Ivo de Taillebois, Sheriff of Lincoln, 1st Baron of Kendal

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Ivo FitzReinfrid de Taillebois, Earl of Holland, Sheriff of Lincoln, 1st Baron of Kendal

Also Known As: "Cut-bush", "Ives /Taillebois/", "Tailboys", "John Talbot", "Ivor Woodcutter", "Ivo Tallboys", "Ivo Lord Holland", "Ivo /De Tailbois/", "Baron of Kentdal", "Earl of Anjou /de Tailbois/", "Ivo de Taillebois; he is sometimes reported to have been born in England", "but this is..."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Cristot, Calvados, France or Taillebois, Normandy, France
Death: Died in Kendal, Cumbria, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Reinfrid de Taillebois, Prior of Whitby Abbey
Husband of Judith de Lens, Countess of Huntingdon; Gondreda de Tailbois, Countess of Wessex and Lucy Thoroldsdottir, Countess of Chester
Father of Waldef Tailboys; William De Tailbois; Christiana wife of Ketel; Beatrix de Taillebois, Heiress of Kendal; Eldred de Tailbois and 1 other
Half brother of Azeline de Beauchamp

Occupation: 1st Earl of Chester, The Earl of Holland, 1st Baron of Kentdale, Sieur, de Kendal, Sheriff, de Lincoln, de Bedford, 1st Baron of Kendal. On Falais roll as standard bearer at Hastings. Possible relative of William I, and Charlemagne., 1sdt Baron of Kendal
Managed by: Pam Wilson
Last Updated:

About Ivo de Taillebois, Sheriff of Lincoln, 1st Baron of Kendal

There is much confusion as to his identity--his parentage, especially. The following articles seem to indicate that he was NOT (1) the son of Foulques/Fulk, (2) the son of Richard de Roumare (his wife remarried into this family), He was most likely the son of Reinfrid of Taillebois of Normandy (c1220-1083), first prior of Whitby Abbey.

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posted by Dix Preston, 28 Nov 2005, on http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Soc/soc.genealogy.medieval/2005−11/msg01282.html:

IVO DE TAILLEBOIS: Ivo Taillebois, probably brother of Ralph Taillebois, a sheriff of Bedfordshire who was dead by 1086, was a prominent administrator throughout the reign of William I and well into that of William II. He appears to have been twice married since he was ancestor of the English family surnamed 'of Lancaster' or Taillebois who descended from the thegn Eldred, alive in 1086. In 1093 he can be seen to have had a daughter Beatrice, then married to Ribald of Richmond. She was dead in 1121, when Ivo's widow Lucy was married to her third husband. Lucy and Beatrice, probably widow of Eldred before marriage to Ribald, were contemporaries, so Lucy must have been Ivo's second wife. She was the daughter of Ivo's predecessor as sheriff of Lincoln, Turold, who was probably a Norman. Her mother undoubtedly had English ancestry since she was the daughter of William Malet, a sheriff of York who seems to have had English maternal antecedents.* Source: DOMESDAY DESCENDANTS; by K. S. B. Keats−Rohan, page 35

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from J. T. Holmes, http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps05/ps05_274.htm

Ivo was made a "Marcher Baron" by William II ("Rufus"), "enfeoffed...of the whole of Ewecross wapentake, the later lordship of Burton in Lonsdale, and of the later barony of Kendal along with the south-western portion of Cumberland which came to be described as the barony of Copeland." {-"The Northerners," J.C.Holye (Oxford: Clarendon, 1961), p.214. "The Rainsford Family," by Emily A. Buckland (Worcester: Phillips & Probert, Ltd., 1932-33), p. 38, gives a chart "compiled Nov. 1932 by Alfred Ransford" which "shews the ancestors of that historical person Ivo le-Tailibois, (who figures as the principal character in Charles Kingsley's famous novel, Hereward the Wake.')" - Ivo is said to have died in 1093 and his wife is Lucy (died 1138, "dau. of Thorold, Sheriff of Lincoln"; her 3rd husband is Ranulph, Earl of Chester, who died in 1129; here Ivo's father is given as Reinfrid, soldier and first prior of Whitby Abbey (b. ca. 1020, d. ca. 1083, bur. at Hackness, Yorkshire, son of Reinfrid Talibois of Normandy).}

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Ivo Taillebois From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ivo Taillebois (1036–1094) was a powerful Norman nobleman in 11th century England.

The name Taillebose or Taillebois, means "cut wood" in French, but the reasons for using this name are not known. There is a town named Taillebois in Lower Normandy for example, with which people using this surname may have been associated. It in the arrondisement of Argentan, and a noble French family who used this surname lived in the area. A note in the cartulary of La Trinite de Vendome mentions a copy of the grant of the church and patronage of Cristot by Ives Taillebois to the abbey. It should be mentioned that the placename may itself have been derived from a personal name. In any case this is what Hector de la Ferrière-Percy felt when writing his Histoire du Canton d'Athis, Orne, et de ses Communes (1858 p.297). According to him the Norman Taillebois family, who he believes to be that of Ivo in England, were based in Briouze, just to the south of Taillebois, from at least the 11th century. Because there was a Taillebois family in France, it is possible that the Taillebois individuals we find in England all arrived at different times and were perhaps only distantly related.

Other men using this name in England during this period include...

  1. Ralph Taillebois, Sheriff of Bedford who appears as a witness on one of Ivo’s charters and is widely thought to be a brother
  2. William Taillebois of Lincoln

Ivo was among the followers of Duke William of Normandy who invaded England in 1066. He shared in the distribution of lands among the Norman Barons, and received the lordship of Kendal as his allotment of the spoils. It consisted of a large portion of Northern Lancashire and Southern Westmorland.

His centre of power appears to have been in Lincolnshire. He married Lucy, probable daughter of Turold, Sheriff of Lincoln[1] and subsequently Countess of Chester, from whom he received all her ancient family domains, thus making him one of the most influential nobles in England in his day.

Ivo had one daughter at least, Beatrix, who married Ribald of Middleham and was probably his only legitimate child. According to the annalist Peter of Blois, Ivo and Lucy's "only daughter, who had been nobly espoused, died before her father; for that evil shoots should not fix deep roots in the world, the accursed lineage of that wicked man perished by the axe of the Almighty, which cut off all his issue." Peter did not like Ivo.

Ivo de Taillebois is also sometimes represented in modern texts as being a brother to Fulk, Count of Anjou, France[citation needed]. More contemporaneously, he was said to be an ancestor of William Lancaster who is one of the earliest known users of the surname Lancaster.

In fiction

Ivo Taillebois appears as a character in Charles Kingsley's novel on Hereward the Wake.

Sources

  1. ^ Keats-Rohan, Katharine S B. "Antecessor Noster: The Parentage of Countess Lucy made plain". Prosopon Newsletter Issue 2 (1995). http://users.ox.ac.uk/~prosop/prosopon/issue2-2.pdf. Retrieved on 2006-11-02.

