Jacob Thompson, U.S. Sec'y Interior, Inspector Gen., CSA

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Jacob Thompson, Sec'y Interior

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Leasburg, NC, USA
Death: Died in Memphis, TN, USA
Place of Burial: Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, TN
Immediate Family:

Son of Nicholas Thompson and Lucretia Thompson
Husband of Catherine Ann Thompson
Father of Caswell Macon Thompson and Katherine Kirkman
Brother of Joseph Sidney Thompson; George Nicholas Thompson and Joseph Sidney Thompson

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Jacob Thompson, Sec'y Interior

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Thompson

Jacob Thompson (May 15, 1810 – March 24, 1885) was a lawyer and politician who served as United States Secretary of the Interior from 1857 to 1861.


Biography


Born in Leasburg, North Carolina, in 1810, Thompson attended Bingham Academy in Orange County, North Carolina, and later went on to graduate from the University of North Carolina in 1831. Afterwards, he served on the university faculty for a short time until he left to study law in 1832. He was admitted to the bar in 1834 and commenced practice in Pontotoc, Mississippi.


Thompson got involved in politics and was elected to the 26th Congress, serving from 1839 to 1851. He was appointed to the United States Senate in 1845, but never received the commission and the seat went to Joseph W. Chalmers. Thompson was the chairman of the Committee on Indian Affairs in the 29th Congress. He lost reelection to the 32nd Congress and went back to practicing law until 1857, when newly elected President James Buchanan appointed Thompson United States Secretary of the Interior.


In the later years of the Buchanan administration, the cabinet members argued with one another on issues of slavery and secession. Thompson sided with the Confederacy and resigned as Interior Secretary in January 1861. When he resigned, Horace Greeley's New-York Daily Tribune denounced him as "a traitor," remarking: "Undertaking to overthrow the Government of which you are a sworn minister may be in accordance with the ideas of cotton-growing chivalry, but to common men cannot be made to appear creditable." Thompson then became Inspector General of the Confederate States Army. Though not a military man, Thompson later joined the army as an officer and served as an aide to Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard at the Battle of Shiloh. He attained the rank of Lt. Colonel and was present at several other battles in the Western Theater of the war including Vicksburg, Corinth and Tupelo.


In March, 1864, Jefferson Davis asked Thompson to lead a secret delegation in Canada. He accepted and arrived in Montreal in May of that year. From where he directed a failed plot to free Confederate prisoners of war on Johnson's Island, off Sandusky, Ohio, in September. He also arranged purchase of a steamer with the intention of arming it to harass shipping in the Great Lakes. Regarded in the North as a schemer and conspirator, many devious plots were associated with his name, though much of this may have been public hysteria. One plot was a planned burning of New York on November 25, 1864 in retaliation for Union Generals Philip Sheridan and William Tecumseh Sherman's scorched earth tactics in the south. As head of Confederate secret agents some speculate that John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of Abraham Lincoln, met with Thompson but this has not been proven (Thompson worked hard to clear his name of involvement in the assassination in the years after the war). His manor called "Home Place" in Oxford, Mississippi, was burned down by Union troops in 1864.


After the Civil War, Thompson fled to England and later returned to Canada as he waited for passions to cool in the United States. He eventually came home and settled in Memphis, Tennessee to manage his extensive holdings. Thompson was later appointed to the board of the University of the South at Sewanee and was a great benefactor of the school. He died in Memphis and was interred in Elmwood Cemetery.


William Faulkner, who was also a resident of Oxford, loosely based several ancestral members of the Compson family, featured in The Sound and the Fury on Thompson.

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He became the inspiration for one Confederate unit, Company K, 19th Mississippi Infantry, known as the “Jake Thompson Guards”.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Thompson

Born in Leasburg, North Carolina, in 1810, Thompson attended Bingham Academy in Orange County, North Carolina, and later went on to graduate from the University of North Carolina in 1831. Afterwards, he served on the university faculty for a short time until he left to study law in 1832. He was admitted to the bar in 1834 and commenced practice in Pontotoc, Mississippi.

Thompson then became Inspector General of the Confederate States Army. Though not a military man, Thompson later joined the army as an officer and served as an aide to Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard at the Battle of Shiloh. He attained the rank of Lt. Colonel and was present at several other battles in the Western Theater of the war including Vicksburg, Corinth and Tupelo.

After the Civil War, Thompson fled to England and later returned to Canada as he waited for passions to cool in the United States. He eventually came home and settled in Memphis, Tennessee to manage his extensive holdings. Thompson was later appointed to the board of the University of the South at Sewanee and was a great benefactor of the school. He died in Memphis and was interred in Elmwood Cemetery.

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=caswellcounty&id=I3921

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Jacob Thompson, U.S. Sec'y Interior, Inspector Gen., CSA's Timeline

1810
1810
Leasburg, NC, USA
1839
1839
Age 29
1863
1863
Age 53
1885
1885
Age 75
Memphis, TN, USA
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????
Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, TN