Jacob Jacques Bourgeois II

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Jacob (Jacques) Bourgeois, II

Also Known As: "Jaques", "Jacob"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Compviay en Brie, Champagne or LaFerte-Gaucher, France
Death: Died in Port Royal, Acadia, New Brunswick, Canada
Place of Burial: Port Royal, Acadia, Canada
Immediate Family:

Son of Nicolas-Jacques Bourgeois dit Grandjehan and Renee Desloges
Husband of Jeanne Bourgeois and Jeanne Trahan
Father of Marie Bourgeois; Jeanne Bourgeois; Charles Bourgeois I; Germaine Bourgeois; Marie Bourgeois and 5 others
Half brother of Marie Bourgeois; Barbara Bourgeois; Catherine Bourqueois; Simon Bourg and Robert Bourgeois

Occupation: Doctor, Military Surgeon. Patriarch of Bourgeois family in America, Founded Beaubassin, Surgeon, Docteur or Surgeon for the Gouv Charles Aulnay regime, In charge of shipping and trade in the Baie Française (Fundy), Surgeon / Chirurgien
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About Jacob Jacques Bourgeois II

NOTE: Paul Pierre Bourgeois and proven by Rene Perron of Sevres, France. There is a record of a Jacques Bourgeois (It is possible that Jacques Bourgeois is this person, but Stephen White says there is no proof ) was baptized on Jan 8, 1621, in the church of Saint Romain in La Ferte-Gaucher, north east of Paris. His father was said to be Nicolas Grandjehan and a Bourgeois woman whose name is left blank. She is said the widow of Grandjehan. The family is well known in this town. The woman's name is Marguerite. The Grand Jeahan-Bourgeois family has various alliances with the Order of Malta, the medical society, and even the court of France. His mother was Marguerite Bourgeois. The father is unknown. Marguerite was married to Nicholas Grandjehan, but Nicholas died some time before Jacques was born. Speculation is that Jacques was therefore illegitimate and thus kept his mother's name. His mother had 5 other children baptized in France. His was educated at the Commandery of Courtran where he left to serve in Acadia in 1642.

Nephew of the Commander (Germain DOUCET) of the garrison at Port Royal, Acadia

Founder of Beaubassin, Acadia

Had two daughters named Marie who lived to adulthood and married

Immigration: 1641 From France to Acadia on ship "St Fraçois"

Alternate DOD AFT 1707 He is listed as the "living" parent of Marguerite on her marriage in Jan 1707

Patriarch of Bourgeois family in America --------------------

The distinguished colonist had settled at Port-Royal again before 1699; he died there, an octogenarian, in 1701. The family name was perpetuated by two of his three sons: Charles, born in 1646, who married Anne Dugas in 1668; and Germain, born about 1650, who married his first wife, Marguerite Belliveau, in 1673 and his second wife, Madeleine Dugas, in 1682; the third son, Guillaume, left only a daughter --------------------

Note: Jacques Jacob Bourgeois (Acadian Descendents, Vol 1, by Janet Jehen ) arrived in Port Royal in about 1640. He was a master surgeon to Sier d'Aulnay. In about 1672 he began an agricultural development which became Beaubassin and set up a flour mill there. Before leaving France, Bourgeois had entered the medical profession. He came to Port Royal in 1642 with 18 families that Governor Menou D'aunlnay brought with him on one of his voyages. Bourgeois' father also named Jacques, was an army officer at Port Royal and the brother in law of Germain Doucet, Sieur de La Verdure, Aulnay's Assistant. While Jacques Sr. was returned to France, his son remarried in Acadia where he became the ancestor of a large number of descendants, In 1643 he married Jean Trahan, Guillaume Trahan's dauighter, who was born in France in 1631; they had 10 children; seven girls and three boys. At Port Royal, Jacques became a farmer and shipbuilder. He traded with the Bostonians, particularly with John Nelson and William Phipps; he learned their language, and was the interpreter for the French in their dealings with the English. In 1672 he sold part of his holdings in Port Royal in order to settle, with his sons Charles and Germain and two of lhis sons-in-law, in Chigneto Basin, thus becoming the first promoter of settlement in this region; he built a flour mill and a saw mill there. A few years later, in 1676, the region was made into a Seigneury, the holder of which Michel Leneuf de la Valliere (the elder), a nobleman born at Trois-Rivieres; in the fief, 100 square leagues in extent, was named Beaubassin. As La Valliere brought in settlers and indentured employees from Canada, two distinct establishments adjourned each other at Beaubassin, but a clause in the title to the land grant protected the interests of Jacques Bourgeois and the other Acadian settlers established on the domain; it was not long before the two elements of the population merged into one......