______________________

A thoughtful discussion of the many conflicting interpretations of Ivo's ancestry over the years from John Stockman's family history site (contact information: J. E. STOCKMAN, Mill Creek, Washington United States; j.stockman@gte.net), February 2008 http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/t/o/John-E-Stockman/GENE9-0001.html

Ivo de Taillebois, The Earl of Holland and 1st Baron of Kentdale (now Kendal)

...A published history of Colonial families in America refers to Ivo's parentage in a passage relating to "Margaret Radcliffe, ...descended from William the Lion, King of Scotland, and Ivo de Taillebois, son of Fulke, Count of Anjou".[a] Assuming Ivo's birth date to be about 1036, Fulke III (970-1040), the 5th Count, lived too early to be Ivo's father, and Fulke IV (1043-1109), the 7th Count, lived too late. The only Count of Anjou, then, who could have been Ivo's father was the 6th Count, Geoffrey II Martel (1006-1061), but his name was not "Fulke". On the other hand, "An ancient pedigree of the House of Curwen" styles Ivo not as the son of Fulke, but as "the 'left-handed' (illegitimate) brother of Fulk/Foulque, Earl Anjou, King of Jerusalem".[b; aa; bb] However, the Fulke who became King of Jerusalem was Count Fulke V (1092-1143) of Anjou, and he was born too late to have been Ivo's half-brother. If the ancient pedigree is correct that Ivo was the bastard half-brother of Fulke, it would have to have been Fulke IV "Rechine" (1043-1109), the 7th Count of Anjou, whose life-span was contemporaneous with Ivo's....

Under the above construction, one of Ivo's parents would have been either Ermengarde (c.1018-1076), daughter of Fulke III, or her husband, Geoffrey, Count of Gatinais (c.1000-1046). Ivo's being styled "de Taillebois" rather than "de Gatinais" seems to argue against his having been the son of Geoffrey of Gatinais. The writer, therefore, accepts as most likely that Ivo was the issue of an out-of-wedlock union of Ermengarde and a man said to be Reinfred Taillebois, which would make Ivo the illegitimate half-brother of Fulke IV. ...

Ivo de Taillebois (literally translated, Ivor Woodcutter) was listed in the DOMESDAY BOOK of 1086-7, the detailed survey of landowners throughout England that was ordered by WILLIAM the Conqueror. Under the Barony of Kendal (then part of Yorkshire), the DOMESDAY BOOK included the following information:

"TALLBOYS, IVO Also called 'cut-bush'. Married Lucy. In charge of siege of Hereward the Wake at Ely, 1069. Steward to William II. Holdings in Lincs. and Norfolk."[e]

Speculation has abounded regarding the birth and death dates for Ivo, Lord Holland. While the year 1094 appears to be established as the date of his death,[f] a definite year for his birth has not been determined with certainty. The conjectured dates of birth range incredibly from 995 to 1075. One source states he was "born 995-1036 in York, England",[b]...

While one source states that "Ivo Taillebois died about 1097",[l] the year 1094 appears to be accepted by most as the actual date of Ivo's death. Ivo's age of 58 at the time of his death gives us a birth year of 1036, but the source and accuracy of this information are unknown to the writer. However, a determination of the weight to be given it may be aided by considering the dates of other major events and circumstances in his life. Available records disclose that in 1066 Ivo fought alongside WILLIAM the Conqueror in the Norman Conquest of England;[m] that in 1068 King WILLIAM granted to Ivo the family estates in Lincolnshire and/or Norfolk taken from the Saxon Hereward the Wake;[n] that in 1069-1071 Ivo was in charge of the siege of Hereward at Ely;[e; o] that Ivo, as Steward to King WILLIAM II,[e] was certainly living when that monarch ascended the throne in 1087; and that Ivo reportedly died in 1094. The dates and circumstances of these events, together with Ivo's mother's reported birth date of 1018, suggest that Ivo's birth must indeed have occurred in or about 1036, as at least several other researchers show.[k]

Like the date of Ivo's birth, the place of his birth has also been variously reported. One source claims that he was "born in Anjou or Normandy, France".[d] Another source states, when speaking of Kendal Castle, the home of the Barons of Kendal, that it "was probably constructed by the men of Ivo Taillebois (Ivor Woodcutter), from Caen in Normandy, who was one of [the] region's first barons".[p] As seen above, other researchers claim that he was born in England, either in Yorkshire[s] or in Spalding, Lincolnshire.[r] Although a Norman, Ivo could well have been born in England since there was much movement of people back and forth between France and England before the Conquest. In this regard, the following seems significant:

In 1001, near Ramsey Abbey in the County of Huntingdonshire, a skeleton was unearthed that was believed to be that of the legendary Persian bishop, St Ivo, who had settled in the fen-country of England. The Fens, which cover portions of Cambridgeshire, Lincolnshire, Huntingdonshire, and Norfolk, include the town of St Ives in Huntingdonshire, named after the saint and located eight miles southeast of Ramsey Abbey. That Ivo was named after St Ivo not long after the discovery of the saint's bones suggests that Ivo may in fact have born in the area, and that his birthplace therefore may indeed have been in Spalding, a Lincolnshire town twenty-two miles north of Ramsey Abbey and which, like the Abbey, is located in The Fens.

A composite picture of the life of Ivo, Lord Holland, can be drawn from various early sources, including mediæval manuscripts. One of these, DE GESTIS HERWARDI, or GESTA HEREWARDI, is believed to have been written before 1125 by a reputable monk-historian called Richard who was commissioned to do the work by an authority who may have been Hervey, the first Bishop of Ely (1107-1131).[q] In addition to giving other details about Ivo, this manuscript describes Ivo's support of Duke WILLIAM of Normandy in opposing the Englishman, Hereward the Wake, who took up arms to resist the confiscation of his lands by the French conquerors. The material in this manuscript was based upon Richard's interviews with companions of Hereward's who were still living. From this, and the other early sources, the following picture of Ivo de Taillebois can be gained:

It appears that Ivo began life as the bastard child of Ermengarde de Anjou.... Later, Ivo, then in France, "went to England in 1066"[d] at the time of the Norman Conquest, and was a companion in that year of Duke WILLIAM of Normandy at the Battle of Hastings.[r, m] Before sailing to England, WILLIAM and his knights heard Mass in the church at Dives-sur-Mer, Normandy, France, and a plaque there that lists WILLIAM's companions in the invasion includes "Ivo Taillebois".[m] Also listed on the plaque were "Guillaume [William] Taillebois", and "Raoul [Rolf] Taillebois", who were possibly sons but more probably brothers or other relatives of Ivo's.[m] The Battle Abbey Rolls also name "Ivo Taillebois" as one of WILLIAM's companions at the Battle of Hastings.[r] Finally, other companions of WILLIAM at the Conquest, significant because of Ivo's later marriage to Lucy, included Lucy's grandfather William Malet de Graville, his sons Gilbert de Malet and Robert Malet, and his brother (or another son?) Durand Malet.[r, m]

As one of WILLIAM's Commanders, Ivo would have been amongst the elite who provided WILLIAM with ships, horses, men, and supplies for the invasion of England, in return for which WILLIAM granted them English baronies and earldoms forcibly taken from conquered Saxon lords.[r] The Norman Conquest, estimated at 12,000-men strong, proved victorious at the Battle of Hastings. In that battle, and subsequently, Ivo appears to have served WILLIAM as a loyal and effective fighter. The following description of Ivo, probably fairly accurate, appeared in a 19th-century novel that was itself simply an expanded rewriting of the GESTA HEREWARDI:

"A proud man was Ivo de Tailleboise as he rode next morning out of Spalding Town with a hawk on his fist, hound at heel, and a dozen men-at-arms at his back. . . An adventurer from Anjou, brutal, ignorant, and profligate, low-born too . . . valiant he was, cunning, and skilled in war. Called 'thou old butcher' by King William, he and his group of Angevin [i.e., of Anjou] rutters had fought like tigers by William's side at Hastings".[s]

