Jörund Yngvasson, King of Uppsala

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Jörund Yngvasson (King in Sweden), King of Uppsala

Nicknames: "Jørund Svitjord Yngvesson", "Jorund", "Eorund", "Jörundr", "Gjørund", "Jorund /Yngvisson/", "Jorund /Ynvasson/"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Uppsala, Västergötland, Sweden
Death: Died in Oddesund ved Limfjorden, Denmark
Immediate Family:

Son of Yngve Alreksson, King of Svitjod, Uppsala & Sweden
Husband of NN wife of Jörund Yngvisson
Father of Grytha Jørundsdatter, of Sweden and Aun "The Aged" Jorundsson King of Uppsala
Half brother of Eirik II Yngvasson and Ingibjorg Yngvasdotter

Occupation: King in Uppsala, King of Sweden, Konge, King of Uppsala, King of Upsala, Roi de Svitjod (Novgorod, Russie; Uppsala, Suède et Vingulmark Norvège), Konge i Norden, крал, King of Upsala, Konge in Uppsala, Swedish King of the House of Yngling.
Managed by: Jennie Jacobson
Last Updated:

About Jörund Yngvasson (King in Sweden), King of Uppsala

http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jorund Jorund eller Eorund var en sveakung av Ynglingaätten, enligt Heimskringla. Han var son till Yngve och hämnades sin far genom att dräpa Hake och återvann så den svenska tronen.

Jorund tillbringade somrarna med att plundra i grannländerna. En sommar befann han sig i Danmark och hade slagit läger i Oddasund. Han blev dock upptäckt av den norske kungen Gylaug vars far Jorund och hans bror Erik hade hängt.

Under striden upptäckte danerna vad som var på gång och anslöt sig från alla håll. Jorund blev tillfångatagen och hängd av Gylaug.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jorund Jorund or Jörundr (5th century) was a Swedish king of the House of Yngling. He was the son of Yngvi, and he had reclaimed the throne of Sweden for his dynasty from Haki (the brother of Hagbard, the hero of the legend of Hagbard and Signy, and it should be noted that Snorri cites two kennings from this legend Sigar's steed and Hagard's fell noose, when telling of Jorund).

Snorri Sturluson relates that when Jorund was young he used to travel the seas and plunder with his brother Erik, and they were great warriors. One summer they plundered in Denmark where they met another pillager, King Gudlög of Hålogaland (a province in Norway) with whom they fought. They took him prisoner and carried him ashore at Stromones where they hanged him. Gudlaug's surviving companions raised a mound over him there.

Snorri then cites the poem Háleygjatal by a Norwegian skald named Eyvindr skáldaspillir:

   En Guðlaugr
   grimman tamdi
   við ofrkapp
   austrkonunga
   Sigars jó,
   er synir Yngva
   menglötuð
   við meið reiddu.
   Og náreiðr
   á nesi drúpir
   vingameiðr,
   þar er víkur deilir,
   þar er fjölkunnt
   um fylkis hreyr
   steini merkt,
   Straumeyjarnes.[1][2]
   By the fierce East-kings' cruel pride,
   Gudlog must on the wild horse ride --
   The wildest horse you e'er did see:
   'Tis Sigur's steed – the gallows tree.
   At Stromones the tree did grow,
   Where Gudlog's corpse waves on the bough.
   A high stone stands on Stromo's heath,
   To tell the gallant hero's death.[3][4]

This act rendered the Swedish princes, Eric and Jorund, even more famous and they were thought of as even greater men. When they learnt that King Haki no longer had his forces around him, they decided to take care of their enemy. They assembled a large force that was joined by Swedes as they approached. They entered Mälaren (a bay at the time) and steered towards Uppsala. They left their ships at the Fyris Wolds and were met by Haki who had less men. Haki was a brutal fighter and managed to turn the tide of the battle. He slew Erik who held the banner and Jorund retreated with his men. Luckily, Haki had been seriously wounded and died.

Jorund then ruled Sweden at Uppsala, but he usually spent the summers pillaging. One summer, he plundered in Jutland and entered Limfjorden, where he continued the pillaging. They anchored in Oddesund (before a storm in 1825, it was near the innermost part of the fjord and almost 200 km from its mouth) but were discovered by the Norwegian pirate Gylaug of Hålogaland, the son of Gudlaug. Gylaug and his men attacked them and were joined by local forces who wanted revenge. As Jorund was vastly outnumbered (and had to run an almost 200 km long gauntlet to get out of the fjord), he lost the battle, and Gylaug had him hanged.

Snorri illustrates this event with the stanza from Ynglingatal:

   Varð Jörundr
   hinn er endr of dó,
   lífs of lattr
   í Limafirði,
   þá er hábrjóstr
   hörva Sleipnir
   bana Goðlaugs
   of bera skyldi;
   ok Hagbarðs
   hersa valdi
   höðnu leif
   at halsi gekk.[5][6]
   Jorund has travelled far and wide,
   But the same horse he must bestride
   On which he made brave Gudlog ride.
   He too must for a necklace wear
   Hagbert's fell noose in middle air.
   The army leader thus must ride
   On Horva's horse, at Lymfjord's side.[7][8]

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation, continuing after Yngvi (called Ingialdr):

Post hunc filius ejus Jorundr, qui cum Danos debellasset, ab eisdem suspensus in loco Oddasund in sinu quodam Daciæ, quem Limafiorth indiginæ appellant, male vitam finivit. Iste genuit Auchun (i.e. Aun) [...][9] After him his son Jorund ruled, who ended his days unhappily once he had fought a war against the Danes, who hanged him at Oddesund, on an arm of the sea in Denmark which the natives call Limfjorden. He became the father of Aukun, [...][10] The even earlier source Íslendingabók also cites the line of descent in Ynglingatal and it gives the same line of succession: xiiii Yngvi. xv Jörundr. xvi Aun inn gamli[11].

The Skjöldunga saga and the Bjarkarímur tell that Jorund was defeated by the Danish king Fróði (corresponds to the Heaðobard Froda in Beowulf), who made him a tributary and took his daughter. The daughter gave birth to Halfdan, but another woman became Fróði's legitimate wife and gave him an heir named Ingjaldr (corresponds to the Heaðobard Ingeld in Beowulf). Together with one of his earls, Swerting, Jorund conspired against Fróði and killed him during the blót. -------------------- Konge i Uppsala (Sverige) -------------------- Jorund or Jörundr (5th century) was a Swedish king of the House of Yngling. He was the son of Yngvi, and he had reclaimed the throne of Sweden for his dynasty from Haki (the brother of Hagbard, the hero of the legend of Hagbard and Signy, and Snorri cites two kennings from this legend Sigar's steed and Hagard's fell noose, when telling of Jorund).

Snorri Sturluson relates that when Jorund was young he used to travel the seas and plunder with his brother Erik, and they were great warriors. One summer they plundered in Denmark where they met another pillager, King Gudlög of Hålogaland (a province in Norway) with whom they fought. They took him prisoner and carried him ashore at Stromones where they hanged him. Gudlaug's surviving companions raised a mound over him there

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jorund -------------------- 28. JORUND, YNGVE'S SON.

