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Isaac Robinson

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Leiden, Leiden, South Holland, The Netherlands
Death: Died in Barnstable, Barnstable County, Province of Massachusetts, (Present USA)
Immediate Family:

Son of Rev. John Robinson and Bridget Robinson
Husband of Mary Harlow (Faunce) and Margaret Robinson (Hanford)
Father of Israel Robinson; Jacob Robinson, Sr.; Lt. Peter Robinson; Thomas Robinson; Abraham Peter Robinson and 8 others
Brother of John Robinson, Dr.; Bridgett Robinson; Mercy Robinson; Favor ( Fear ) Robinson; N.N. Robinson and 4 others

Managed by: Susan
Last Updated:

About Isaac Robinson

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Isaac Robinson - Our American Progenitor

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DOB: __________ 1610 in Leyden Holland 

Married: on 06-27-1636 in Scituate, Plymouth Co., MA to Margaret Hanford

Children: Susannah, JOHN, Isaac, Fear, Mercy

Married: on ______ 1650 in Plymouth, Plymouth Co., MA to Mary ______

Children: Israel, Jacob, Peter, Thomas

Died: _______1704 in Barnstable, MA

Buried: Old Common Burial Ground (C. Banks' History of Martha's Vineyard)

 

From the CD

"The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-33"

ORIGIN: Leiden, Holland

MIGRATION: 1631

FIRST RESIDENCE: Plymouth

REMOVES: Scituate 1636, Barnstable 1639, Falmouth by 1664, Tisbury by 1671, Barnstable 1701

OCCUPATION: Innkeeper. On 7 February 1664/5 Isaac Robinson was approved to keep an ordinary at Saconeesett "since there is great recourse to and fro by travellers to Martin's Vineyard and Nantucket" [PCR 4:80].

CHURCH MEMBERSHIP: "Isaac Robinson and my son Fuller joined [Scituate church] having their letters dismissive from the church at Plimoth unto us," 7 November 1636 [NEHGR 9:280].

FREEMAN: In "1633" list of Plymouth freemen between those admitted 1 January 1633/4 and those admitted 1 January 1634/5 [PCR 1:4]. In 7 March 1636/7 list of Plymouth Colony freemen [PCR 1:52]. In the Scituate section of the 1639 Plymouth Colony list of freemen; his name was then erased and reentered in the Barnstable section of the same list [PCR 8:175, 177]. In Barnstable section of 1658 Plymouth Colony list of freemen [PCR 8:200]. On 7 March 1659/60 the court "taking notice of sundry scandals and falsehoods in a letter of Isacke Robinson's, tending greatly to the prejudice of this government and encouragement of those commonly called Quakers, and thereby liable ... to disenfranchisement, yet we at present forebear the censure until further inquiry be made into things" [PCR 3:183]. On 6 June 1660 Isaac Robinson "for being a manifest opposer of the laws of this government expressed by him in a letter directed the Governor and otherwise" is disenfrancised of the freedom of the corporation. An interlineation following says, there being some mistake in this, Isaac Robinson is re-established and by general vote of the court, accepted again [PCR 3:189]; this interlineation may have been made as late as 1673, for Isaac Robinson is not in the 29 May 1670 list of Plymouth freemen, and on 4 July 1673 Plymouth Court "voted Mr. Isacke Robinson to be reestablished in the privilege of a freeman of this corporation" [PCR 5:126].

EDUCATION: Sufficient to write a letter to Plymouth Colony authorities in support of the Quakers.

OFFICES: Deputy for Barnstable to Plymouth General Court, 28 October 1645, 5 June 1651 [PCR 2:94, 168]. Tax collector, 7 July 1646, 1 June 1647, 7 June 1648 [PCR 2:105, 116, 125]. Coroner's jury, 5 June 1658 on the body of Simon Davis, aged two [PCR 3:147]. Jury, 2 March 1640/1 [PCR 7:19]. (Isaac Robinson does not appear in the 1643 Plymouth Colony list of men able to bear arms.)

