Isabelle d'Angoulême, Queen consort of England

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Isabelle d'Angoulême, Reine consort d'Angleterre

Nicknames: "Isabella of Angoulême", "Isabella of Angouleme", "Countess of Angoulême from 1202 until 1246"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Angoulême, Charente, Poitou-Charentes, France
Death: Died in Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France
Place of Burial: Abbaye de Fontevraud, Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Aymer 'Taillefer' d'Angoulême, comte d'Angoulême and Alice de Courtenay
Wife of King John Lackland; John Lackland, King of England and Hugues X le Brun de Lusignan, comte de la Marche
Mother of Isabella of England, Holy Roman Empress; Henry III of England; Richard Plantagenet, 1st Earl of Cornwall / "King of the Romans"; Joan of England, Queen Consort of Scotland; Eleanor of Leicester, Countess of Pembroke & Leicester and 10 others
Sister of William Taillefer
Half sister of Pierre Joigny, Count

Occupation: Queen of England, Queen of England/Countess of Gloucester, QUEEN OF ENGLAND, Grandmother of Isabel de Warenne, Crowned Queen of England on 8 October 1200, Queen of England; daughter of Count de Angouieme, Queen Consort of England, Countess of Angouleme
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About Isabelle d'Angoulême, Reine consort d'Angleterre

Isabella of Angoulême (French : Isabelle d'Angoulême; 1188 - 31 May 1246) was Countess of Angoulême and queen consort of England . Queen of England She was the only daughter and heir of Aymer Taillefer , Count of Angoulême , by Alice de Courtenay . Her paternal grandparents were William IV of Angoulême , Count of Angouleme and Marguerite de Turenne. Her maternal grandparents were Pierre de Courtenay and Elizabeth de Courtenay. Her maternal great-grandfather was King Louis VI of France . She became Countess of Angoulême in her own right in 1202, by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on 24 August 1200, at Bordeaux , a year after he annulled his first marriage to Isabel of Gloucester . Isabella was originally betrothed to Hugh le Brun, Count of Lusignan, son of the then Count of La Marche. As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all of their French lands, and armed conflict ensued. At the time of her marriage to John, the 12-year-old Isabella was already renowned for her beauty and has sometimes been called the Helen of the Middle Ages by historians. However, her marriage to John cannot be said to have been successful, in part because she was much younger than her husband and had a fiery character to match his. Second marriage When John died in 1216, Isabella was still in her twenties. She returned to France and in 1220, proceeded to marry Hugh X of Lusignan Count of La Marche . It is unclear whether it had been Hugh X or his father to whom Isabella had been betrothed before her marriage to King John. By Hugh X, Isabella had nine more children. Their eldest son Hugh XI of Lusignan succeeded his father as Count of La Marche and Count of Angouleme in 1249. Death and burial Isabella was accused of plotting against King Louis IX of France in 1244; she fled to Fontevrault Abbey , where she died on 31 May 1246, and was buried there. At her own insistence, she was first buried in the churchyard, as an act of repentance for her many misdeeds. On a visit to Fontevrault, her son King Henry III of England was shocked to find her buried outside the Abbey and ordered her immediately moved inside. She was finally placed beside Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine . Afterwards, most of her many children, having few prospects in France, set sail for England and the court of Henry, their half-brother. -------------------- Isabella of Angoulême From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Isabella of Angoulême (Fr. Isabelle d'Angoulême ; c. 1187 – May 31, 1246) was countess of Angoulême and queen consort of England. She was the only daughter and heir of Aymer Taillifer, Count of Angoulême, by Alix de Courtenay; her maternal great-grandfather was King Louis VI of France. She became Countess of Angoulême in her own right in 1202, by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on August 24, 1200, at Bordeaux, a year after he annulled his first marriage. At the time of this marriage Isabella was aged about thirteen, and her beauty was renowned; she is sometimes called the "Helen" of the Middle Ages by historians. It could not be said to have been a successful marriage, as Isabella was much younger than her husband and had a fiery character to match his. Before their marriage, she had been betrothed to Hugh X of Lusignan[1], son of the then Count of La Marche. As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all his French lands, and armed conflict ensued. When John died in 1216, Isabella was still in her twenties. She returned to France and in 1220 proceeded to marry Hugh X of Lusignan, now Count of La Marche, her former fiancé. Isabella was accused of plotting against the French king in 1244; she fled to Fontevrault Abbey, where she died on May 31, 1246, and was buried there. Afterwards most of her many children, having few prospects in France, set sail for England and the court of their half-brother King Henry III.

Issue

With King John of England: 5 children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including: King Henry III of England (b. 1207 – d. 1272) Richard, Earl of Cornwall and King of the Romans (b. 1209 – d. 1272) Joan (b. 1210 – d. 1238), the wife of King Alexander II of Scotland Isabella (b. 1214 – d. 1241), the wife of Emperor Frederick II Eleanor (b. 1215 – d. 1275), who would marry William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke

-------------------- Isabelle went into hiding (inside the abbey) due to her being blamed for the death of her husband, John. She remained in hideing (in a secret chamber) until her death. She was buried, upon her request, in the open cemetery (common graveyard) at Fontevrault. Some years later her son, Henry III, moved her body into the choir of the Abbey Church & commissioned the fine effigy which is the only near contemporary likeness of her. -------------------- Isabella of Angoulême (French: Isabelle d'Angoulême) was Countess of Angoulême and queen consort of England. She became Countess of Angoulême in her own right in 1202, by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on 24 August 1200, at Bordeaux, a year after he annulled his first marriage to Isabel of Gloucester. At the time of this marriage Isabella was aged about twelve, and her beauty was renowned; she is sometimes called the "Helen" of the Middle Ages by historians.

It could not be said to have been a successful marriage, as Isabella was much younger than her husband and had a fiery character to match his. Before their marriage, she had been betrothed to Hugh le Brun, Count of Lusignan, son of the then Count of La Marche. As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all his French lands, and armed conflict ensued.

She had five children with King John, including our ancestor King Henry III.

When John died in 1216, Isabella was still in her twenties. She returned to France and in 1220 proceeded to marry Hugh X of Lusignan, now Count of La Marche, her former fiancé. By him, Isabella had nine more children, including our ancestor Alice of Lusignan.

Isabella was accused of plotting against King Louis IX of France in 1244; she fled to Fontevrault Abbey, where she died on 31 May 1246, and was buried there. At her own insistence she was first buried in the churchyard, as an act of repentance for her many misdeeds. On a visit to Fontevrault her son King Henry III of England was shocked to find her buried outside the Abbey and ordered her immediately moved inside.