Jorund, King Yngve's son, remained king at Upsal. He ruled the country; but was often in summer out on war expeditions. One summer he went with his forces to Denmark; and having plundered all around in Jutland, he went into Lymfjord in autumn, and marauded there also. While he was thus lying in Oddesund with his people, King Gylog of Halogaland, a son of King Gudlog, of whom mention is made before, came up with a great force, and gave battle to Jorund. When the country people saw this they swarmed from all parts towards the battle, in great ships and small; and Jorund was overpowered by the multitude, and his ships cleared of their men. He sprang overboard, but was made prisoner and carried to the land. Gylog ordered a gallows to be erected, led Jorund to it, and had him hanged there. So ended his life. Thjodolf talks of this event thus: --

"Jorund has travelled far and wide, But the same horse he must bestride On which he made brave Gudlog ride. He too must for a necklace wear Hagbert's fell noose in middle air. The army leader thus must ride On Horva's horse, at Lymfjord's side."

  • *******************

Events in the life of Jörundr Yngvesson

event 1 . ·a great warrior, like his brother Eric, and they bided their time in their warships during the reign of the usurper, Hake, who'd killed their cousin Hugleik, event 1 . ·became more celebrated by this deed, he and his brother, this killing of King Gudlog from Halogaland, and they appeared to be much greater men than before, and they steered for home, Sweden, and gathered together a strong force, for as soon as the Swedes heard that the Yngling brothers were come to them, they flocked to them in multitudes † death 1 . ·Though ruler of a country; he was often in the summer out on war expeditions. One summer he went with his forces to Denmark; and having plundered all around in Jutland, he went into Lymfjord in autumn, and marauded there also. While he was thus lying in Oddesund with his people, King Gylog of Halogaland, a son of King Gudlog, of whom mention is made before, came up with a great force, and gave battle to Jorund. When the country people saw this they swarmed from all parts towards the battle, in great ships and small; and Jorund was overpowered by the multitude, and his ships cleared of their men. He sprang overboard, but was made prisoner and carried to the land. Gylog ordered a gallows to be erected, led Jorund toit, and had him hanged there. So ended his life. Thjodolf talks of this event thus: -- "Jorund has travelled far and wide, But the same horse he must bestride On which he made brave Gudlog ride. He too must for a necklace wear Hagbert's fell noose in middle air. The army leader thus must ride On Horva's horse, at Lymfjord's side." event 1 . ·recovered the lands of his father from Hake, the usurper, -------------------- Jørund and his brother, Eric were very young when their father was killed, so their uncle Alf's son Hugleik ruled, reputed as not being a warrior and being quite greedy. Two sea king brothers, Hake and Hagbard, invaded Sweden and killed Hugleik, Hake ruled the Swedes.

Meanwhile, Yngvi's sons, Jørund and Eric, invaded Denmark, taking and hanging the king, Gudlog at Stromones. They went after Hake next, who killed Eric and cut the brother's banner in two at a great battle on the Fyrisvoid near Uppsala, Hake was wounded enough to have set his boat free with all his men and burned it, falling upon the flames to die. Jorund becmae the king at Uppsala.

Jørund would leave on expeditions to Denmark and Jutland. One year he was marauding at Lymfjord in the autumn when Gudlog's son, King Gylog of Halogaland, attacked, imprisoned and hanged Jørund.

Heimskringla, Ynglinga Saga, Section 25-28

Jørund or Eorund was a Swedish king of the House of Yngling. He was the son of Yngvi, and he had reclaimed the throne of Sweden for his dynasty from Haki (the brother of Hagbard, the hero of the legend of Hagbard and Signy, and it should be noted that Snorri cites two kennings from this legend Sigar's steed and Hagard's fell noose, when telling of Jorund).

Snorri Sturluson relates that when Jørund was young he used to travel the seas and plunder with his brother Erik, and they were great warriors. One summer they plundered in Denmark where they met another pillager, King Gudlög of Hålogaland (a province in Norway) with whom they fought. They took him prisoner and carried him ashore at Stromones where they hanged him. Gudlaug's surviving companions raised a mound over him there.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jorund

-------------------- 28. JORUND, YNGVE'S SON.

Jorund, King Yngve's son, remained king at Upsal. He ruled the country; but was often in summer out on war expeditions. One summer he went with his forces to Denmark; and having plundered all around in Jutland, he went into Lymfjord in autumn, and marauded there also. While he was thus lying in Oddesund with his people, King Gylog of Halogaland, a son of King Gudlog, of whom mention is made before, came up with a great force, and gave battle to Jorund. When the country people saw this they swarmed from all parts towards the battle, in great ships and small; and Jorund was overpowered by the multitude, and his ships cleared of their men. He sprang overboard, but was made prisoner and carried to the land. Gylog ordered a gallows to be erected, led Jorund to it, and had him hanged there. So ended his life. Thjodolf talks of this event thus: --

"Jorund has travelled far and wide, But the same horse he must bestride On which he made brave Gudlog ride. He too must for a necklace wear Hagbert's fell noose in middle air. The army leader thus must ride On Horva's horse, at Lymfjord's side."

  • *******************

Events in the life of Jörundr Yngvesson

event 1 . ·a great warrior, like his brother Eric, and they bided their time in their warships during the reign of the usurper, Hake, who'd killed their cousin Hugleik, event 1 . ·became more celebrated by this deed, he and his brother, this killing of King Gudlog from Halogaland, and they appeared to be much greater men than before, and they steered for home, Sweden, and gathered together a strong force, for as soon as the Swedes heard that the Yngling brothers were come to them, they flocked to them in multitudes † death 1 . ·Though ruler of a country; he was often in the summer out on war expeditions. One summer he went with his forces to Denmark; and having plundered all around in Jutland, he went into Lymfjord in autumn, and marauded there also. While he was thus lying in Oddesund with his people, King Gylog of Halogaland, a son of King Gudlog, of whom mention is made before, came up with a great force, and gave battle to Jorund. When the country people saw this they swarmed from all parts towards the battle, in great ships and small; and Jorund was overpowered by the multitude, and his ships cleared of their men. He sprang overboard, but was made prisoner and carried to the land. Gylog ordered a gallows to be erected, led Jorund toit, and had him hanged there. So ended his life. Thjodolf talks of this event thus: -- "Jorund has travelled far and wide, But the same horse he must bestride On which he made brave Gudlog ride. He too must for a necklace wear Hagbert's fell noose in middle air. The army leader thus must ride On Horva's horse, at Lymfjord's side." event 1 . ·recovered the lands of his father from Hake, the usurper, -------------------- Notes for Kong Jørund Yngveson Ble hengt av Kong Gylaug.