ESTATE: Assessed 9s. in Plymouth tax list of 27 March 1634 [PCR 1:29]. In his list of houses built in Scituate, Rev. John Lothrop included among those erected in 1636 "Isaac Robinson's ... now Goodman Twisden's," and as the first built in 1637 "Isaac Robinson's new house" [NEHGR 10:42-43]. On 4 June 1660 the court gave Isaac Robinson and others permission to purchase land at or near Saconeesett [PCR 3:216]. On 5 June 1666 Isaac Robinson and others were granted fifty acres each of upland at Pausatuke Neck, with six acres of meadow [PCR 4:128], and on 7 June 1668 the court confirmed a certain neck of land with meadow adjoining at Passuntaquanuncke Neck to Isaac Robinson and two others [PCR 4:189]. On 8 November 1669 Isaac Robinson of Saconeesett, husbandman, sold to John Jenkins land in Saconeesett; Isaac's wife Mary acknowledged this deed [TAG 56:147, citing PCLR 3:154]. On 20 December 1666 "Isacke Robinson Senior of Barnstable, planter," posted a bond of £4 with Joseph Tilden of Scituate, yeoman, as security for the receipt of a legacy of forty shillings "given and bequeathed unto ... Isaac Robinson Junior by the last will and testament of Mr. Timothy Hatherley deceased" [PCLR 3:102]. On 9 June 1683 the court granted Isaac Robinson's petition to look out for land for his accommodation [PCR 6:110]. In November 1701 Isaac Robinson sold his homelot at Tisbury to his son Isaac and removed to his daughter's in Barnstable [TAG 18:46].

BIRTH: Leiden, Holland, about 1610 (aged 92 years, 4 April 1702 [Sewall 463]), son of Rev. John and Bridget (White) Robinson.

DEATH: At Barnstable in 1704 (so stated in all secondary sources, but no evidence supplied). (On 4 April 1702 Samuel Sewall wrote "Visit Mr. [Isaac] Robinson, who saith he is 92 years old, is the son of Mr. [John] Robinson pastor of the church of Leyden, part of which came to Plimo. But to my disappointment he came not to New England till the year [1631] in which Mr. [John] Wilson was returning to England after the settlement of Boston. I told him was very desirous to see him for his father's sake, and his own. Gave him an Arabian piece of gold to buy a book for some of his grandchildren" [Sewall 463-64].)

MARRIAGE: (1) Scituate 26 September 1636 Margaret Hanford, daughter of Eglin (Hatherly) (Downe) Hanford and niece of TIMOTHY HATHERLY ("Isaac Robinsonn and Margaret Handford contracted at Mr. Hetherlye's June 27, 1636" [NEHGR 9:286]) [Stevens-Miller Anc 485-87]. "The wife of Isaac Robinsonn buried [at Barnstable] June 13, 1649, and a maid child born of her before the ordinary time buried the week before" [NEHGR 9:285]. (2) By 1651 Mary _____ [TAG 56:147, citing PCLR 3:154]. She died after 8 November 1669 [PCLR 3:154]. CHILDREN: With first wife i SUSANNA, bp. Scituate 21 January 1637/8 [NEHGR 9:281]; no further record. ii JOHN, bp. Barnstable 5 April 1640 [NEHGR 9:282]; m. Barnstable "about the middle of May" 1667 Elizabeth Weeks [MD 12:153]. iii ISAAC, bp. Barnstable 7 August 1642 [NEHGR 9:282]; d. before 22 October 1668 ("he tried to fetch two geese from a pond full of weedy grass and was entangled" [PCR 5:7]). (He is said to have had wife Anne, but the evidence for this is not seen. There may be some confusion with his younger halfbrother who assumed his name, and did have a wife named Anne.) iv FEAR, bp. Barnstable 26 January 1644/5 [NEHGR 9:283]; m. by 1664 Rev. Samuel Baker (in his will of 20 December 1664 TIMOTHY HATHERLY bequeathed to "Fear Robinson now the wife of Samuel Baker" [MD 16:159]; see also NEHGR 142:123-25]). v MERCY, bp. Barnstable 4 July 1647 [NEHGR 9:283]; m. Falmouth 16 March 1669 William Weekes (the bride's name given as "Mary Robenson" as published). vi Daughter, prematurely born June 1649 and buried a few days before her mother [NEHGR 9:285]. With second wife vii ISRAEL, bp. Barnstable 5 October 1651 [NEHGR 9:284] (later called Isaac in honor of his deceased elder halfbrother); m. Anne Cottle [TAG 18:47; Martha's Vineyard Hist 3:107, 419]. viii JACOB, bp. Barnstable 15 May 1653 [NEHGR 9:284]; m. (1) Mary _____; m. (2) by 1714 Experience Rogers. (These two marriages are presented in all sources without documentation [Martha's Vineyard Hist 3:419, 423; TAG 18:47]). ix PETER, b. say 1655; m. (1) by about 1688 Mary Manter, daughter of John Manter [Martha's Vineyard Hist 3:284]; m. (2) say 1698 Experience _____ (she could not have been daughter of John Manter Jr. [TAG 18:47]).