Isabella was our ancestor through two distinct descent lines--through her son King Henry III and through her daughter Alice of Lusignan.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella_of_Angoul%C3%AAme for more information. -------------------- She was the only daughter and heir of Aymer Taillefer, Count of Angoulême, by Alix de Courtenay. Her paternal grandparents were William V Taillefer, Count of Angouleme and Marguerite de Turenne. Her maternal grandparents were Pierre de Courtenay and Elizabeth de Courtenay. Her maternal great-grandfather was King Louis VI of France. She became Countess of Angoulême in her own right in 1202, by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on August 24, 1200, at Bordeaux, a year after he annulled his first marriage to Isabel of Gloucester. At the time of this marriage Isabella was aged about twelve, and her beauty was renowned; she is sometimes called the "Helen" of the Middle Ages by historians.

It could not be said to have been a successful marriage, as Isabella was much younger than her husband and had a fiery character to match his. Before their marriage, she had been betrothed to Hugh X of Lusignan[2], son of the then Count of La Marche. As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all his French lands, and armed conflict ensued. -------------------- 24.08.1200 - 19.10.1216 Queen of England 16.06.1202 - 31.05.1246 Countess of Angouleme

Isabella of Angoulême (French: Isabelle d'Angoulême, IPA: [izabɛl dɑ̃ɡulɛm]; 1188 – 31 May 1246) was suo jure Countess of Angoulême and queen consort of England as the second wife of King John. She was queen from 24 August 1200 until John's death on 19 October 1216. She had five children by the king including his heir Henry who succeeded John as Henry III of England. In 1220, Isabella married secondly Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche, by whom she had another nine children. In 1241 Isabella formed a conspiracy against King Louis IX of France, after being publicly snubbed by his mother, Blanche of Castile for whom she had a deep-seated hatred.[1] In 1244, after the plot had failed, Isabella was accused of attempting to poison the king, and to avoid arrest, sought refuge in Fontevraud Abbey where she died two years later at the age of about 58. -------------------- Married at age 12. Renowned for her beauty After John died, returned to France Married Hugh X of Lusigan, Count of La Marche in 1220 Five children by John and nine by Hugh -------------------- Isabella of Angoulenne Taillefer Widow of John Lackland King of England (1167-?) (King James) and 2nd husband ? Hugh le Lusignan was her 3rd husband. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella_of_Angoul%C3%AAme -------------------- Isabella of Angoulême (Fr. Isabelle d'Angoulême ; c. 1187 – May 31, 1246) was countess of Angoulême and queen consort of England.

She was the only daughter and heir of Aymer Taillifer, Count of Angoulême, by Alix de Courtenay; her maternal great-grandfather was King Louis VI of France. She became Countess of Angoulême in her own right in 1202, by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on August 24, 1200, at Bordeaux, a year after he annulled his first marriage. At the time of this marriage Isabella was aged about thirteen, and her beauty was renowned; she is sometimes called the "Helen" of the Middle Ages by historians.

It could not be said to have been a successful marriage, as Isabella was much younger than her husband and had a fiery character to match his. Before their marriage, she had been betrothed to Hugh X of Lusignan[1], son of the then Count of La Marche. As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all his French lands, and armed conflict ensued.

When John died in 1216, Isabella was still in her twenties. She returned to France and in 1220 proceeded to marry Hugh X of Lusignan, now Count of La Marche, her former fiancé.

Isabella was accused of plotting against the French king in 1244; she fled to Fontevrault Abbey, where she died on May 31, 1246, and was buried there. At her own insistance she was first buried in the churchyard, as an act of repentance for her many misdeeds. On a visit to Fontevrault her son Henry III was shocked to find her buried outside the Abbey and ordered her immediately moved inside. She was finally placed beside Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Afterwards most of her many children, having few prospects in France, set sail for England and the court of their half-brother King Henry III.

-------------------- Isabella of Angouleme married John Lackland of England, son of Eleanor of Aquitaine and Henry II of England. John had put aside his first wife in 1198. Isabella was twelve years old at her marriage to John.

In 1202, Isabella's father died, and she became Countess of Angouleme in her own right.

The marriage of Isabella and John was not an easy one. John was infatuated with his young and beautiful wife, but they both were reported to have engaged in adultery, and to have had strong tempers which they used on each other. When John suspected Isabella of having had an affair, he had her suspected lover hanged and then dangled above her bed.

Isabella and John had five children before John died in 1216. At John's death, Isabella's quick action had her son Henry crowned at John's death, in Gloucester where they were at the time.

John and Isabella had 5 children together:

  1. King Henry III (b. October 1, 1207)
  2. Richard, Earl of Cornwall, King of the Romans
  3. Joan (married Alexander II of Scotland)
  4. Isabella (married Emperor Frederick II)
  5. Eleanor (married William Marshall and then Simon de Montfort)

Epilogue

After John's death Isabella went on to marry Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche. They had many scandalous adventures together, some of which you may read for yourself if you are so inclined.

  • By her own prior arrangement, Isabella was first buried in the Fontevraud Abbey's churchyard, as an act of repentance for her many misdeeds. On a visit to Fontevraud, her son King Henry III of England was shocked to find her buried outside the Abbey and ordered her immediately moved inside. She was finally placed beside Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine.

-------------------- Isabella of Angoulême (French: Isabelle d'Angoulême, IPA: [izabɛl dɑ̃ɡulɛm]; 1188[1] – 31 May 1246) was suo jure Countess of Angoulême and queen consort of England as the second wife of King John. She was queen from 24 August 1200 until John's death on 19 October 1216. She had five children by the king including his heir Henry who succeeded John as Henry III of England. In 1220, Isabella married secondly the man to whom she had been originally betrothed, Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche, by whom she had another nine children. Hugh had been promised to her eldest daughter, Joan, but the latter was instead married to King Alexander II of Scotland.

In 1241, Isabella formed a conspiracy against King Louis IX of France, after being publicly snubbed by his mother, Blanche of Castile for whom she had a deep-seated hatred.[2] In 1244, after the plot had failed, Isabella was accused of attempting to poison the king, and to avoid arrest, sought refuge in Fontevraud Abbey where she died two years later at the age of about 58. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella_of_Angoul%C3%AAme

Isabella became Countess of Angoulême in her own right on 16 June 1202, by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on 24 August 1200, at Bordeaux, a year after he annulled his first marriage to Isabel of Gloucester. She was crowned queen in an elaborate ceremony on 9 October at Westminster Abbey in London. Isabella was originally betrothed to Hugh IX le Brun, Count of Lusignan,[2] son of the then Count of La Marche. As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all of their French lands, and armed conflict ensued.

