years a leader in the mercantile interests at the capital of Tennessee. He associated with him several young men who also have attamed distinction in business circles.

It is, however, concerning his career in the war and his charming traits with his family with which readers of the VETERAN are to be entertained. The book written by his wife, from memory after thirty years, tells of these things. Her thrilling and pathetic story of "How It Was" during the four years tells how Mr. Morgan went about procuring materials for the army. He visited New Orleans, Louisville, and other cities, procured material and established a percussion cap manufactory in Nashville. He next went to Texas and bought 450,000 pounds of wool, shipped it to Nashville, and then re shipped it to factories farther South. He procured in this way for the Confederacy a half million yards of Confederate gray at seventy five cents per yard when it was selling in the market at five dollars.

Greater zeal was never shown by man for his country. Besides these great enterprises, Mr. Morgan volunteered as a private soldier in the regiment of his brother, John T. Morgan, now United States Senator from Alabama. His services in procuring supplies for the army were so valuable that Merideth P. Gentry and others secured for him the appointment of Division Quartermaster, but he sent the commission "posthaste " back to Richmond, and went on a private soldier to the end. He carried to the grave a bullet from a gun of the enemy. He was afterwards nearly killed by the fall of his horse when the command was near Augusta.

In a letter to his wife, Senator Morgan, who had news that the illness would be fatal, wrote of his last visit to Nashville, saying: "He was then so weak and had lived so many years in the midst of so much of toil and trial, and the wounds of battle still sapping his vitality, that I was not surprised he should feel that he could not live a great while." Continuing, Senator Morgan wrote, not knowing the end had come: " His life from childhood has been filled with honorable and dutiful toil, in which he has done more and suffered more than any man I ever knew. He has never done a willful wrong to anybody, and charity and loving kindness have inspired every deliberate act of his life. . . . I have no doubt of his acceptance with our merciful Father any more than I have that our parents will be glad to welcome him to their glad embrace. Hence I telegraphed him: 'Be not afraid, it is God who calls you.' "

The VETERAN has access to other charming and pathetic letters of this eminent man, and many notes have been made from Mrs. Morgan's thrilling book, with interesting reference to his cousin, Gen. John H. Morgan, but space is denied, now at least, and this brief tribute is concluded with an extract from a letter of his venerable sister, Mrs. Sayre, of Montgomery, Ala., nearly eighty years old, written upon notice of Mr. Morgan's death : "It awoke in me a long train of pleasant recollections of that sweet time, so long ago, when we were inseparable as playmates, and I was always ready to help him in any undertaking from the making and flying of a kite to a ramble through the woods in search of nuts and flowers. I have not forgotten those happy days, but they are pushed out and turned aside by the sterner realities of life. It makes me very sad."

from:

http://www.usgennet.org/usa/ga/county/macon/newspapers/CV/cv1894pg8.htm

ID: I0079

Name: Irby Morgan , Sr.

Sex: M

Birth: 10 JAN 1819 in Huntsville, AL

Death: 20 JUN 1894 in Nashville, TN 1

Burial: Mt. Olivet Cem. Nashville, TN

Note:

A wholesale merchant in Nashville for more than 40 years.

Civil War service: under his brother, Gen. John Tyler Morgan's, command; 51st Alabama Partisan Rangers Company D. Enlisted in Calhoun County, AL. Was twice injured, carried a Federal mini-ball in his hip until death. Did much purchasing of goods for the Confederacy; John Hunt Morgan was

Irby Morgan's cousin.

Twenty-two members of this Southern Morgan family gave there lives in the Civil War.

__________________________________________________________________________

__

Confederate Veteran - Aug 1894

IRBY MORGAN was born June 10, 1819, at Huntsville, Ala; died near Nashville, Tenn., June 20, 1894. His ancestors were originally from Wales, seafaring men, with Sir Francis Drake and Sir Walter Raleigh. His father and mother were early Methodists, his mother specially eminent for piety. His brother, John T. Morgan, of Alabama, has for years held a foremost place in the United States Senate. Irby Morgan married a Miss Demoville, of Nashville. They were blessed with a large family of children. His devotion to his wife and thoughtful study to know the disposition and needs of each child so as to best develop each, was a marked feature of his everyday life. He entered the Confederate army as a private, and carried to his death a ball, which was a constant irritant to his nervous system. After his wound prevented him from service in the field, he devoted himself to the comfort of his comrades. He had removed to Georgia, and his home was open to all Confederates in need. A book filled with memories of these days, written by his wife, is the most charming recital of war incidents which has been portrayed by any pen. The book is rich in heart treasuries, and the tenderest touches of unselfish and sincerely told incidents which unintentionally give insight to his exhaustless generosity and unstinted expenditure of large sums of money for others. A man among ten thousand, an intellect of the brightest

type, so quick that his reasoned conclusions seemed to be intuitions, so broad that no important theme lay beyond his high interest; his business perceptions were of the keenest; his plans of excellent adjustment. He won twice large fortunes, which disappeared through operations beyond his control; once by the results of the war, and once through yellow fever. A delightful conversationalist, full of both charm and profit; given to hospitality, as delicately attentive as he was magnanimous. A friend who,

when he trusted, surrendered his whole confidence; when deceived, relinquished at once all relations with the party whom he could not trust. With a single exception he has helped more people than any man I ever knew. He was singularly painstaking in his dealings with children and servants, to explain the elements of right and wrong, and to impress high principle and honor in all dealings, so that to be under his care was to learn to honor what is noblest in life. Many of our older ministers knew and valued him. He was the intimate friend of Drs. Green, Summers, and McTyeire. While they inspired, he really builded the first Tulip Street church in East Nashville, and built it of such dimensions that it was self-sustaining from the beginning, and has risen to its present commanding position more rapidly than any Church in Nashville. He was deeply attached to Drs. Barbee and Fitzgerald, and was a brother to

the writer. At his request, Dr. Barbee and the writer aided the pastor, Dr. J. M. Wright, in the funeral service, at Hobson Chapel, where he last held membership. He loved the Bible, knew what true religion was, and valued it above rubies. In death he calmly told of his trust in Jesus of Nazareth, and entered the dark valley without a fear. D. C. KELLEY

Confederate Veteran July 1894.

