Hedvig, királynő

public profile

Hedvig, királynő's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Hedvig, királynő

Polish: Jadwiga Andegaweńska, królowa
Also Known As: "Święta Jadwiga"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Buda, Budapest, Hungary
Death: Died in Kraków, Małopolskie, Poland
Place of Burial: katedra wawelska, Kraków, Małopolskie, Poland
Immediate Family:

Daughter of I. (Nagy) Lajos of Hungary, király and Kotromanić Erzsébet
Wife of Jogaila / Władysław II Jagiełło
Mother of Elżbieta Bonifacja Jagiellonka
Sister of Catherine of Hungary and Maria /Mary of Hungary, I

Managed by: Lúcia Pilla
Last Updated:

About Hedvig, királynő

Jadwiga Andegaweńska w Wikipedii po Polsku

Jadwiga of Poland on Wikipedia in English

Jadwiga of Anjou (1373/4 – July 17, 1399) was Queen of Poland from 1384 to her death. She was a member of the Capetian House of Anjou and the daughter of King Louis I of Hungary and Elisabeth of Bosnia. She is known in Polish as Jadwiga, in English and German as Hedwig, in Lithuanian as Jadvyga, in Hungarian as Hedvig, and in Latin as Hedvigis.

She is venerated by the Roman Catholic Church as Saint Hedwig. Jadwiga is the patron saint of queens, and of United Europe.

Royal titles

Royal titles in Latin: Hedvigis dei gracia Regina Polonie, necnon terrarum Cracovie, Sandomirie, Syradie, Lancicie, Cuyavie, Pomeranieque domina et heres.

English translation: Jadwiga by the grace of God Queen of Poland,[2] lady and inheritor of the land of Kraków (Cracow), Sandomierz, Sieradz, Łęczyca, Kuyavia, Pomerania (Pomerelia).

[edit]Biography

[edit]Childhood

Jadwiga was the youngest daughter of Louis I of Hungary and of Elizabeth of Bosnia. Jadwiga could claim descent from the House of Piast, the ancient native Polish dynasty on both her mother's and her father's side. Her paternal grandmother Elisabeth of Cuyavia was the daughter of King Władysław I the Elbow-high, who had reunited Poland in 1320.

Jadwiga was brought up at the royal court in Buda and Visegrád, Hungary. In 1378, she was betrothed (sponsalia de futuro) to Habsburg scion William of Austria, and spent about a year at the imperial court in Vienna, Austria. Jadwiga's father Louis had, in 1364 in Kraków, during festivities known as the Days of Kraków, also made an arrangement with his former father-in-law Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV to inter-marry their future children: Charles' son and future Holy Roman Emperor Sigismund of Luxemburg was engaged and married, as a child, to Louis' daughter and future Queen Mary. One of Louis' original plans had been to leave the kingdom of Poland to Mary, whose marriage with Sigismund was more relevant to this end as Sigismund was an heir in his own right to Poland and was intended to inherit Brandenburg, which was nearer to Poland than to Hungary. Jadwiga's destiny as Austrian consort was a better fit for Hungary, as it was an immediate neighbor of Austria.

Jadwiga was well-educated and a polyglot, speaking Latin, Bosnian, Hungarian, Serbian, Polish, German,[citation needed] interested in the arts, music, science, and court life. She was also known for her piety and her admiration for Saints Mary, Martha, and Bridget of Sweden, as well as her patron saint, Hedwig of Andechs.

[edit]Reign

Until 1370, Poland had been ruled by the native Piast Dynasty. Its last king, Casimir III, had left no legitimate son and considered his male grandchildren either unsuited or too young to reign. He therefore decided that his surviving sister Elizabeth of Poland and her son, Louis I of Hungary, should succeed him. Louis was proclaimed king, while Elizabeth held much of the practical power until her death in 1380.

When Louis died in 1382, the Hungarian throne was inherited by his eldest surviving daughter Mary, under the regency of their Bosnian mother. In Poland, however, the lords of Lesser Poland (Poland's virtual rulers) did not want to continue the personal union with Hungary, nor to accept as regent Mary's fiancé Sigismund, whom they expelled from the country. They therefore chose as their new monarch Mary's younger sister, Jadwiga. After two years' negotiations with Jadwiga's mother, Elizabeth of Bosnia, who was regent of Hungary, and a civil war in Greater Poland (1383), Jadwiga finally came to Kraków and at the age of ten, on November 16, 1384, was crowned King of Poland — Hedvig Rex Poloniæ, not Hedvig Regina Poloniæ, as the Polish law had no provision for a female ruler (queen). The masculine gender of her title was also meant to emphasize that she was monarch in her own right, not a queen consort.

As child monarch of Poland, Jadwiga had at least one relative in Poland (all her immediate family having remained in Hungary): her mother's childless uncle, Władysław the White (d. 1388), Prince of Gniewkowo.

Soon after Jadwiga's coronation, new suitors for Jadwiga's hand appeared: Duke Siemowit IV of Masovia and Grand Duke Jogaila of Lithuania, the latter supported by the lords of Lesser Poland. In 1385 (when Jadwiga was eleven years old) William of Austria came to Kraków to consummate the marriage and present the lords with a fait accompli. His plan, however, failed and William was expelled from Poland while Jadwiga declared her sponsalia invalid. William later married Jadwiga's cousin and rival, Joan II of Naples. That same year (1385), Jogaila and the lords of Lesser Poland signed the Union of Krewo whereby Jogaila pledged to adopt Western Christianity and unite Lithuania with Poland in exchange for Jadwiga's hand and the Polish crown. Twelve-year-old Jadwiga and 26-year-old Jogaila — who had earlier been baptized Władysław — wed in March 1385 at Kraków. This was followed by Jogaila's coronation as King of Poland, although Jadwiga retained her royal rights. In 1386, Jadwiga's mother Elizabeth and her sister Queen Maria of Hungary were kidnapped, probably on the order of Maria's husband and consort Sigismund.

In January 1387, Elizabeth was strangled, while Maria was released in July of the same year, by the effort of future Frankopan family and Jadwiga's adopted maternal uncle King Tvrtko of Bosnia. Maria, heavily pregnant, died in 1395 under suspicious circumstances.

As a monarch, young Jadwiga probably had little actual power. Nevertheless, she was actively engaged in her kingdom's political, diplomatic and cultural life and acted as the guarantor of Władysław's promises to reclaim Poland's lost territories. In 1387, Jadwiga led two successful military expeditions to reclaim the province of Halych in Red Ruthenia, which had been retained by Hungary in a dynastic dispute at her accession. As she was an heiress to Louis I of Hungary herself, the expeditions were for the most part peaceful and resulted in Petru I of Moldavia paying homage to the Polish monarchs in September 1387.[3] In 1390 she began a correspondence with the Teutonic Knights, followed by personal meetings in which she opened diplomatic negotiations herself.