At the time of her marriage to John, the 12-year-old Isabella was already renowned for her beauty[3] and has sometimes been called the Helen of the Middle Ages by historians.[4] However, her marriage to John cannot be said to have been successful, in part because she was much younger than her husband and possessed a volatile temper to match his own. King John, however, was deeply infatuated with his young, beautiful wife; he neglected his state affairs to spend time with Isabella, often remaining in bed with her until noon, although it was the custom for kings to rise at five o'clock in the morning to commence their duties. The common people began to term her a "siren" or "Messalina", although they were pleased with her beauty.[5] Her mother-in-law, Eleanor of Aquitaine readily accepted her as John's wife.[6]

On 1 October 1207 at Winchester Castle, Isabella gave birth to a son and heir who was named Henry after the King's father, Henry II. He was quickly followed by another son, Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall, King of the Romans; and three daughters, Joan, Isabel, and Eleanor. All five children survived into adulthood, and would make illustrious marriages; all but Joan would produce offspring of their own. -------------------- Isabella of Angouleme Queen of England was born circa 1187. She married John "Lackland" Plantagenet King of England, son of Henry II "Curtmantle" Plantagenet King of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine Queen of England, on 24 August 1200 at Bordeaux Cathedral, Bordeaux, Gironde, France. As of 24 August 1200,her married name was Plantagenet. Isabella of Angouleme Queen of England died on 31 May 1246 at Fontevraud, Maine-et-Loire, France. -------------------- Only daughter and heir of Aymer, Comte d'Angouleme. Married secondly to Hugh le Brun, Comte de la Marche, in Poitou, France, by who she had issue William de Lusignan, otherwise de Valnce, from whom descended the line of Valence, Earls of Pembroke. From A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, by Sir Bernard Burke, new edn., publ. 1866 (London: Harrison), p. 545, and from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella_of_Angoul%C3%AAme.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella_of_Angoul%C3%AAme -------------------- About Isabella Taillefer, of Angoulême, Queen of England Isabella of Angoulême (French: Isabelle d'Angoulême, IPA: [izabɛl dɑ̃ɡulɛm]; c.1188 – 31 May 1246) was queen consort of England as the second wife of King John from 1200 until John's death in 1216. She had five children by the king including his heir, later Henry III. In 1220, Isabella married Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche, by whom she had another nine children. Some people claim that Isabella formed a conspiracy against King Louis IX of France in 1241, after being publicly snubbed by his mother, Blanche of Castile for whom she had a deep-seated hatred. In 1244, after the plot had failed, Isabella was accused of attempting to poison the king, and to avoid arrest, sought refuge in Fontevraud Abbey where she died two years later, but none of this can be confirmed. She was the only daughter and heir of Aymer Taillefer, Count of Angoulême, by Alice of Courtenay, who was sister of Peter II of Courtenay, Latin Emperor of Constantinople and granddaughter of King Louis VI of France. Isabella became Countess of Angoulême in her own right on 16 June 1202, by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on 24 August 1200, at Bordeaux, a year after he annulled his first marriage to Isabel of Gloucester. She was crowned queen in an elaborate ceremony on 9 October at Westminster Abbey in London. Isabella was originally betrothed to Hugh IX le Brun, Count of Lusignan, son of the then Count of La Marche. As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all of their French lands, and armed conflict ensued. At the time of her marriage to John, the 12-year-old Isabella was already renowned for her beauty and has sometimes been called the Helen of the Middle Ages by historians. Isabella was much younger than her husband and possessed a volatile temper to match his own. King John, however, was deeply infatuated with his young, beautiful wife; he neglected his state affairs to spend time with Isabella, often remaining in bed with her until noon, although it was the custom for kings to rise at five o'clock in the morning to commence their duties. The common people began to term her a "siren" or "Messalina", although they were pleased with her beauty. Her mother-in-law, Eleanor of Aquitaine readily accepted her as John's wife. On 1 October 1207 at Winchester Castle, Isabella gave birth to a son and heir who was named Henry after the King's father, Henry II. He was quickly followed by another son, Richard, and three daughters, Joan, Isabel, and Eleanor. All five children survived into adulthood, and would make illustrious marriages; all but Joan would produce offspring of their own. Described as "vain, capricious, and troublesome", Isabella could not reconcile herself with her less prominent position in France. Though Queen dowager of England, Isabella was now mostly regarded as a mere Countess of La Marche and had to give precedence to other women.[12] In 1241, when Isabella and Hugh were summoned to the French court to swear fealty to King Louis IX of France's brother, Alphonse, who had been invested as Count of Poitou, their mother, the Queen Dowager Blanche openly snubbed her. This so infuriated Isabella, who had a deep-seated hatred of Blanche due to the latter having fervently supported the French invasion of England during the First Barons' War in May 1216, that she began to actively conspire against King Louis. Isabella and her husband, along with other disgruntled nobles, including her son-in-law Raymond VII of Toulouse, sought to create an English-backed confederacy which united the provinces of the south and west against the French king.[13] In 1244, after the confederacy had failed and Hugh had made peace with King Louis, two royal cooks were arrested for attempting to poison the King; upon questioning they confessed to having been in Isabella's pay.[14] Before Isabella could be taken into custody, she fled to Fontevraud Abbey, where she died on 31 May 1246. By her own prior arrangement, she was first buried in the Abbey's churchyard, as an act of repentance for her many misdeeds. On a visit to Fontevraud, her son King Henry III of England was shocked to find her buried outside the Abbey and ordered her immediately moved inside. She was finally placed beside Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Afterwards, most of her many Lusignan children, having few prospects in France, set sail for England and the court of Henry, their half-brother. Issue: With King John of England: 5 children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including: 1.King Henry III of England (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272). Married Eleanor of Provence, by whom he had issue, including his heir, King Edward I of England. 2.Richard, Earl of Cornwall and King of the Romans (5 January 1209 – 2 April 1272). Married firstly Isabel Marshal, secondly Sanchia of Provence, and thirdly Beatrice of Falkenburg. Had issue. 3.Joan (22 July 1210 – 1238), the wife of King Alexander II of Scotland. Her marriage was childless. 4.Isabella (1214–1241), the wife of Emperor Frederick II, by whom she had issue. 5.Eleanor (1215–1275), who would marry firstly William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke; and secondly Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, by whom she had issue. -------------------- Promise à Hugues IX de Lusignan, comte de la Marche, le roi d'Angleterre, Jean sans Terre la soustrait à son fiancé et l'épouse le 24 août 1200 à Bordeaux, Angoulême ou ChinonN 1. Cette péripétie a donné lieu à de nombreux récits plus ou moins controversés. Y eut-il accord entre les parties ou rapt ? La version française, populaire et à connotation romanesque, penche pour l'enlèvement. Jean sans Terre qui tenait alors sa cour à Bordeaux se trouvait sans épouse après avoir fait annuler son mariage[réf. nécessaire] avec Isabelle de Gloucester3. S'étant rendu à Angoulême en tant qu'invité au mariage d'Isabelle et d'Hugues X de Lusignan, il fut si épris de la beauté de la fiancée qu'il la ravit et l'épousa. La chronique de Flandres rapporte que Jean sans Terre fut prié de conduire la fiancée à l'abbaye de Saint-Cybard d'Angoulême et que lorsqu'ils furent devant l'évêque qui devait officier le mariage, il lui dit : « Unissez-moi par les liens du mariage avec cette dame parce que je la désire pour femme. » L'évêque, dit-on, n'osant résister au monarque anglais, les maria4. À Angoulême, une petite rue étroite et très en pente, qui descend à la Charente près de l'ancienne abbaye Saint-Cybard, passe pour être le chemin emprunté par les fuyards. C'est donc âgée seulement d'une douzaine d'années que la jeune Isabelle d'Angoulême devient reine d'Angleterre.