Jorund, som erholdt Styret over Sverige efterat hans Broder Erik var falden mod Hake, blev paa et af sine idelige Sjøtog angreben af den danske Kong Guløg og slagen i Jylland ved Uddesund i Liimfjorden, hvorved han selv blev fangen og hængt. -------------------- Yngvesønene Jorund/Jørund og Eirik var kongar av Ynglingeætta, søner av Yngve, den eine av Alrekssønene i følgje Snorre Sturlason. Dei var det tredje dømet på samkongar eller kongsbrør i Ynglingesoga.

Brørne var berre små då faren Yngve og bror hans drap kvarandre, og det var søskenbarnet Hugleik som rådde for Svitjod medan dei vaks opp. Soga fortel at brørne reiste tidleg på herferd og vart store sjøkongar, og herja mellom anna i Danmark. Her råka dei på ein Gudlaug, konge over håløygene, og dei tok på han og vann. Sidan vende dei seg til Svitjod, der ein dansk hovding, Hake, hadde teke makta og drepe Hugleik. Jorund og Eirik gjekk til slag mot Hake på Fyrisvollane, og Eirik vart drepen der. Hake fekk og banesår, og vart førd ut på sjøen i langskip, som sidan vart brend.

Jorund var sidan konge i Uppsala, og var på herferd om somrane, er det gjete. Han miste livet på Jylland, då kong Gylaug av Hålogaland, son av Gudlaug, vann over han, og Jorund vart hengd der. Jorund var far til Aun den gamle, som vart konge etter han.

Tjodolv frå Kvine fortel i Ynglingatal:

Då Jørund var feig i forne tid live han let i Limfjorden, då stry-hesten høg-bringa banen hans Gudlaug bera skulde og det harde reipe som Hagbard kvævde herse-hovdingen um halsen gjekk. Etter soga er Hake bror av Hagbard. I kvada som omtalar kong Jorund, er det mange tilvisingar til forteljinga om Hagbard og Signe (Hagbard vart og hengd).

Den eldste Noregshistoria [endre]

Historia Norvegiæ omtalar berre Jorund, ikkje Eirik. Her er dei søner av ein Ingjald (visseleg eit anna namn på Yngve). Denne framstillinga veit berre av at Jorund miste livet i kamp med danene, og vart hengd der. At det var ein håløyg-konge som valda dette, finst berre attgjeve hjå Snorre (som kan ha hatt andre kjelder).

Historisk fastsetjing [endre]

Forteljinga om Hugleik, Eirik og Jorund er knytt både til Hagbard og Signe-forteljinga, og til forteljinga om Starkad den gamle, ein av kjempene hans Hake. Samstundes er det mogleg at Hake er den same som Hoc Healfdene, nemnd i kvædet Béowulf. Har dette noko føre seg, kan ein datere hendingane i livet hans Jorund til første halvdel av 400-talet, ei tid då danene var på frammarsj og la under seg landa aust og vest for øyane dei opphavleg budde på, og slik kom i trette med sveane og jydane. Kjeldene er elles uklåre på kongsrekkja før Jorund, og mykje tyder på at Jorund kan reknast som byrjinga på historisk tid, sidan han og er son av ein Yngve (som er opphavsnamnet til heile slekta). Kongane før Jorund (unnateke sonen Aun), er skildra i meir mytisk/magiske vendingar.

Jorund og Eirik er og omtalt hjå Øyvind Skaldespillar. Dei er soleis måteleg namngjetne.

Henta frå «http://nn.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yngves%C3%B8nene»

-------------------- Noteringar Sveakonung under senare hälften av 400-talet med säte i G.a Uppsala. Son till Yngve. Om somrarna var han ute och härjade i grannländerna. En sommar var han och skövlade i Danmark. Han låg med sitt manskap i Oddasundet då Gylaug Hålögakonung kom med en väldig flotta. Jornund hade tidigare tillsammans med sin bror Erik hängt Gylaugs far Gudlaug. Det blev en stor strid och när landets folk fick reda på vem man stred emot kom de strömmande från alla hörn. Jorund blev infångad och ledd upp på land där kung Gylaug lät hänga honom. Troligen höglagd vid Limfjorden.

--------------------

 Jorund and brother Eirik killed King Guthlaug (Gudlagur) of Halogaland. He also killed King Haki of Sweden. Later he was captured by King Gyllaug of Halogaland and hanged.
   He and his brother Eric, the sons of Yngve, became famous by conquering the King Gudlaug of the Haleygians in Norway, whom they had met in Demnark. Met King Hake and his army af the Fyrisvols. In the battle, Eric was killed and Jorund fled to his ship. King Hake was himself so grievously wounded that he ordered a warship to be loaded with his dead men and their weapons, and himself placed on it. The sails were hoisted and the ship set on fire, and out it flew, with the dying king on board. Jorund now became king in Upsala. When he was maurauding in Jutland one summer, he met a son of King Gudlaug in battle and was overpowered, captured and hanged. [WBH - Sweden]
   FOSTER, MINOR, BURR, WAITE, NEWLIN LINES
   When Hake had ruled as king of Upsala for three years, Jorund and Eric, the sons of Yngve, returned with warships and warriors. They had grown up and become famous by conquering the king Gudlaug, of the Haleygians in Norway, whom they had met in Denmark. Now they met King Hake and his army at the Fyrisvols. In the battle Eric was killed and Jorund fled to his ship. But King Hake was himself so grievously wounded that he ordered a warship to be loaded with his dead men and their weapons, and himself to be placed upon it. The sails were hoisted and the ship set on fire, and out it flew, with the dying king on board, between the skerries to the sea. Jorund now became king in Upsala. When he was one summer marauding in Jutland, he met a son of King Gudlaug, in the battle with whom he was overpowered, captured and hanged. [History of Sweden, pp. 36-7]
  1. Reference Number: G6SZ-Q5

---

  1. Note: Heimskringla or The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway
  2. Note: The Ynglinga Saga, or The Story of the Yngling Family from Odin to Halfdan the Black
  3. Note: 28. JORUND, YNGVE'S SON.
   Jorund, King Yngve's son, remained king at Upsal. He ruled the country; but was often in summer out on war expeditions. One summer he went with his forces to Denmark; and having plundered all around in Jutland, he went into Lymfjord in autumn, and marauded there also. While he was thus lying in Oddesund with his people, King Gylog of Halogaland, a son of King Gudlog, of whom mention is made before, cameup with a great force, and gave battle to Jorund. When the country people saw this they swarmed from all parts towards the battle, in great ships and small; and Jorund was overpowered by the multitude, and his ships cleared of their men. He sprang overboard, but was made prisoner and carried to the land. Gylog ordered a gallows to be erected, led Jorund to it, and had him hanged there. So ended his life. Thjodolf talks of this event thus: --

"Jorund has travelled far and wide, But the same horse he must bestride On which he made brave Gudlog ride. He too must for a necklace wear Hagbert's fell noose in middle air. The army leader thus must ride On Horva's horse, at Lymfjord's side." -------------------- Jorund or Jörundr (5th century) was a Swedish king of the House of Yngling. He was the son of Yngvi, and he had reclaimed the throne of Sweden for his dynasty from Haki (the brother of Hagbard, the hero of the legend of Hagbard and Signy, and it should be noted that Snorri cites two kennings from this legend Sigar's steed and Hagard's fell noose, when telling of Jorund).