   The parents of Pierre Cyr: Pierre Cyr and Marie Bourgeois who married Abt. 1670. He was born Abt. 1644 and died Abt 1679.
   Marie Bourgeois was born Abt. 1652 and died/buried 02 March 1740/41 and 03 March 1740/41 at Beaubassin, Acadia.
   Source: Dictionnaire Généalogique des Familles Acadiennes by Stephen A. White, page 433 1.
   This Pierre's parents are unknown.
   Marie Bourgeois' parents: JACQUES DIT JACOB BOURGEOIS and JEANNE TRAHAN who married Abt. 1643. Jacques was born Abt. 1619 and died in 1701 in Port-Royal, Acadia. Jeanne was born Abt. 1629.
   Source: Dictionnaire Généalogique des Familles Acadiennes by Stephen A. White English Supplement p 57
   -------

BOURGEOIS, Jacques

The Bourgeois ancestors of Acadia go back to one person. Their ancestor Jacques, born in France abt 1619, arrived in the colony as a surgeon abt 1641 on the ship Le Francois. About two years later, he married Jeanne Trahan, daughter of Guillaume Trahan and Françoise Corbineau. He settled in Port-Royal. In 1672, he sent some settlers to Beaubassin and is thus considered the founder of that area. His son Charles, born abt 1646, married Anne Dugas, d/o Abraham Dugas and Marguerite Doucet abt 1668. Charles and Anne settled at Beaubassin. Charles Bourgeois son, born abt 1672, married abt 1692 to Marie Blanchard, d/o Guillaume Blanchard and Huguette Gougeon. Pierre Bourgeois, born abt 1699, was the second son of Charles and Marie. He married August 18, 1722 Marie-Françoise Cormier at Beaubassin. She was the d/o Pierre Cormier and Catherine LeBlanc. The sixth of their eight sons, Joseph Bourgeois dit Calotte, was born at Beaubassin on March 10, 1741. Abt 1764, he married Félicité Belliveau, daugther of Pierre Belliveau and Jeanne Gaudet. They settled at Pisiguit and then at Memramcook where Joseph died November 20, 1833.

   All of the other Bourgeois families of southeast New Brunswick, descend from Germain Bourgeois, second son of the first ancestor.
   Source: Thirty-Seven Families, 1994 by Stephen A. White
   Parents of Jacques are unknown.meanwhile, Jeanne Trahan was the daughter of GUILLAUME TRAHAN and FRANÇOISE CORBINEAU. They married 13 July 1627 at St-Étienne de Chinon.
   Source: Dictionnaire Généalogique des Familles Acadiennes by Stephen A. White, page 1536
   Guillaume was the son of NICOLAS TRAHAN and RENÉE DESLOGES. They married abt 1600.
   Nicolas Trahan was a farmer in St-Pierre de Montreauil-Bellay in Anjou, France.
   Source: Dictionnaire Généalogique des Familles Acadiennes by Stephen A. White, page 1535

-------------------- Jacques (or Jacques dit Jacob) Bourgeois, also known as Middle-Class Jacques, was born in Coupvrai-en-Brie, France on January 28, 1620 or 1621. He came to Acadia as a surgeon with Governor Charles D’Aulnay in 1642 in a fleet of four ships. About 1644 in Port Royal, Acadia, he married 14-year-old Jeanne Trahan , born in France in 1629. She had come to Acadia in 1632 with her father, who was an armorer, a maker of weapons and knives. Governor Charles D’Aulnay granted Jacques Bourgeois some land, so he became both a farmer and a surgeon. He also founded Beaubassin (now Amhearst), Acadia, for his children, but he may never have resided there himself. Jacques Bourgeois would later serve as lieutenant of the garrison at Port Royal under Germain Doucet , and he also found time to be a marine merchant, with boats operating up and down the coast. Jeanne Trahan died after 1686 in Acadia, and Jacques Bourgeois died in 1701 in Port Royal, Acadia. -------------------- http://larryvoyer.com/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I32319&tree=v7_28 http://larryvoyer.com/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I32321&tree=v7_28 -------------------- The family of Jacques ou Jacob BOURGEOIS and Jeanne TRAHAN [84316] BOURGEOIS, Jacques ou Jacob (..), surgeon (chirurgien), born 1621 (rec. 1671), 1619 (rec. 1686, rec. 1693) or 1616 (rec. 1698), died 1701 Port-Royal (Acadie)

  • married about 1643, from prob Port-Royal (Acadie)

TRAHAN, Jeanne (Guillaume & Françoise CORBINEAU [115976]), born about 1631 (rec. 1671), 1629 (rec. 1686, rec. 1693) or 1626 (rec. 1698) Chinon ? (Indre-et-Loire : 370072), France, died after census 1698 Beaubassin (Acadie)