C’est à la suite de cet enlèvement2, que Jean sans Terre est condamné pour forfaiture et que la commise est prononcée sur ses biens du royaume de France, biens qui reviennent au roi de France, Philippe Auguste. À la mort de Jean sans Terre en 1216, tandis que son fils aîné devient roi d'Angleterre sous le nom d'Henri III, elle rentre en France et épouse le fils de son ancien fiancé Hugues X de LusignanN 2 en 1220.

C'est sans doute sous son influence que Henri III d'Angleterre et Hugues de Lusignan organisent un front commun contre le roi de France Louis IX. Cependant ce dernier bat les coalisés à Taillebourg (dans l'actuel département de la Charente-Maritime) les 21 et 22 juillet 1242. À la suite de cette défaite Hugues de Lusignan se soumet au roi de France. Au cours de la rencontre, Isabelle, qui voulait toujours porter le titre de reine, aurait tenté de faire empoisonner sans succès Louis IX5.

Elle mourut en 1246 et fut d'abord enterrée dans une chapelle de l'abbaye Notre-Dame de La Couronne, appelée alors Saint-Nicolas5 avant d'être transférée à Fontevraud. -------------------- House House of Taillefer Father Aymer, Count of Angoulême Mother Alice of Courtenay Born c.1188 Died 4 June 1246 (aged c. 57–58) Fontevraud Abbey, France Burial Fontevraud Abbey -------------------- Isabella of Angoulême (French : Isabelle d'Angoulême; 1188 - 31 May 1246) was Countess of Angoulême and queen consort of England . Queen of England She was the only daughter and heir of Aymer Taillefer , Count of Angoulême , by Alice de Courtenay . Her paternal grandparents were William IV of Angoulême , Count of Angouleme and Marguerite de Turenne. Her maternal grandparents were Pierre de Courtenay and Elizabeth de Courtenay. Her maternal great-grandfather was King Louis VI of France . She became Countess of Angoulême in her own right in 1202, by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on 24 August 1200, at Bordeaux , a year after he annulled his first marriage to Isabel of Gloucester . Isabella was originally betrothed to Hugh le Brun, Count of Lusignan, son of the then Count of La Marche. As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all of their French lands, and armed conflict ensued. At the time of her marriage to John, the 12-year-old Isabella was already renowned for her beauty and has sometimes been called the Helen of the Middle Ages by historians. However, her marriage to John cannot be said to have been successful, in part because she was much younger than her husband and had a fiery character to match his. Second marriage When John died in 1216, Isabella was still in her twenties. She returned to France and in 1220, proceeded to marry Hugh X of Lusignan Count of La Marche . It is unclear whether it had been Hugh X or his father to whom Isabella had been betrothed before her marriage to King John. By Hugh X, Isabella had nine more children. Their eldest son Hugh XI of Lusignan succeeded his father as Count of La Marche and Count of Angouleme in 1249. Death and burial Isabella was accused of plotting against King Louis IX of France in 1244; she fled to Fontevrault Abbey , where she died on 31 May 1246, and was buried there. At her own insistence, she was first buried in the churchyard, as an act of repentance for her many misdeeds. On a visit to Fontevrault, her son King Henry III of England was shocked to find her buried outside the Abbey and ordered her immediately moved inside. She was finally placed beside Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine . Afterwards, most of her many children, having few prospects in France, set sail for England and the court of Henry, their half-brother. -------------------- Isabella of Angoulême From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Isabella of Angoulême (Fr. Isabelle d'Angoulême ; c. 1187 – May 31, 1246) was countess of Angoulême and queen consort of England. She was the only daughter and heir of Aymer Taillifer, Count of Angoulême, by Alix de Courtenay; her maternal great-grandfather was King Louis VI of France. She became Countess of Angoulême in her own right in 1202, by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on August 24, 1200, at Bordeaux, a year after he annulled his first marriage. At the time of this marriage Isabella was aged about thirteen, and her beauty was renowned; she is sometimes called the "Helen" of the Middle Ages by historians. It could not be said to have been a successful marriage, as Isabella was much younger than her husband and had a fiery character to match his. Before their marriage, she had been betrothed to Hugh X of Lusignan[1], son of the then Count of La Marche. As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all his French lands, and armed conflict ensued. When John died in 1216, Isabella was still in her twenties. She returned to France and in 1220 proceeded to marry Hugh X of Lusignan, now Count of La Marche, her former fiancé. Isabella was accused of plotting against the French king in 1244; she fled to Fontevrault Abbey, where she died on May 31, 1246, and was buried there. Afterwards most of her many children, having few prospects in France, set sail for England and the court of their half-brother King Henry III.

Issue

With King John of England: 5 children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including: King Henry III of England (b. 1207 – d. 1272) Richard, Earl of Cornwall and King of the Romans (b. 1209 – d. 1272) Joan (b. 1210 – d. 1238), the wife of King Alexander II of Scotland Isabella (b. 1214 – d. 1241), the wife of Emperor Frederick II Eleanor (b. 1215 – d. 1275), who would marry William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke

-------------------- Isabelle went into hiding (inside the abbey) due to her being blamed for the death of her husband, John. She remained in hideing (in a secret chamber) until her death. She was buried, upon her request, in the open cemetery (common graveyard) at Fontevrault. Some years later her son, Henry III, moved her body into the choir of the Abbey Church & commissioned the fine effigy which is the only near contemporary likeness of her. -------------------- Isabella of Angoulême (French: Isabelle d'Angoulême) was Countess of Angoulême and queen consort of England. She became Countess of Angoulême in her own right in 1202, by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on 24 August 1200, at Bordeaux, a year after he annulled his first marriage to Isabel of Gloucester. At the time of this marriage Isabella was aged about twelve, and her beauty was renowned; she is sometimes called the "Helen" of the Middle Ages by historians.