Snorri Sturluson relates that when Jorund was young he used to travel the seas and plunder with his brother Erik, and they were great warriors. One summer they plundered in Denmark where they met another pillager, King Gudlög of Hålogaland (a province in Norway) with whom they fought. They took him prisoner and carried him ashore at Stromones where they hanged him. Gudlaug's surviving companions raised a mound over him there.

This act rendered the Swedish princes, Eric and Jorund, even more famous and they were thought of as even greater men. When they learnt that King Haki no longer had his forces around him, they decided to take care of their enemy. They assembled a large force that was joined by Swedes as they approached. They entered Mälaren (a bay at the time) and steered towards Uppsala. They left their ships at the Fyris Wolds and were met by Haki who had less men. Haki was a brutal fighter and managed to turn the tide of the battle. He slew Erik who held the banner and Jorund retreated with his men. Luckily, Haki had been seriously wounded and died.

Jorund then ruled Sweden at Uppsala, but he usually spent the summers pillaging. One summer, he plundered in Jutland and entered Limfjorden, where he continued the pillaging. They anchored in Oddesund (before a storm in 1825, it was near the innermost part of the fjord and almost 200 km from its mouth) but were discovered by the Norwegian pirate Gylaug of Hålogaland, the son of Gudlaug. Gylaug and his men attacked them and were joined by local forces who wanted revenge. As Jorund was vastly outnumbered (and had to run an almost 200 km long gauntlet to get out of the fjord), he lost the battle, and Gylaug had him hanged

After him his son Jorund ruled, who ended his days unhappily once he had fought a war against the Danes, who hanged him at Oddesund, on an arm of the sea in Denmark which the natives call Limfjorden. He became the father of Aukun -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jorund -------------------- Roi de Uppland -------------------- Jorund or Jörundr (5th century) was a Swedish king of the House of Yngling. He was the son of Yngvi, and he had reclaimed the throne of Sweden for his dynasty from Haki (the brother of Hagbard, the hero of the legend of Hagbard and Signy, and Snorri cites two kennings from this legend Sigar's steed and Hagard's fell noose, when telling of Jorund).

Snorri Sturluson relates that when Jorund was young he used to travel the seas and plunder with his brother Erik, and they were great warriors. One summer they plundered in Denmark where they met another pillager, King Gudlög of Hålogaland (a province in Norway) with whom they fought. They took him prisoner and carried him ashore at Stromones where they hanged him. Gudlaug's surviving companions raised a mound over him there.

Snorri then cites the poem Háleygjatal by a Norwegian skald named Eyvindr skáldaspillir:

En Guðlaugr

grimman tamdi

við ofrkapp

austrkonunga

Sigars jó,

er synir Yngva

menglötuð

við meið reiddu.

Og náreiðr

á nesi drúpir

vingameiðr,

þar er víkur deilir,

þar er fjölkunnt

um fylkis hreyr

steini merkt,

Straumeyjarnes.[1][2] By the fierce East-kings' cruel pride,

Gudlog must on the wild horse ride --

The wildest horse you e'er did see:

'Tis Sigur's steed – the gallows tree.

At Stromones the tree did grow,

Where Gudlog's corpse waves on the bough.

A high stone stands on Stromo's heath,

To tell the gallant hero's death.[3][4]

This act rendered the Swedish princes, Eric and Jorund, even more famous and they were thought of as even greater men. When they learnt that King Haki no longer had his forces around him, they decided to take care of their enemy. They assembled a large force that was joined by Swedes as they approached. They entered Mälaren (a bay at the time) and steered towards Uppsala. They left their ships at the Fyris Wolds and were met by Haki who had less men. Haki was a brutal fighter and managed to turn the tide of the battle. He slew Erik who held the banner and Jorund retreated with his men. Luckily, Haki had been seriously wounded and died.

Jorund then ruled Sweden at Uppsala, but he usually spent the summers pillaging. One summer, he plundered in Jutland and entered Limfjorden, where he continued the pillaging. They anchored in Oddesund (before a storm in 1825, it was near the innermost part of the fjord and almost 200 km from its mouth) but were discovered by the Norwegian pirate Gylaug of Hålogaland, the son of Gudlaug. Gylaug and his men attacked them and were joined by local forces who wanted revenge. As Jorund was vastly outnumbered (and had to run an almost 200 km long gauntlet to get out of the fjord), he lost the battle, and Gylaug had him hanged.

Snorri illustrates this event with the stanza from Ynglingatal:

Varð Jörundr

hinn er endr of dó,

lífs of lattr

í Limafirði,

þá er hábrjóstr

hörva Sleipnir

bana Goðlaugs

of bera skyldi;

ok Hagbarðs

hersa valdi

höðnu leif

at halsi gekk.[2][5] Jorund has travelled far and wide,

But the same horse he must bestride

On which he made brave Gudlog ride.

He too must for a necklace wear

Hagbert's fell noose in middle air.

The army leader thus must ride

On Horva's horse, at Lymfjord's side.[3][4]

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation, continuing after Yngvi (called Ingialdr):

Post hunc filius ejus Jorundr, qui cum Danos debellasset, ab eisdem suspensus in loco Oddasund in sinu quodam Daciæ, quem Limafiorth indiginæ appellant, male vitam finivit. Iste genuit Auchun (i.e. Aun) [...][6]

After him his son Jorund ruled, who ended his days unhappily once he had fought a war against the Danes, who hanged him at Oddesund, on an arm of the sea in Denmark which the natives call Limfjorden. He became the father of Aukun, [...][7]
 

The even earlier source Íslendingabók also cites the line of descent in Ynglingatal and it gives the same line of succession: xiiii Yngvi. xv Jörundr. xvi Aun inn gamli.[8]

The Skjöldunga saga and the Bjarkarímur tell that Jorund was defeated by the Danish king Fróði (corresponds to the Heaðobard Froda in Beowulf), who made him a tributary and took his daughter. The daughter gave birth to Halfdan, but another woman became Fróði's legitimate wife and gave him an heir named Ingjaldr (corresponds to the Heaðobard Ingeld in Beowulf). Together with one of his earls, Swerting, Jorund conspired against Fróði and killed him during the blót.

[edit] Notes

1.^ Háleygjatal

2.^ a b Ynglinga saga at Norrøne Tekster og Kvad

3.^ a b Laing's translation at the Internet Sacred Text Archive

4.^ a b Laing's translation at Northvegr

5.^ A second online presentation of Ynglingatal

6.^ Storm, Gustav (editor) (1880). Monumenta historica Norwegiæ: Latinske kildeskrifter til Norges historie i middelalderen, Monumenta Historica Norwegiae (Kristiania: Brøgger), pp. 99-100.

7.^ Ekrem, Inger (editor), Lars Boje Mortensen (editor) and Peter Fisher (translator) (2003). Historia Norwegie. Museum Tusculanum Press. ISBN 8772898135, p. 77.