Following the Conquest, WILLIAM I, now King of all England, rewarded Ivo by making him the Earl of Holland in Lincolnshire.[b] Reportedly, WILLIAM also gave Ivo lands that had belonged to the Earl Ælfgar.[b] Later, Ivo was granted the Castle and Barony of Kentdale (now Kendal),[t] which had been held by the Englishman, Turold (Thorold) of Bucknall, Sheriff of Lincolnshire,[u; l] and which was located in that portion of Yorkshire that later became County Westmorland (now County Cumbria). One source states that "The barony and castle of Kendal, held by Turold, were granted by William I to Ivo de Taillebois."[u] However, another source states that "The earliest records show the Barony of Kentdale being granted to Ivo de Taillebois by William Rufus in 1087".[t] A third source gives further light on the matter:

"The two expeditions of William Rufus to York in 1091 and to Carlisle in 1092, were probably instrumental to the king's grant of all Kentdale, including Beetham and its members, to Ivo Taillebois, who appears to have obtained Kirkby Stephen also."[l]

This grant is disclosed in the documents relating to Ivo's alms gift of various parish churches to St Mary's Abbey, York.[l] It would appear likely that the original grant of the Barony to Ivo was made by WILLIAM the Conqueror, and an additional extensive grant of all the lands of Kentdale was later made to Ivo (between 1087 and 1091) by WILLIAM II Rufus.

Kendal Castle is thought to have been originally "a wooden motte-and-bailey structure [that] was built by the Normans sometime during the early 1100s", and "was probably constructed by the men of Ivo Taillebois (Ivor Woodcutter), from Caen in Normandy, who was one of [the] region's first barons. A more permanent, stone structure was put up later and new buildings were added at different periods during the castle's history."[p]...

The Lincolnshire lands given to Ivo by WILLIAM included the family estates at Bourne of the Saxon patriot, Hereward the Wake, as previously mentioned. Upon Hereward's return to Bourne in 1068, he became enraged when he found that his lands had been given to Ivo de Taillebois, and his brother's decapitated head had been impaled above the entrance. That very night, Hereward armed himself and slew fifteen Norman soldiers, impaling their heads in place of his brother's.[n] Hereward is renowned for his heroic achievements in resisting the encroachments of WILLIAM I as the latter sought to solidify his conquest of England. [q, o] In 1070, King WILLIAM appointed a Norman abbot for Peterborough Abbey in place of the Saxon Abbot Turold. At this, Hereward the Wake and his followers revolted against King WILLIAM, sacked Peterborough Abbey, and then fled to the Isle of Ely in Cambridgeshire, where a large number of refugees gathered round Hereward.[q] The following passage is from a 13th-century manuscript:

"AD 1071. The Earls Edwin, Morcar and Siward with Egelwin, Bishop of Durham, associated themselves with many thousand disaffected persons and rebels against William the First. . . . finally [they] seek a place of refuge in the Isle of Ely. There, under the leadership of Hereward the Wake, they make frequent sallies and do much damage . . ."[v]

The Isle of Ely had remained a "pocket of resistance"[n] as WILLIAM sought to complete his conquest of England. (Ely was at that time an "isle" of land on a hill surrounded by marshland.)

In 1071, King WILLIAM, with Ivo leading his army, besieged the Isle,[q] and in the course of the siege, Hereward shot an arrow through WILLIAM's shield, pinning it to his breast. Ivo is credited with having saved WILLIAM's life.[b] Later, Hereward, who had escaped capture during the siege,[o] was caught and placed in fetters in the custody of Robert de Horepol, at Bedford. A year later King WILLIAM was inclined to set Hereward free . .

"But the Earl de Warenne and Robert Malet and Ivo de Taillebois remained hostile to him, dissuading the king from setting him free from custody, declaring that it was because of him that the country was not pacified."[q]

At this, Hereward's warder, Robert de Horepol, exclaimed:

" 'Alas, alas! Soon now, through the machinations of Ivo de Taillebois, this man once renowned for hosts of soldiers and the leader and lord of so many very eminent men, is to be taken from here and delivered into the hands of a detestable man and sent to the castle of Rockingham'."[q]

Other accounts of Ivo also are not exactly superlative in their flattery. An early history spoke of accusations made by Ivo as having ruined Ulfketul, the Saxon Abbot of Croyland Abbey, so that Ingulphus could be installed in his place. Ingulphus, who had been secretary to WILLIAM the Conqueror, was an Englishman who had been bred in Normandy. Showing kindness to the ejected Ulfketul, Ingulphus said, "Seeing that this venerable person was worthy of all favor and filial love, and was distinguished for his most holy piety, I had him placed in his ancient [Abbot's] stall", after which Ingulphus considered himself sort of a sub-Abbot during the remainder of Ulfketul's lifetime.[w]

The common Saxon people over whom Ivo ruled in his Earldom seemingly had little love for their master whom they "supplicated as their lord on their bended knees" and who "tortured and harassed, worried and annoyed, incarcerated and tormented them".[w] The people were not the only recipients of Ivo's allegedly abusive treatment. It was said that Ivo

"would follow the various animals of the people of Croyland in the marshes with his dogs; drive them to a great distance, drown them in the lakes, mutilate some in the tail, others in the ear; while often, by breaking the feet and the legs of the beasts of burden, he would render them utterly useless".[w]

Such, at least, was the Englishmen's perception of Ivo, biased as it probably was.

Ivo, Lord Holland, apparently married twice. The above-mentioned ancient pedigree of the Curwen family states that he was "married to Gondreda, Countess of Warwick".[b; aa; bb] Presumably after Lady Gondreda's death, WILLIAM I, having granted to Ivo the Barony of Kentdale that previously had belonged to Turold of Bucknall, also gave Turold's daughter, Lucy, to Ivo as his second wife. At this, Ivo is said to have remarked, "I have her father's lands, why not have the daughter too?"[b]

The question arises as to who were the children of Ivo de Taillebois, and indeed whether he had any children at all. According to one source, Ivo never had issue:

"One of the earliest Barons of Kirkby Kendal in Westmorland was Ivo Taillebois who came with William the Conqueror, but had no children so his title and estates were left to his brother, Gerard".[x]

Another genealogist states that many researchers now believe that Ivo and Lucy Malet, who later became the Countess of Chester, did not have issue, but whether or not Ivo had children by Lady Gondreda is not mentioned.[y] According to the Oxford scholar Lady Katherine Keats-Rohan, Ivo and Lucy did, in fact, have issue, but apparently only one child, a daughter named Beatrice. This source states that

"the lordship of Spalding and other places in Lincolnshire were held after Ivo's death not by Beatrice, his direct heir and the daughter of his marriage to Lucy, but by the later husbands of Lucy".[z]

Two other sources name as Ivo's children Ælftred de Tailbois,[b; cc] "The Englishman", born in 1045,[d] and Lucy de Tailbois.[b; dd] Regarding Lucy de Taillebois, the first source states that "Lucia [Ivo's wife] had one child, a daughter named Lucia, who married twice", and the second source has the daughter Lucy de Taillebois marrying Ranulph de Meschines, her mother's third husband.[dd] Thus, it seems clear that the two Lucys were actually one and the same person, Ivo's wife. As for Ælftred de Taillebois, one source cites a published genealogy of the Southworth family according to which

"Lucy obtained the parental estates and married Yvon Taylboys, earl of Angiers in France, and baron of Kendal . . . [the Southworth genealogy] gives her no children by Taylboys, but mentions children by her second and third husbands . . . mentions a son, Eltret or Ughtud [i.e., Ælftred], living in 1106, as if he were the son of Yvon Taylboys. . . Documents . . confirm Eltret's or Ughtud's son was Ketel or Chetel, whose son was Gilbert, whose son was William FitzGilbert".[ee]

Ælftred, then would appear to be the son of Ivo by his first wife, Lady Gondreda. Ælftred's reported birthdate of 1045 is in conflict with a birthdate of 1036 for Ivo, which would make him aged nine in 1045. A reconciliation of the dates must remain unresolved at present. One further point: Some records also name as Ivo's son Nicholas FitzGilbert de Tailbois, born in "1097 or 1100", but he was more probably Ivo's great-grandson.[d] One further presumed relative of Ivo's, perhaps a sister, would appear to be Matilda Taillebois, born 1044 in Normandy, who married Hugh Beauchamp, born 1040 in Normandy,[dd] whose descendants became the Earls of Warwick.

