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James Allred

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Asheboro, Randolph County, North Carolina, United States
Death: Died in Spring City, Sanpete County, Utah, United States
Place of Burial: Spring City Cemetery, Spring City, Sanpete County, UT
Immediate Family:

Son of William Allred; William Allred; Elizabeth Thrasher and Elizabeth Allred
Husband of Sarah Allred; Elizabeth Ann Allred (Davis) and Elizabeth Allred
Father of William Hackley Allred; Martin Carroll Allred; Hannah Caroline Allred; Isaac Allred; Reuben Warren Allred and 17 others
Brother of (No Name); Sarah Allred; Mary Allred; Elizabeth Allred; Isaac Allred and 3 others
Half brother of William M, Allred; Mahlon Allred; John Allred; Stephen Allred Sr. ; Renne Allred and 14 others

Managed by: Private User
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About James Allred

The Allred family is a large family and can trace their pedigree back to William Aldrich Sr. who was born Abt. 1421 in Yarmouth, Norfolk Co. England. Preceed to William Allred Sr., the father of the below James to read about the 12 generations of this Allred family.

Rodney Dalton, Sept. 2008.

The following is a short history of James Allred:

Allred, James, a member of Zion's Camp and presiding Elder of the Allred settlement (now Spring City, Sanpete County, Utah), in 1852, was born Jan. 22, 1788, in North Carolina, the son of William Allred and Elizabeth Thresher. He became a member of the Church at an early day, being baptized Sept. 10, 1832, in Missouri, by Geo. M. Hinkle and was a member of Zion's Camp in 1834, and served as a body guard to the Prophet Joseph Smith. He passed through all of the persecutions of the Saints in Missouri and Illinois, and he was ordained a High Priest by the Prophet Joseph Smith. In 1851 he arrived in Utah and was one of the founders of Spring City in 1852. Bro. Allred, or "Father" Allred, as he was known by his associates, was always a faithful member of the Church. He raised a large family and died in Spring City, Sanpete County, June 10, 1876.

A story of survival - Renewal of Hostilities in Missouri:

It would appear that Hatred's hunger is never fed; it seems to possess an appetite which is insatiable, and can never feel at ease so long as the object of its detestation remains within its reach; and even when that object is removed beyond the immediate power of Hatred to do it harm, as the dragon of the apocalypse when he could not follow the woman he had persecuted into the wilderness, cast out of his mouth a flood of water after her to destroy her-even so Hatred, when baffled in his efforts to destroy his victims, sends out floods of falsehood to overwhelm them by infusing his own venom into the breasts of others; that that destruction which he could not bring to pass himself, might be brought about by another. Such was the course of hate-blinded Missouri towards the Saints of God, whom she had driven beyond her borders. Seeing that she had not destroyed them, but that they were now upon the eve of enjoying an era of prosperity such as they had never enjoyed while within her borders, she employed all her cunning to incite the hatred of the citizens of Illinois against them. But this was not easy of accomplishment; and at first, the misrepresentations of a State that had been guilty of such outrages as those committed by Missouri against the Latter-day Saints, had but little weight in Illinois.

Finding that their accusations against the people whom they had so wronged had little or no effect, an effort was made to give coloring to their statements; and stolen goods were conveyed from Missouri to the vicinity of Commerce, so that when they were found, suspicion might rest upon the people in whose neighborhood the stolen articles were discovered. Nor did their outrages stop at this. But doubtless being emboldened by reason of the general government's refusing to make any effort to redress the wrongs of the Saints, a company of men led by William Allensworth, H. M. Woodyard, Wm. Martin, J. H. Owsely, John Bain, Light T. Lair and Halsay White, crossed over the Mississippi to Illinois, at a point a few miles above Quincy, and kidnapped Alanson Brown, James Allred, Benjamin Boyce and Noah Rogers; and without any writ or warrant of any character whatever, they dragged them over to Missouri, to a neighborhood called Tully, in Lewis County. These unfortunate men were imprisoned for a day or two in an old log cabin, during which time their lives were repeatedly threatened. At one time Brown was taken out, a rope placed around his neck, and he was hung up to a tree until he was nearly strangled to death. Boyce at the same time was tied to a tree, stripped of his clothing and inhumanly beaten. Rogers was also beaten, and Allred was stripped of every particle of clothing, and tied up to a tree for the greater part of the night, and threatened frequently by a man named Monday, exclaiming: "G-d d-n you, I'll cut you to the hollow." He was finally, however, released without being whipped. After they had received this inhuman treatment, their captors performed an act purely Missourian in its character, that is, they gave them the following note of acquittal:

TULLY, MISSOURI, July 12, 1840.