It could not be said to have been a successful marriage, as Isabella was much younger than her husband and had a fiery character to match his. Before their marriage, she had been betrothed to Hugh le Brun, Count of Lusignan, son of the then Count of La Marche. As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all his French lands, and armed conflict ensued.

She had five children with King John, including our ancestor King Henry III.

When John died in 1216, Isabella was still in her twenties. She returned to France and in 1220 proceeded to marry Hugh X of Lusignan, now Count of La Marche, her former fiancé. By him, Isabella had nine more children, including our ancestor Alice of Lusignan.

Isabella was accused of plotting against King Louis IX of France in 1244; she fled to Fontevrault Abbey, where she died on 31 May 1246, and was buried there. At her own insistence she was first buried in the churchyard, as an act of repentance for her many misdeeds. On a visit to Fontevrault her son King Henry III of England was shocked to find her buried outside the Abbey and ordered her immediately moved inside.

Isabella was our ancestor through two distinct descent lines--through her son King Henry III and through her daughter Alice of Lusignan.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella_of_Angoul%C3%AAme for more information. -------------------- She was the only daughter and heir of Aymer Taillefer, Count of Angoulême, by Alix de Courtenay. Her paternal grandparents were William V Taillefer, Count of Angouleme and Marguerite de Turenne. Her maternal grandparents were Pierre de Courtenay and Elizabeth de Courtenay. Her maternal great-grandfather was King Louis VI of France. She became Countess of Angoulême in her own right in 1202, by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on August 24, 1200, at Bordeaux, a year after he annulled his first marriage to Isabel of Gloucester. At the time of this marriage Isabella was aged about twelve, and her beauty was renowned; she is sometimes called the "Helen" of the Middle Ages by historians.

It could not be said to have been a successful marriage, as Isabella was much younger than her husband and had a fiery character to match his. Before their marriage, she had been betrothed to Hugh X of Lusignan[2], son of the then Count of La Marche. As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all his French lands, and armed conflict ensued. -------------------- 24.08.1200 - 19.10.1216 Queen of England 16.06.1202 - 31.05.1246 Countess of Angouleme

Isabella of Angoulême (French: Isabelle d'Angoulême, IPA: [izabɛl dɑ̃ɡulɛm]; 1188 – 31 May 1246) was suo jure Countess of Angoulême and queen consort of England as the second wife of King John. She was queen from 24 August 1200 until John's death on 19 October 1216. She had five children by the king including his heir Henry who succeeded John as Henry III of England. In 1220, Isabella married secondly Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche, by whom she had another nine children. In 1241 Isabella formed a conspiracy against King Louis IX of France, after being publicly snubbed by his mother, Blanche of Castile for whom she had a deep-seated hatred.[1] In 1244, after the plot had failed, Isabella was accused of attempting to poison the king, and to avoid arrest, sought refuge in Fontevraud Abbey where she died two years later at the age of about 58. -------------------- Married at age 12. Renowned for her beauty After John died, returned to France Married Hugh X of Lusigan, Count of La Marche in 1220 Five children by John and nine by Hugh -------------------- Isabella of Angoulenne Taillefer Widow of John Lackland King of England (1167-?) (King James) and 2nd husband ? Hugh le Lusignan was her 3rd husband. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella_of_Angoul%C3%AAme -------------------- Isabella of Angoulême (Fr. Isabelle d'Angoulême ; c. 1187 – May 31, 1246) was countess of Angoulême and queen consort of England.

She was the only daughter and heir of Aymer Taillifer, Count of Angoulême, by Alix de Courtenay; her maternal great-grandfather was King Louis VI of France. She became Countess of Angoulême in her own right in 1202, by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on August 24, 1200, at Bordeaux, a year after he annulled his first marriage. At the time of this marriage Isabella was aged about thirteen, and her beauty was renowned; she is sometimes called the "Helen" of the Middle Ages by historians.

It could not be said to have been a successful marriage, as Isabella was much younger than her husband and had a fiery character to match his. Before their marriage, she had been betrothed to Hugh X of Lusignan[1], son of the then Count of La Marche. As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all his French lands, and armed conflict ensued.

When John died in 1216, Isabella was still in her twenties. She returned to France and in 1220 proceeded to marry Hugh X of Lusignan, now Count of La Marche, her former fiancé.

Isabella was accused of plotting against the French king in 1244; she fled to Fontevrault Abbey, where she died on May 31, 1246, and was buried there. At her own insistance she was first buried in the churchyard, as an act of repentance for her many misdeeds. On a visit to Fontevrault her son Henry III was shocked to find her buried outside the Abbey and ordered her immediately moved inside. She was finally placed beside Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Afterwards most of her many children, having few prospects in France, set sail for England and the court of their half-brother King Henry III.

-------------------- Isabella of Angouleme married John Lackland of England, son of Eleanor of Aquitaine and Henry II of England. John had put aside his first wife in 1198. Isabella was twelve years old at her marriage to John.

In 1202, Isabella's father died, and she became Countess of Angouleme in her own right.

The marriage of Isabella and John was not an easy one. John was infatuated with his young and beautiful wife, but they both were reported to have engaged in adultery, and to have had strong tempers which they used on each other. When John suspected Isabella of having had an affair, he had her suspected lover hanged and then dangled above her bed.

Isabella and John had five children before John died in 1216. At John's death, Isabella's quick action had her son Henry crowned at John's death, in Gloucester where they were at the time.

John and Isabella had 5 children together:

King Henry III (b. October 1, 1207) Richard, Earl of Cornwall, King of the Romans Joan (married Alexander II of Scotland) Isabella (married Emperor Frederick II) Eleanor (married William Marshall and then Simon de Montfort) Epilogue

After John's death Isabella went on to marry Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche. They had many scandalous adventures together, some of which you may read for yourself if you are so inclined.