Based on his extensive research and that of a professional genealogist, Charles Hampson concludes that Ivo was succeeded in the Barony of Kentdale

"by his son, Ælftred, called the Englishman, whose eldest son and subsequent successor was Gilbert de Furnesco. Gilbert by his wife Goditha had two sons. The elder was William de Lancaster and the younger Nicholas de Radeclive".[aa]

The writer accepts the descent given by Hampson, absent the discovery of contrary evidence. Further information regarding the life and death of Ivo, Lord Holland, has not been found. Whether or not he was as described by the novelist, "An adventurer from Anjou, brutal, ignorant, and profligate, low-born too . . . valiant he was, cunning, and skilled in war",[s] his place in the history of England is secure.

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From Andrew Lancaster's The de Lancasters of Westmorland

The known de Lancaster family connections at the peak of power in the early Middle Ages is as follows below. This attempts to summarize what we know of the original male-line ancestry. To compare to other summaries which may contain more information, see especially Steve Hissem's de Lancaster webpage, the "stirnet" Lancaster webpage, as well as the website of Paul Lawrence. Concerning the earliest ancestors of the de Lancasters, controversy continues. A useful starting point is the debate of November 2005 on the GEN-MEDIEVAL Rootsweb List.

Ivo de Taillebois (Ives “Cut-bush” in French), died in the 1090s and was of the time of King William the Conqueror and his son King William Rufus. He is said to have been an ancestor of the de Lancasters, though it does not appear possible that this was through an unbroken line of sons - as is sometimes asserted[1] - in any case not legitimate sons.

He was married to Lucy,who seems to have had both Anglo-Saxon and Norman noble blood from Lincolnshire, which was perhaps the area he most called home. He is often asserted to have had a connection with Anjou in France, rather than Normandy itself, perhaps because he or his family appear to have been benefactors of religious institutions there. He might certainly have had such connections to his fellow French warlords, but his name is chiefly remembered for his role in putting down important rebellions (such as in Durham and in the Fens were he fought Hereward the Wake). His real ancestry is not certain. While he played a role in managing operations in several parts of the country, especially Lincolnshire, Durham, the Fens, Kendal and Carlisle, it is most relevant to us here that it appears that the later Barony of Kendal was formed out of possessions put together under one lord for the first time by him, possibly as part of a quite deliberate policy of the King to establish a strong man near the tough Scottish border. There are many other speculations about the full extent of his rights and possessions, but the only certain ones in the northwest of England are Kirkby Stephen and Clapham in Yorkshire. It is very likely that he also played at least some role in administering the disputed lands closer to Scotland, such as Carlisle.

There were several de Taillebois men in England in Ivo's generation and they may have been related. Ralf de Taillebois, sheriff of Bedfordshire, appears as a witness on one of Ivo’s charters and is widely thought to be a brother. Ralf's family line, like Ivo's, "daughtered out". By the way, in French, his name appears as Raoul, and of course Ralph or Ralf is actually the same name as Randolph, which in Latin can appear as Radolfus for example.

The surname, which reappears in later generations in England, sounds like it is based on a nickname rather than a title, but there is a place called Taillebois in Lower Normandy (not Anjou), in the arrondisement of Argentan, and a noble French family who used this surname lived in the area. A note in the cartulary of La Trinite de Vendome mentions a copy of the grant of the church and patronage of Cristot by Ives Taillebois to the abbey. It should be mentioned that the placename may itself have been derived from a personal name. In any case this is what Hector de la Ferrière-Percy felt when writing his Histoire du Canton d'Athis, Orne, et de ses Communes (1858 p.297). According to him the Norman Taillebois family, who he believes to be that of Ivo in England, were based in Briouze, just to the south of Taillebois, from at least the 11th century. Because there was a Taillebois family in France, it is possible that the Taillebois individuals we find in England all arrived at different times and were perhaps only distantly related.

In any case after Ivo and Ralf, there is a long gap in the records for definite sightings in England of this family. While it is not clear how later families with this surname connect back to Ivo and/or the de Lancasters, there were some who were specifically in the area of Ivo's possessions in Cumbria, most strikingly a second Ivo de Tailboys, chamberlain of Robert de Veteripont. He possessed land in Cliburn, and the neighbouring parishes of Bampton and Askham, in Westmorland, and apparently through a marriage of about 1209, also Hepple, in Northumberland and Hurworth in Durham. His descendants came to hold land in Lincolnshire and play a role in English political life in a much different world than the first Ivo's. But what was the connection between the two Ivo's? Both the first Ivo, the more famous one, and his seeming brother Ralph were apparently succeeded by daughters, so who were the "new" Taillebois? Ragg was no doubt right to suggest that Ivo could very well have had illegitimate children. On the other hand, we know of one case where this surname was passed on by a daughter to her son...

Apart from this second Ivo's family, and that of the first Ivo's daughter (below), there are few hints of any Taillebois presence in Northern England during the 1100s and 1200s, between the two Ivos. We can only mention a few hints.

  • First, Ragg draws our attention to a citation by a historian named Hodgson, who on p.137 of a book called Westmorland apparently stated that a Thomas Tailbois had given the church of Shap to Shap Abbey.
  • Second, the powerful cleric, Aimeric Thebert, archdeacon of Carlisle from 1196, and apparently also an archdeacon in Durham, is often referred to as a Taillebois. I have not been able to find a source for this assertion.
  • A Walter Tailbois appears as a witness of a grant by William de Lancaster II to his illegitimate son Gilbert of land in Patterdale, which must have been before 1184. The time and place make this Walter a probable "antecessor," possibly father, to the second Ivo de Tailbois mentioned above. It is of course very interesting that he appears in an important Lancaster family transaction.
  • The de Lancaster family of Kendal

Beatrix de Taillebois, wife of Ribald of Middleham, was a daughter of Ivo de Taillebois, and probably his only child. According to the annalist Peter of Blois, Ivo and Lucy's "only daughter, who had been nobly espoused, died before her father; for that evil shoots should not fix deep roots in the world, the accursed lineage of that wicked man perished by the axe of the Almighty, which cut off all his issue." Peter did not like Ivo. What is important for us is that Ribald and Beatrix's son Ralf (or Randolph, Ranulph etc.) used the name Taillbois, and married a member of the de Brus family, later closely allied to the the de Lancasters. According to a pedigree appearing page 42 of Keats-Rohan's Domesday Descendants, and pointed out to me by Susan Johanson, there were other sons, Hervi, Rainald, William. Keats-Rohan's sources were apparently Rev, H. C. FitzHerbert, "An Original Pedigree of Tailbois and Neville" The Genealogist, ns iii (1886), 31 and Charles Clay (ed.), Early Yorkshire Charters, vol. 5 (Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1936) pp.298-315. These men would be about the same generation as Gilbert, the father of William de Lancaster discussed below. Concerning Clay, Rosie Bevan informed me that the four sons were mentioned in a charter of St Mary's York, dated between 1121 and 1130, but only Ralph was there named as a Taillebois. Concerning FitzHerbert Peter Stewart informed me that an old pedigree there gives all four brothers the name Taylboys. If this family is somehow the source of the second Ivo (of Cliburn and Hepple), then later Tailboys of England may have actually descended from Ribald of Middleton, who was apparently of Breton ancestry. His main heirs eventually took the surname Fitz Randolph. But there is no sign of any Gilbert, and Gilbert the father of William de Lancaster I (see below) must have been a contemporary of Ralf, Harvey, Rainald and William?