Most political responsibilities, however, were probably in Władysław's hands, with Jadwiga attending to cultural and charitable activities.[3] She sponsored writers and artists and donated much of her personal wealth, including her royal insignia, to charity, for purposes including the founding of hospitals. She financed a scholarship for twenty Lithuanians to study at Charles University in Prague to help strengthen Christianity in their country, to which purpose she also founded a bishopric in Vilnius. Among her most notable cultural legacies was the restoration of the Kraków Academy, which in 1817 was renamed Jagiellonian University in honour of the couple.[4]

[edit]Death and inheritance

On June 22, 1399 Jadwiga gave birth to a daughter, Elizabeth Bonifacia. Within a month, both the girl and her mother had died from birth complications. They were buried together in Wawel Cathedral. Jadwiga's death undermined Jogaila's position as King of Poland, but he managed to retain the throne until his death 35 years later.

It is not easy to state who was Jadwiga's heir in line of Poland, or Poland's rightful heir, since Poland had not used primogeniture, but kings had ascended by some sort of election. There were descendants of superseded daughters of Casimir III of Poland (d. 1370), such as his youngest daughter Anna, Countess of Celje (d. 1425 without surviving issue), and her daughter Anna of Celje (1380–1416) whom Władysław II Jagiełło married next,who had a daughter Jadwiga of Lithuania born in 1408. Jadwiga died in 1431, reputedly poisoned by Sophia, Władysław's last wife, after a faction of Polish nobles supported Jadwiga against Sophia's sons. Emperor Sigismund himself was an heir of Casimir III, as eldest son of his mother Elisabeth of Pomerania, who was since 1377 the only surviving child of Elisabeth of Poland, herself daughter of Casimir III from his first marriage with Gediminaitis Aldona of Lithuania. The family possession of the principality of Kuyavia belonged to Sigismund, who was the heir with the strongest hereditary claims. However, the leaders of the country wanted to avoid Sigismund and any personal union with Hungary.

Other descendants of Władysław the Short (through the Silesian dukes of Świdnica) included the then Emperor Wenceslas, king of Bohemia, who died without issue in 1419, as well as the Silesian dukes of Opole and Sagan.

Male-line Piasts were represented most closely by the Dukes of Masovia, one of whom had aspired to marry Jadwiga in 1385. Also various princes of Silesia were of Piast descent, but they had been largely pushed aside since the exile of Vladislas II, Duke of Kraków.

Jadwiga's husband Władysław Jagiello kept the throne, mostly because no claimant with clearly better stature appeared. He was never ousted, not even after the death of his second wife, and eventually succeeded to found a dynasty in Poland by the sons of his last wife, who were not related to earlier Polish rulers.

[edit]Legends and veneration

From the time of her death, Jadwiga was in Poland widely venerated like a saint, even though she was only beatified in the 1980s, and canonized in 1997, by the Polish Pope John Paul II. Numerous legends about miracles were recounted to justify a desired sainthood. The two best-known are those of "Jadwiga's cross" and "Jadwiga's foot."

Jadwiga often prayed before a large black crucifix hanging in the north aisle of Wawel Cathedral. During one of these prayers, the Christ on the cross is said to have spoken to her. The crucifix, "Saint Jadwiga's cross", is still there, with her relics beneath it.

According to another legend, Jadwiga took a piece of jewelry from her foot and gave it to a poor stonemason who had begged for her help. When the King left, he noticed her footprint in the plaster floor of his workplace, even though the plaster had already hardened before her visit. The supposed footprint, known as "Jadwiga's foot", can still be seen in one of Kraków's churches.

On June 8, 1979 Pope John Paul II prayed at her sarcophagus; and the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments officially affirmed her beatification on August 8, 1986. The Pope canonized Jadwiga in Kraków on June 8, 1997.

[edit]Exhumations and sarcophagus

Jadwiga's body has been exhumed at least three times. The first time was in the 17th century, in connection with the construction of a bishop's sarcophagus next to Jadwiga's grave. The next exhumation took place in 1887. Jadwiga's complete skeleton was found, together with a mantle and hat. Jan Matejko made a sketch of Jadwiga's skull, which later helped him paint her portrait (see above).

On July 12, 1949, her grave was again opened. This time she was reburied in a sarcophagus paid for by Karol Lanckoroński, which had been sculpted in white marble in 1902 by Antoni Madeyski. The queen is depicted with a dog, a symbol of fidelity, at her feet. The sarcophagus is oriented with Jadwiga's feet pointing west, unlike all the other sarcophagi in the cathedral. On display next to the sarcophagus are the modest wooden orb and scepter with which the queen had been buried - she had sold her jewels to finance the renovation of the Kraków Academy, known today as Jagiellonian University.

-------------------- Jadwiga


King of Poland Reign 16 October 1384 – 17 July 1399 Coronation 16 October 1384 in the Wawel Cathedral, Kraków Predecessor Louis I Successor Władysław II Jagiełło


Spouse Jogaila Issue

       Elizabeth Bonifacia (died at birth) 

House House of Anjou Father Louis I of Hungary Mother Elizabeth of Bosnia Born between 3 October 1373 and 18 February 1374[1]

Jadwiga (1373/4 – 17 July 1399) was monarch of Poland from 1384 to her death. Her official title was 'king' rather than 'queen', reflecting that she was a sovereign in her own right and not merely a royal consort. She was a member of the Capetian House of Anjou, the daughter of King Louis I of Hungary and Elizabeth of Bosnia. She is known in Polish as Jadwiga, in English and German as Hedwig, in Lithuanian as Jadvyga, in Hungarian as Hedvig, and in Latin as Hedvigis.

Queens regnant being relatively uncommon in Europe at the time, Jadwiga was officially crowned a King.[2] She is venerated by the Roman Catholic Church as Saint Hedwig, where she is the patron saint of queens and a United Europe.[3]

Jadwiga was the youngest daughter of Louis I of Hungary and of Elizabeth of Bosnia. Jadwiga could claim descent from the House of Piast, the ancient native Polish dynasty on both her mother's and her father's side. Her paternal grandmother Elisabeth of Cuyavia was the daughter of King Władysław I the Elbow-high, who had reunited Poland in 1320.[4]

Jadwiga was brought up at the royal court in Buda and Visegrád, Hungary. In 1378, she was betrothed (sponsalia de futuro) to Habsburg scion William of Austria, and spent about a year at the imperial court in Vienna, Austria. Jadwiga's father Louis had, in 1364 in Kraków, during festivities known as the Days of Kraków, also made an arrangement with his former father-in-law Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV to inter-marry their future children: Charles' son and future Holy Roman Emperor Sigismund of Luxemburg was engaged and married, as a child, to Louis' daughter and future Queen Mary. One of Louis' original plans had been to leave the kingdom of Poland to Mary, whose marriage with Sigismund was more relevant to this end as Sigismund was an heir in his own right to Poland and was intended to inherit Brandenburg, which was nearer to Poland than to Hungary. Jadwiga's destiny as Austrian consort was a better fit for Hungary, as it was an immediate neighbor of Austria.

Jadwiga was well-educated and a polyglot, speaking at least six languages such as Latin, Bosnian, Hungarian, Serbian, Polish and German,[3] interested in the arts, music, science, and court life. She was also known for her piety and her admiration for Saints Mary, Martha, and Bridget of Sweden, as well as her patron saint, Hedwig of Andechs.

