Jacob Gallman, Jr. (1674 - 1738)

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Birthplace: Mettmenstetten, Zurich, Switzerland
Death: Died in Lexington City, Lexington, South Carolina, USA
Managed by: Elizabeth Boyce Fortune
Last Updated:

About Jacob Gallman, Jr.

http://www.palmettoroots.org/Family_Gallman.html

The family of immigrant Jacob Gallman lived in Mettmenstetten, canton Zürich, Switzerland. In 1734, they joined a large emigration-party led by de-frocked pastor Moritz Göttschi, with the intent of settling in Carolina. Despite the disapproval of local authorities, and highly-negative press coverage, the group left Zürich on 4 October 1734; they soon discovered that Göttschi had not arranged for the boats to carry them down the Rhine from Basel. A group of 31, including the Gallman family, left the main group to go overland across France and make their own arrangements for getting to Carolina. The group that remained with Göttschi suffered further delays and unexpected expenses, finally arrived at Philadelphia—not Charleston—on 28 May 1735. Pastor Göttschi died on the day of arrival.

The breakaway group reached their intended destination of Carolina. They sailed from London on the ship William, Capt. William Vitery, and arrived in Charlestown on 7 February 1735, per Jacob Gallman’s letter of 1738 describing the trip. Like most Swiss, he used the new Gregorian calendar. The equivalent English date, under the old Julian calendar, was 27 January 1734. The journal of the Upper House of Assembly of the Province of Carolina records a resolution on 6 February 1734/5 to pay the passage of those new arrivals who could not afford the fare, and had not traveled as indentured servants. On the next day, the journal listed the 19 Swissers whose fares were to be covered, including 10 members of the Gallman party. The shipfare paid was £780, 10 shillings SC money, equivalent to five Guineas (£5, 5 shillings Sterling) per passenger. The immigrants were sent to settle the newly-opened interior country at Saxegotha (modern Lexington County, SC), location of an Indian trading-post and a small fort.

Some individual traders had established residence in the back-country before 1735, but this group of Swiss families was the first official colony of settlers in Orangeburgh District. A plat of 350 acres was surveyed for widower Jacob Colerman [sic], and six dependents on 2 February 1735/6, granted on 17 September 1736. Eldest son Hans Heinrich had a separate 50-acre tract surveyed on 7 February 1735/6 for “John Coleman”, granted on 16 September 1738.

Jakob Gallmann was christened on 23 August 1674 in Mettmenstetten, Zürich. He was the son of schoolmaster Hans Gallmann (1631-1725) and Elsbetha Dubbs (1648-1709). On 28 October 1696, he married Verena Staheli (Stähli) in Mettmenstetten, where all their children were born. He died in Saxegotha SC on 20 October 1738. -------------------- The family of immigrant Jacob Gallman lived in Mettmenstetten, canton Zürich, Switzerland. In 1734, they joined a large emigration-party led by de-frocked pastor Moritz Göttschi, with the intent of settling in Carolina. Despite the disapproval of local authorities, and highly-negative press coverage, the group left Zürich on 4 October 1734; they soon discovered that Göttschi had not arranged for the boats to carry them down the Rhine from Basel. A group of 31, including the Gallman family, left the main group to go overland across France and make their own arrangements for getting to Carolina. The group that remained with Göttschi suffered further delays and unexpected expenses, finally arrived at Philadelphia— not Charleston—on 28 May 1735. Pastor Göttschi died on the day of arrival.1

Most of the breakaway group reached their intended destination of Carolina. They arrived on the ship William on 7 February 1735, per Jacob Gallman’s letter of 1738 describing the trip. Like most Swiss, he used the new Gregorian calendar. The equivalent English date, under the old Julian calendar, was 28 January 1734. The journal of the Upper House of Assembly of the Province of Carolina records a resolution on 6 February 1734 to pay the passage of those new arrivals who could not afford the fare, and had not traveled as indentured servants. On the next day, the journal listed the 19 Swissers whose fares were to be covered, including the 10 members of the Gallman party. The immigrants were sent to settle the newly-opened interior country at Saxegotha (modern Lexington County, SC), location of an Indian trading-post and a small fort to protect the trade goods.

Some individual traders had established residence in the back-country before 1735, but this group of Swiss families was the first official colony of settlers in Orangeburgh District. A plat of 350 acres was surveyed for Jacob Colerman [sic], his wife, and the five youngest children on 2 February 1735/6, granted on 17 September 1736. Eldest son Hans Heinrich also had a separate 50-acre tract surveyed on 7 February 1735/6 for “John Coleman”, granted on 16 September 1738.3 The other members of Jacob Gallman’s party were daughter Anna and her husband Heinrich Buchman. Both became ill of a fever and died in September 1735, before there was time to survey any land for them.2

Jakob Gallmann was christened on 23 August 1674 in Mettmenstetten, Zürich. He was the son of schoolmaster Hans Gallmann (1651-1725) and Elsbetha Dubbs (1648-1709). On 28 October 1696, he married Verena Staheli (Stähli) in Mettmenstetten, where all their children were born. He died in Saxegotha SC on 20 October 1738.4

http://www.palmettoroots.org/Family_Gallman.html

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Jacob Gallman, Jr.'s Timeline

1674
August 23, 1674
Zurich, Switzerland
August 23, 1674
1696
October 10, 1696
Age 22
Mettmenstetten, Zurich, Switzerland
1697
August 24, 1697
Age 23
Zurich, Mettmenstetten, Switzerland
1698
October 28, 1698
Age 24
Zurich, Switzerland
1700
April 21, 1700
Age 25
Zurich, Mettmenstetten, Switzerland
April 21, 1700
Age 25
Zurich, Switzerland
1701
April 22, 1701
Age 26
Switzerland
1703
February 11, 1703
Age 28
Zurich, Switzerland
1704
August 31, 1704
Age 30
Zurich, Mettmenstetten, Switzerland