ASSOCIATIONS: JOHN CARVER was uncle by marriage to Isaac Robinson.

COMMENTS: On 24 May 1649 Isaac Robinson testified that he heard Mr. Gillson say that he wanted to leave his land to two of his sister's children (John and Hannah Damman) which he looked upon as his own, and that he heard Gillson's wife acknowledge it and say she wouldn't wrong them [PCR 2:143]. On 1 March 1658/9 Isaac Robinson and Gyles Rickard Sr., complained on behalf of two children of Henery Coggen, deceased [PCR 3:156]. Perhaps as a result of this, John Coggen, one of these children, chose Mr. Isaac Robinson as one of his guardians [PCR 3:160-61]. On 8 April 1664 he was discharged as guardian [PCR 4:77]. Some sources include a son Thomas born in March 1657, but there does not seem to be any evidence for this child. This is in part based on the existence of a Thomas Robinson of Guilford, who cannot have been a son of Isaac [TAG 18:47].

BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE: In 1941 Mary Lovering Holman presented the ancestry of Isaac Robinson, treated the immigrant himself and followed a line of descent from Isaac [TAG 17:207-15, 18:45-55]. Amos Otis and Charles Edward Banks also prepared brief biographical sketches of Isaac Robinson [Otis 2:228-31; Martha's Vineyard Hist 2:West Tisbury:60-62].


 

PCR

1:4, 1:4,

2:105, 2:116, 2:125, 2:94, 2:168,

3:147, 3:183, 3:189,

4:80,

5:126,

8:175, 8:177, 8:200

NEHGR 9:280

 
 
 
 

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Contact Information

Donald L. Robinson

11915 W. 66th Street

Shawnee, KS 66216-2717

blinkybill158@RevJohnRobinson.com

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Ancestry.com File:

Ancestors of Pamela Jean Robinson

Generation No. 10

     512. Isaac Robinson, born 1610 in Leiden, S. Holland, Netherlands; died 1704 in Barnstable, Barnstable Co., MA. He was the son of 1024. Rev. John Robinson and 1025. Bridget White. He married 513. Mary Faunce Abt. 1650 in Barnstable, Massachusetts. 
     513. Mary Faunce, born 1638 in Plymouth, MA; died October 4, 1664 in Plymouth, MA. She was the daughter of 1026. John Faunce and 1027. Patience Morton. 

Notes for Isaac Robinson:

ISAAC ROBINSON.

The first of this family to come to Tisbury was Isaac, the second son of Rev. John Robinson, famous as the pastor of the Pilgrims at Leyden, Holland, and of Bridget White his wife. [*Rev. John Robinson was a native of Lincolnshire, born about 1575. He matriculated at Emanuel College, Cambridge, in 1592, becoming a Fellow of Corpus Christi six years later. He resigned in 1604 and became identified with the Puritans or Dissenters, and fled to Amsterdam about 1608 and thence removed in 1609 to Leyden. His record as spiritual leader of the English exiles, who later became the "Mayflower" Pilgrims, is well known. He died March 1, 1625. His wife, whom he had married in Northampton, England, Feb. 15, 1603, survived, and perhaps came to New England in the fleet with Winthrop (Letter, Shirley to Bradford, March 8, 1629-30).] "He came not to New England" writes Sewall, "till the year in which Mr [John] Wilson was returning to England after the settlement of Boston. [*Sewall, Diary. He came in the ship "Lyon."] This was in 1631, and Isaac immediately settled at Plymouth, later removing to Duxbury (1634), Scituate (1636), Barnstable (1639) and Falmouth (1660). In Scituate he married for his first wife Margaret, daughter of Theophilus and Eglin (Mortimer) Hanford, June 27, 1636, sister of Rev. Thomas Hanford of Norwalk, Conn., and niece of Mr. Timothy Hatherly. By her he had five children and after her death (June 14, 1649), he married second, Mary Faunce, 1650, and four more children, all sons, were the fruit of this union.

