Hon. Isaac WINSLOW, Esq. (1671 - 1738)

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Birthplace: family estate in the village of Marshfield, MA
Death: Died in Marshfield, MA
Managed by: Ivy Jo Smith
Last Updated:

About Hon. Isaac WINSLOW, Esq.

Hon Isaac Winslow was born 1671 in Marshfield, Plymouth, MA and died 7 Sep 1738 in Marshfield, Plymouth, MA Age: 67

Parents: Gov. Josiah Winslow (1627-1680) and Penelope Pelham (~1630-1703)

Married:

  1. on 11 Jul 1700 in Marshfield MA to Sarah Hensley Winslow (1673 - 1753). She was the daughter of John Winsley (1648-1680) and Elizabeth Paddy (1641-1700).

Children:

  1. Josiah , M (1702-1724)
  2. John , M (1703-1774)
  3. Penelope , F (1704-1737)
  4. Elizabeth , F (1707-1761)
  5. Anna , F (1709-1723)
  6. Edward , M (1714-1784)

Brief Biography

Judge Isaac Winslow held many prominent positions in the colony, both military and civil. He was the judge of the Probate Court at Plymouth, chief justice of the Court of Common Pleas, and president of the Council of the Province of Massachusetts Bay.

Winslow House

Circa 1699 he built "The Isaac Winslow House" at the place named "Careswell" after their family home "Kerswell" in Worcestershire, England. This was the third house built on land granted to Gov. Edward Winslow (1595–1655) in the 1630s who erected the first homestead.

  • The following description of the Winslow mansion was written by Walter Pritchard Eaton, published by House Beautiful magazine, September 1921.

The Historic Winslow House built in 1699 by Hon. Isaac Winslow, a man of means, on the land and near the site of his grandfather’s (Gov. Edward Winslow) and father’s (Gov. Josiah Winslow’s) house which was burned: a four square house, built around a gigantic chimney, with fine high pitched roof and an enclosed Portico in front, with wide windows and unusual depth, making an entrance hall. The house is framed with “gun stock” timbers conforming to the “first period Colonial” except that it has no overhang to the second story.

Flkr imageset of the interior of Winslow House

Links

Misc Notes

1. Roser, Susan E., Mayflower Births & Deaths (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.), p490, "Six children ; Isaac's will, dated 4 May 1736 (prob. 6 Apr 1739), mentions wife Sarah and four children, missing are Josiah and Anna. Sarah's will, dated 5 Sept. 1753 (prob. 4 Feb. 1754 ), mentions John, Edward, Elizabeth and Penelope (dec'd). " 2. Roser, Susan E., Mayflower Births & Deaths, vol 2:490."Hon. Isaac Winslow3, b. c1671, d . 14 Dec. 1738, ae 67, Marshfield g.s.". 3. Roser, Susan E., Mayflower Marriages (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. 1990), p340, "Isa cc WINSLOW (3) and Sarah WENSLEY, 11 July 1700, Boston ".

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The Honorable Isaac Winslow (1671-December 14, 1738)[1] was an early settler and notable of the town of Marshfield, Massachusetts. A member of the prominent Winslow family of Plymouth, he served as a civil and military official in early 18th century Massachusetts, a period marked by political transition.

Contents [hide] 1 Early Life and Family 2 Career 3 Death and Burial 4 Legacy 5 Notes 6 References Early Life and Family[edit] Isaac Winslow was the grandson of Mayflower passenger Edward Winslow (October 18, 1595-1655), a governor of Plymouth Colony and one of that colony’s near-mythical “Pilgrims.” Isaac’s father Josiah also served as governor of Plymouth Colony, and as Commander-in-Chief of the colonial English forces during King Philip’s War.

Winslow was born ca. 1671 on the family estate in the village of Marshfield.[2] His parents were Josiah Winslow and Penelope (Pelham) Winslow.[3] Of this generation of the family, Isaac and his sister Elizabeth (b. April 8, 1664) were the only children to survive to adulthood, a sister and brother having each died within a year of their birth.[4]

Somewhere around the turn of the 17th century, Isaac built a house at the current intersection of Careswell Street and Webster Street in Marshfield, which still exists as the Historic 1699 Winslow House.[5]

On July 11, 1700, he married Sarah Wensley of Boston, in a ceremony presided over by the Reverend Cotton Mather.[6] The marriage produced six children; Josiah (b. 1701), John (b. 1703), Penelope (b. 1704), Elizabeth (b. 1707), Anna (b. 1709/10), and Edward (b. 1714).[7]

Career[edit] Active in local affairs, Winslow was appointed to the Plymouth County Inferior Court of Common Pleas in 1712, and served until 1738, for the last nine years as its Chief Justice. In 1715, he was commissioned a colonel in the Massachusetts militia and given charge of a regiment drawn from Plymouth County, and was a judge of the Court of Probate for Plymouth from 1718 to 1738.[8]

A decade after Plymouth’s incorporation into Massachusetts, Winslow became prominent at a wider colonial level. In 1703, he was appointed for the first time to the Council for the Province of Massachusetts Bay. As a representative in the legislature’s upper house, he and his fellow Councilors were to serve as advisors to the Royal Governor in Boston, as well as passing laws and approving government expenditures.