By her own prior arrangement, Isabella was first buried in the Fontevraud Abbey's churchyard, as an act of repentance for her many misdeeds. On a visit to Fontevraud, her son King Henry III of England was shocked to find her buried outside the Abbey and ordered her immediately moved inside. She was finally placed beside Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. -------------------- Isabella of Angoulême (French: Isabelle d'Angoulême, IPA: [izabɛl dɑ̃ɡulɛm]; 1188[1] – 31 May 1246) was suo jure Countess of Angoulême and queen consort of England as the second wife of King John. She was queen from 24 August 1200 until John's death on 19 October 1216. She had five children by the king including his heir Henry who succeeded John as Henry III of England. In 1220, Isabella married secondly the man to whom she had been originally betrothed, Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche, by whom she had another nine children. Hugh had been promised to her eldest daughter, Joan, but the latter was instead married to King Alexander II of Scotland.

In 1241, Isabella formed a conspiracy against King Louis IX of France, after being publicly snubbed by his mother, Blanche of Castile for whom she had a deep-seated hatred.[2] In 1244, after the plot had failed, Isabella was accused of attempting to poison the king, and to avoid arrest, sought refuge in Fontevraud Abbey where she died two years later at the age of about 58. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella_of_Angoul%C3%AAme

Isabella became Countess of Angoulême in her own right on 16 June 1202, by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on 24 August 1200, at Bordeaux, a year after he annulled his first marriage to Isabel of Gloucester. She was crowned queen in an elaborate ceremony on 9 October at Westminster Abbey in London. Isabella was originally betrothed to Hugh IX le Brun, Count of Lusignan,[2] son of the then Count of La Marche. As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all of their French lands, and armed conflict ensued.

At the time of her marriage to John, the 12-year-old Isabella was already renowned for her beauty[3] and has sometimes been called the Helen of the Middle Ages by historians.[4] However, her marriage to John cannot be said to have been successful, in part because she was much younger than her husband and possessed a volatile temper to match his own. King John, however, was deeply infatuated with his young, beautiful wife; he neglected his state affairs to spend time with Isabella, often remaining in bed with her until noon, although it was the custom for kings to rise at five o'clock in the morning to commence their duties. The common people began to term her a "siren" or "Messalina", although they were pleased with her beauty.[5] Her mother-in-law, Eleanor of Aquitaine readily accepted her as John's wife.[6]

On 1 October 1207 at Winchester Castle, Isabella gave birth to a son and heir who was named Henry after the King's father, Henry II. He was quickly followed by another son, Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall, King of the Romans; and three daughters, Joan, Isabel, and Eleanor. All five children survived into adulthood, and would make illustrious marriages; all but Joan would produce offspring of their own. -------------------- Isabella of Angouleme Queen of England was born circa 1187. She married John "Lackland" Plantagenet King of England, son of Henry II "Curtmantle" Plantagenet King of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine Queen of England, on 24 August 1200 at Bordeaux Cathedral, Bordeaux, Gironde, France. As of 24 August 1200,her married name was Plantagenet. Isabella of Angouleme Queen of England died on 31 May 1246 at Fontevraud, Maine-et-Loire, France. -------------------- Only daughter and heir of Aymer, Comte d'Angouleme. Married secondly to Hugh le Brun, Comte de la Marche, in Poitou, France, by who she had issue William de Lusignan, otherwise de Valnce, from whom descended the line of Valence, Earls of Pembroke. From A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, by Sir Bernard Burke, new edn., publ. 1866 (London: Harrison), p. 545, and from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella_of_Angoul%C3%AAme.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella_of_Angoul%C3%AAme -------------------- About Isabella Taillefer, of Angoulême, Queen of England Isabella of Angoulême (French: Isabelle d'Angoulême, IPA: [izabɛl dɑ̃ɡulɛm]; c.1188 – 31 May 1246) was queen consort of England as the second wife of King John from 1200 until John's death in 1216. She had five children by the king including his heir, later Henry III. In 1220, Isabella married Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche, by whom she had another nine children. Some people claim that Isabella formed a conspiracy against King Louis IX of France in 1241, after being publicly snubbed by his mother, Blanche of Castile for whom she had a deep-seated hatred. In 1244, after the plot had failed, Isabella was accused of attempting to poison the king, and to avoid arrest, sought refuge in Fontevraud Abbey where she died two years later, but none of this can be confirmed. She was the only daughter and heir of Aymer Taillefer, Count of Angoulême, by Alice of Courtenay, who was sister of Peter II of Courtenay, Latin Emperor of Constantinople and granddaughter of King Louis VI of France. Isabella became Countess of Angoulême in her own right on 16 June 1202, by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on 24 August 1200, at Bordeaux, a year after he annulled his first marriage to Isabel of Gloucester. She was crowned queen in an elaborate ceremony on 9 October at Westminster Abbey in London. Isabella was originally betrothed to Hugh IX le Brun, Count of Lusignan, son of the then Count of La Marche. As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all of their French lands, and armed conflict ensued. At the time of her marriage to John, the 12-year-old Isabella was already renowned for her beauty and has sometimes been called the Helen of the Middle Ages by historians. Isabella was much younger than her husband and possessed a volatile temper to match his own. King John, however, was deeply infatuated with his young, beautiful wife; he neglected his state affairs to spend time with Isabella, often remaining in bed with her until noon, although it was the custom for kings to rise at five o'clock in the morning to commence their duties. The common people began to term her a "siren" or "Messalina", although they were pleased with her beauty. Her mother-in-law, Eleanor of Aquitaine readily accepted her as John's wife. On 1 October 1207 at Winchester Castle, Isabella gave birth to a son and heir who was named Henry after the King's father, Henry II. He was quickly followed by another son, Richard, and three daughters, Joan, Isabel, and Eleanor. All five children survived into adulthood, and would make illustrious marriages; all but Joan would produce offspring of their own. Described as "vain, capricious, and troublesome", Isabella could not reconcile herself with her less prominent position in France. Though Queen dowager of England, Isabella was now mostly regarded as a mere Countess of La Marche and had to give precedence to other women.[12] In 1241, when Isabella and Hugh were summoned to the French court to swear fealty to King Louis IX of France's brother, Alphonse, who had been invested as Count of Poitou, their mother, the Queen Dowager Blanche openly snubbed her. This so infuriated Isabella, who had a deep-seated hatred of Blanche due to the latter having fervently supported the French invasion of England during the First Barons' War in May 1216, that she began to actively conspire against King Louis. Isabella and her husband, along with other disgruntled nobles, including her son-in-law Raymond VII of Toulouse, sought to create an English-backed confederacy which united the provinces of the south and west against the French king.[13] In 1244, after the confederacy had failed and Hugh had made peace with King Louis, two royal cooks were arrested for attempting to poison the King; upon questioning they confessed to having been in Isabella's pay.[14] Before Isabella could be taken into custody, she fled to Fontevraud Abbey, where she died on 31 May 1246. By her own prior arrangement, she was first buried in the Abbey's churchyard, as an act of repentance for her many misdeeds. On a visit to Fontevraud, her son King Henry III of England was shocked to find her buried outside the Abbey and ordered her immediately moved inside. She was finally placed beside Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Afterwards, most of her many Lusignan children, having few prospects in France, set sail for England and the court of Henry, their half-brother. Issue: With King John of England: 5 children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including: 1.King Henry III of England (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272). Married Eleanor of Provence, by whom he had issue, including his heir, King Edward I of England. 2.Richard, Earl of Cornwall and King of the Romans (5 January 1209 – 2 April 1272). Married firstly Isabel Marshal, secondly Sanchia of Provence, and thirdly Beatrice of Falkenburg. Had issue. 3.Joan (22 July 1210 – 1238), the wife of King Alexander II of Scotland. Her marriage was childless. 4.Isabella (1214–1241), the wife of Emperor Frederick II, by whom she had issue. 5.Eleanor (1215–1275), who would marry firstly William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke; and secondly Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, by whom she had issue. -------------------- Promise à Hugues IX de Lusignan, comte de la Marche, le roi d'Angleterre, Jean sans Terre la soustrait à son fiancé et l'épouse le 24 août 1200 à Bordeaux, Angoulême ou ChinonN 1. Cette péripétie a donné lieu à de nombreux récits plus ou moins controversés. Y eut-il accord entre les parties ou rapt ? La version française, populaire et à connotation romanesque, penche pour l'enlèvement. Jean sans Terre qui tenait alors sa cour à Bordeaux se trouvait sans épouse après avoir fait annuler son mariage[réf. nécessaire] avec Isabelle de Gloucester3. S'étant rendu à Angoulême en tant qu'invité au mariage d'Isabelle et d'Hugues X de Lusignan, il fut si épris de la beauté de la fiancée qu'il la ravit et l'épousa. La chronique de Flandres rapporte que Jean sans Terre fut prié de conduire la fiancée à l'abbaye de Saint-Cybard d'Angoulême et que lorsqu'ils furent devant l'évêque qui devait officier le mariage, il lui dit : « Unissez-moi par les liens du mariage avec cette dame parce que je la désire pour femme. » L'évêque, dit-on, n'osant résister au monarque anglais, les maria4. À Angoulême, une petite rue étroite et très en pente, qui descend à la Charente près de l'ancienne abbaye Saint-Cybard, passe pour être le chemin emprunté par les fuyards. C'est donc âgée seulement d'une douzaine d'années que la jeune Isabelle d'Angoulême devient reine d'Angleterre.