The people of Tully, having taken up Mr. Allred, with some others, and having examined into the offenses committed, find nothing to justify his detention any longer, and have released him.

By order of the committee.

H. M. WOODYARD.

As soon as the people of Commerce and vicinity were informed of this outrage, Gentiles as well as Mormons were loud in their condemnation of it, and at once a mass meeting was called, and resolutions were adopted, expressing their unqualified indignation, and calling upon the governor of Illinois to take the necessary steps to punish those who had committed this outrage, and by vindicating the law, give the Missourians to understand there was a limit beyond which their deeds of violence must not pass.

D. H. Wells, not then a member of The Church, and George Miller were appointed a committee to wait upon Governor Carlin, and lay the ease before him. For this purpose they repaired to Quincy, and at the recital of the cruelties practiced upon the men who were the victims of the Missourians, the governor's wife, who was present at the interview, was moved to tears, and the governor himself was greatly agitated. He promised to counsel with the State attorney, who by law was made his adviser, and promised to take such steps as the ease seemed to require, and the law to justify. Just what was done by Governor Carlin, however, I am unable to learn; but one thing is certain, and that is, the guilty parties were never brought to justice, nor even to a trial-indeed it may be that even then the love which Governor Carlin once had for the Saints, and which at last became dead, had begun to grow cold.

Scarcely had the excitement occasioned by the kidnapping of Allred and his associates subsided, when Governor Boggs of Missouri made a requisition on Governor Carlin, of Illinois, for the persons of Joseph Smith, Jr., Sidney Rigdon, Lyman Wight, P. P. Pratt, Caleb Baldwin and Alanson Brown, as fugitives from justice. Governor Carlin granted the requisition-was it another case of Herod and Pilate being made friends over the surrender of God's Prophet? But fortunately when the sheriff went to Commerce with his requisition, Joseph and his brethren were not at home, and could not be found; so that the officers returned without them. These men were not fugitives from justice, no process had ever been found against them, the governor himself had connived at their escape from the hands of the officers charged with the duty of conducting them from Liberty, Clay County, to Boone County; I and these men did not feel disposed to try again "the solemn realities of mob law in Missouri."

Spring City had a rather unique beginning. Early in 1852, President Brigham Young asked James Allred to take his sons, their wives and families and move south into Central Utah and begin a settlement. The boys were James T. S., Wm. H., Andrew Jackson, Reuben W., Isaac and Franklin Lafayette Allred. After doing some exploring they decided to settle along a creek flowing from the mountains to the east of them. They called the stream Canal Creek. It was first called "The Allred Settlement," but, later when about forty families of converts from Denmark came to join them, it was called "Little Denmark." Since this did not seem appropriate it was named "Spring Town" after the large spring along the line of travel. Indians and explorers made this a camping center. The settlers had no sooner started to farm the land, when the Indians began to drive away their cattle and burn their possessions, causing them to make the move to Manti. Later they moved to Fort Ephraim and it was not until 1859 that they moved back to their former homes.