Winslow's term in Council was marked by a period of war and turbulent politics; Massachusetts was almost constantly fighting New England natives and French colonists in Canada, and several successive governors would clash with the lower House of Representatives on issues of finance and legislative appointments.

With the exception of 1715, Winslow served as a member of the Council until 1736, for a time as its President.[9]

Death and Burial[edit] He died in Marshfield on December 14, 1738, having named as his heirs his wife Sarah, his sons John and Edward, and his daughters Penelope and Elizabeth.[10] He is buried in the Winslow Cemetery in Marshfield, Massachusetts, not far from the house that he built in 1699.

Legacy[edit] Isaac’s house, the 1699 Winslow House, still stands today in Marshfield. It has been converted into a historic house museum providing a glimpse into the lives of New England landed gentry prior to the Revolutionary War.[11]

Notes[edit] Jump up ^ Kellogg, L. M. (1991). Mayflower Families through Five Generations: Descendants of the Pilgrims Who Landed at Plymouth, Ma.. December 1620. Vol. 5. Plymouth, MA: General Society of Mayflower Descendants. p. 10. Jump up ^ Kellogg, L. M. (1991). Mayflower Families through Five Generations: Descendants of the Pilgrims who landed at Plymouth, Ma. December 1620. Plymouth, MA: General Society of Mayflower Descendants. p. 10. Jump up ^ Kellogg, L. M. (1991). Mayflower Families through Five Generations: Descendants of the Pilgrims who landed at Plymouth, Ma. December 1620. Plymouth, MA: General Society of Mayflower Descendants. p. 7. Jump up ^ Kellogg. p. 8. Missing or empty |title= (help) Jump up ^ Krusell, Cynthia Hagar (2012). Winslows of Careswell in Marshfield. Marshfield, MA: Historical Research Associates. p. 23. Jump up ^ Krusell, Cynthia Hagar (2012). Winslows of Careswell in Marshfield. Marshfield, MA: Historical Research Associates. p. 25. Jump up ^ Kellogg. p. 11. Missing or empty |title= (help) Jump up ^ Krusell. p. 24. Missing or empty |title= (help) Jump up ^ Whitmore, William H. (1870). The Massachusetts Civil List for the Colonial and Provincial Periods 1630-1774. Albany: J. Munsell, State Street. pp. 49–59. Jump up ^ Kellogg. p. 10. Missing or empty |title= (help) Jump up ^ 1699 Historic Winslow House and Cultural Center. "The Winslows". Retrieved 26 March 2014. References[edit] Kellogg, L. M., ed. Mayflower Families through Five Generations: Descendants of the Pilgrims Who Landed at Plymouth, Ma.. December 1620. Vol. 5. Plymouth, MA: General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1991.

Krusell, Cynthia Hagar, and Betty Magoun Bates. Marshfield: A Town of Villages 1640-1990. Marshfield Hills, MA: Historical Research Associates, 1990.

---Winslows of Careswell in Marshfield. Marshfield, MA: Historical Research Associates, 2012.

1699 Historic Winslow House and Cultural Center. “The Winslows.” <http://www.winslowhouse.org/the-winslows/>

Taylor, Alan. American Colonies: The Settling of North America. Vol. 1. The Penguin History of the United States. United States: Penguin Books, 2001.

Whitmore, William H. The Massachusetts Civil List for the Colonial and Provincial Periods 1630-1774. Albany: J. Munsell, State Street, 1870.

Winsor, Justin, ed. The Memorial History of Boston Including Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1630-1880. Vol. 2: The Provincial Period. 4 vols. Boston: James R. Osgood and Company, 1881. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Winslow

Isaac Winslow House http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Winslow_House

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Hon. Isaac WINSLOW, Esq.'s Timeline

1671
1671
family estate in the village of Marshfield, MA
1700
July 11, 1700
Age 29
Boston, MA
1701
July 27, 1701
Age 30
Marshfield, MA
1703
May 10, 1703
Age 32
Marshfield, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA
1704
December 21, 1704
Age 33
Marshfield, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA
1707
December 13, 1707
Age 36
Marshfield, MA
1710
January 29, 1710
Age 39
Marshfield, MA
1714
June 9, 1714
Age 43
Marshfield, MA
1738
December 14, 1738
Age 67
Marshfield, MA
December 1738
Age 67
Winslow Cemetery, Marshfield (Plymouth) Massachusetts