-----------------------------------------

a. George Norbury MacKenzie, ed., COLONIAL FAMILIES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, vol. V (1912; reprint Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1995) p. 492. b. Deborah Thornsbury Keser, in her Web site, THORNSBERRY GENEALOGY; Website: (http://www.aros.net/~deboraht/genealogy.htm). e. THE DOMESDAY BOOK: "Landowners"; URL: http://www.domesdaybook.co.uk/landowners.html. f. John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, THE OXFORD ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF THE BRITISH MONARCHY (Oxford, England, and New York : Oxford University Press, 1998); as cited in ROYAL ANCESTORS OF SOME LDS FAMILIES, by Michael L. Call, Chart 438; Web site: http://222.genpc.com/gen/gen_files/main.html. l. William Farrer Litt, RECORDS OF KENDALE, vol. 1, edited by John F. Curwen; published on the Internet at URL: http://edenlinks.rootsweb.com/lgp/RECORDS/FAR/INTRO. HTM. m. LIST OF KNIGHTS ACCOMPANYING WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR ON HIS INVASION OF ENGLAND, 1066, by Robert Bunker, Hong Kong; Website: http://www.geocities.com/blainenay/1066.htm. See also COMPANIONS OF DUKE WILLIAM AT HASTINGS; Website: http://www.genealogyweb.com/norman.htm; this list is "a combination of all the known Battell Abbey Rolls". n. CITY OF ELY Website; Web site telling of the City of Ely; URL: http://www.ely.org.uk/heros/Hereward1.html. o. "Famous Cambridgeshire Men and Women," in CAMBRIDGESHIRE GENEALOGY (An England GenWeb Project Website); http://www.rootsweb.com/~engcam/famspple.htm#hereward. p. "Kendal Castle" at KENDAL, CUMBRIA Web site; URL: http://www.argonet.co.uk/users/lakes/ken.html. q. DE GESTIS HERWARDI SAXONIS (or GESTA HEREWARDI), Peterborough Cathedral Manuscript 1, ff. 320-39; translated into modern English and published on the Internet as: Stephen Knight and Thomas H. Ohlgren, ed., HEREWARD THE WAKE (Kalamazoo, Mich.: Western Michigan University for TEAMS, 1997); URL: http://docserver.ub.rug.nl/camelot/teams/hereward.htm; originally published in ROBIN HOOD AND OTHER OUTLAW TALES. r. COMPANIONS OF DUKE WILLIAM AT HASTINGS, op. cit. s. Charles Kingsley, 1819-1875, HEREWARD THE WAKE : "LAST OF THE ENGLISH", 2 vols., with an introduction by Maurice Kingsley (1866; reprint New York: J.F. Taylor, 1898) vol. II, chap. XXI, p. 1; as cited in THORNSBERRY GENEALOGY, op. cit. t. A SHORT HISTORY OF KENDAL in the Website of The Glen Guest House, Oxenholme, Kendal, Cumbria (http://www.smoothhound.co.uk/hotels/glen2.html). Also see THE ENCYCLOPÆDIA BRITANNICA (Chicago: The Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 1966) vol. 13, p. 28. u. THE ENCYCLOPAEDIA BRITANNICA (Chicago: The Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc., 1966) vol. 13, p. 280: KENDAL, a market town and municipal borough in Westmorland, Eng., 22 mi. N. of Lancaster. v. Matthew Paris, CHRONICA MAJORS, compiled in the 13th century; as cited in "Famous Cambridgeshire Men and Women" in CAMBRIDGESHIRE GENEALOGY, An England GenWeb Project Website: http://www.rootsweb.com/~engcam/famspple.htm#hereward. w. Charles Knight (1791-1873), THE POPULAR HISTORY OF ENGLAND : AN ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF SOCIETY AND GOVERNMENT FROM THE EARLIEST PERIOD TO OUR OWN TIMES, vol. 1, From the invasion of Caesar to the end of the reign of Edward III (London: Bradbury and Evans, 1856) chaps. XIV, XV; Charles Knight Collection, Hallward Library, University of Nottingham Library; Website at URL: http://aleph.nottingham.ac.uk:4505/ALEPH. x. Melatiah Everett Dwight, THE KIRBYS OF NEW ENGLAND (New York: Trow Printing, 1898) p. 3; FHC microfilm #1429854, Item 8; quoted in ENGLAND, the Website of Betti Paull (effie@nut-n-but.net); URL: http://members.tripod.com/~adriannehopkins/england.htm. y. "More Ratcliff Branches" in LINNIE VANDERFORD POYNEER's Website; URL: http://www.geocities.com/linniev2/gp/ratcliff2.html. z. Katherine S.B. Keats-Rohan, "Antecessor Noster: The Parentage of Countess Lucy Made Plain" in PROSOPON: NEWSLETTER OF THE UNIT FOR PROSOPOGRAPHICAL RESEARCH, no. 2 (May 1995) © Linacre College, Oxford; Website: http://www.linacre.ox.ac.uk/research/prosop/PRSPN2.stm. aa. Charles P. Hampson, THE BOOK OF THE RADCLYFFES (Edinburgh: Privately printed by T. and A. Constable, Ltd., at the University Press, 1940) p. 297; regarding Ivo de Taillebois and his descendants, Hampson states, "VIDE [i.e., see] Kuerden's MSS. in Chetham's Library, Manchester". bb. CHETHAM'S LIBRARY (Web site: http://www.chethams.org.uk/); Chetham's library, Long Millgate, Manchester, M31SB, England; the Curwen pedigree will be found in the Library's MSS at: "C.6.1-3 KUERDEN, Richard (1623-90?) (1-2) 2 vols. of notes for the History of Lancashire. Proposed History by Richard Kuerden and Christopher Towneley (3) Index to the Chetham folio and quarto volumes by R.T. Hampson and W. Dobson 1850s". cc. SAHLIN : OUR FAMILY HISTORY; Web site of Ingvar Sahlin, Sweden (arkis@hem1.passagen.se), URL: http://www.gbrf.com/genealog4/sahlin/home.htm. dd. DESCENDANTS OF IVES TAILLEBOIS; Website of David Thaler, 10605, 171st Ct., NE, Redmond, Wa., 98052 (dthaler@microsoft.com); URL: http://www.armidalesoftware.com/issue/full/Thaler_AEX_main.html. ee. Samuel Gilbert Webber, A GENEALOGY OF THE SOUTHWORTHS (SOUTHARDS): DESCENDANTS OF CONSTANT SOUTHWORTH, WITH A SKETCH OF THE FAMILY IN ENGLAND (Boston: The Fort Hill Press, S. Usher, 1905) p. 432 (footnote); as cited in Frederick Lewis Weis, ANCESTRAL ROOTS OF CERTAIN AMERICAN COLONISTS WHO CAME TO AMERICA BEFORE 1700, 7th ed. (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., c1992) 34:24, 132A:26, 246B:25; and as quoted in the STEVENS/SOUTHWORTH/MEDIEVAL DATABASE Website: http://www.gendex.com/users/jast/index.html#Welcom. dd. World Family Tree, vol. 1, Pedigree #986; CD V701_01; (c) 1995 Broderbund Software, Inc.