Spring City as a settlement dates back to 1852, when Pres. Brigham Young advised Father James Allred to select a place for a settlement where he could locate with his numerous posterity and kindred and preside over them. Complying with this advice, Father Allred, early in the spring of 1852, examined the tract of country lying along Canal Creek and finally decided on the present site of Spring City for a settlement March 22, 1852. Four days later the Allred’s commenced making improvements. James T. S. Allred hauled a small log house with him from Manti with an ox team. The settlers re-erected this dwelling on the present site of Spring City in one day; it was a sawed log building about 16 feet square. During the summer of 1852 other houses were built, and a townsite surveyed. The little colony became known from the beginning as the Allred Settlement with Father James Allred as the patriarchal head of the family. Meetings were held principally in his own log cabin, and about a dozen families spent the winter of 18521853 in the little settlement. In the spring of 1853 farming operations were resumed successfully, and the colony was duly organized as a bishop's ward in April, 1853, with Reuben W. Allred as Bishop. When the Walker Indian War broke out in July, 1853, the settlements in Sanpete Valley were exposed to great danger, and after the raid on the Mt. Pleasant Settlement July 19, 1853, about a dozen families from that place moved into the Allred Settlement, where all hands hastily built a fort by moving their log houses together. This fort was completed July 28, 1853. Notwithstanding the precaution of building a fort, the Indians, under Walker, made a raid on the Allred Settlement and drove off 200 head of horned stock and 30 head of horses, which was nearly all the stock belonging to the colony. In the face of these Indian troubles the Allred Settlement was vacated July 31, 1853, the people moving to Manti. While the families from the Allred Settlement were safely housed in Manti, the brethren returned to the vacated settlement on Canal Creek in companies to water and harvest their grain. In October, 1853, while James Allred and others were attending conference in Salt Lake City, they learned of the arrival of the first large company of Scandinavian emigrants, who had reached Salt Lake City Sept. 31, 1853. An influence was brought to bear upon them to settle in Sanpete Valley, and a large number of them responded, and accompanied James Allred to the location on Canal Creek, which was re-settled and called “Little Denmark.” The Scandinavian saints lived in a kind of United Order, dividing their provisions and labor, some working on their houses while others stood guard. In the meantime the Indians continued to be hostile, and so the settlement on Canal Creek was vacated a second time, Dec. 19, 1853, the people moving to Manti. On Jan. 6, 1854, the Indians burned the fort and everything which had been left by the settlers on Canal Creek. For nearly six years after that no new attempt was made to settle on Canal Creek, but in the summer of 1859 the permanent settlement of Spring City (originally called Springtown) was made by a little company of settlers who arrived on Canal Creek June 28, 1859; it included William Black, George Black, Joseph S. Black, and others with their families. These settlers

immediately had a town site containing 640 acres surveyed, and the surrounding farming lands were surveyed into 10 and 5 acre lots, which were distributed among the brethren. About a dozen families spent the winter of 18591860 in that new settlement, which since that time has enjoyed a gradual growth and continued prosperity.

The new settlement was organized as a bishop's ward in January, 1860, with Christen G. Larsen as Bishop. During the Black Hawk Indian War, James Meeks and Andrew Johnson were killed by Indians near Spring City, April 13, 1867. Bishop Larsen was succeeded in 1868 by Fred Olsen, who in 1882 was succeeded by James A. Allred, who died April 3, 1904, and was succeeded by Lauritz Orson Larsen, who died Sept. 28, 1913, and was succeeded by Samuel Allred, who in 1928 was succeeded by James F. Ellis, who presided Dec. 31, 1930, on which date the Spring City Ward had a Church membership of 1,021, including 166 children. The total population of the Spring City Precinct was 1,050 in 1930, of which 992 resided in Spring City.

James ALLRED (1788-1876), born in North Carolina, marched with Zion's Camp and lived through the expulsion of the Saints from Far West and Nauvoo. He was kidnapped in Nauvoo and held in Missouri, but was eventually released. He settled Spring City, Utah.

Source: History of Utah by Orson F. Whitney

James Allred and Elizabeth Warren Allred:

James Allred, son of William and Elizabeth Thrasher Allred, was born in North Carolina, Randolph County, January 22, 1788. His wife Elizabeth Warren was born in South Carolina on May 6, 1787. They were married November 14, 1803, and moved to the Ohio River near Yellow Banks. In 1811, they moved to Missouri, Monroe County, a distance of 500 miles. Here they settled down on the 10th of September, 1832. They were baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Elder George M. Hinlsle at which place a large branch of the Church was built up and called “Salt River Branch.”

In the fall of 1833, James Allred, two sons, and two sons-in-law joined the company of the Prophet Joseph. In June 1834, they with the Prophet’s company of 200 brethren journeyed to the upper part of Missouri in order to redeem “Zion”, as they thought, and to reinstate a portion of the Saints who had been driven from their homes in Jackson County, Missouri.

In the year 1835, they moved to Clay County, Missouri, and in the spring of 1837, to Caldwell County where the Saints commenced to gather to build up a Stake of Zion. James Allred was elected Judge and also President of the Southern Firm. When the Church left Missouri in the spring of 1839, he moved to Pittsfield, Pike County, Illinois. In 1839, the same year, he moved to Commerce (afterwards called Nauvoo). Where he was ordained a High Priest and a member of the High Council. He was one of the Prophets bodyguards in the Nauvoo Legion and held several other responsible positions. He helped to build the Nauvoo Temple In the year 1842, James Allred was ordained a Seventy and a member of the 4th Quorum of Seventies....