Until 1370, Poland had been ruled by the native Piast Dynasty. Its last king, Casimir III, had left no legitimate son and considered his male grandchildren either unsuited or too young to reign. He therefore decided that his surviving sister Elizabeth of Poland and her son, Louis I of Hungary, should succeed him. Louis was proclaimed king, while Elizabeth held much of the practical power until her death in 1380.

When Louis died in 1382, the Hungarian throne was inherited by his eldest surviving daughter Mary, under the regency of their Bosnian mother. In Poland, however, the lords of Lesser Poland (Poland's virtual rulers) did not want to continue the personal union with Hungary, nor to accept as regent Mary's fiancé Sigismund, whom they expelled from the country. They therefore chose as their new monarch Mary's younger sister, Jadwiga. After two years' negotiations with Jadwiga's mother, Elizabeth of Bosnia, who was regent of Hungary, and a civil war in Greater Poland (1383), Jadwiga finally came to Kraków and at the age of ten, on 16 October 1384, was crowned King of Poland — Hedvig Rex Poloniæ, not Hedvig Regina Poloniæ. Polish law had no provision for a female ruler (queen regnant), but did not specify that the King had to be a male. The masculine gender of her title was also meant to emphasize that she was monarch in her own right, not a queen consort.

As child monarch of Poland, Jadwiga had at least one relative in Poland (all her immediate family having remained in Hungary): her mother's childless uncle, Władysław the White (d. 1388), Prince of Gniewkowo. The terms Nobilissimus (most noble) and nobilissima familia (most noble family) have been used since the 11th century for the King of Hungary and his family, but it were then only a few, among them also Jadwiga, which were mentioned in official documents as such.

Soon after Jadwiga's coronation, new suitors for Jadwiga's hand appeared: Duke Siemowit IV of Masovia and Grand Duke Jogaila of Lithuania, the latter supported by the lords of Lesser Poland. In 1385 (when Jadwiga was eleven years old) William of Austria came to Kraków to consummate the marriage and present the lords with a fait accompli. His plan, however, failed and William was expelled from Poland while Jadwiga declared her sponsalia invalid. William later married Jadwiga's cousin and rival, Joan II of Naples. That same year (1385), Jogaila and the lords of Lesser Poland signed the Union of Krewo whereby Jogaila pledged to adopt Western Christianity and unite Lithuania with Poland in exchange for Jadwiga's hand and the Polish crown. Twelve-year-old Jadwiga and 26-year-old Jogaila — who had earlier been baptized Władysław — wed in March 1385 at Kraków. This was followed by Jogaila's coronation as King of Poland, although Jadwiga retained her royal rights. In 1386, Jadwiga's mother Elizabeth and her sister Queen Mary of Hungary were kidnapped, probably on the order of Mary's husband and consort Sigismund.

In January 1387, Elizabeth was strangled, while Mary was released in July of the same year, by the effort of future Frankopan family and Jadwiga's adopted maternal uncle King Tvrtko of Bosnia. Mary, heavily pregnant, died in 1395 under suspicious circumstances.

As a monarch, young Jadwiga probably had little actual power. Nevertheless, she was actively engaged in her kingdom's political, diplomatic and cultural life and acted as the guarantor of Władysław's promises to reclaim Poland's lost territories. In 1387, Jadwiga led two successful military expeditions to reclaim the province of Halych in Red Ruthenia, which had been retained by Hungary in a dynastic dispute at her accession. As she was an heiress to Louis I of Hungary herself, the expeditions were for the most part peaceful and resulted in Petru I of Moldavia paying homage to the Polish monarchs in September 1387.[5] In 1390 she began a correspondence with the Teutonic Knights, followed by personal meetings in which she opened diplomatic negotiations herself.

Most political responsibilities, however, were probably in Władysław's hands, with Jadwiga attending to cultural and charitable activities.[5] She sponsored writers and artists and donated much of her personal wealth, including her royal insignia, to charity, for purposes including the founding of hospitals. She financed a scholarship for twenty Lithuanians to study at Charles University in Prague to help strengthen Christianity in their country, to which purpose she also founded a bishopric in Vilnius. Among her most notable cultural legacies was the restoration of the Kraków Academy, which in 1817 was renamed Jagiellonian University in honour of the couple.[6]

On 22 June 1399 Jadwiga gave birth to a daughter, Elizabeth Bonifacia. Within a month, both the girl and her mother had died from birth complications. They were buried together in Wawel Cathedral. Jadwiga's death undermined Jogaila's position as King of Poland, but he managed to retain the throne until his death 35 years later.

It is not easy to state who was Jadwiga's heir in line of Poland, or Poland's rightful heir, since Poland had not used primogeniture, but kings had ascended by some sort of election. There were descendants of superseded daughters of Casimir III of Poland (d. 1370), such as his youngest daughter Anna, Countess of Celje (d. 1425 without surviving Issue), and her daughter Anna of Celje (1380–1416) whom Władysław II Jagiełło married next. Anna had a daughter Jadwiga of Lithuania born in 1408. Jadwiga died in 1431, reputedly poisoned by Sophia – Władysław's last wife, after a faction of Polish nobles supported Jadwiga against Sophia's sons. Emperor Sigismund himself was an heir of Casimir III, as eldest son of his mother Elisabeth of Pomerania, who was since 1377 the only surviving child of Elisabeth of Poland, herself daughter of Casimir III from his first marriage with Aldona Gediminaite of Lithuania. The family possession of the principality of Kuyavia belonged to Sigismund, who was the heir with the strongest hereditary claims. However, the leaders of the country wanted to avoid Sigismund and any personal union with Hungary.

Other descendants of Władysław the Short (through the Silesian dukes of Świdnica) included the then Emperor Wenceslas, king of Bohemia, who died without Issue in 1419, as well as the Silesian dukes of Opole and Sagan. Male-line Piasts were represented most closely by the Dukes of Masovia, one of whom had aspired to marry Jadwiga in 1385. Also various princes of Silesia were of Piast descent, but they had been largely pushed aside since the exile of Vladislas II, Duke of Kraków.

Jadwiga's husband Władysław Jagiello kept the throne, mostly because no claimant with clearly better stature appeared. He was never ousted, not even after the death of his second wife, and eventually succeeded to found a dynasty in Poland by the sons of his last wife, who were not related to earlier Polish rulers.

From the time of her death, Jadwiga was venerated widely in Poland as a saint, though she was only beatified by the church in the 1980s. She was canonized in 1997, by Polish-born Pope John Paul II. Numerous legends about miracles were recounted to justify her sainthood. The two best-known are those of "Jadwiga's cross" and "Jadwiga's foot."

Jadwiga often prayed before a large black crucifix hanging in the north aisle of Wawel Cathedral. During one of these prayers, the Christ on the cross is said to have spoken to her. The crucifix, "Saint Jadwiga's cross," is still there, with her relics beneath it.