--------------------

  • *Thornburgs in England
  • Selside Hall Pedigree of Thornburgs in England
    • Name Birth Spouse
  • 1. Ivo de Taillebois 1036 (Gondreda, Lucy)
  • 2. Eldred de Culwen 1055 (Adigitha)
  • 3. Ketel de Culwen 1074 (Christiana de Taillebois)
  • 4. Orm de Workington 1080 (Gunilda Dunbar)
  • 5. Robert Ormson 1122 (Christiana De Meynwarin)
  • 6. Walter de Thornburgh 1185 (Emma)
  • etc. ....
  • Note: Birth dates are approximate.
  • In summary, the above pedigree suggests that our Thornburghs were of European origin, first coming to England from France during the Norman Conquest in 1066. Following the conquest, a Norman bloodline united through marriage with the native Saxons and the Thornburgh lines were born. Normans are said to descend from Vikings (Norse) and Saxons descend from Germans. During the 11th through 16th Centuries Thornburghs lived in what is now Yorkshire, Lancashire, and Cumbria, England. Thornburgs in England married with prominent families in the region and allied with the Barony of Lancaster. However, beginning in generation 25 (17th Century), Thornburgs migrated first to Ireland and then to America over a period lasting four generations (25th – 28th) before settling in Randolph County, Indiana.
  • There can be found two dual lines of Thornburgs from England. Ketel de Taillebois (generation 3) may have married a 1st or 2nd cousin. Elena de Culwen is reported to descend from Eldred de Culwen and her marriage to William around the year 1300 forms the second dual line.
  • From: http://home.earthlink.net/~camp100/id6.html

-------------------------

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/t/o/John-E-Stockman/GENE9-0001.html

Ivo's parentage and ancestry has been the subject of many articles and conflicting theories. The consensus is the he was born in 1036, probably in Cristol, Calvados, France of scandalous parentage. It appears that Ivo began life as the out-of-wedlock child of Hermengarde of Anjou (1018-1076) a direct descendant of Charlemagne, Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire and a man said to be Reinfred Taillebois (the woodcutter. She was 18 at the time and had just married Geoffrey, Count of Gatinais (1004-1046), who was 14 years older than she. As a descendant of Charlemagne, Ivo would also then have descended from Charlemagne's forefathers who are documented back to Antenor, King of the Cimmerians, who in died about 443 BC!

http://www.wamss.com/andersonfamilytree/ivodetaillebois.aspx

--------------------

IVES TAILLEBOIS - Spalding, Lincolnshire. In Spalding (Spaldinge ) Ivo(Tailbois) had 4 ploughs in lordship; 40 villagers and 33 s mallholders who have 13 ploughs. A market, 40s; 6 fisheries, 30 s from salt -houses, 30s; a wood of alders, 8s. Value before 106 6 23 pounds 2 s.8d. ; now 30 pounds, Exactions 30 pounds.

1st Baron Kendall

Comte D'anjou

Emigration With William The Conqueror

--------------------

Ivo Taillebois was a Norman who became Sheriff of Lincolnshire as a result of the Norman Conquest of England.

Ivo was the brother of Ralph Taillebois, but the two of them were of unknown parentage.

Ivo was also called Yvo de Taillebois.

Ivo and his wife Lucy founded, or perhaps re-founded, a priory at Spalding subject to St Nicholas, Angers, in France.

Ivo was employed at the siege of Ely in 1071.

Ivo was a notable and ruthless royal official, active against both Hereward the Wake and Ralph of Gael. He took part in the settlement of the liberties of Ely circa 1080.

Ivo and Lucy made a grant to Saint-Nicholas d'Angers in 1083.

Ivo had custody of the lands of the see of Durham on the expulsion of the Bishop for taking the part of Duke Robert in 1088.

After his death, his fief passed to the heirs of Lucy's third husband, Ranulf I, Earl of Chester, and none of it passed to the heirs of his daughter Beatrice, wife of Ribald.

See "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p353.htm#i18786 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm )

  • --------------------

Ivo De TAILBOIS/TAILLEBOIS

Born: 1020 / 1040, Anjou or Normandy, France

Notes: Known as "Baron of Kendal", brother of the Earl of Anjou. Went to England in 1066. his wife Lucia was the daughter of Earl Aelfgar, who was the son of Godifu "Lady Godiva".

Father: Ferreol De GATINAIS

Mother: Ermengarde Comtesse d'Anjou

Married: Lucia MALET (dau. of Earl Aelfgar and grandau. of Gruffydd, King of Wales)

Children:

1. Lucia De TAILBOIS (C. Chester)

2. Nicholas FITZGILBERT

3. Aelftred De TAILBOIS

4. Adeliza De TAILBOIS

5. Beatrix De TAILBOIS

6. Christiana De TAILBOIS

Married 2: Judith De LENS (Countess of Boulogne) (b. ABT 1054 - d. AFT 1086) (dau. of Lambert de Boulogne, Comte de Lens, and Adeliza of Normandy) (w. of Waltheof, Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton)

Children:

7. William De TAILLEBOIS -------------------- •Name: Ivo Tallebois 1 •Sex: M •Birth: ABT 1016 2 •Death: UNKNOWN

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivo_de_Taillebois

Ivo de Taillebois, The Earl of Holland and 1st Baron of Kentdale (now Kendal. A published history of Colonial families in America refers to Ivo's parentage in a passage relating to "Margaret Radcliffe, dau. of Sir Edward Radcliffe, who d. 1520, cousin of Queen Katherine Parr, and descended from William the Lion, King of Scotland, and

Ivo de Taillebois, son of Fulke, Count of Anjou".[a]

Assuming Ivo's birth date to be about 1036, Fulke III (970-1040), the 5th Count, lived too early to be Ivo's father, and Fulke IV (1043-1109), the 7th Count, lived too late. The only Count of Anjou, then, who could have been Ivo's father was the 6th Count, Geoffrey II Martel (1006-1061), but his name was not "Fulke". On the other hand, "An ancient pedigree of the House of Curwen" styles Ivo not as the son of Fulke, but as "the 'left-handed' (illegitimate) brother of Fulk/Foulque, Earl Anjou, King of Jerusalem".[b; aa; bb] However, the Fulke who became King of Jerusalem was Count Fulke V (1092-1143) of Anjou, and he was born too late to have been Ivo's half-brother. If the ancient pedigree is correct that Ivo was the bastard half-brother of Fulke, it would have to have been Fulke IV "Rechine" (1043-1109), the 7th Count of Anjou, whose life-span was contemporaneous with Ivo's. (This same ancient pedigree records Ivo as being the common ancestor of both the Radclyffe and Curwen families,[b] which later intermarried with each other.) Under the above construction, one of Ivo's parents would have been either Ermengarde (c.1018-1076), daughter of Fulke III, or her husband, Geoffrey, Count of Gatinais (c.1000-1046). Ivo's being styled "de Taillebois" rather than "de Gatinais" seems to argue against his having been the son of Geoffrey of Gatinais. The writer, therefore, accepts as most likely that Ivo was the issue of an out-of-wedlock union of Ermengarde and a man said to be Reinfred Taillebois, which would make Ivo the illegitimate half-brother of Fulke IV.