     1) Jeanne
     2) Charles, ploughman (laboureur), born about 1646 (rec. 1671), died between census 1671 and census 1678, before 1679-04-26, married about 1668 Anne DUGAS
     3) Germain, born about 1650 (rec. 1671), 1652 (rec. 1686, rec. 1693), 1650 (rec. 1698) or 1649 (rec. 1699), died 1711, married about 1673 Madeleine BÉLIVEAU, married about 1682 Madeleine DUGAS
     4) Marie1, born about 1652/1653 (rec. 1671), 1652 (rec. 1686) or 1651 (rec. 1698), married about 1670 Pierre CYR, married Beaubassin (Acadie) 1680-06-09 Germain GIROUARD
     5) Guillaume, married after census 1686 Marie Anne D'APRENDESTEGUY
     6) Marguerite, born about 1658 (rec. 1671), 1660 (rec. 1693), 1658 (rec. 1698) or 1661 (rec. 1699), married about 1676 Jean BOUDREAU, married Beaubassin (Acadie) 1679-11-30 Emmanuel MIRANDE dit TAVARE, married Port-Royal (Acadie) 1707-01-12 Pierre MAISONNAT dit BAPTISTE
     7) Françoise, married about 1673 Claude DUGAS
     8) Anne, born about 1661 (rec. 1671, rec. 1686) or 1663 (rec. 1693), died 1747-12-28, buried 1747-12-29 Grand-Pré (Saint-Charles-des-Mines) (Acadie), married about 1678 René LEBLANC
     9) Marie2, married about 1681 Antoine LEBLANC
     10) Jeanne, married about 1689 Pierre le jeune COMEAU dit DES LOUPS-MARINS

Bibliographie : Dictionnaire généalogique des familles acadiennes (White); Mémoires (Société généalogique canadienne-française); http://www.umoncton.ca/etudeacadiennes/centre/cea.html; Rapport des Archives du Canada; Dictionnaire des Acadiens d'Archange Godbout; Dictionnaire généalogique de l'Ancienne Acadie; Recensements 1671 et 1686; Acadian Church Records; Microfilms Drouin; Déclarations de Belle-Île-en-Mer

http://www.francogene.com/quebec--genealogy/084/084316.php -------------------- Jacques dit Jacob Bourgeois, a surgeon recruited by d'Aulnay, was 23 when he arrived in the colony in 1642. He married Jeanne, oldest daughter of Guillaume Trahan, in 1643, the year after his arrival. Jeanne gave him 10 children, including three sons who established families of their own. Thirty years after he arrived at Port-Royal, Jacques, now a successful farmer and Indian trader as well as a surgeon, pioneered the major Acadian settlement at Beaubassin. -------------------- Before leaving France, Bourgeois had entered the medical profession. He came to Port-Royal in 1642 with 18 families that Gov. Menou d'Aulnay brought with him on one of his voyages, Bourgeois' father, also named Jacques, was an army officer at Port-Royal and the brother-in-law of Germaine Doucet, Sieur de La Verdure, Aulnay's assistant....

While Jacques senior was returned to France, his son remained in Acadia where he became the ancestor of a large number of descendants, In 1643 he had married Jeanne, Guillaume Trahan's daughter, who was born in France in 1631; they had ten children; seven girls and three boys.

At Port-Royal, Jacques became a farmer and shipbuilder. He traded with the Bostonians, particularly with John Nelson and William Phips; he learned their language, and was the interpreter for the French in their dealings with the English. In 1672 he sold part of his holdings at Port-Royal in order to settle, with his sons Charles and Germain, and two of his sons-in-law, in the Chigneto Basin, thus becoming the first promoter of settlement in this region; he built a flour mill and a saw mill there. A few years later, in 1676, the region was made into a Seigneury, the holder of which was Michel Leneuf de la Valliere (the elder), a nobleman born at Trois-Rivieres; the new fief, 100 square leagues in extent, was named Beaubassin. As LaValliere brought in settlers and indentured employees from Canada, two distinct establishments adjoined each other at Beaubassin; but a clause in the title to the land grant protected the interests of Jacques Bourgeois and the other Acadian settlers established on the domain; it was not long before the two elements of the population merged into one....