About this time the Saints began to be persecuted very hard and more especially heads of the Church. The Prophet and his brother Hyrum were continually being hunted and persecuted by the mobs....

In the year 1844, in June, the Prophet, John Taylor, and Willard Richards were taken to the Carthage Jail, Hancock County, Illinois. At the jail the Prophet handed his sword to James and said, “Take this---you may need it to defend yourself.” James carried this sword with him to Utah and it is now on display at the Utah State Capitol.

On the 27th of June, the Prophet and Hyrum were murdered in the Carthage Jail. The Prophet previously prophesied that Willard Richards would not be harmed and true to the prophecy he escaped without a scratch, but President Taylor was badly wounded by four bullets.

James took President Taylor from the prison to take him to his home. He only had his wagon to carry him and the trip was long by road, so they decided that a sleigh could be pulled behind the wagon by going through the fields which were mostly swamps, and this would be only 18 miles distance from Nauvoo. Accordingly, they secured a sleigh, fastened it behind the wagon and placed President Taylor in it. He was bleeding badly and so weak from the loss of blood that he could scarcely speak. His wife sat beside him bathing the blood from his wounds and trying to make the journey as easy as possible. The sleigh was much easier riding than the wagon and by the time they reached home President Taylor was able to talk loud enough that James could hear him from where he sat in the wagon.

After the murder of the Prophet, President Brigham Young with the help of the Apostles then took up the work for which the Prophet had laid the foundation. Persecutions began to rage again with awful fury and in the fall of 1845, the mob commenced burning houses.

On the 29th of February 1846, James crossed the Mississippi River to go west with the heads of the Church. He arrived at the Missouri River July 15, of the same year. Here he was made President of the High Council and acting Bishop at Council Point.

In the spring of 1851, he started west to the Rocky Mountains. He arrived at Salt Lake in October of the same year. He went to Manti, Sanpete County, in March 1852, and April 14, 1852, moved to Canal, now known as Spring City. He was called to preside over this branch of the Church.

At the spring conference in 1853, he was ordained a Patriarch in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In July of the same year, the Indians drove most of the cattle and horses of the settlement off, and on the last day of the month, they moved back to Manti.

In October, he moved back to Canal again with a company of 40 Danish families and 10 families of his own relatives. On the 17th of December of the same year, he was called to vacate and again moved back to Manti. In February 1854, in company with 50 families he commenced to build a fort at Cottonwood (now called Ephraim). It was built of stone, the walls being 10 feet high. This was finished and James presided over it until 1860, then he moved back to Canal where he resided until his death. He was a faithful member of the Church and strict in relations with the Word of Wisdom. He fully endorsed all the principles of the Gospel as far as he knew them. For many years he was a regular attendant of Quorum and public meetings and always ready to devote to the poor.

A friend of the widows and orphans, exemplary to his family. He taught them to be honest and industrious, trustworthy and confidential. He told the Bishop he was ready to join the United Order and all that he had was for the building up of the Kingdom of God.

He raised 12 children of his own and 8 orphan grandchildren (all lived to have children of their own).

He left the wife of his youth after living together for nearly 73 years, and posterity of 447 souls. He had 12 children, 104 grandchildren, 302 great grandchildren, 29 great great grandchildren. Five of his sons were present at his funeral. He laid his hands on his oldest son William Hackley’s head the day before he died and blessed him. All of his children lived to embrace the new and everlasting covenant, and those that are dead died strong in the faith. The most of his posterity lived in Utah and are members of the Church.

He lacked 12 days of being 92 years old when he died. His wife was 90 years old but had been blind for 6 years. His funeral took place on the 11th, and was the largest that had ever been held in this place. Thirty-nine wagons and sleighs loaded with people followed him to his last resting-place.

Apostle Orson Hyde preached his funeral sermon and made some sincere remarks concerning his life, labors, and faithfulness as a Patriarch, which was satisfactory to the family and friends. He died at Spring City, Utah, January 10, 1876, at 92 years of age.

Elizabeth Warren died April 23, 1879, at Rabbit Valley, Utah. Her body was later brought to Spring City by her husband, Samuel Allred and Reuben Warren Allred, Jr.

Her parents were Thomas Warren and Hannah Catherine Warren. Children of James and Elizabeth: William Hackley, Martin Carrel, Hannah, Sally, Isaac, Reuben Warren, Wiley Payne, Nancy Chummy, Eliza Maria, James Tillman Sanford, John Franklin Lafayette, Andrew Jackson.