Whatever the construction, a 1,980-page chart listing the descendants of the Emperor CHARLEMAGNE discloses that Ivo, as a member of the House of Anjou, was clearly a descendant of the Emperor CHARLEMAGNE (742-814).[c] As a descendant of CHARLEMAGNE, Ivo would then also descend from CHARLEMAGNE's forefathers who are documented back to ANTENOR, King of the Cimmerians, who died in about 443 B.C.!

(The historic province of Anjou, with its ancient capital of Angers, is now the Department of Maine-et-Loire. Fulke IV was the grandfather of Ivo's half-grandnephew, Geoffrey Plantagenet [1113-1151], Count of Anjou from 1129. Geoffrey married Princess Matilda, daughter of King HENRY I of England, and became the founder of the English royal dynasty of Plantagenet.)

Vhttp://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/t/o/John-E-Stockman/GENE9-0001.html

Official Father: Foulques III b: 21 JUN 967 in Anjou, France

Most likely the illegitimate son of Adelaide , of Vermandois, descended from Charlemage

Official Mother: Hildegarde Of Lotharingia b: ABT 984 in Anjou, France

Marriage 1 Lucia Of Mercia b: ABT 1040 Children 1. Adeliza Taillebois b: ABT 1067 2. Eldred b: ABT 1070

IVO DE2 TAILLEBOIS, THE EARL OF HOLLAND (REINFRED1)1,2,3 was born 1036 in either France (Caen in Normandy, or Anjou), or in England (Spalding, Lincolnshire, or Yorkshire)4,5,6,7, and died 1094 in England, probably in the Barony of Kendal (in what is now County Cumbria)8,9,10,11,12.

He married (1) LADYGONDREDA, COUNTESS OF WARWICK13. She was born about 1032 in England, and died Unknown. He married (2) LADYLUCY, COUNTESS OF CHESTER about 1076 in (Lincolnshire, England?), daughter of THOROLD/TUROLD, SHERIFF OF LINCOLN and [----?----] MALET. She was born about 1060 in England, perhaps in Alkborough, Lincolnshire14,15, and died 1136 in England (probably), and was buried in Spalding, Lincolnshire16.

Notes for IVO DE TAILLEBOIS, THE EARL OF HOLLAND: [The writer's thirtieth great grandfather.] Ivo de Taillebois, The Earl of Holland and 1st Baron of Kentdale (now Kendal), is the claimed Progenitor in England of our Radclyffe / Ratcliffe family. A published history of Colonial families in America refers to Ivo's parentage in a passage relating to "Margaret Radcliffe, dau. of Sir Edward Radcliffe, who d. 1520, cousin of Queen Katherine Parr, and descended from William the Lion, King of Scotland, and Ivo de Taillebois, son of Fulke, Count of Anjou".[a] Assuming Ivo's birth date to be about 1036, Fulke III (970-1040), the 5th Count, lived too early to be Ivo's father, and Fulke IV (1043-1109), the 7th Count, lived too late. The only Count of Anjou, then, who could have been Ivo's father was the 6th Count, Geoffrey II Martel (1006-1061), but his name was not "Fulke". On the other hand, "An ancient pedigree of the House of Curwen" styles Ivo not as the son of Fulke, but as "the 'left-handed' (illegitimate) brother of Fulk/Foulque, Earl Anjou, King of Jerusalem".[b; aa; bb] However, the Fulke who became King of Jerusalem was Count Fulke V (1092-1143) of Anjou, and he was born too late to have been Ivo's half-brother. If the ancient pedigree is correct that Ivo was the bastard half-brother of Fulke, it would have to have been Fulke IV "Rechine" (1043-1109), the 7th Count of Anjou, whose life-span was contemporaneous with Ivo's. (This same ancient pedigree records Ivo as being the common ancestor of both the Radclyffe and Curwen families,[b] which later intermarried with each other.) Under the above construction, one of Ivo's parents would have been either Ermengarde (c.1018-1076), daughter of Fulke III, or her husband, Geoffrey, Count of Gatinais (c.1000-1046). Ivo's being styled "de Taillebois" rather than "de Gatinais" seems to argue against his having been the son of Geoffrey of Gatinais. The writer, therefore, accepts as most likely that Ivo was the issue of an out-of-wedlock union of Ermengarde and a man said to be Reinfred Taillebois, which would make Ivo the illegitimate half-brother of Fulke IV.

Whatever the construction, a 1,980-page chart listing the descendants of the Emperor CHARLEMAGNE discloses that Ivo, as a member of the House of Anjou, was clearly a descendant of the Emperor CHARLEMAGNE (742-814).[c] As a descendant of CHARLEMAGNE, Ivo would then also descend from CHARLEMAGNE's forefathers who are documented back to ANTENOR, King of the Cimmerians, who died in about 443 B.C.!

(The historic province of Anjou, with its ancient capital of Angers, is now the Department of Maine-et-Loire. Fulke IV was the grandfather of Ivo's half-grandnephew, Geoffrey Plantagenet [1113-1151], Count of Anjou from 1129. Geoffrey married Princess Matilda, daughter of King HENRY I of England, and became the founder of the English royal dynasty of Plantagenet.)

It appears that Ivo began life as the bastard child of Ermengarde de Anjou, a direct descendant of CHARLEMAGNE. Later, Ivo, then in France, "went to England in 1066"[d] at the time of the Norman Conquest, and was a companion in that year of Duke WILLIAM of Normandy at the Battle of Hastings.[r, m] Before sailing to England, WILLIAM and his knights heard Mass in the church at Dives-sur-Mer, Normandy, France, and a plaque there that lists WILLIAM's companions in the invasion includes "Ivo Taillebois".[m] Also listed on the plaque were "Guillaume [William] Taillebois", and "Raoul [Rolf] Taillebois", who were possibly sons but more probably brothers or other relatives of Ivo's.[m] The Battle Abbey Rolls also name "Ivo Taillebois" as one of WILLIAM's companions at the Battle of Hastings.[r] (Battle Abbey, built by WILLIAM in 1094 near Hastings, Sussex, was named after the Battle of Hastings in 1066 which ensured WILLIAM the crown of England.) Finally, other companions of WILLIAM at the Conquest, significant because of Ivo's later marriage to Lucy, included Lucy's grandfather William Malet de Graville, his sons Gilbert de Malet and Robert Malet, and his brother (or another son?) Durand Malet.[r, m]

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/t/o/John-E-Stockman/GENE9-0001.html

"Descendants of Charlemagne des Francs, King" in BRUNER/NIX GENEALOGY, Web site of Elmer Gene Bruner (egbruner@prodigy.net), 6345 Fennwood Drive, Zachary, La., 70791: <http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/b/r/u/Elmer-G-Bruner/index.html>; p. 1,941.