The distinguished colonist had settled at Port-Royal again before 1699; he died there, an octogenarian, in 1701. The family name was perpetuated by two of his three sons: Charles, born in 1646, who married Anne Dugas in 1668; and Germain, born about 1650, who married his first wife, Marguerite Belliveau, in 1673 and his second wife, Madeleine Dugas, in 1682; the third son, Guillaume, left only a daughter. -------------------- Notes for Jacques Jacob Bourgeois Jacques L'Heureux Says he was born in La-Feret-Gaucher, France. He might have learned the trade of surgeon in a commandery of the Order of Malta in nearby Coutrans By his own acct, Jacques Bourgeois, the pioneer of the Bourgeois family in Acadia, came to Acadia as a surgeon in 1642, during the governorship of Charles d'Aulnay (There are two databases containing the desc. of Nicolas and Marguerite. I. the L'Heureaux database which has 28,000 desc. and 2. the Jack Coffee database.) When Port Royal surrendered on August 6, 1654, Jacques was lieutenant of the small Acadian garrison. His name tops the 1671 census list where he is described as a surgeon. ( Judging from the extent of the cultivated acreage of his farm, in two different locations, and the number of cattle he owned, Bourgeois made a living from agriculture as much as from his profession. Its possible this means he had already begun his settlement at Beaubassin. Jacques was a jack-of-all-trades. he was equally at home as a carpenter, merchang and colonizer. it was he who established the colony of Beaubassin by settling his sons there as well as his sons-in-law, Pierre Cyr and Germain Girourd. When Beaubassin was granted to La Valliere as a seigniory in 1676, his patent letters stated he was not to interfere with the settlers established there. The little colony comprised the first European settlers in Chignecto and excepting the settlement at Baie des Vents, the first in the province of New Brunswick. His setttlement was made between 1671 & 1675 At Beaubassin, Jacques was involved in ship building and he also built a flour and saw mill. His knowledge of English allowed him to trade with the Boston merchants.

In 1671, Jacob Bourgeois, age 40 and his wife Jeanne Trahan were enumerated with children, Jeanne, 27; Charles, 25; Germain, 21; Marie, 19; Guillaume, 16; Marguerite, 13; Francois, 12; Anne, 10; Marie,7; Jeanne,4. 33 cattle, 23 sheep.

The majority of the member ofthe Bourgeois family living in Acadia in 1755 were deported to New England, especially to Mass, Connecticut and South Carolina . Unable to live as exiles among anglo-protestants, they took to the roads in order to come back to Canada and most of them settled in the Nicolet-Saint-Gregoire, Betancourt, L'Assomption and Saint-Jacques-de-l'Achigan areas. In New Brunswick, this family settled in the southern part of the province, especially at Memramcook and in Grande-Digue. The ancestor of the Bourgeois family of Memramcook and of Grande-Digue, Pierre-Benjamin was a grandson of Germain Bourgeois of Port Royal. He was married five times, but only the names of four of his wives are known: Cecile Aucoin, Anne LeBlanc, Anne Thebault and Anne Thibodeau. -------------------- Il est venu en Acadie en 1642 pour s'y établir et exercer la chirurgie. -------------------- AKAN: Jacques Bourgeois, Jacob En Acadie en 1672, comme chirurgien, sous le nom de Jacob, avec leur 10 enfants. Officier militaire de Couparau en Brie Champagne. Serait arrivé en Acadie sous D'Aulnay vers 1640 en qualité de chirurgien militaire. En 1698 à Beaubassin mais retourna à Port-Royal. En 1686, son plus jeune fils, Guillaume (21 ans) demeure avec lui à Port-Royal alors que ses deux autres fils, Charles et Germain sont installés à Beaubassin; ses filles sont mariées.

-------------------- Acadian Descendants, Vol I, by Janet Jehn

Before leaving France, Bourgeois had entered the medical profession. He came to Port-Royal in 1642 with 18 families that Gov. Menou d'Aulnay brought with him on one of his voyages, Bourgeois' father, also named Jacques, was an army officer at Port-Royal and the brother-in-law of Germaine Doucet, Sieur de La Verdure, Aulnay's assistant....

While Jacques senior was returned to France, his son remained in Acadia where he became the ancestor of a large number of descendants, In 1643 he had married Jeanne, Guillaume Trahan's daughter, who was born in France in 1631; they had ten children; seven girls and three boys.

At Port-Royal, Jacques became a farmer and shipbuilder. He traded with the Bostonians, particularly with John Nelson and William Phips; he learned their language, and was the interpreter for the French in their dealings with the English. In 1672 he sold part of his holdings at Port-Royal in order to settle, with his sons Charles and Germain, and two of his sons-in-law, in the Chigneto Basin, thus becoming the first promoter of settlement in this region; he built a flour mill and a saw mill there. A few years later, in 1676, the region was made into a Seigneury, the holder of which was Michel Leneuf de la Valliere (the elder), a nobleman born at Trois-Rivieres; the new fief, 100 square leagues in extent, was named Beaubassin. As LaValliere brought in settlers and indentured employees from Canada, two distinct establishments adjoined each other at Beaubassin; but a clause in the title to the land grant protected the interests of Jacques Bourgeois and the other Acadian settlers established on the domain; it was not long before the two elements of the population merged into one....