Jadwiga liked to smuggle food from the castle to give to the poor, and carried it in her apron. King Jagiello was informed of these excursions at night, and was told that Jadwiga might be giving information to rebels. King Jagiello was enraged and decided to find the meaning of these wanderings after dark. One night, while Jadwiga was leaving by a secret door, Jagiello sprang out of the bushes and demanded to see what was in her apron. A miracle occurred and the food she was carrying (which would have earned her a death sentence[citation needed]), turned into a garland of roses. To this day, Jadwiga is always depicted wearing an apron of roses.[citation needed]

According to another legend, Jadwiga took a piece of jewelry from her foot and gave it to a poor stonemason who had begged for her help. When the King left, he noticed her footprint in the plaster floor of his workplace, even though the plaster had already hardened before her visit. The supposed footprint, known as "Jadwiga's foot", can still be seen in one of Kraków's churches.[7]

In yet another legend, Jadwiga was taking part in a Corpus Christi Day procession when a coppersmith's son drowned by falling into a river. Jadwiga threw her mantle over the boy's body, and he regained life.[8]

On 8 June 1979 Pope John Paul II prayed at her sarcophagus; and the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments officially affirmed her beatification on 8 August 1986. The Pope canonized Jadwiga in Kraków on 8 June 1997.

Jadwiga's body has been exhumed at least three times. The first time was in the 17th century, in connection with the construction of a bishop's sarcophagus next to Jadwiga's grave. The next exhumation took place in 1887. Jadwiga's complete skeleton was found, together with a mantle and hat. Jan Matejko made a sketch of Jadwiga's skull, which later helped him paint her portrait (see above).

On 12 July 1949, her grave was again opened. This time she was reburied in a sarcophagus paid for by Karol Lanckoroński, which had been sculpted in white marble in 1902 by Antoni Madeyski. The queen is depicted with a dog, a symbol of fidelity, at her feet. The sarcophagus is oriented with Jadwiga's feet pointing west, unlike all the other sarcophagi in the cathedral. On display next to the sarcophagus are the modest wooden orb and scepter with which the queen had been buried – she had sold her jewels to finance the renovation of the Kraków Academy, known today as Jagiellonian University.

References:

^ S. A. Sroka, Genealogia Andegawenów, Kraków ^ Hedvigis Rex Polonie: M. Barański, S. Ciara, M. Kunicki-Goldfinger, Poczet królów i książąt polskich, Warszawa 1997, also Teresa Dunin-Wąsowicz, Dwie Jadwigi (The Two Hedwigs) ^ a b Crown of Queen Jadwiga, at Talisman World Coins and Medals Accessed 31 March 2011 ^ This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Library of Congress Country Studies. - Poland. ^ a b (Polish) Paweł Jasienica (1988). "Władysław Jagiełło". Polska Jagiellonów. Warsaw: Państwowy Instytut Wydawniczy. pp. 80–146. ISBN 83-06-01796-X ^ (English) Stanisław Waltos (2004). "The Past and the Present". Jagiellonian University's web page. Jagiellonian University. Archived from the original on 2006-08-19. http://web.archive.org/web/20060819142255/http://www.uj.edu.pl/dispatch.jsp?item=uniwersytet/historia/historiatxt.jsp&lang=en#narodziny. Retrieved 2006-08-04. ^ [1] ^ Catholic World Culture Chapter XXIII, pp. 146-151 ^ Psałterz floriański Further reading:

Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Jadwiga of Poland Heinze, Karl (8 December 2003). Baltic Sagas. Virtualbookworm Publishing. ISBN 1-58939-498-4. Lukowski, Jerzy; Hubert Zawadzki (20 September 2001). A Concise History of Poland. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-55917-0. Turnbull, Stephen; Richard Hook (30 May 2003). Tannenberg 1410. Osprey Publishing. ISBN 1-84176-561-9. -------------------- Jadwiga Andegaweńska (ur. między 3 października 1373 a 18 lutego 1374[4] w Budzie, zm. 17 lipca 1399 w Krakowie) – najmłodsza córka Ludwika Węgierskiego i Elżbiety Bośniaczki, królowa (władca) Polski od 1384, święta Kościoła katolickiego, katolicka patronka Polski. Spis treści [ukryj] 1 Jadwiga – tytulatura, pieczęcie i herby 1.1 Tytulatura 1.2 Sfragistyka 2 Biografia 2.1 Królewna Jadwiga 2.1.1 Data i miejsce urodzenia 2.1.2 Imię (imiona) 2.1.3 Wczesne dzieciństwo 2.2 Królowa Jadwiga 2.2.1 Objęcie tronu i koronacja 2.2.2 Sprawa małżeństwa z Wilhelmem Habsburgiem 2.2.3 Małżeństwo z Władysławem Jagiełłą 2.2.4 Działalność polityczna 2.2.5 Działalność kulturalna i fundacje kościelne 2.2.6 Śmierć i pochówek 2.2.7 Eksploracja grobu 3 Proces kanonizacyjny 3.1 Dzień obchodów 3.2 Patronat 3.3 Ikonografia 3.4 Relikwie 3.5 Wywód rodowodowy 4 Zobacz też 5 Uwagi 6 Przypisy 7 Bibliografia 8 Linki zewnętrzne Jadwiga – tytulatura, pieczęcie i herby[edytuj]

Tytulatura[edytuj] Królewna węgierska i polska Jadwiga była określana w dokumentach jako Hedvigis filia regis Ungarie et Polonie. Po ostatecznym desygnowaniu Jadwigi przez Elżbietę Bośniaczkę na władczynię Polski królewnie przysługiwał tytuł heres Polonie (dziedziczka Polski)[5]. Po koronacji pełna tytulatura Jadwigi brzmiała: Hedvigis Dei gracia regina Polonie, necnon terrarum Cracovie, Sandomirie, Siradie, Lancicie, Cuiavie, Pomoranieque domina et heres (Jadwiga z Bożej łaski królowa Polski, a także pani i dziedziczka ziem krakowskiej, sandomierskiej, sieradzkiej, łęczyckiej, kujawskiej i pomorskiej), a w wersji skróconej serenissima princeps domina Hedwiga regina Polonie lub Hedwigis regina Polonie. Po zawarciu małżeństwa z Władysławem Jagiełłą do tytulatury polskiej Jadwigi dodawano tytulaturę litewską i ruską po mężu: Hedvigis regina Polonie, princepsque Lithuanie suprema et heres Russie (królowa Polski oraz najwyższa księżna Litwy i dziedziczka Rusi). W okresie od maja 1395 r. (śmierć siostry Marii, królowej Węgier) do lipca 1397 r. (zawarcie porozumienia ze szwagrem Zygmuntem Luksemburskim na zjeździe spiskim) Jadwiga używała ponadto tytułu heres Ungarie (dziedziczka Węgier)[6]. Sfragistyka[edytuj]

Pieczęć majestatyczna królowej Jadwigi z tytulaturą hedwigis dei gracia regina polo[...]