C’est à la suite de cet enlèvement2, que Jean sans Terre est condamné pour forfaiture et que la commise est prononcée sur ses biens du royaume de France, biens qui reviennent au roi de France, Philippe Auguste. À la mort de Jean sans Terre en 1216, tandis que son fils aîné devient roi d'Angleterre sous le nom d'Henri III, elle rentre en France et épouse le fils de son ancien fiancé Hugues X de LusignanN 2 en 1220.

C'est sans doute sous son influence que Henri III d'Angleterre et Hugues de Lusignan organisent un front commun contre le roi de France Louis IX. Cependant ce dernier bat les coalisés à Taillebourg (dans l'actuel département de la Charente-Maritime) les 21 et 22 juillet 1242. À la suite de cette défaite Hugues de Lusignan se soumet au roi de France. Au cours de la rencontre, Isabelle, qui voulait toujours porter le titre de reine, aurait tenté de faire empoisonner sans succès Louis IX5.

Elle mourut en 1246 et fut d'abord enterrée dans une chapelle de l'abbaye Notre-Dame de La Couronne, appelée alors Saint-Nicolas5 avant d'être transférée à Fontevraud. -------------------- House House of Taillefer Father Aymer, Count of Angoulême Mother Alice of Courtenay Born c.1188 Died 4 June 1246 (aged c. 57–58) Fontevraud Abbey, France Burial Fontevraud Abbey -------------------- Queen consort of England Reigning Countess of Angouleme -------------------- Isabella of Angoulême (French: Isabelle d'Angoulême, IPA: [izabɛl dɑ̃ɡulɛm]; c.1188 – 4 June 1246) was queen consort of England as the second wife of King John from 1200 until John's death in 1216. She was also reigning Countess of Angoulême from 1202 until 1246.

She had five children by the king including his heir, later Henry III. In 1220, Isabella married Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche, by whom she had another nine children.

Some of her contemporaries, as well as later writers, claim that Isabella formed a conspiracy against King Louis IX of France in 1241, after being publicly snubbed by his mother, Blanche of Castile for whom she had a deep-seated hatred.[1] In 1244, after the plot had failed, Isabella was accused of attempting to poison the king. To avoid arrest, she sought refuge in Fontevraud Abbey where she died two years later, but none of this can be confirmed. Queen of England[edit] She was the only daughter and heir of Aymer Taillefer, Count of Angoulême, by Alice of Courtenay, who was sister of Peter II of Courtenay, Latin Emperor of Constantinople and granddaughter of King Louis VI of France.

Isabella became Countess of Angoulême in her own right on 16 June 1202, by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on 24 August 1200, in Angoulême[2], a year after he annulled his first marriage to Isabel of Gloucester. She was crowned queen in an elaborate ceremony on 9 October at Westminster Abbey in London. Isabella was originally betrothed to Hugh IX le Brun, Count of Lusignan,[3] son of the then Count of La Marche. As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all of their French lands, and armed conflict ensued.

At the time of her marriage to John, the blonde and blue-eyed 12-year-old Isabella was already renowned by some for her beauty[4] and has sometimes been called the Helen of the Middle Ages by historians.[5] Isabella was much younger than her husband and possessed a volatile temper similar to his own. King John was infatuated with his young, beautiful wife; However, his acquisition of her had as much, if not more to do with spiting his enemies, than romantic love. She was already engaged to Hugh IX le Brun, when she taken by John. It had been said that he neglected his state affairs to spend time with Isabella, often remaining in bed with her until noon. However, these were rumors, ignited by Johns enemies to discredit him as being a weak and grossly irresponsible ruler. Given that at the time they were made John was engaging in a desperate war with King Phillip of France to hold on to the remaining Plantagenet dukedoms. The common people began to term her a "siren" or "Messalina", which spoke volumes as to common opinion .[6] Her mother-in-law, Eleanor of Aquitaine readily accepted her as John's wife.[7]

On 1 October 1207 at Winchester Castle, Isabella gave birth to a son and heir who was named Henry after the King's father, Henry II. He was quickly followed by another son, Richard, and three daughters, Joan, Isabel, and Eleanor. All five children survived into adulthood, and would make illustrious marriages; all but Joan would produce offspring of their own.