The distinguished colonist had settled at Port-Royal again before 1699; he died there, an octogenarian, in 1701. The family name was perpetuated by two of his three sons: Charles, born in 1646, who married Anne Dugas in 1668; and Germain, born about 1650, who married his first wife, Marguerite Belliveau, in 1673 and his second wife, Madeleine Dugas, in 1682; the third son, Guillaume, left only a daughter.

THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION JOURNAL fIen anb 1Bookh JACQUES BOURGEOIS. CHIRURGIEN. 1621-1701 A. C. JOST, M.D. It is supposed that Jacques Bourgeois was brought to Nova Scotia by D'Aulnay to attend to the medical and surgical needs of his colonists. With Bourgeois came his wife, Jeanne Trahan, the marriage having taken place but a short time before his arrival in Nova Scotia. It is thought that the year 1640 was -for him a notable one, it being not only the year of his marriage, but the year in which he first set foot in the young colony in which he played so prominent a part. If Rameau St. Pere is correct in his conclusions, he was one of a party of colonists, many of whom were closely connected by marriage; another prominent member of the little coterie was Ger- main Doucette de la Verdure, D'Aulnay's man of affairs, who after D'Aulnay's death became the protector of his children and his estate. Soon after his arrival in Port Royal, Bourgeois was able to obtain an interest in some land (L'Ile Aux Cochins) concerning which there was at a later date some litigation, though in the interval Bourgeois' holdings had been at least partially conveyed to another colonist. After D'Aulnay's death in 1650, the colony at Port Royal fell upon troublous times. In 1654, when Sedgewick was able to wrest the control of the little fort from Doucette, Bourgeois was delivered to Sedgewick as a hostage for the carrying out of the capitulatory agreement. After the terms of the convention had been met, and during the period of relative quiet which followed Jacques Bourgeois not only increased his holdings of land, but is said to have carried on considerable trading with the Indians and with the English colonists to the south, in vessels the construction of which he had himself over- seen. In 1671 he was one of the most prominent men in Port Royal. His family then consisted of his wife and ten children, and his agricultural holdings were among the most considerable of the colony. In addition to the home establish- ment under the protection of Port Royal he was about that time engaged in promoting the foundation of a commercial and farming enter- prise, which later became Beaubassin, one of the largest offshoots from the parent colony. In the development of this settlement he was very deeply interested, relinquishing for it to his sons his lands at Port Royal, and leading to it a number of Acadians, both relatives and friends who were willing to undertake with him the task of pioneering in a hitherto unsettled district. The task involved difficulties greater than those usually met in such attempts. La Valliere, pressing his claims of possession of the land as within the limits of his seigneury, resented his presence, and the absence of protection made the new settlement vulnerable to attack from the English colonists; but in spite of all obstacles the settlement made rapid progress. It was of this period of Bourgeois' life that Rameau thus writes,-" This Jacob Bourgeois, brought by D'Aulnay as surgeon to his forces, who takes one holding, then two, then three, who clears and cultivates them; then sells them and buys them back; who builds vessels and opens up a trade with the Puritans of Boston, becomes to us a striking personage. He has character; he steers his course with prudence and does not allow himself to be made tipsy by success, and acts in all things with that moderation which conduces to success and merits it." "He installs his sons in the businesses he has founded, and in his old days goes to found at the head of the Bay of Fundy, at Chignecto the first colony of Acadians. There, although aged seventy-five years, he bears in 1696 the shock of an invasion of English pirates; he can not rely on the strength of his enfeebled arm to protect himself and his friends, but his brain has retained its clearness and its firmness. He visits in his little boat the enemy flotilla; he recognises among these unwelcome visitors persons with whom he had business dealings in former days; he had then been of service to them, and had letters to show the value of that service. These letters he shows; the old man astonishes them; his energy dominates them, and earns a recog- nition and a welcome. He entertains in his home his old associates, and he and his are thus saved from spoliation. Was this, then, an ordinary man?" He died about the year 1701, supposedly at Beaubassin. His family had in it those appar- ently capable of carrying on the work he had undertaken, and members of it had places of more than minor prominence in the rapidly grow- ing settlements. But the blight of the expulsion in 1755 involved them in its tragedies, so that a few years thereafter his descendants were scattered from Quebec to Louisiana, from France to the Cayennes. Gaudet has attempted to construct from the material available a genealog- ical tree of the descendants of Nova Scotia's first permanent surgeon, and has followed in his efforts the different branches of the family to the widely separated localities where their for- tunes has scattered them. A few of them escaped the English dragnet; others succeeded in working their way back to the lands of their fathers, and many French Acadians, especially those living in New Brunsw ck, can today trace their origin back to D'Aulnay's surgeon. REFERENCES Rameau St. Pere.-Une Colonie Feodale. Documents Inedits: Gaudet, Acadian Genealogy.