It appears that Ivo began life as the out-of-wedlock child of Hermengarde of Anjou (1018-1076) (Ted's 30th Great Grandmother), a direct descendant of Charlemagne, Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire and a man said to be Reinfred Taillebois (the woodcutter) (Ted's 30th Great Grandfather). She was 18 at the time and had just married Geoffrey, Count of Gatinais (1004-1046), who was 14 years older than she. As a descendant of Charlemagne, Ivo would also then have descended from Charlemagne's forefathers who are documented back to Antenor, King of the Cimmerians, who in died about 443 BC! Now that's really a long way back.

Descendant of the Saxon Kings?

http://www.daltondatabank.org/Chronicles/RDaltonBook/15.htm#top

http://www.amjancestry.com/I01863.html

http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/2/25579.htm

  • --------------------

Sheriff of Lincolnshire

  • ________________

-------------------- View Post-em! Name: Ives (Ivo) de TAILLEBOIS , 1st Baron of Kendal 1 2 3 Sex: M ALIA: Ivo /Tailboys/ Birth: ABT 1036 in Cristot, Calvados, Normandy, France 4 Death: 1094 in Kendal, Westmorland, England 5 Note:

   Came with William the Conqueror. In 1092 (shortly before his death) William II Rufus drove the Scots from the Lake District and gave Kendal to Ivo de Taillebois, whose descendants maintained an interest in the town until the nineteenth century.
   No published source that I have gives parents for Ives/Ivo. World Connect/rootsweb was the source of Gatinais/Anjou as parents, and I have seen references in soc.genealogy.medieval as "of Anjou" which fits with his mother. The book "Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families" does give a reliable account of his origins in Cristot, Calvados,Normandy, although that is not where he was necessarily born, and he may have held other lands than just Cristot.
   ----------------------------------------------
   The following concerns Ivo's origins in Normandy, prior to the conquest:
   Taillebois.
   Cristot: Calvados, arr. Caen, cant. Tily-sur-Seulles.
   A note in the cartulary of La Trinite de Vendome mentions a copy of the grant of the church and patronage of Cristot by Ives Taillebois to the abbey. An account of Cristot is given in Beziers, "Diocese de Bayeux, vol ii, p. 192. [Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families]
   ----------------------------------------------
   The following is a post to SGM, 22 Oct 2001, by Rosie Bevan (gives details of Ivo's claim to Kendal):
   From: Rosie Bevan (cbevan AT paradise.net.nz)
   Subject: Taillebois [was Gundred de Warenne, Countess of Warwick)
   Newsgroups: soc.genealogy.medieval
   Date: 2001-10-22 17:57:13 PST
   Hi Todd
   Yes, I agree in the normal course of events, it was very unusual for a Norman to name a son by an English name. On the face of it, this family appears to have been a mix of Norman, Saxon and Scandinavian and blood. The barony of Kendal was granted to Ivo de Taillebois, who died about 1089, by William Rufus and during the reign of Henry I it passed to Ketel son of Eldred, lord of Workington. Ketel was followed by his son Gilbert and Gilbert by his son William of Lancaster. Dugdale in Monasticon [v.5, p.249] claims that William was called Taillebois and by permission from the king (Henry II) changed his name to Lancaster. [Sanders p.56]. Why he would need permission, I'm not sure. Ketel also had a son Orm which I think is also a Scandinavian name. I think it is important to remember that this was at the northern tip of the Norman empire in England where Norman influence and culture was not initially quite so important locally and the north of England has always had a different culture and perspective from the south. Cumberland was not even covered in the Domesday Book.
   Whether there is a genetic link between Ivo de Taillebois and Eldred is not absolutely clear but for Eldred to have been born to Ivo, he (Ivo) would have had to have married a very high status Saxon lady (his marriage to Countess Lucy was evidently contracted late in life). For Eldred to have had a son with a Norwegian name he would have had to have married a high status Norwegian lady. Ketel appears to have maried a Norman lady although Orm, Ketel's son, was reputedly married to Gunnild da. of Gospatric and granddaughter of Harold II. I am no expert on this period (and it probably shows) so would appreciate informed comment from someone who has studied
   this line.
   Cheers
   Rosie
   Note: I at one time had Eldred as son of Ivo de Taillebois, but have subsequently changed it based on later information to his son Ketel (Chetell) marrying a daughter of Ivo, thus explaining the relationship.
   -----------------------------------------------
   The following information on Ivo was supplied in a post-em by Curt Hofemann, curt_hofemann AT yahoo.com:
   Not much to hang your hat on, but...
   Ivo de Talboys. Also called 'cut-bush'. Married Lucy. In charge of siege of Hereward the Wake at Ely, 1069. Steward to William II. Holdings in Lincs. and Norfolk.
   [Ref: Domesday Online: http://www.domesdaybook.co.uk/index.html]
   The Lancasters are said to be descendants of Ivo de Taillebois and as William was governor of Lancaster Castle assumed the name accordingly. [Stemma Ivonis de Tayleboyse (ex registro S. Mar Ebor New Monast iii 553) Ivo is stated to have had issue Elthred, the father of Ketel, the father of Gilbert, father of Wm of Lancaster who married Gundreda Countess of Warwick. Ketellus filius Elredi was donor of various property to the Abbey of St Mary, York. [Ref: Rosie Bevan 21 Oct 2001 citing The Topographer and Genealogist 1846 p15] note: "is stated" is usually a subtle reference to a difference of opinion amongst scholars... Curt
   Regards,
   Curt

Father: Geoffroy II "Ferreol" Count of GATINAIS b: ABT 1000 in Chateau Landon, Seine-et-Marne, Ile-de-France, France Mother: Ermengarde d' ANJOU b: 1018 in Anjou/Pays-de-la-Loire, France

Marriage 1 Judith of LENS b: 1054 in Lens, Artois/Pas-de-Calais, France

   Married: AFT 1076 in 2nd husband

Children

   Has Children William de TAILLEBOIS , of Lancaster b: ABT 1077 in Lancaster, Lancashire, England
   Has Children Waltheof (Waldelf) de HEPPLE b: BEF 1086 in Hepple, Rothbury, Northumberland, England

Marriage 2 Lucy (Lucia) of MERCIA b: ABT 1070 in Crowland & Spalding, Lincolnshire, England

   Married: AFT 1086 in 1st husband 2nd wife 6

Children

   Has Children Christina de TAILLEBOIS b: AFT 1086 in Kendal, Westmorland, England
   Has Children Beatrice de TAILLEBOIS b: ABT 1090 in Taillebois, Orne, Normandy, France

Sources:

   Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
   Page: 95
   Text: Ivo Tailboys
   Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
   Page: 132a-26, 246b-25
   Text: 132a=Ives Taillebois, 246b=Ivo Taillebois
   Title: The Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families, by Lewis C Loyd, 1999
   Page: 100
   Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
   Page: Susan Shannon, 24 Jun 1996
   Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
   Page: BarBara J. Fricke, 29 Mar 1998
   Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
   Page: 246b-25
   Text: no date, 1st husband of Lucy 

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Ivo de Taillebois, Sheriff of Lincoln, 1st Baron of Kendal's Timeline

1036
1036
Cristot, Calvados, France or Taillebois, Normandy, France
1054
1054
Age 18
Taillebois, Normandie, West Francia (now France)
1055
1055
Age 19
Mercia, England
1086
1086
Age 50
Of, , Lincolnshire, England
1094
1094
Age 58
Kendal, Cumbria, England
1994
December 8, 1994
Age 58
1995
October 11, 1995
Age 58
????
????
????