By reason of his parentage he was a prominent man in Plymouth Colony, but later in 1669, for displaying liberality toward the doctrines of the Quakers, was disfranchised by Governor Thomas Prince. It appears that he had attended their meetings for the purpose of showing them the error of their ways, but instead of accomplishing this, became self -convicted and embraced some of their beliefs. He was restored to citizenship in 1673 by Governor Winslow. [*The old record of disfranchisement is interlined with the words:"there being some mistake in this the said Isaac at his request is re-established." (Hiss. of Falmouth, 13.)]

It appears that Isaac Robinson with others, in 1660, decided to leave Barnstable presumably for the Vineyard, and took letters of dismissal to the church at Great Harbor, but finally decided to settle at Falmouth. [*Records, Church, West Barnstable, comp. History of Falmouth. He built his house in 1661 on the neck between Fresh and Salt Ponds, Falmouth Heights.] How long he remained an actual resident of that town is not known, but in May, 1671, he was admitted a proprietor of the new settlement at Takemmy, and probably soon after this became identified with Tisbury. At this time he was about 60 years of age, having been born in 1610, and he was perhaps, with the exception of Joseph Merry, the oldest resident of the new settlement. In 1673 he became associated with the "Dutch Rebellion," but suffered no punishment therefor, unless the records are silent regarding him. His four sons by the second marriage, Israel, Jacob, Peter and Thomas, became residents of the Vineyard, though none of them left descendants here to perpetuate the name. Those who resided here in the next century were his descendants through his first marriage. His son Israel, baptized Oct. 5, 1651, assumed the name of Isaac in memory of an older half brother of that name who was drowned in 1668, and was ever after known by the adopted name. [*He signed as Israel in 1670 and 1671. Tisbury Records, 3, 4.] This change made two Isaac Robinsons in the town and creates difficulties in identification of the one whose name appears on the records, but it is probable that he is the "good man" Robinson chosen townsman in 1678, 1680, 1683, rather than the younger of the name. He had his home lot on the east side of Old Mill river, bounded on the south by the Mill path. This he sold in November, 1701, to his son Isaac, together with all his dividend lots in various parts of the town. [*Dukes Deeds, II, 35. This establishes the identity of Isaac Senior as the resident here, as his son Isaac was childless.] He was then over ninety years of age, but continued to reside here, presumably with one of his sons. Sewall saw him here when on a visit in 1702 and thus refers to the incident:

"He saith he is 92 years old is the son of Mr. Robinson pastor of the ch. of Leyden, part of wch came to Plimo. * * * * I told him I was very desirous to see him for his fathers sake and his own. Gave him an Arabian piece of gold to buy a book for some of his grand children." [*Sewall, Diary.]

According to tradition this scion of a distinguished family died about 1704 in Barnstable at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Fear Baker. "A venerable man," writes Prince in his Annals, "whom I have often seen."

His sons Isaac and Jacob remained in Tisbury, dying within eighteen days of each other, in 1718, while the other two brothers, Peter and Thomas, removed to Connecticut early in the 18th century

Isaac (Isack) Robinson came in the ship Lion in 1631, at the age of 21,

to Scituate, Massachusetts; made Freeman in 1633; joined the church

at Barnstable, Massachusetts, Nov. 7, 1636; his home lot was the fifth

from Colman's Hill, consisting of 12 acres, on which he built a house.

At the time of his death at age 94 he was living with his daughter Fear

and her husband Samuel Baker.[dickdutton(2).ged]

History of Martha's Vineyard (C. Banks) Came to New England in 1[Robinson00.GED]

Time Line for Isaac Robinson:

1610 Born in Leyden, Holland

1631 Came in the ship Lyon at the age of 21 to Scituate, MA. [1]

1633 Made a Freeman. [1]

1633 Taxed in the town of Plymouth [2]

1634 (Feb 20) Sold his estate to John Twisden and removed to Barnstable accompanied by the Rev. John Lathrop. [1]

1634 Lived in Duxbury [2]

1635 [July 14] Sold lands in Plymouth and then moved to the town of Scituate.