Received from Loa Allred Aiken great-great granddaughter of James Allred and Elizabeth Warren

Death of a Patriarchal in Israel:

Father James Allred, son of William and Elizabeth Allred died in Spring City, Sanpete County, Utah, January 10, 1876. Father Allred was born in North Carolina, Randolph County, January 22, A.D. 1788. He was married to Elizabeth Warren, November 14, 1803 and moved to Kentucky, Warren County. Two years afterward moved to the Ohio River near Yellow Banks. In 1811 he moved to Tennessee, Bedford County. In 1830 he moved to Missouri, Oats(?) County, which was afterward divided into two counties, they living in Monroe County. On the 10th day of September 1832, he and most of his family were baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints, at which place a large branch of the Church was built up by G.M. Hinkle and others, and called the Salt River Branch.

In June 1834, he went up in Zion’s Camp with the Prophet and others to redeem Zion. In September 1835, he moved to Clay County Missouri, and in the year of 1836, to Caldwell County where he was elected county judge and also president of the Southern firm. When the Church left Missouri the spring of 1839, he moved to Pittsfield, Pike County, Illinois. In the fall of the same year he moved to Commerce, afterward called Nauvoo, where he was ordained a High Priest, and a member of the High Council, and was one of the Prophet’s life guards in the Nauvoo Legion. He also held several other responsible positions, helping to build the Nauvoo Temple, and assisting in giving the endowments therein. On the 9th day of February 1846, he crossed the Mississippi River to go west with the heads of the Church and others. He arrived at the Missouri River July 15th of the same year, and here he was president of the High Council and acting Bishop at Council Point. In the spring of 1851 he started to the mountains, arriving at Salt Lake in October of the same year and went to Manti City, Sanpete County. In March 1852 he moved to Canal, now known as Spring City and was called to preside over this branch of the Church. At the spring conference of 1853 he was ordained a Patriarch in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. In July of the same year the Indians drove most of the cattle and horses off belonging to the settlement, and they moved on the last day of the month back to Manti. In October they moved to Canal again with a company of Danish Brethren, about 40 families, and ten families of his own relatives, On the 17th of December of the same year, he was called to vacate and again moved back to Manti. In February 1854 in company with fifty families, he commenced to build a fort on Cottonwood, now called Ephraim, of stone, 10 feet high, which he finished and presided over for some time. In 1860 he moved back to Canal, or what is now called Spring City, where he resided until his death...

He raised twelve children of his own and eight orphan children, who all lived to have children of their own. He leaves a wife of his youth, after living together nearly 73 years, and a posterity of 447 souls, viz; 12 children, 104 grandchildren, 302 great grandchildren and 29 great-great grandchildren, who sprang from the two. Five of his sons were present at his death, who were the only ones living. He laid his hands on the head of his oldest son on the day before his death, and blessed him, who is now nearly 73 years of age. All of his children lived to embrace the new and everlasting covenant, and those that are dead, died strong in the faith. Most of his posterity lived in Utah are members of the Church. A large number of them have been baptized in the U.O. He was 92 years old

lacking 12 days. His wife, nearly 90 years old, has been blind for six years and is healthy and strong at present.

The funeral took place on the 11th and was one of the largest ever held in this place, 39 wagons and sleight loaded with people followed him to his last resting-place. President Orson Hyde preached his funeral sermon, and made some pertinent remarks touching the life and labors and faithfulness of the Patriarch, which was satisfactory to the family and friends. He died as he had lived, faithful to the Gospel of the Son of God.

J.T.S. Allred

Copied off by Mrs. S.A. Allred, Manti, Utah, November 10, 1926.

-------------------- LDS patriarch

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James Allred's Timeline

1784
January 22, 1784
Asheboro, Randolph County, North Carolina, United States
1804
April 14, 1804
Age 20
Franklin Co.,Georgia,U.S.
April 14, 1804
Age 20
Franklin, Heard County, GA, USA
1806
September 8, 1806
Age 22
Warren County, Kentucky, United States
1808
September 20, 1808
Age 24
Ohio, Kentucky
September 20, 1808
Age 24
1810
1810
Age 25
Bedford, Tennessee, United States
1811
April 13, 1811
Age 27
Bedford, Bedford County, TN, USA
April 13, 1811
Age 27
Randolph Co.,N-Cr.
1813
June 28, 1813
Age 29
Nashville, Bedford, Tennessee, USA