Articles from Canadian Medical Association Journal are provided here courtesy of Canadian Medical Association -------------------- It is believed that Jacques Bourgeois would have been the first surgeon to settle in Port Royal.

He chose the medical career and is described as military surgeon. He may have learned this profession in a commandery of the Order of Malta near his home in France.

He was born in La Ferté-Gaucher situated 60 kilometers west of Paris.

Jacques Bourgeois arrived in Port Royal on the 6th of July 1641, on the St-François from La Rochelle in France. He arrived with Menou d' Aulney, governor of Acadia, the lead of a fleet of four ships.

He joined the colony with the title of surgeon.

He married Jeanne Trahan who arrived in Port Royal in 1643 from Bourgueil in the Loire region in France. They had twelve children. After living about 30 years in Port Royal, Jacques left the fort with his family for the new village of Beaubassin becoming one of its founders if not the pioneer of the new village.With his sons Charles and Germain and their wives, Jacques Bourgeois formed what was at that time called Bourgeois Clan around the end of the 1670s in Beaubassin.Jacques Bourgeois also called Jacob contributed to the development of Beaubassin with his medical services, and also agriculture, his mills one a lumber mill and one grain mill and his commercial activities.

More Info:

http://abda.histoire-de-bourgeois.net/abda_e/abda_Jacques%20%28Jacob%29%20Bourgeois_Nos_origines.html -------------------- Chirurgien -------------------- Jacques, born in France in 1618, was a Surgeon and arrived in Acadia in 1642 on the ship "Aulnay" with the rank Military Doctor; Jacques was one of the most prosperous inhabitants of Port Royal. He began to develop a new colony in about 1672, called Chigneetou by the Indians, later called Bourgeois, then Beaubassin. He married Jeanne Trahan in 1644 and had 10 children-

Jeanne-1645

Charles- 1646--- The Capt Bourgeois lineage

Germain 1650

Marie 1652

Guillaume 1655

Marguerite 1658

Francoise 1659

Anne 1661

Marie 1664

Jeanne 1667

By the 1698 census, Jacques and family lived in Beaubassin. They later moved to Port Royal. Many descendants of Jacques migrated from Acadia during the 1755 Expulsion. They married into other families that settled in Acadia and continued their family line into what it is today.... Very Rich in Faith, Family and Culture.

The founding of Beaubassin

The far-reaching tides also created fertile farmland in this area, which was why Acadians from Port Royal travelled here, to Nova Scotia, in the early 1670s, when it was part of Acadia. These intrepid Acadians, led by a surgeon called Jacob Bourgeois, founded the village of Beaubassin, recently declared a National Historic Site and administered by Parks Canada. The colonists built a complex network of dykes and “aboiteaux”—a form of canal work used to drain salt marshes and prevent sea water from flooding the land—in order to grow hay. Because of its high salt content, this hay was sold as far away as New England, making Beaubassin one of the most prosperous villages in Acadia