8.^ Guðni Jónsson's edition of Íslendingabók

[edit] Primary sources

Ynglingatal

Ynglinga saga (part of the Heimskringla)

Historia Norwegiae

Skjöldunga saga

Bjarkarímur

[edit] Secondary sources

Nerman, B. Det svenska rikets uppkomst. Stockholm, 1925.

-------------------- http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jorund Jorund eller Eorund var en sveakung av Ynglingaätten, enligt Heimskringla. Han var son till Yngve och hämnades sin far genom att dräpa Hake och återvann så den svenska tronen.

Jorund tillbringade somrarna med att plundra i grannländerna. En sommar befann han sig i Danmark och hade slagit läger i Oddasund. Han blev dock upptäckt av den norske kungen Gylaug vars far Jorund och hans bror Erik hade hängt.

Under striden upptäckte danerna vad som var på gång och anslöt sig från alla håll. Jorund blev tillfångatagen och hängd av Gylaug.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jorund Jorund or Jörundr (5th century) was a Swedish king of the House of Yngling. He was the son of Yngvi, and he had reclaimed the throne of Sweden for his dynasty from Haki (the brother of Hagbard, the hero of the legend of Hagbard and Signy, and it should be noted that Snorri cites two kennings from this legend Sigar's steed and Hagard's fell noose, when telling of Jorund).

Snorri Sturluson relates that when Jorund was young he used to travel the seas and plunder with his brother Erik, and they were great warriors. One summer they plundered in Denmark where they met another pillager, King Gudlög of Hålogaland (a province in Norway) with whom they fought. They took him prisoner and carried him ashore at Stromones where they hanged him. Gudlaug's surviving companions raised a mound over him there.

Snorri then cites the poem Háleygjatal by a Norwegian skald named Eyvindr skáldaspillir:

  En Guðlaugr
  grimman tamdi
  við ofrkapp
  austrkonunga
  Sigars jó,
  er synir Yngva
  menglötuð
  við meið reiddu.
  Og náreiðr
  á nesi drúpir
  vingameiðr,
  þar er víkur deilir,
  þar er fjölkunnt
  um fylkis hreyr
  steini merkt,
  Straumeyjarnes.[1][2]
  By the fierce East-kings' cruel pride,
  Gudlog must on the wild horse ride --
  The wildest horse you e'er did see:
  'Tis Sigur's steed – the gallows tree.
  At Stromones the tree did grow,
  Where Gudlog's corpse waves on the bough.
  A high stone stands on Stromo's heath,
  To tell the gallant hero's death.[3][4]

This act rendered the Swedish princes, Eric and Jorund, even more famous and they were thought of as even greater men. When they learnt that King Haki no longer had his forces around him, they decided to take care of their enemy. They assembled a large force that was joined by Swedes as they approached. They entered Mälaren (a bay at the time) and steered towards Uppsala. They left their ships at the Fyris Wolds and were met by Haki who had less men. Haki was a brutal fighter and managed to turn the tide of the battle. He slew Erik who held the banner and Jorund retreated with his men. Luckily, Haki had been seriously wounded and died.

Jorund then ruled Sweden at Uppsala, but he usually spent the summers pillaging. One summer, he plundered in Jutland and entered Limfjorden, where he continued the pillaging. They anchored in Oddesund (before a storm in 1825, it was near the innermost part of the fjord and almost 200 km from its mouth) but were discovered by the Norwegian pirate Gylaug of Hålogaland, the son of Gudlaug. Gylaug and his men attacked them and were joined by local forces who wanted revenge. As Jorund was vastly outnumbered (and had to run an almost 200 km long gauntlet to get out of the fjord), he lost the battle, and Gylaug had him hanged.

Snorri illustrates this event with the stanza from Ynglingatal:

  Varð Jörundr
  hinn er endr of dó,
  lífs of lattr
  í Limafirði,
  þá er hábrjóstr
  hörva Sleipnir
  bana Goðlaugs
  of bera skyldi;
  ok Hagbarðs
  hersa valdi
  höðnu leif
  at halsi gekk.[5][6]
  Jorund has travelled far and wide,
  But the same horse he must bestride
  On which he made brave Gudlog ride.
  He too must for a necklace wear
  Hagbert's fell noose in middle air.
  The army leader thus must ride
  On Horva's horse, at Lymfjord's side.[7][8]

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation, continuing after Yngvi (called Ingialdr):

Post hunc filius ejus Jorundr, qui cum Danos debellasset, ab eisdem suspensus in loco Oddasund in sinu quodam Daciæ, quem Limafiorth indiginæ appellant, male vitam finivit. Iste genuit Auchun (i.e. Aun) [...][9] After him his son Jorund ruled, who ended his days unhappily once he had fought a war against the Danes, who hanged him at Oddesund, on an arm of the sea in Denmark which the natives call Limfjorden. He became the father of Aukun, [...][10] The even earlier source Íslendingabók also cites the line of descent in Ynglingatal and it gives the same line of succession: xiiii Yngvi. xv Jörundr. xvi Aun inn gamli[11].

The Skjöldunga saga and the Bjarkarímur tell that Jorund was defeated by the Danish king Fróði (corresponds to the Heaðobard Froda in Beowulf), who made him a tributary and took his daughter. The daughter gave birth to Halfdan, but another woman became Fróði's legitimate wife and gave him an heir named Ingjaldr (corresponds to the Heaðobard Ingeld in Beowulf). Together with one of his earls, Swerting, Jorund conspired against Fróði and killed him during the blót. -------------------- Konge i Uppsala (Sverige) -------------------- Jorund or Jörundr (5th century) was a Swedish king of the House of Yngling. He was the son of Yngvi, and he had reclaimed the throne of Sweden for his dynasty from Haki (the brother of Hagbard, the hero of the legend of Hagbard and Signy, and Snorri cites two kennings from this legend Sigar's steed and Hagard's fell noose, when telling of Jorund).

Snorri Sturluson relates that when Jorund was young he used to travel the seas and plunder with his brother Erik, and they were great warriors. One summer they plundered in Denmark where they met another pillager, King Gudlög of Hålogaland (a province in Norway) with whom they fought. They took him prisoner and carried him ashore at Stromones where they hanged him. Gudlaug's surviving companions raised a mound over him there

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jorund -------------------- 28. JORUND, YNGVE'S SON.

Jorund, King Yngve's son, remained king at Upsal. He ruled the country; but was often in summer out on war expeditions. One summer he went with his forces to Denmark; and having plundered all around in Jutland, he went into Lymfjord in autumn, and marauded there also. While he was thus lying in Oddesund with his people, King Gylog of Halogaland, a son of King Gudlog, of whom mention is made before, came up with a great force, and gave battle to Jorund. When the country people saw this they swarmed from all parts towards the battle, in great ships and small; and Jorund was overpowered by the multitude, and his ships cleared of their men. He sprang overboard, but was made prisoner and carried to the land. Gylog ordered a gallows to be erected, led Jorund to it, and had him hanged there. So ended his life. Thjodolf talks of this event thus: --

"Jorund has travelled far and wide, But the same horse he must bestride On which he made brave Gudlog ride. He too must for a necklace wear Hagbert's fell noose in middle air. The army leader thus must ride On Horva's horse, at Lymfjord's side."

