Jacobus Francois Joubert (1901 - 1901)

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Birthdate:
Birthplace: Rooikraal Distrik, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Death: Died in South Africa
Cause of death: Bronchitis
Managed by: Lea Herbst
Last Updated:

About Jacobus Francois Joubert

Norvals Pont Refugee Camp

Personal Details

Name: Master Jacobus Francois Joubert

Born in camp? No

Place of death: Norvals Pont RC

Age died: 9 months

Died in camp? Yes

Cause of death: bronchitis

Gender: male

Race: white

Marital status: single

Nationality: Free State

Registration as child: Yes

Unique ID: 26680

Camp History

Name: Norvals Pont RC

Farm History

Name: Rooikraal / Roodekraal / Rooipal

District: Bloemfontein

Sources

Title: RS 29 ORC DL

Type: Death lists

Location: National Archives, Pretoria

Reference No.: RS 29

Origin: Goldman

Notes: p.140

Title: Government Gazette of the Orange River Colony

Location:

Notes: 15/10/1901, p.596

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Jacobus Francois Joubert's Timeline

1900
1900
- 1902
South Africa

The camps were formed by the British army to house the residents of the two Boer republics of the South African Republic and the Orange Free State. They were established towards the end of 1900, after Britain had invaded the Boer republics. This database was designed to investigate mortality and morbidity in the camps during the war. Although it will include everyone listed in the registers during the war, it usually excludes returning prisoners-of-war and men who came back from commando at the end of the war, as well as the considerable movement of people which took place after 31 May 1902, when families were repatriated to their homes.

If there was a model camp in the ORC system, it was Norvals Pont. And, if anyone could be described as the hero of the camps, it was Lieutenant St John Cole Bowen, the first civilian superintendent. Norvals Pont was one of those camps, like Aliwal North, Kimberley and Orange River Station, which was in the Cape Colony, although it formed part of the ORC complex. It was located on the banks of the Orange River, South Africa’s longest river, which ensured an ample water supply and plenty of wood from the bush on the river banks. As the name suggests, Norvals Pont was a crossing on the Orange River but the camp, although on the railway line, was isolated from any towns.
Norvals Pont was probably established about November 1900, in order to relieve the overcrowded Bloemfontein camp with its dire shortage of water The first superintendents, both military men, seem to have been capable people; Lieutenant Wynne of the Imperial Yeomanry was described as the ‘Father of the Camp’ and he was succeeded in January 1901 by Major du Plat Taylor of the Grenadier Guards, who instilled ‘firm military discipline’. At the end of February 1901, when the camp passed into civilian control Cole Bowen was appointed. He was of Irish extraction, a fact which may have given him some sympathy for the Boers.1 His ability ensured that he did not remain at Norvals Pont and Cole Bowen was later appointed as a travelling inspector. Almost everyone who encountered him commented on his calm efficiency. Emily Hobhouse wrote later that Cole Bowen possessed ‘marked administrative powers; his rule was firm, just and kind and he seemed possessed of unlimited resources’.2 After the war Cole Bowen became a resident magistrate in the Free State, spending his life amongst the Boers whom he had served in the camps.

http://www2.lib.uct.ac.za/mss/bccd/Histories/Norvals_pont/

1901
January, 1901
Bloemfontein, South Africa
October 18, 1901
South Africa
1901
South Africa