The Bourgeois’ of Acadian descent can be traced back to one individual, which is Jacques Bourgeois, originally from Ferté-Gaucher a French commune located in the department of Seine-et-Marne , in the Île-de-France region. He arrived in Acadia, on the 6th of July 1641, on the St-François from La Rochelle in France. Jacques (also called Jacob) chose the medical career and is described as military surgeon. He may have learned this profession in a commandery of the Order of Malta near his home in France.Jacob was born on January 7, 1621, in La Ferte-Gaucher, France. He arrived at Port-Royal with Menou d' Aulney, governor of Acadia, the lead of a fleet of four ships.In 1643, Jacob Bourgeois marries Jeanne Trahan in Port-Royal. She was born about 1629, in Bourgueil, province of Anjou, in France. She came to Acadia in 1636, with her father Guillaume Trahan, her mother Francoise Corbineau and a sister (first name unknown).Jeanne was only 14 years old at the time of her marriage to Jacques.This union is the progenitor of the present day Acadian Bourgeois family line.In 1645, upon the death of Isaac Pesseley (ancestors of several Acadian), the major of the garrison of Port-Royal, the brother-in-law of J acob Bourgeois, German Doucet, dit Laverdure, the right-hand man of the governor d’ Aulney, is named major of the garrison, while Jacques Bourgeois becomes “lieutenant of the place”.Around 1646, Mr. Menou d' Aulney grants an island called Isle aux Cochon (Isle of Pigs), located on the Dauphin river (today Annapolis River) upstream from Port Royal to Jacob Bourgeois.In August 1654, major Sedgewick, although France and England are in peace and “without orders from his superiors”, appears in the Port-Royal basin, at the head of an army of 500 English soldiers. He arrived from Fort Saint-Jean, where he captured Charles de Saint-Etienne de La Tour then governor of Acadia. After several days of siege, Germain Doucet must capitulate. Charles de Saint-Etienne is made a prisoner and brought to England.Jacob Bourgeois, the only surgeon of the area, is extremely occupied caring for the casualties for several weeks.The English don’t leave any military or civil presence at Port Royal and in 1667 the colony is ceded back to France, although the French do not take possession until 1670. In the interim, the Acadians governed themselves under a syndic ruled by Guillaume Trahan, Jacob’s father-in-law.By the time the census 1670 was taken, Jacques and Jeanne had added six children to their family; one son, Guillaume, and five daughters; Marguerite, Françoise, Anne, Marie (the younger) and Jeanne (the younger). In that census Jacques was the richest inhabitant at Port Royal.In the same census, Charles, their oldest son had married Anne Dugas (du Gast), and they had one daughter, Marie.Jacques and Jeanne’s oldest daughter was married to Pierre SIRE (CYR), and they had a son, Jehan (Jean).Jacob becomes thereafter a farmer-merchant. His boats follow the coast of the Baie Française (Bay of Fundy) to trade with the Micmac Indians and the coast of New England to trade with the English.In 1671, Jacques, aided by his three sons and his son-in-law, Pierre SIRE, and his future son-in-law, Jean Boudrot, founded the settlement of the “Bourgeois colony”, later to become Beaubassin, when Michel Leneuf de La Vallière was granted the Seignerie de Beaubassin. The settlement was near the border separating present day New Brunswick from Nova Scotia. Jacques and his son, Guillaume, returned to live at Port Royal after the establishment at Beaubassin, although they kept farms at the new settlement. Jacques' other two sons, Charles and Germain, stay in Beaubassin with their families.In 1686, Jacques and Jeanne moved definitively to Beaubassin to live with their son, Germain. On Oct. 15, 1687, Jacques Bourgeois signed a document, along with others, attesting to the works of the ex-governor d'Aulnay in the colony.At the beginning of Sept. 1696, the English Colonel Benjamin Church from Boston attacks Beaubassin, left undefended by the French. Jacques was enlisted to negotiate with the English contingent from Boston. Jacques obtained a promise from Church that the residents would be left in peace, but Church reneges on his promise and soldiers set a blaze most of the homes in the region. The Acadians of Beaubassin were forced to flee to the woods; however, the English respected the Acadians' capabilities as marksmen and refused to chase the Acadians out of the reach of their ship's cannons.In the Acadian census of 1686, Jacques Bourgeois was 67 years old and Jeanne Trahan was 57ans. In the census of 1698, Jacob Bourgeois now 82 years old and Jeanne Trahan, 72 years old, live with their son Germain Bourgeois, in Beaubassin. In the census of 1700, they are not mentioned. They must have died.1702, the commandant of the fort at Port Royal referred to him in an official report as the late Jacques Bourgeois. -------------------- The founding of Beaubassin

The far-reaching tides also created fertile farmland in this area, which was why Acadians from Port Royal travelled here, to Nova Scotia, in the early 1670s, when it was part of Acadia. These intrepid Acadians, led by a surgeon called Jacob Bourgeois, founded the village of Beaubassin, recently declared a National Historic Site and administered by Parks Canada. The colonists built a complex network of dykes and “aboiteaux”—a form of canal work used to drain salt marshes and prevent sea water from flooding the land—in order to grow hay. Because of its high salt content, this hay was sold as far away as New England, making Beaubassin one of the most prosperous villages in Acadia