Pieczęć herbowa królowej Jadwigi z tytulaturą hedwigis dei gra[...] Regina Polonie Kilka pieczęci królowej Jadwigi znanych jest z oryginałów oraz XIX-wiecznych odlewów i odrysów. Wiadomo, że pieczęć majestatyczną królowej odciskano w wosku bezbarwnym, a pieczęć herbową w wosku czerwonym[7]. Na pieczęci majestatycznej, przywieszonej m.in. do dokumentu z 1386 r., wyobrażono smukłą postać Jadwigi z insygniami władzy, siedzącej na gotyckim, okazałym tronie otoczonym tarczami herbowymi. Odrys pieczęci posłużył Janowi Matejce do stworzenia wizerunku Jadwigi na majestacie[8]. Na innej pieczęci Jadwigi, przywieszonej do dokumentu z 1387 r., umieszczono polskiego Orła zwróconego głową, zgodnie z zasadą kurtuazji herbowej, w stronę tarczy węgierskiej linii Andegawenów. Ukazany na pieczęci anioł-tarczownik (tenant – trzymacz tarczy) jest jednym z pierwszych przykładów zastosowania tego schematu ikonograficznego w sfragistyce polskiej[9]. Na małej pieczęci Jadwigi, przywieszonej do dokumentu z 1397 r., wyobrażono herb węgierskich Andegawenów z klejnotem w formie głowy Strusia między dwoma piórami[10]. Legendy pieczęci są częściowo zatarte, jednak mimo ubytków czytelna jest tytulatura Jadwigi: Hedwigis dei gracia regina Polonie[11]. Biografia[edytuj]

Królewna Jadwiga[edytuj] Data i miejsce urodzenia[edytuj] W zgodnej opinii źródeł węgierskich i polskich Jadwiga była ostatnim dzieckiem ze związku Ludwika Węgierskiego i Elżbiety Bośniaczki[12]. Data urodzin przyszłej królowej nie została odnotowana w źródłach i może być ustalona jedynie na podstawie danych pośrednich. Dawniejsza historiografia za datę narodzin Jadwigi uznawała rok 1371, opierając się na błędnym przekazie Jana Długosza[13]. W XX w. historycy ustalili, że w roku 1371 przyszła na świat starsza siostra Jadwigi Maria Andegaweńska, a ostatnie dziecko Ludwika Węgierskiego i Elżbiety Bośniaczki urodziło się pod koniec roku 1373 albo na początku roku 1374[14]. Jan Dąbrowski jako pierwszy zwrócił uwagę na źródła z epoki, z których można wywnioskować, że Jadwiga urodziła się po 3 października 1373 r. (dokument Ludwika Węgierskiego mówiący o dwóch córkach króla i dziecku, które się dopiero narodzi), a przed 17 kwietnia 1374 r. (instrukcja poselska wymieniająca imiennie trzy córki króla, w tym Jadwigę). Przyjął ponadto, że najbardziej prawdopodobny czas narodzin Jadwigi to pierwsze tygodnie roku 1374[15]. Anna Misiąg-Bocheńska za najpóźniejszą możliwą datę narodzin Jadwigi przyjęła dzień 18 lutego 1374 r., ponieważ z zapiski w Kalendarzu katedralnym krakowskim wynika, że 18 lutego 1386 r. Jadwiga była już in annis maturitatis, tj. musiała mieć w tym dniu ukończone 12 lat[16]. Większość współczesnych badaczy przyjmuje, że Jadwiga urodziła się albo w dniu 18 lutego 1374 r.[17], albo kilka dni wcześniej[18], np. w dniu 15 lutego[12] lub najwcześniej 11 lutego[19]. Prawdopodobnym miejscem narodzin królowej Jadwigi był zamek wyszehradzki[20] lub zamek budziński[21] Imię (imiona)[edytuj] Królewna otrzymała imię chrzestne na cześć św. Jadwigi Śląskiej, której kult wówczas mocno się rozwijał albo po prababce Jadwidze, żonie Władysława Łokietka[22]. W dokumentach z epoki imię Jadwigi zapisywano jako Adviga, Hedviga (Heduiga), Hedvigis (Hedwigis, Heduigis), Hedwig[23]. Być może Jadwiga Andegaweńska nosiła również drugie, słowiańskie imię Draga, pod którym występuje w zadarskiej kronice Pawła Pavlovicia. Pierwsze, chrzestne imię Jadwiga mogła otrzymać zgodnie z życzeniem babki Elżbiety Łokietkówny, a drugie nadałaby jej matka[24]. Wczesne dzieciństwo[edytuj] Jadwigę od dzieciństwa przygotowywano do pełnienia roli króla poprzez wykształcenie. Pobyt w środowisku kulturalnym dworu w Budzie sprawił, że Jadwiga posiadła umiejętność czytania, znajomość języków obcych, zamiłowanie do lektury, muzyki, sztuki i nauki[25]. 15 czerwca 1378 została zaręczona z ośmioletnim Wilhelmem z dynastii Habsburgów. Odbyła się nawet ceremonia zaręczyn mających charakter formalnego ślubu pomiędzy dziećmi (sponsalia de futuro). Nie był to jednak kontrakt nierozerwalny. Podpisano zobowiązanie, że strona, która zerwałaby zaręczyny, wypłaci drugiej stronie 200 000 florenów w złocie. Królowa Jadwiga[edytuj] Objęcie tronu i koronacja[edytuj] Na zjeździe w Radomsku obrano Jadwigę Andegaweńską królem Polski. Jesienią 1384 przybyła z Węgier do Polski[26] 16 października tego roku w Krakowie została koronowana przez arcybiskupa gnieźnieńskiego Bodzantę na króla Polski. Wobec jej małoletności ster rządów w państwie dzierżyli możnowładcy małopolscy, pozostający w kontakcie z jej matką Elżbietą Bośniaczką, jednakże nie powołano regenta, ponieważ, jak pisze Jan Długosz, wszystko co mówiła lub czyniła znamionowało sędziwego wieku powagę. Sprawa małżeństwa z Wilhelmem Habsburgiem[edytuj] Kandydaturę Wilhelma Habsburga na męża Jadwigi usilnie popierał Władysław Opolczyk, który nawet opanował 24 sierpnia 1385 zamek wawelski, przygotowując dopełnienie ceremonii małżeństwa. Panowie krakowscy mieli jednak wobec niej zupełnie inne plany, chcąc związać Polskę z Litwą, ofiarowali polską koronę wielkiemu księciu litewskiemu Jagielle, który miał przyjąć chrzest wraz ze swoim państwem (unia w Krewie 14 sierpnia 1385). Kasztelan krakowski Dobiesław Kurozwęcki przepędził austriackiego pretendenta z zamku. Jan Długosz utrzymuje, że zrozpaczona młodziutka królowa, próbowała wówczas wyrąbać toporem bramę wawelską, by uciec z miłością swojego życia na Śląsk (powstrzymać miał ją podskarbi wielki koronny Dymitr z Goraja), jednakże harmonijny związek, jaki stworzyła z Jagiełłą, świadczy o innej motywacji jej postępowania niż uczucie do Habsburga. Małżeństwo z Władysławem Jagiełłą[edytuj]