   *******************

Events in the life of Jörundr Yngvesson

event 1 . ·a great warrior, like his brother Eric, and they bided their time in their warships during the reign of the usurper, Hake, who'd killed their cousin Hugleik, event 1 . ·became more celebrated by this deed, he and his brother, this killing of King Gudlog from Halogaland, and they appeared to be much greater men than before, and they steered for home, Sweden, and gathered together a strong force, for as soon as the Swedes heard that the Yngling brothers were come to them, they flocked to them in multitudes † death 1 . ·Though ruler of a country; he was often in the summer out on war expeditions. One summer he went with his forces to Denmark; and having plundered all around in Jutland, he went into Lymfjord in autumn, and marauded there also. While he was thus lying in Oddesund with his people, King Gylog of Halogaland, a son of King Gudlog, of whom mention is made before, came up with a great force, and gave battle to Jorund. When the country people saw this they swarmed from all parts towards the battle, in great ships and small; and Jorund was overpowered by the multitude, and his ships cleared of their men. He sprang overboard, but was made prisoner and carried to the land. Gylog ordered a gallows to be erected, led Jorund toit, and had him hanged there. So ended his life. Thjodolf talks of this event thus: -- "Jorund has travelled far and wide, But the same horse he must bestride On which he made brave Gudlog ride. He too must for a necklace wear Hagbert's fell noose in middle air. The army leader thus must ride On Horva's horse, at Lymfjord's side." event 1 . ·recovered the lands of his father from Hake, the usurper, -------------------- Jørund and his brother, Eric were very young when their father was killed, so their uncle Alf's son Hugleik ruled, reputed as not being a warrior and being quite greedy. Two sea king brothers, Hake and Hagbard, invaded Sweden and killed Hugleik, Hake ruled the Swedes.

Meanwhile, Yngvi's sons, Jørund and Eric, invaded Denmark, taking and hanging the king, Gudlog at Stromones. They went after Hake next, who killed Eric and cut the brother's banner in two at a great battle on the Fyrisvoid near Uppsala, Hake was wounded enough to have set his boat free with all his men and burned it, falling upon the flames to die. Jorund becmae the king at Uppsala.

Jørund would leave on expeditions to Denmark and Jutland. One year he was marauding at Lymfjord in the autumn when Gudlog's son, King Gylog of Halogaland, attacked, imprisoned and hanged Jørund.

Heimskringla, Ynglinga Saga, Section 25-28

Jørund or Eorund was a Swedish king of the House of Yngling. He was the son of Yngvi, and he had reclaimed the throne of Sweden for his dynasty from Haki (the brother of Hagbard, the hero of the legend of Hagbard and Signy, and it should be noted that Snorri cites two kennings from this legend Sigar's steed and Hagard's fell noose, when telling of Jorund).

Snorri Sturluson relates that when Jørund was young he used to travel the seas and plunder with his brother Erik, and they were great warriors. One summer they plundered in Denmark where they met another pillager, King Gudlög of Hålogaland (a province in Norway) with whom they fought. They took him prisoner and carried him ashore at Stromones where they hanged him. Gudlaug's surviving companions raised a mound over him there.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jorund

-------------------- 28. JORUND, YNGVE'S SON.

Jorund, King Yngve's son, remained king at Upsal. He ruled the country; but was often in summer out on war expeditions. One summer he went with his forces to Denmark; and having plundered all around in Jutland, he went into Lymfjord in autumn, and marauded there also. While he was thus lying in Oddesund with his people, King Gylog of Halogaland, a son of King Gudlog, of whom mention is made before, came up with a great force, and gave battle to Jorund. When the country people saw this they swarmed from all parts towards the battle, in great ships and small; and Jorund was overpowered by the multitude, and his ships cleared of their men. He sprang overboard, but was made prisoner and carried to the land. Gylog ordered a gallows to be erected, led Jorund to it, and had him hanged there. So ended his life. Thjodolf talks of this event thus: --

"Jorund has travelled far and wide, But the same horse he must bestride On which he made brave Gudlog ride. He too must for a necklace wear Hagbert's fell noose in middle air. The army leader thus must ride On Horva's horse, at Lymfjord's side."

   *******************

Events in the life of Jörundr Yngvesson

event 1 . ·a great warrior, like his brother Eric, and they bided their time in their warships during the reign of the usurper, Hake, who'd killed their cousin Hugleik, event 1 . ·became more celebrated by this deed, he and his brother, this killing of King Gudlog from Halogaland, and they appeared to be much greater men than before, and they steered for home, Sweden, and gathered together a strong force, for as soon as the Swedes heard that the Yngling brothers were come to them, they flocked to them in multitudes † death 1 . ·Though ruler of a country; he was often in the summer out on war expeditions. One summer he went with his forces to Denmark; and having plundered all around in Jutland, he went into Lymfjord in autumn, and marauded there also. While he was thus lying in Oddesund with his people, King Gylog of Halogaland, a son of King Gudlog, of whom mention is made before, came up with a great force, and gave battle to Jorund. When the country people saw this they swarmed from all parts towards the battle, in great ships and small; and Jorund was overpowered by the multitude, and his ships cleared of their men. He sprang overboard, but was made prisoner and carried to the land. Gylog ordered a gallows to be erected, led Jorund toit, and had him hanged there. So ended his life. Thjodolf talks of this event thus: -- "Jorund has travelled far and wide, But the same horse he must bestride On which he made brave Gudlog ride. He too must for a necklace wear Hagbert's fell noose in middle air. The army leader thus must ride On Horva's horse, at Lymfjord's side." event 1 . ·recovered the lands of his father from Hake, the usurper, -------------------- Notes for Kong Jørund Yngveson Ble hengt av Kong Gylaug.

Jorund, som erholdt Styret over Sverige efterat hans Broder Erik var falden mod Hake, blev paa et af sine idelige Sjøtog angreben af den danske Kong Guløg og slagen i Jylland ved Uddesund i Liimfjorden, hvorved han selv blev fangen og hængt. -------------------- Yngvesønene Jorund/Jørund og Eirik var kongar av Ynglingeætta, søner av Yngve, den eine av Alrekssønene i følgje Snorre Sturlason. Dei var det tredje dømet på samkongar eller kongsbrør i Ynglingesoga.

Brørne var berre små då faren Yngve og bror hans drap kvarandre, og det var søskenbarnet Hugleik som rådde for Svitjod medan dei vaks opp. Soga fortel at brørne reiste tidleg på herferd og vart store sjøkongar, og herja mellom anna i Danmark. Her råka dei på ein Gudlaug, konge over håløygene, og dei tok på han og vann. Sidan vende dei seg til Svitjod, der ein dansk hovding, Hake, hadde teke makta og drepe Hugleik. Jorund og Eirik gjekk til slag mot Hake på Fyrisvollane, og Eirik vart drepen der. Hake fekk og banesår, og vart førd ut på sjøen i langskip, som sidan vart brend.