The Bourgeois’ of Acadian descent can be traced back to one individual, which is Jacques Bourgeois, originally from Ferté-Gaucher a French commune located in the department of Seine-et-Marne , in the Île-de-France region. He arrived in Acadia, on the 6th of July 1641, on the St-François from La Rochelle in France. Jacques (also called Jacob) chose the medical career and is described as military surgeon. He may have learned this profession in a commandery of the Order of Malta near his home in France.Jacob was born on January 7, 1621, in La Ferte-Gaucher, France. He arrived at Port-Royal with Menou d' Aulney, governor of Acadia, the lead of a fleet of four ships.In 1643, Jacob Bourgeois marries Jeanne Trahan in Port-Royal. She was born about 1629, in Bourgueil, province of Anjou, in France. She came to Acadia in 1636, with her father Guillaume Trahan, her mother Francoise Corbineau and a sister (first name unknown).Jeanne was only 14 years old at the time of her marriage to Jacques.This union is the progenitor of the present day Acadian Bourgeois family line.In 1645, upon the death of Isaac Pesseley (ancestors of several Acadian), the major of the garrison of Port-Royal, the brother-in-law of J acob Bourgeois, German Doucet, dit Laverdure, the right-hand man of the governor d’ Aulney, is named major of the garrison, while Jacques Bourgeois becomes “lieutenant of the place”.Around 1646, Mr. Menou d' Aulney grants an island called Isle aux Cochon (Isle of Pigs), located on the Dauphin river (today Annapolis River) upstream from Port Royal to Jacob Bourgeois.In August 1654, major Sedgewick, although France and England are in peace and “without orders from his superiors”, appears in the Port-Royal basin, at the head of an army of 500 English soldiers. He arrived from Fort Saint-Jean, where he captured Charles de Saint-Etienne de La Tour then governor of Acadia. After several days of siege, Germain Doucet must capitulate. Charles de Saint-Etienne is made a prisoner and brought to England.Jacob Bourgeois, the only surgeon of the area, is extremely occupied caring for the casualties for several weeks.The English don’t leave any military or civil presence at Port Royal and in 1667 the colony is ceded back to France, although the French do not take possession until 1670. In the interim, the Acadians governed themselves under a syndic ruled by Guillaume Trahan, Jacob’s father-in-law.By the time the census 1670 was taken, Jacques and Jeanne had added six children to their family; one son, Guillaume, and five daughters; Marguerite, Françoise, Anne, Marie (the younger) and Jeanne (the younger). In that census Jacques was the richest inhabitant at Port Royal.In the same census, Charles, their oldest son had married Anne Dugas (du Gast), and they had one daughter, Marie.Jacques and Jeanne’s oldest daughter was married to Pierre SIRE (CYR), and they had a son, Jehan (Jean).Jacob becomes thereafter a farmer-merchant. His boats follow the coast of the Baie Française (Bay of Fundy) to trade with the Micmac Indians and the coast of New England to trade with the English.In 1671, Jacques, aided by his three sons and his son-in-law, Pierre SIRE, and his future son-in-law, Jean Boudrot, founded the settlement of the “Bourgeois colony”, later to become Beaubassin, when Michel Leneuf de La Vallière was granted the Seignerie de Beaubassin. The settlement was near the border separating present day New Brunswick from Nova Scotia. Jacques and his son, Guillaume, returned to live at Port Royal after the establishment at Beaubassin, although they kept farms at the new settlement. Jacques' other two sons, Charles and Germain, stay in Beaubassin with their families.In 1686, Jacques and Jeanne moved definitively to Beaubassin to live with their son, Germain. On Oct. 15, 1687, Jacques Bourgeois signed a document, along with others, attesting to the works of the ex-governor d'Aulnay in the colony.At the beginning of Sept. 1696, the English Colonel Benjamin Church from Boston attacks Beaubassin, left undefended by the French. Jacques was enlisted to negotiate with the English contingent from Boston. Jacques obtained a promise from Church that the residents would be left in peace, but Church reneges on his promise and soldiers set a blaze most of the homes in the region. The Acadians of Beaubassin were forced to flee to the woods; however, the English respected the Acadians' capabilities as marksmen and refused to chase the Acadians out of the reach of their ship's cannons.In the Acadian census of 1686, Jacques Bourgeois was 67 years old and Jeanne Trahan was 57ans. In the census of 1698, Jacob Bourgeois now 82 years old and Jeanne Trahan, 72 years old, live with their son Germain Bourgeois, in Beaubassin. In the census of 1700, they are not mentioned. They must have died.1702, the commandant of the fort at Port Royal referred to him in an official report as the late Jacques Bourgeois.

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Jacob Jacques Bourgeois II's Timeline

1621
January 8, 1621
Compviay en Brie, Champagne or LaFerte-Gaucher, France
January 8, 1621
Couvray-en-Brie, Champagne, France
1621
P251-1
1641
July 6, 1641
Age 20
Nova Scotia, Canada
1641
Age 19
"Saint-Francois" from France to Acadia
1642
1642
Age 20
Acadia
1643
1643
Age 21
Acadie
1643
Age 21
came acadia, was probably the first surgeon in acadia
1644
1644
Age 22
Port-Royal, Acadie
1646
1646
Age 24
Canada