Polska i Litwa w latach 1386-1434 11 stycznia 1386 w Wołkowysku panowie polscy oznajmili Jagielle, że Jadwiga zgodziła się zostać jego żoną. Królowa odwołała publicznie swoje sponsalia z Wilhelmem. Jagiełło przybył do Krakowa, gdzie 15 lutego 1386 przyjął chrzest. 18 lutego Jadwiga i Jagiełło uroczyście zawarli związek małżeński w katedrze na Wawelu. Historycy wielokrotnie spekulowali na temat relacji pomiędzy Jadwigą i jej mężem, Władysławem II Jagiełłą. Dominuje przekonanie, iż Jadwiga była w tym politycznym związku nieszczęśliwa, ze względu na różnicę wieku, wychowania, kultury itd. Według odmiennej koncepcji zaprezentowanej ostatnio Jagiełło był dla Jadwigi raczej postacią ojcowską, a ich współżycie mogło mieć stosunkowo harmonijny charakter[27]. Działalność polityczna[edytuj] Na wiosnę 1387 stanęła na czele wyprawy rycerstwa polskiego, której celem była rewindykacja zajętej przez Węgrów Rusi Czerwonej. 8 marca 1387 potwierdziła przywileje dla Lwowa, gwarantując mu prawo składu. Tam też 26 września 1387 złożył jej hołd lenny hospodar mołdawski Piotr I. W 1397 w Inowrocławiu odbyła zjazd z wielkim mistrzem krzyżackim Konradem von Jungingenem w celu wynegocjowania powrotu do korony ziemi dobrzyńskiej. Działalność kulturalna i fundacje kościelne[edytuj] Na swoim dworze skupiła elitę intelektualną Polski (Piotr Wysz, Mateusz z Krakowa, Hieronim z Pragi). Zleciła pierwsze w naszej historii tłumaczenie Księgi Psalmów na język polski (zachował się po dziś dzień egzemplarz tego dzieła znany jako Psałterz floriański). Fundowała wiele nowych kościołów oraz uposażała już istniejące klasztory. Opiekowała się szpitalami. W 1397 założyła bursę dla polskich i litewskich studentów przy Uniwersytecie Karola w Pradze. W tym też roku uzyskała zgodę papieża na utworzenie fakultetu teologii na Akademii Krakowskiej. Śmierć i pochówek[edytuj] 22 czerwca 1399 roku urodziła córkę Elżbietę Bonifację, która zmarła 13 lipca 1399 roku. Sama Jadwiga zmarła cztery dni później prawdopodobnie na gorączkę połogową[28]. W testamencie zapisała swój majątek Akademii Krakowskiej. Kiedy w latach 80. XX wieku otworzono jej grobowiec, znajdujący się w Katedrze Wawelskiej, stwierdzono, że istotnie klejnoty grobowe wykonane były ze skóry i drewna. Grób powszechnie czczonej królowej nie znalazł oprawy godnej jej wyjątkowej pozycji i zasług. Być może w oczekiwaniu na rychłą kanonizację Jadwigi Andegaweńskiej odwlekano budowę bardziej okazałego grobowca. Przez ponad 200 lat skromna płyta lub tumba nad pochówkiem królowej znajdowała się po północnej stronie prezbiterium, obok wielkiego ołtarza katedry[29]. Według XVI-wiecznych źródeł napis na grobie Jadwigi Andegaweńskiej brzmiał: Sidus Polonorum, hic iacet Hedvigis eorum Regina[30]. Pierwotna, być może wapienna płyta grobowca Jadwigi została zniszczona podczas przebudowy prezbiterium katedry w 1 poł. XVII w. Wówczas to nieoznaczone miejsce pochówku królowej zniknęło pod nową posadzką. W 1634 r. wykonaną z czarnego marmuru płytę komemoratywną z nową inskrypcją, fundacji biskupa Piotra Gembickiego, umieszczono po lewej stronie wielkiego ołtarza, na występie podwyższenia posadzki[31]. Eksploracja grobu[edytuj] Królowa Jadwiga została pochowana w Katedrze Wawelskiej. Jej sarkofag kilkakrotnie otwierano. Po raz pierwszy zrobiono to w XVII w., przy okazji przebudowy katedry. W 1887 r. naukowcy w obecności Jana Matejki, który przygotowywał portrety polskich władców, otworzyli grobowiec powtórnie. Napisano wówczas sprawozdanie – skromna trumna zawierała kompletny szkielet i królewski płaszcz. Malarz wykonał szkic czaszki, po czym szczątki królowej umieszczono w miedzianej trumnie, a tę z kolei w większej, dębowej. Następnie grób ponownie zamurowano. W 1949 r. naukowcy przeprowadzili badania na szczątkach w celu ustalenia wyglądu królowej. Stwierdzono, że monarchini prawdopodobnie została pochowana razem ze zmarłą trzy tygodnie po narodzinach córeczką, której szkielet się nie zachował, ponieważ kości noworodka nie były dostatecznie ukształtowane. Sarkofag ozdobiono nagrobkiem z 1902 r., wykonanym przez Antoniego Madeyskiego (fundacja Karola Lanckorońskiego). Odbyły się uroczystości pogrzebowe. W 1976 r., z uwagi na rozwój medycyny sądowej, postanowiono przeprowadzić kolejne badania[32]. Ustalono, że Jadwiga Andegaweńska była kobietą silnej budowy i bardzo wysoką (177-180 cm)[a]. Nie wykryto zmian patologicznych kośćca, jednak zwrócono uwagę na szczególnie wąską i wysoką miednicę, której budowa mogła spowodować komplikacje przy porodzie. Wiek monarchini w chwili zgonu, oceniony na podstawie badań anatomicznych, był wyższy od metrykalnego o kilka lat (28-30 lat)[b].

Nagrobek Jadwigi Andegaweńskiej w Katedrze na Wawelu Według zapisów kronikarzy Święta Jadwiga uprawiała surowe umartwienia. Jej kierownikiem duchowym był krakowski dominikanin Henryk Bitterfeld, autor traktatu o Komunii świętej i traktatu ascetyczno-mistycznego napisanego specjalnie dla Jadwigi. W swym życiu harmonijnie łączyła kontemplację z działalnością praktyczną, co wyraziła również w nawiązującym do Ewangelii symbolu dwóch przeplatających się liter MM (Maria i Marta), który poleciła umieścić na ścianach swej komnaty, a chcąc, by chwała Boża nieustannie rozbrzmiewała w katedrze wawelskiej założyła i zapewniła utrzymanie Kolegium Psałterzystów, którzy dzień i noc śpiewali psalmy przed Najświętszym Sakramentem. Ufundowała również i częściowo własnoręcznie wyhaftowała racjonał – drogocenną szatę liturgiczną dla biskupów krakowskich, zachowaną po dziś dzień, używaną podczas największych uroczystości. Jadwiga uprawiała działalność charytatywną – ufundowała szpital w Bieczu, uposażyła szpitale w Sandomierzu i Sączu oraz otoczyła opieką liczne inne szpitale miejskie i klasztorne, w tym szpital św. Jadwigi Śląskiej w Krakowie na Stradomiu. Wykazywała wrażliwość nie tylko na biedę materialną, ale stawała również w obronie ludzkiej godności: do króla Władysława Jagiełły, kompensującego pieniędzmi krzywdę chłopów miała powiedzieć: „A któż im łzy powróci?”. Proces kanonizacyjny[edytuj]