MR. IRBY MORGAN.

A very remarkable man was Irby Morgan, whose picture, an excellent likeness, is given herewith.

Mr. Morgan was for many years a leader in the mercantile interests at the capital of Tennessee. He associated with him several young men who also have attained distinction in business circles.

It is, however, concerning his career in the war and his charming traits with his family with which readers of the VETERAN are to be entertained. The book written by his wife, from memory after thirty years, tells of these things. Her thrilling and pathetic story of "How It Was" during the four years tells how Mr. Morgan went about procuring materials for the army. He visited New Orleans, Louisville, and other cities, procured material and established a percussion cap manufactory in Nashville. He next went to Texas and bought 450,000 pounds of wool, shipped it to Nashville, and then re-shipped it to factories farther South. He procured in this way for the Confederacy a half million yards of Confederate gray at seventy five cents per yard when it was selling in the market at five dollars. Greater zeal was never shown by man for his country. Besides these great enterprises, Mr. Morgan volunteered as a private soldier in the regiment of his brother, John T. Morgan, now United States Senator from Alabama.

His services in procuring supplies for the army were so valuable that Merideth P. Gentry and others secured for him the appointment of Division Quartermaster, but he sent the commission "posthaste " back to Richmond, and went on a private soldier to the end. He carried to the grave a bullet from a gun of the enemy. He was afterwards nearly killed by the fall of his horse when the command was near Augusta. In a letter to his wife, Senator Morgan, who had news that the illness would be fatal, wrote of his last visit to Nashville, saying: "He was then so weak and had lived so many years in the midst of so much of toil and trial, and the wounds of battle still sapping his vitality, that I was not surprised he should feel that he could not live a great while." Continuing, Senator Morgan wrote, not knowing the end had come: " His life from childhood has been filled with honorable and dutiful toil, in which he has done more and suffered more than any man I ever knew. He has never done a willful wrong to anybody, and charity and loving kindness have inspired every deliberate act of his life. . . . I have no doubt of his acceptance with our merciful Father any more than I have that our parents will be glad to welcome him to their glad embrace. Hence I telegraphed him: 'Be not afraid, it is God who calls you.' "

The VETERAN has access to other charming and pathetic letters of this eminent man, and many notes have been made from Mrs. Morgan's thrilling book, with interesting reference to his cousin, Gen. John H. Morgan, but space is denied, now at least, and this brief tribute is concluded with an extract from a letter

of his venerable sister, Mrs. Sayre, of Montgomery, Ala., nearly eighty years old, written upon notice of Mr. Morgan's death : "It awoke in me a long train of pleasant recollections of that sweet time, so long ago, when we were inseparable as playmates, and I was always ready to help him in any undertaking from the making and flying of a kite to a ramble through the woods in search of nuts and flowers. I have not forgotten those happy days, but they are pushed out and turned aside by the sterner realities of life. It makes me very sad."

1850 -Lincoln Co. Tennessee Census, Irby, Julia, Mary & Judith:Household #27 pg 194

January 7, 1876

Rosebank Nurseries "the oldest in the South", Nashville, Tenn., operated by Truett's Sons (L. A. and W. H. Truett) and Morgan (Irby Morgan), announced that as of December 1, 1875 A. W. Webber had been admitted as a partner in their business. [This nursery business was established by Ezekial Truett, 1812-1872, a native of Hickman Co., Tennessee.]

Father: George Washington Morgan b: 9 JUL 1788 in Saratoga Springs, NY

Mother: Frances Irby b: 31 JAN 1795 in Virginia

Marriage 1 Julia Ann Demoville b: 28 APR 1827 in Hanover Co. Virginia

Married: 3 OCT 1844 in Nashville, TN

Children

Samuel George Morgan b: ABT. 1846 in Nashville, TN
Mary Frances (Fanny) Morgan b: 1848 in Nashville, Tennessee
Judith Morgan b: OCT 1849 in Nashville, Tennessee
Robert Franklin Morgan b: 25 MAY 1851 in Nashville, Tennessee
Virginia Hicks Morgan b: FEB 1853 in Nashville, Tennessee
Susan Fuller Morgan b: 18 JAN 1856 in Nashville, Tennessee
Irby Morgan b: 31 OCT 1858 in Nashville, Tennessee
Bettie (Elizabeth Demoville) Morgan b: DEC 1859 in Nashville, Tennessee
William Chilton Morgan b: 6 AUG 1861 in Huntsville, Madison Co., AL
Cornelia Hunt Morgan b: SEP 1864 in probably, Marietta, Georgia
Johnetta (Etta) Lee Morgan b: 17 SEP 1866 in Nashville, Tennessee

Sources:

Title: fountain.GED

Repository:

Media: Other

Text: Date of Import: Mar 30, 2002

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Irby Morgan's Timeline

1819
January 10, 1819
Jan. 10, 1819 Huntsville Madison County Alabama
January 10, 1819
Huntsville, Alabama, United States
1851
1851
Age 31
1894
1894
Age 74
Nashville Davidson County Tennessee
????
????
Mount Olivet Cemetery Nashville Davidson County Tennessee