Second marriage[edit] When King John died in October 1216, Isabella's first act was to arrange the speedy coronation of her nine-year-old son at the city of Gloucester on 28 October. As the royal crown had recently been lost in The Wash, along with the rest of King John's treasure, she supplied her own golden circlet to be used in lieu of a crown.[8] The following July, less than a year after his crowning as King Henry III of England, she left him in the care of his regent, William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and returned to France to assume control of her inheritance of Angoulême.

In the spring of 1220, she married Hugh X of Lusignan, "le Brun", Seigneur de Luisignan, Count of La Marche, the son of Hugh IX, to whom she had been betrothed before her marriage to King John. It had been previously arranged that her eldest daughter Joan should marry Hugh, and the little girl was being brought up at the Lusignan court in preparation for her marriage. Hugh, however, upon seeing Isabella, whose beauty had not diminished,[9] preferred the girl's mother. Princess Joan was provided with another husband, King Alexander II of Scotland, whom she wed in 1221.

Isabella had married Hugh without waiting to receive the consent of the King's council in England, which was the required procedure for a former Queen of England, as the Council had the power to not only choose the Queen Dowager's second husband, but to decide whether or not she should be allowed to marry at all. Isabella's flouting of this law caused the Council to confiscate her dower lands and stop the payment of her pension.[10] Isabella and her husband retaliated by threatening to keep Princess Joan, who had been promised in marriage to the King of Scotland, in France. The council first responded by sending furious letters, signed in the name of young King Henry, to the Pope, urging him to excommunicate Isabella and her husband, but then decided to come to terms with Isabella, as to avoid conflict with the Scottish king, who was eager to receive his bride. Isabella was granted, in compensation for her dower lands in Normandy, the stannaries in Devon and the revenue of Aylesbury for a period of four years. She also received £3000 as payment for arrears in her pension.[11]

By Hugh X, Isabella had nine more children. Their eldest son Hugh XI of Lusignan succeeded his father as Count of La Marche and Count of Angoulême in 1249.

Isabella's children from her past marriage continued their lives in England.

Rebellion and death[edit] Described by some contemporaries as "vain, capricious, and troublesome,"[12] Isabella could not reconcile herself with her less prominent position in France. Though Queen dowager of England, Isabella was now mostly regarded as a mere Countess of La Marche and had to give precedence to other women.[13] In 1241, when Isabella and Hugh were summoned to the French court to swear fealty to King Louis IX of France's brother, Alphonse, who had been invested as Count of Poitou, their mother, the Queen Dowager Blanche openly snubbed her. This so infuriated Isabella, who had a deep-seated hatred of Blanche due to the latter having fervently supported the French invasion of England during the First Barons' War in May 1216, that she began to actively conspire against King Louis. Isabella and her husband, along with other disgruntled nobles, including her son-in-law Raymond VII of Toulouse, sought to create an English-backed confederacy which united the provinces of the south and west against the French king.[14] In 1244, after the confederacy had failed and Hugh had made peace with King Louis, two royal cooks were arrested for attempting to poison the King; upon questioning they confessed to having been in Isabella's pay.[15] Before Isabella could be taken into custody, she fled to Fontevraud Abbey, where she died on 4 June 1246.[16]

By her own prior arrangement, she was first buried in the Abbey's churchyard, as an act of repentance for her many misdeeds. On a visit to Fontevraud, her son King Henry III of England was shocked to find her buried outside the Abbey and ordered her immediately moved inside. She was finally placed beside Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Afterwards, most of her many Lusignan children, having few prospects in France, set sail for England and the court of Henry, their half-brother.

Issue[edit] With King John of England: 5 children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including: King Henry III of England (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272). Married Eleanor of Provence, by whom he had issue, including his heir, King Edward I of England. Richard, Earl of Cornwall and King of the Romans (5 January 1209 – 2 April 1272). Married firstly Isabel Marshal, secondly Sanchia of Provence, and thirdly Beatrice of Falkenburg. Had issue. Joan (22 July 1210 – 1238), the wife of King Alexander II of Scotland. Her marriage was childless. Isabella (1214–1241), the wife of Emperor Frederick II, by whom she had issue. Eleanor (1215–1275), who would marry firstly William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke; and secondly Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, by whom she had issue. With Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche: nine children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including: Hugh XI of Lusignan (1221–1250), Count of La Marche and Count of Angoulême. Married Yolande de Dreux, Countess of Penthièvre and of Porhoet, by whom he had issue. Aymer of Lusignan (1222–1260), Bishop of Winchester Agnès de Lusignan (1223–1269). Married William II de Chauvigny (d. 1270), and had issue. Alice of Lusignan (1224 – 9 February 1256). Married John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey, by whom she had issue. Guy of Lusignan (c. 1225 – 1264), killed at the Battle of Lewes. (Tufton Beamish maintains that he escaped to France after the Battle of Lewes and died there in 1269). Geoffrey of Lusignan (c. 1226 – 1274). Married in 1259 Jeanne, Viscountess of Châtellerault, by whom he had issue. Isabella of Lusignan (c.1226/1227 14 January 1299). Married firstly before 1244 Maurice IV, seigneur de Craon (1224–1250),[17] by whom she had issue; she married secondly, Geoffrey de Rancon.[18] William of Lusignan (c. 1228 – 1296). 1st Earl of Pembroke. Married Joan de Munchensi, by whom he had issue. Marguerite de Lusignan (c. 1229 – 1288). Married firstly in 1243 Raymond VII of Toulouse; secondly c. 1246 Aimery IX de Thouars, Viscount of Thouars and had issue

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Isabelle d'Angoulême, Queen consort of England's Timeline

1188
1188
Angoulême, Charente, Poitou-Charentes, France
1200
August 24, 1200
Age 12
Salisbury, Wiltshire, , England
August 26, 1200
Age 12
Bordeaux, Gironde, France

Annulled on the grounds of consanguinity.

1207
October 1, 1207
Age 19
Winchester Castle, Winchester, Hampshire, England

Born in the old Anglo-Saxon city of Winchester (Hampshire).

1209
January 5, 1209
Age 21
Winchester Castle, Winchester, Hampshire, England
1210
July 22, 1210
Age 22
Coucy, Alsne, France
1214
1214
Age 26
Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England
1215
1215
Age 27
Winchester, Hampshire, England
1220
May 10, 1220
Age 32
England
1220
Age 32
Lusignan, Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France