1636 Built a house in Scituate. His home lot was the fifth from Colman's Hill, consisting of twelve

acres on which he built a house. [1] It was 29th house built in the town of Scituate and later

sold to Goodman Twisden [2]

1636 (Nov 7) Joined the church at Barnstable, MA. [1]

1637 [Jan 1] He and others had lands granted them by the Plymouth Colony court, lying between

North and South Rivers[2] and in 1637 he built his "new house" which was the 49th in

Scituate. [1&2]

1639 He moved with the pastorate of Mr. Lathrop to Barnstable. His lands were on the north side

of the county road, bounded on the west by Calves Pasture lande. This lot he sold before

1653 to Mr. Thomas Allyn, and removed to a lot about a mile west. [2]

1639 He was a member of the Grand Inquest of the colony[2]

1641 He was on the jury for trials [2]

1645 He was adeputy from Barnstable in the Plymouth Colony Court [2]

1646 He was Receiver of the Excise in the Town of Barnstable [2]

1647 He was Receiver of the Excise in the Town of Barnstable [2]

1648 He was Receiver of the Excise in the Town of Barnstable [2]

1648 He was a member of the Grand Inquest of the colony[2]

1651 He was adeputy from Barnstable in the Plymouth Colony Court [2]

1659 He was asked to attend Quaker meetings to help the Quakers see the error of their ways.

Instead, upon attendance, he felt that the laws that had been enacted against the Quakers

were tyrannical and should be repealed. He wrote a letter to the magistrates stating this.

As a consequence in 1660, the court ordered him stripped of his rights as a freeman, which

lasted for thirteen years. [2]

1663 (About) He removed to Falmouth, MA. [1]

1664 He helped to settled the town of Saconnet (Falmouth), and probably was a tavern keeper there. [2]

1673 Regained his rights as a freeman

1673 He removed to Tisbury on Martha's Vinyard [1] where he was the Recorder and Town clerk

and continued to live there until 1701[2]

1673 He interested himself in the Dutch Rebellion [2]

1678 He was named as a selectman [2]

1680 He was named as a selectman [2]

1684 He was named as a selectman [2]

1701 He sold his land in on the east side of the Old Mill River in West Tisbury to his son, Isaac. [2]

1701 (Nov) He returned to Barnstable where he had retained his church membership and resided with his daughter Fear, the wife of Samuel Baker until his death in 1704, aged 94. [1]

1704 At his death, he was buried in the Old Common Burying Ground. [2]

  • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

[1] = Robinson Genealogy, page 36, references the ship as "Lion". Richard Morgan morgan@ultranet.com says the ship's proper name is "Lyon" as he has a list and other lists on the Internet reference this same ship.

[2] = James Kaufman: History of Martha's Vineyard (C. Banks) Came to New England in 1631 on the ship "Lyon" and settled in Plymouth. He was made a freeman in 1633 and was taxed the following year in the town of Plymouth. He lived in Duxbury in 1634.

July l4, 1635, he sold lands in Plymouth and then moved to the town of Scituate. He built the 29th house in the town in 1636, which he sold to Goodman Twisden and in 1637 built his "new house" which was the forty-ninth.

Jan 1, 1637-8, he and others had lands granted them by the Plymouth Colony court, lying between North and South Rivers. In 1639, he moved with the pastorate of Mr. Lathrop to Barnstable. His lands were on the north side of the county road, bounded on the west by Calves Pasture lande. This lot he sold before 1653 to Mr. Thomas Allyn, and removed to a lot about a mile west.

In 1639 and 1648, he was a member of the Grand Inquest of the colony, in 1641 on the jury for trials, in 1645 and 1651 deputy from Barnstable in the Plymouth Colony Court and in 1646, '47, and '48, Receiver of the Excise in the Town of Barnstable.

In 1659, he was asked to attend Quaker meetings to help the Quakers see the error of their ways. Instead, upon attendance, he felt that the laws that had been enacted against the Quakers were tyrannical and should be repealed. He wrote a letter to the magistrates stating this. As a consequence in 1660, the court ordered himstripped of his rights as a freeman, which lasted for

thirteen years.

In 1664, he helped to settled the town of Saconnet (Falmouth), and probably was a tavern keeper there. In 1673, he lived in Tisbury, and continued to live there until 1701 where he was the Recorder and Town clerk. In 1678, 1680 and 1684 he was named as a selectman. In 1673, he interested himself in the Dutch Rebellion In 1701, he sold his land in on the east side of the Old Mill

River in West Tisbury to his son, Isaac. In 1702, he moved to Barnstable and lived with his

daughter, Fear and her husband. During all of this time he continued to remain a member of the Barnstable Church. At his death, he was buried in the Old Common Burying Ground. (History of Martha's Vineyard, by C. Banks)

Submitter: James J. Kaufman

349 W. Main Street

P.O. Box 254

Fairchild, WI 54741-0254

(715) 334-5202

jjkauf@overlord.edp.net

07 AUG 1996

More About Isaac Robinson:

Burial: 1704, Old Common Burying Ground

Fact 1: also lived in Scituate, Falmouth and Tisbury

Fact 2: June 27, 1636, Married Margaret Hanford b.1619 dau

Fact 3: of _____ and Egglin (Hatherly) Hanford

Fact 4: 1650, Married Mary Birth and death not recorded

Fact 5: nor Parent s name now believed to possiblt

Fact 6: be Foster

Fact 7: 1704, Died in Barnstable at home of his daughter

Fact 8: Fear Robinson Baker

LDS Records: AFN: 378Z-ZD

More About Mary Faunce:

LDS Records: AFN: 3790-0H (Mary Faunce)

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Arrived in Plymouth on the Lyon in 1631. The only child of John and Bridget Robinson known to have come to the Americas. -------------------- The immigrant New England ancestor of the descendant family. He was born circa 1610 probably at Leiden, the Netherlands, and arrived at Boston, Mass. on Feb. 15, 1630/1 as a passenger of the Lion, William Peirce, Master. He was a resident first of Plymouth, Mass. then successively at Scituate, Barnstable, Falmouth, Tisbury and again at Barnstable, Mass. He was living at Barnstable in Apr. 1702 when Judge Samuel Sewell of Boston visited him. During the same visit, Judge Sewell traveled to Martha's Vineyard where he "walked" with one of Isaac's sons, but Sewell did not mention in his diary the son's name.

Isaac purportedly died at Barnstable in 1704, but there is no proof of when he died. A five year gap in the Barnstable County, Mass. probate records (May 12, 1701 to Jan. 10, 1705/6) possibly included Isaac's estate record.

An expanded bio will be added later. In the meantime, for Isaac's descendants the most important event occurred in 1632. In a letter dated July 1, 1633 from Rev. Ralph Smith at Plymouth, Mass. to Rev. Hugh Goodyear of the English Church at Leiden [Hugh Goodyear Letter Collection, excerpted in D. Plooij: "The Pilgrim Fathers from a Dutch Point of View" (NYU Press, 1932), 100]:

• Isaak Robinson was at hir [Mary Masterson's] house last sommr nigh death and so continewed til his recoverie aftr or [our] friend's [Richard Masterson's] death and comes to us sometimes, soo shee hath had op[por]tunitie to requite his fathrs labor of love in some measure, and his mothrs love and loving tokens.

In 1614, Richard Masterson purchased a house at Leiden from Roger Wilson and married Mary Goodall in 1619. While the Mastersons may have intended to sail on the Mayflower, they otherwise stayed behind where Masterson, together with Isaac Robinson's uncle Roger White, was a Deacon of Rev. John Robinson's remnant church. By tradition versus confirmable fact the Mastersons and their two children, Nathaniel and Sarah, arrived at New England in 1629. Richard Masterson died at Plymouth in either 1632 or 1633 during a cholera epidemic.

Thereafter, the widow Mary Masterson married Rev. Ralph Smith at Plymouth, who since 1629 was the first minister of the Plymouth, Mass. church. Smith's letter to Goodyear was the beginning of a long and arduous attempt to affect a sale of the Masterson house at Leiden on behalf of his now wife and two stepchildren. Since the letter was dated in July 1633, if one takes Smith's words literally - "Isaac was nigh death last summer" or in 1632 - it is very likely that the descendants of Isaac Robinson owe their existence to the nursing skill of Mary (Goodall)(Masterson) Smith. Absent her care, Isaac's life may have ended unmarried in 1632.

Thank you Mary!

view all 21

Isaac Robinson's Timeline

1610
1610
Leiden, Leiden, South Holland, The Netherlands
1631
1631
Age 21
Plymouth, MA
1636
January 21, 1636
Age 26
Scituate, (Present Plymouth County), Plymouth Colony (Present Massachusetts)
June 27, 1636
Age 26
Scituate, (Present Plymouth County), Plymouth Colony (Present Massachusetts), (Present USA)
1640
April 5, 1640
Age 30
Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States
1640
Age 30
Barnstable, Barnstable, MA
1641
1641
Age 31
Barnstable, Cape Cod, Plymouth Colony
1642
August 7, 1642
Age 32
Probably Barnstable, Cape Cod (Present Barnstable County), Plymouth Colony (Present Massachusetts)
1647
July 4, 1647
Age 37
Barnstable, (Present Barnstable County), Plymouth Colony (Present Massachusetts)
1649
June 6, 1649
Age 39
Barnstable, Barnstable, MA