Jorund var sidan konge i Uppsala, og var på herferd om somrane, er det gjete. Han miste livet på Jylland, då kong Gylaug av Hålogaland, son av Gudlaug, vann over han, og Jorund vart hengd der. Jorund var far til Aun den gamle, som vart konge etter han.

Tjodolv frå Kvine fortel i Ynglingatal:

Då Jørund var feig i forne tid live han let i Limfjorden, då stry-hesten høg-bringa banen hans Gudlaug bera skulde og det harde reipe som Hagbard kvævde herse-hovdingen um halsen gjekk. Etter soga er Hake bror av Hagbard. I kvada som omtalar kong Jorund, er det mange tilvisingar til forteljinga om Hagbard og Signe (Hagbard vart og hengd).

Den eldste Noregshistoria [endre]

Historia Norvegiæ omtalar berre Jorund, ikkje Eirik. Her er dei søner av ein Ingjald (visseleg eit anna namn på Yngve). Denne framstillinga veit berre av at Jorund miste livet i kamp med danene, og vart hengd der. At det var ein håløyg-konge som valda dette, finst berre attgjeve hjå Snorre (som kan ha hatt andre kjelder).

Historisk fastsetjing [endre]

Forteljinga om Hugleik, Eirik og Jorund er knytt både til Hagbard og Signe-forteljinga, og til forteljinga om Starkad den gamle, ein av kjempene hans Hake. Samstundes er det mogleg at Hake er den same som Hoc Healfdene, nemnd i kvædet Béowulf. Har dette noko føre seg, kan ein datere hendingane i livet hans Jorund til første halvdel av 400-talet, ei tid då danene var på frammarsj og la under seg landa aust og vest for øyane dei opphavleg budde på, og slik kom i trette med sveane og jydane. Kjeldene er elles uklåre på kongsrekkja før Jorund, og mykje tyder på at Jorund kan reknast som byrjinga på historisk tid, sidan han og er son av ein Yngve (som er opphavsnamnet til heile slekta). Kongane før Jorund (unnateke sonen Aun), er skildra i meir mytisk/magiske vendingar.

Jorund og Eirik er og omtalt hjå Øyvind Skaldespillar. Dei er soleis måteleg namngjetne.

Henta frå «http://nn.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yngves%C3%B8nene»

-------------------- Noteringar Sveakonung under senare hälften av 400-talet med säte i G.a Uppsala. Son till Yngve. Om somrarna var han ute och härjade i grannländerna. En sommar var han och skövlade i Danmark. Han låg med sitt manskap i Oddasundet då Gylaug Hålögakonung kom med en väldig flotta. Jornund hade tidigare tillsammans med sin bror Erik hängt Gylaugs far Gudlaug. Det blev en stor strid och när landets folk fick reda på vem man stred emot kom de strömmande från alla hörn. Jorund blev infångad och ledd upp på land där kung Gylaug lät hänga honom. Troligen höglagd vid Limfjorden.

--------------------

Jorund and brother Eirik killed King Guthlaug (Gudlagur) of Halogaland. He also killed King Haki of Sweden. Later he was captured by King Gyllaug of Halogaland and hanged.
  He and his brother Eric, the sons of Yngve, became famous by conquering the King Gudlaug of the Haleygians in Norway, whom they had met in Demnark. Met King Hake and his army af the Fyrisvols. In the battle, Eric was killed and Jorund fled to his ship. King Hake was himself so grievously wounded that he ordered a warship to be loaded with his dead men and their weapons, and himself placed on it. The sails were hoisted and the ship set on fire, and out it flew, with the dying king on board. Jorund now became king in Upsala. When he was maurauding in Jutland one summer, he met a son of King Gudlaug in battle and was overpowered, captured and hanged. [WBH - Sweden]
  FOSTER, MINOR, BURR, WAITE, NEWLIN LINES
  When Hake had ruled as king of Upsala for three years, Jorund and Eric, the sons of Yngve, returned with warships and warriors. They had grown up and become famous by conquering the king Gudlaug, of the Haleygians in Norway, whom they had met in Denmark. Now they met King Hake and his army at the Fyrisvols. In the battle Eric was killed and Jorund fled to his ship. But King Hake was himself so grievously wounded that he ordered a warship to be loaded with his dead men and their weapons, and himself to be placed upon it. The sails were hoisted and the ship set on fire, and out it flew, with the dying king on board, between the skerries to the sea. Jorund now became king in Upsala. When he was one summer marauding in Jutland, he met a son of King Gudlaug, in the battle with whom he was overpowered, captured and hanged. [History of Sweden, pp. 36-7]
   Reference Number: G6SZ-Q5

---

   Note: Heimskringla or The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway
   Note: The Ynglinga Saga, or The Story of the Yngling Family from Odin to Halfdan the Black
   Note: 28. JORUND, YNGVE'S SON.
  Jorund, King Yngve's son, remained king at Upsal. He ruled the country; but was often in summer out on war expeditions. One summer he went with his forces to Denmark; and having plundered all around in Jutland, he went into Lymfjord in autumn, and marauded there also. While he was thus lying in Oddesund with his people, King Gylog of Halogaland, a son of King Gudlog, of whom mention is made before, cameup with a great force, and gave battle to Jorund. When the country people saw this they swarmed from all parts towards the battle, in great ships and small; and Jorund was overpowered by the multitude, and his ships cleared of their men. He sprang overboard, but was made prisoner and carried to the land. Gylog ordered a gallows to be erected, led Jorund to it, and had him hanged there. So ended his life. Thjodolf talks of this event thus: --

"Jorund has travelled far and wide, But the same horse he must bestride On which he made brave Gudlog ride. He too must for a necklace wear Hagbert's fell noose in middle air. The army leader thus must ride On Horva's horse, at Lymfjord's side." -------------------- Jorund or Jörundr (5th century) was a Swedish king of the House of Yngling. He was the son of Yngvi, and he had reclaimed the throne of Sweden for his dynasty from Haki (the brother of Hagbard, the hero of the legend of Hagbard and Signy, and it should be noted that Snorri cites two kennings from this legend Sigar's steed and Hagard's fell noose, when telling of Jorund).

Snorri Sturluson relates that when Jorund was young he used to travel the seas and plunder with his brother Erik, and they were great warriors. One summer they plundered in Denmark where they met another pillager, King Gudlög of Hålogaland (a province in Norway) with whom they fought. They took him prisoner and carried him ashore at Stromones where they hanged him. Gudlaug's surviving companions raised a mound over him there.