Po śmierci Jadwigę otoczono kultem. 31 maja 1979 Jadwiga została beatyfikowana przez zatwierdzenie kultu, a kanonizowana 8 czerwca 1997. W obu przypadkach osobiście Jan Paweł II[33] ogłosił ją odpowiednio błogosławioną i świętą. Dzień obchodów[edytuj] Na świecie Wspomnienie liturgiczne w Kościele katolickim na świecie obchodzone jest 17 lipca[34][35]. W Polsce Od dnia kanonizacji wspomnienie w Kościele katolickim w Polsce obchodzone jest 8 czerwca i ma rangę wspomnienia obowiązkowego[36]. Patronat[edytuj] Święta Jadwiga jest patronką Polaków i apostołką Litwy. Władze kilku polskich miejscowości związanych ze świętą Jadwigą podjęły uchwały w sprawie ustanowienia jej patronką miasta. Decyzje rad miejskich zostały oficjalnie potwierdzone przez papieży Jana Pawła II i Benedykta XVI, którzy ogłosili świętą Jadwigę patronką m.in. Nieszawy w roku 2003[37], Radomska w roku 2008[38] i Inowrocławia w roku 2009[39]. Ikonografia[edytuj] W ikonografii św. Jadwiga przedstawiana jest w stroju królewskim. Jej atrybutem są buciki, z czym związana jest legenda: Przy budowie kościoła NMP na Piasku, który istnieje do dziś, królowa Jadwiga sama doglądała robót. Pewnego dnia jej czujne oko dojrzało kamieniarza, który był smutny. Kiedy zapytała o powód, odpowiedział, że w domu zostawił ciężko chorą żonę, boi się, że go zostawi z drobnymi dziećmi, a nie ma pieniędzy na lekarza. Królowa, nie namyślając się, oderwała ze swego bucika złotą klamrę, wysadzaną drogimi kamieniami, i oddała ją robotnikowi, aby zapłacił dla lekarza. Nie zauważyła tylko, że stopę położyła na kamieniu oblanym wapnem. Odbity ślad bucika wdzięczny kamieniarz obkuł dokoła i wraz z kamieniem wmurował w zewnętrzną ścianę świątyni. Do dzisiaj można go oglądać.[40] Relikwie[edytuj] W 1987 r. relikwie królowej Jadwigi umieszczono w północno-wschodniej części Katedry – w mensie ołtarza z czarnym krucyfiksem, z którego według legendy przemówił do bardzo młodej wówczas dziewczyny Chrystus, doradzając jej ślub z Jagiełłą. Neogotycki nagrobek pozostał pusty[41]. 18 października 2009 w Budapeszcie odsłonięto i poświęcono pierwszy pomnik św. Jadwigi na Węgrzech[42].

Zobacz też[edytuj]

Portal: Święci beatyfikowani i kanonizowani przez Jana Pawła II kult świętych modlitwa za wstawiennictwem świętego berło królowej Jadwigi 1 Regiment Pieszy Koronny im. Królowej Jadwigi Sodalicja Świętej Jadwigi Królowej Wojna o Księstwo Halicko-Włodzimierskie w latach 1340-1392 Uwagi

↑ Długość kompletnego szkieletu Jadwigi w ułożeniu anatomicznym wynosiła ponad 175 cm, natomiast same pomiary kości długich dały szacunki w granicach 165-172 cm i nie mogą być traktowane jako nadrzędne wobec pomiaru długości całego szkieletu in situ. ↑ Prawdopodobnie więc królowa szybko osiągnęła dojrzałość i jej organizm wcześnie zaczął się starzeć, ponieważ źródła z czasów królowej wskazują datę jej urodzenia z dokładnością do kilku dni – według nich Jadwiga w chwili zgonu miała 25 lat. Przypisy

↑ Historia Polski. T. 1: Polska do 1586. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN, 2007, s. 320. ISBN 978 84 9819 808 9. ↑ Jadwiga. T. 12. Rzeczpospolita, 2007, s. 9, seria: Władcy Polski cykl dodatków Rzeczpospolitej. ↑ Niekiedy spotyka się (Mariusz Trąba, Lech Bielski: Poczet królów i książąt polskich. Wyd. 2. Bielsko-Biała: Wydawnictwo PARK Sp. z o.o., 2005, s. 285. ISBN 83-7266-284-3.) nieprawidłową datę 15 października, podawaną za omyłkowym zapisem Kalendarza katedry krakowskiej i błędnym przekazem Długosza. Z najwcześniejszych zapisek wynika, że koronacja miała miejsce, zgodnie z tradycją, w niedzielę, która przypadała na dzień 16 października (Jerzy Wyrozumski: Królowa Jadwiga. Miedzy epoką piastowską i jagiellońską. Kraków: Universitas, 1997, s. 83-84. ISBN 83-7052-934-8.). ↑ Stanisław Andrzej Sroka: Genealogia Andegawenów węgierskich. Kraków: Towarzystwo Naukowe Societas Vistulana, 1999, s. 54–55. ISBN 83-909094-1-3. ↑ Jarosław Nikodem: Jadwiga król Polski. Wrocław: Ossolineum, 2009, s. 98. ISBN 9788304049789.; Jerzy Wyrozumski: Królowa Jadwiga. Miedzy epoką piastowską i jagiellońską. Kraków: Universitas, 1997, s. 84. ISBN 83-7052-934-8. ↑ J. Wyrozumski, Królowa Jadwiga między epoką piastowską a jagiellońską, Kraków 1997, s. 92; J. Nikodem, Jadwiga król Polski, Wrocław 2009, s. 221, 292, 300-301, 305. W dokumentach Jadwiga Andegaweńska nie była nazywana królem (rex), ale – zgodnie ze swoją płcią – królową (regina), chociaż została koronowana na króla Polski. ↑ M. Gumowski, Pieczęcie królów polskich, Kraków 1909, nr 6, 8-10; S. K. Kuczyński, Pieczęcie książąt mazowieckich, Wrocław-Warszawa-Kraków-Gdańsk 1978, s. 91-92 – Pieczęcią majestatyczną uwierzytelniano zwykle dokumenty o charakterze wieczystym, natomiast pieczęcią średnią albo sygnetową (zwykle herbową) inne dokumenty i korespondencję. ↑ H. Widacka, Lilia Wawelu. ↑ T. Żebrawski, O pieczęciach dawnej Polski i Litwy, Kraków 1865, s. 42; F. Piekosiński, Pieczęcie polskie wieków średnich, „Wiadomości Numizmatyczno-Archeologiczne”, t. XVII, 1935, nr 580; S. K. Kuczyński, Pieczęcie książąt mazowieckich, Wrocław-Warszawa-Kraków-Gdańsk 1978, s. 172. ↑ T. Żebrawski, O pieczęciach dawnej Polski i Litwy, Kraków 1865, s. 41. ↑ M. Gumowski, Pieczęcie królów polskich, Kraków 1919, nr 6, 8-10. ↑ 12,0 12,1 Z. Wdowiszewski, Genealogia Jagiellonów i Domu Wazów w Polsce, Kraków 2005, s. 63. ↑ J. Nikodem, Jadwiga król Polski, Wrocław 2009, s. 79. W Annales Długosz podał wiele nieprawdziwych informacji o Jadwidze i Jagielle – opinia o wartości przekazu Długosza m.in. w: J. Nikodem, op. cit., s. 132-133. ↑ E. Rudzki, Polskie królowe. Żony Piastów i Jagiellonów, wyd. II, Warszawa 1990, s. 63; J. Wyrozumski, Królowa Jadwiga między epoką piastowską a jagiellońską, Kraków 1997, s. 73; J. Nikodem, Jadwiga król Polski, Wrocław 2009, s. 79-80. ↑ J. Dąbrowski, Królowa Jadwiga, „Przegląd Powszechny”, R. 50, 1933, t. 200, s. 201-220. Taką ostrożną datację podtrzymuje np. Jerzy Wyrozumski – J. Wyrozumski, Królowa Jadwiga między epoką piastowską a jagiellońską, Kraków 1997, s. 67. ↑ A. Misiąg-Bocheńska, Dwie daty z życia królowej Jadwigi, „Polonia Sacra”, t. 3, 1949 s. 267-275. ↑ A. Strzelecka, Jadwiga Andegaweńska, [w:] Polski Słownik Biograficzny, t. X, Wrosław-Warszawa-Kraków 1962-1964, s. 291. ↑ J. Nikodem, Jadwiga król Polski, Wrocław 2009, s. 80. ↑ Rekonstruując horoskop Jadwigi, Jerzy Dobrzycki ustalił tzw. medium coeli – w dniu narodzin Jadwigi Słońce zjadnowało się w znaku Ryb (E. Śnieżyńska-Stolot, Tajemnice dekoracji Psałterza Floriańskiego. Z dziejów średniowiecznej koncepcji uniwersum, Warszawa 1992, przyp. 80 na s. 79), a przed reformą gregoriańską pierwszym dniem wejścia Słońca w ten znak Zodiaku był dzień 11 lutego. (A. Januszajtis, Zegar astronomiczny w Kościele Mariackim w Gdańsku, Gdańsk 1998, s. 29). ↑ E. Rudzki, Polskie królowe. Żony Piastów i Jagiellonów, wyd. II, Warszawa 1990, s. 63. ↑ E. Śnieżyńska-Stolot, Tajemnice dekoracji Psałterza Floriańskiego. Z dziejów średniowiecznej koncepcji uniwersum, Warszawa 1992, przyp. 80 na s. 79. ↑ J. Nikodem, Jadwiga król Polski, Wrocław 2009, s. 132-180. ↑ J. Wyrozumski, Królowa Jadwiga między epoką piastowską a jagiellońską, Kraków 1997, s. 91, 92, 94; J. Nikodem, Jadwiga król Polski, Wrocław 2009, s. 80, 98. ↑ S. Nimano, Słowiańskie imię królowej Jadwigi, „Analecta Cracoviensia”, t. 19, 1987, s. 143-155. ↑ M. Barański, S. Ciara, M. Kunicki-Goldfinger (autorzy not historycznych): Poczet królów i książąt polskich Jana Matejki. Warszawa: Świat Książki, 1996, s. 141-143. ISBN 83-7129-995-8. ↑ Por. Roman Grodecki, Dzieje Polski średniowiecznej. Tom 2. Od roku 1333 do 1506, Kraków 1995, s. 215. ↑ Jarosław Nikodem, Jadwiga. Król Polski, Ossolineum, Wrocław 2009, s. 350-362; Kamil Janicki, Jadwiga i Jagiełło, „Ciekawostki historyczne”, 19 września 2010. ↑ Na to umierali polscy królowie. ↑ P. Mrozowski, Polskie nagrobki gotyckie, Warszawa 1994, s. 25, 261-262. ↑ Napis przytaczali Miechowita i Wapowski. Sprawozdanie Mieczysława Tobiasza z 1949 r. [w:] Z. Święch, Klątwy, mikroby i uczeni, t. I, Warszawa 1988, wyd. II, s. 157. ↑ S. Starowolski, Monumenta sarmatorum viam universae carnis ingressorum, Kraków 1655, s. 5; P. Mrozowski, Polskie nagrobki gotyckie, Warszawa 1994, s. 262. ↑ . Podsumowanie wyników badań Jana Olbrychta i Mariana Kusiaka oraz dyskusji na temat wieku i wzrostu królowej Jadwigi w: Jan Widacki: Detektywi na tropach zagadek historii. Katowice: Wydawnictwo Śląsk, 1988. ↑ Kalendarium pontyfikatu Jana Pawła II. na WIEM (encyklopedia). ↑ Santa Edvige (Jadwiga) (wł.). ↑ Hedwig (Jadwiga) von Polen (von Anjou) = Ekumeniczny leksykon świętych (Ökumenisches Heiligenlexikon) (niem.). ↑ Kalendarz liturgiczny diecezji polskich, Stan na 30 października 2011 (pol.). KKBiDS. [dostęp 2012-03-02]. ↑ http://wloclawskie24.pl/articles/9125-nieszawa-swieto-miastaNieszawa - Święto Miasta. Wloclawskie24.p, 2011-06-03. [dostęp 2011-12-22]. ↑ Uchwała Nr XXI/168/08 Rady Miejskiej w Radomsku. Radomsko-Oficjalna Strona Miasta, 2008-03-27. [dostęp 2011-11-13]. ↑ Św. Jadwiga Królowa - patronką Inowrocławia. oficjalna strona miasta Inowrocław. [dostęp 2011-12-22]. ↑ Święta Jadwiga (Wincenty Zaleski SDB, „Święci na każdy dzień”) i Dwie Jadwigi (Teresa Dunin-Wąsowicz). na interia.pl. ↑ Groby Królewskie - Jadwiga. na stronie o kryminalistyce i medycynie sądowej. ↑ Budapeszt: pomnik św. Jadwigi królowej – Radio Watykańskie [opublikowano: 2009-10-18]. Bibliografia[edytuj]

Jarosław Nikodem, Jadwiga. Król Polski, Ossolineum, Wrocław 2009. Święta królowa Jadwiga (ks. Michał Jagosz) Kolekcja tematyczna – św. Jadwiga królowa Polski – Cyfrowa Biblioteka Narodowa Polona Święta Jadwiga Królowa – materiały na brewiarz.katolik.pl [ostatnia aktualizacja: 27.05.2010]

Linki zewnętrzne

http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jadwiga_Andegawe%C5%84ska

view all

Hedvig, királynő's Timeline

1373
October 3, 1373
Buda, Budapest, Hungary
1386
February 18, 1386
Age 12
Of,Visegrad,Pest,Hungary
1399
June 22, 1399
Age 25
Kraków, Małopolskie, Poland
July 17, 1399
Age 25
Kraków, Małopolskie, Poland
July 19, 1399
Age 25
Kraków, Małopolskie, Poland
????
Poland - aka Hedwig