This act rendered the Swedish princes, Eric and Jorund, even more famous and they were thought of as even greater men. When they learnt that King Haki no longer had his forces around him, they decided to take care of their enemy. They assembled a large force that was joined by Swedes as they approached. They entered Mälaren (a bay at the time) and steered towards Uppsala. They left their ships at the Fyris Wolds and were met by Haki who had less men. Haki was a brutal fighter and managed to turn the tide of the battle. He slew Erik who held the banner and Jorund retreated with his men. Luckily, Haki had been seriously wounded and died.

Jorund then ruled Sweden at Uppsala, but he usually spent the summers pillaging. One summer, he plundered in Jutland and entered Limfjorden, where he continued the pillaging. They anchored in Oddesund (before a storm in 1825, it was near the innermost part of the fjord and almost 200 km from its mouth) but were discovered by the Norwegian pirate Gylaug of Hålogaland, the son of Gudlaug. Gylaug and his men attacked them and were joined by local forces who wanted revenge. As Jorund was vastly outnumbered (and had to run an almost 200 km long gauntlet to get out of the fjord), he lost the battle, and Gylaug had him hanged

After him his son Jorund ruled, who ended his days unhappily once he had fought a war against the Danes, who hanged him at Oddesund, on an arm of the sea in Denmark which the natives call Limfjorden. He became the father of Aukun -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jorund -------------------- Jorund or Jörundr (5th century) was a Swedish king of the House of Yngling. He was the son of Yngvi, and he had reclaimed the throne of Sweden for his dynasty from Haki (the brother of Hagbard, the hero of the legend of Hagbard and Signy, and Snorri cites two kennings from this legend Sigar's steed and Hagard's fell noose, when telling of Jorund).

Snorri Sturluson relates that when Jorund was young he used to travel the seas and plunder with his brother Erik, and they were great warriors. One summer they plundered in Denmark where they met another pillager, King Gudlög of Hålogaland (a province in Norway) with whom they fought. They took him prisoner and carried him ashore at Stromones where they hanged him. Gudlaug's surviving companions raised a mound over him there.

Snorri then cites the poem Háleygjatal by a Norwegian skald named Eyvindr skáldaspillir:

   En Guðlaugr
   grimman tamdi
   við ofrkapp
   austrkonunga
   Sigars jó,
   er synir Yngva
   menglötuð
   við meið reiddu.
   Og náreiðr
   á nesi drúpir
   vingameiðr,
   þar er víkur deilir,
   þar er fjölkunnt
   um fylkis hreyr
   steini merkt,
   Straumeyjarnes.[1][2]

   By the fierce East-kings' cruel pride,
   Gudlog must on the wild horse ride --
   The wildest horse you e'er did see:
   'Tis Sigur's steed – the gallows tree.
   At Stromones the tree did grow,
   Where Gudlog's corpse waves on the bough.
   A high stone stands on Stromo's heath,
   To tell the gallant hero's death.[3][4]

This act rendered the Swedish princes, Eric and Jorund, even more famous and they were thought of as even greater men. When they learnt that King Haki no longer had his forces around him, they decided to take care of their enemy. They assembled a large force that was joined by Swedes as they approached. They entered Mälaren (a bay at the time) and steered towards Uppsala. They left their ships at the Fyris Wolds and were met by Haki who had less men. Haki was a brutal fighter and managed to turn the tide of the battle. He slew Erik who held the banner and Jorund retreated with his men. Luckily, Haki had been seriously wounded and died.

Jorund then ruled Sweden at Uppsala, but he usually spent the summers pillaging. One summer, he plundered in Jutland and entered Limfjorden, where he continued the pillaging. They anchored in Oddesund (before a storm in 1825, it was near the innermost part of the fjord and almost 200 km from its mouth) but were discovered by the Norwegian pirate Gylaug of Hålogaland, the son of Gudlaug. Gylaug and his men attacked them and were joined by local forces who wanted revenge. As Jorund was vastly outnumbered (and had to run an almost 200 km long gauntlet to get out of the fjord), he lost the battle, and Gylaug had him hanged.

Snorri illustrates this event with the stanza from Ynglingatal:

   Varð Jörundr
   hinn er endr of dó,
   lífs of lattr
   í Limafirði,
   þá er hábrjóstr
   hörva Sleipnir
   bana Goðlaugs
   of bera skyldi;
   ok Hagbarðs
   hersa valdi
   höðnu leif
   at halsi gekk.[2][5]

   Jorund has travelled far and wide,
   But the same horse he must bestride
   On which he made brave Gudlog ride.
   He too must for a necklace wear
   Hagbert's fell noose in middle air.
   The army leader thus must ride
   On Horva's horse, at Lymfjord's side.[3][4]

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation, continuing after Yngvi (called Ingialdr):

Post hunc filius ejus Jorundr, qui cum Danos debellasset, ab eisdem suspensus in loco Oddasund in sinu quodam Daciæ, quem Limafiorth indiginæ appellant, male vitam finivit. Iste genuit Auchun (i.e. Aun) [...][6]

After him his son Jorund ruled, who ended his days unhappily once he had fought a war against the Danes, who hanged him at Oddesund, on an arm of the sea in Denmark which the natives call Limfjorden. He became the father of Aukun, [...][7]

The even earlier source Íslendingabók also cites the line of descent in Ynglingatal and it gives the same line of succession: xiiii Yngvi. xv Jörundr. xvi Aun inn gamli.[8]

The Skjöldunga saga and the Bjarkarímur tell that Jorund was defeated by the Danish king Fróði (corresponds to the Heaðobard Froda in Beowulf), who made him a tributary and took his daughter. The daughter gave birth to Halfdan, but another woman became Fróði's legitimate wife and gave him an heir named Ingjaldr (corresponds to the Heaðobard Ingeld in Beowulf). Together with one of his earls, Swerting, Jorund conspired against Fróði and killed him during the blót. -------------------- 13. JORUND - King in Uppsala, Sweden from 302 until he was hanged in 312 A.D. He went on many expeditions, which suddenly ended when he was captured and hanged in 312. His son was:

14. AUN (ON OR ANE) THE OLD - King of Sweden until 380 A.D. -------------------- BIOGRAFI:

Jorund eller Eorund var en sveakung av Ynglingaätten, enligt Heimskringla. Han var son till Yngve och hämnades sin far genom att dräpa Hake och återvann så den svenska tronen.

Jorund tillbringade somrarna med att plundra i grannländerna. En sommar befann han sig i Danmark och hade slagit läger i Oddasund. Han blev dock upptäckt av den norske kungen Gylaug vars far Jorund och hans bror Erik hade hängt.

Under striden upptäckte danerna vad som var på gång och anslöt sig från alla håll. Jorund blev tillfångatagen och hängd av Gylaug.

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Jörund Yngvasson, King of Uppsala's Timeline

479
479
Denmark
487
487
Uppsala, Västergötland, Sweden
508
508
Age 21
Of, , , Sweden
509
509
Age 22
Sverige
548
548
Age 61
Oddesund ved Limfjorden, Denmark
1923
May 28, 1923
Age 61
May 28, 1923
Age 61
May 28, 1923
Age 61
1928
April 23, 1928
Age 61
April 23, 1928
Age 61