James Patrick Calhoun (1688 - 1741) MP

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Birthdate:
Birthplace: Crosh House, Newton Stewart, Tyrone, Ireland, United Kingdom
Death: Died in Chestnut Level, Lancaster, Pennsylvania
Managed by: Robert "Bobby" Hobson Jr
Last Updated:

About James Patrick Calhoun

There is an account of the Calhoun family, primarily that of John C.Calhoun, to be found in Notable Southern Families, Armstrong, Vol. I, II,Gen. Pub. Co. 1918-22, Chattanooga, pp. 46-58 . It is quite certain that James Calhoun, Sr. was a member of the same family.

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James Patrick CALHOUN

Birth1688, Newtownstewart (Crosh House), Tyrone, Ireland

Death1741, Chestnut Level, Lancaster, Pennsylvania

FatherReverand Alexander CALHOUN

MotherLady Judith HAMILTON

Misc. Notes

In Ireland, the Calhouns spelled their name Colhoun (Colquhoun in some records) before moving to the States.

Patrick and Catherine took their children to America in 1733, after her Stewart children were grown. They landed either in New York or Philadelphia and moved to Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania, where they settled in the Chestnut Level area. Around 1748, some time after Patrick’s death, Catherine moved her family to some new lands that were opening up in Augusta Co., Virginia.

ChildrenJames (1716-1760)

Ezekiel (1720-1762)
William (1725-1790)
Patrick (1727-)

Descendants of Patrick Calhoun

Generation No. 1

1. PATRICK1 CALHOUN was born in Donegal, Ireland.

Child of PATRICK CALHOUN is:

2. i. JAMES2 CALHOUN, b. 1680, Donegal County Ireland.


Generation No. 2


2. JAMES2 CALHOUN (PATRICK1) was born 1680 in Donegal County Ireland. He married CATHERINE MONTGOMERY.

Notes for JAMES CALHOUN:

Some Descendants of David McWhorter (McWhirter) (ca. 1741-1789) and his wife Mary Poston (Posten) McWhorter (1750-1846) compiled by Shelley McWhorter Wright (Mrs. Clifton P.) of Chattano oga Tennessee.

Dr. Ernest E. Trice, in his book referred to elsewhere, pg. 45, states:"Scotch-Irish immigration into the Valley of Virginia, stimulated by the new land policy, began in 1732. In that year Joist Hite, a Hollander, migrated from Philadelphia with 15 families in addition to his own , the most being Scotch Irish. Included in the number were the ancestors of Andrew Jackson, John C. Calhoun, Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis."

There is an account of the Calhoun family, primarily that of John C.Calhoun, to be found in Notable Southern Families, Armstrong, Vol. I, II,Gen. Pub. Co. 1918-22, Chattanooga, pp. 46-58 . It is quite certain that James Calhoun, Sr. was a member of the same family. Mrs. Armstrong does not trace the descendants of James Calhoun, the Second, eldest son of James Calhoun the Emigrant and his wife Catherine Montgomery Calhoun. He was born in Donegal County Ireland a bout 1716. He was killed in the Indian Massacre at Long Cane Creek, February 1, 1760, being a bout 44 years of age. (P. 48)

Mrs. Armsrong traced the Calhoun Family back to a younger son of King Conock of Ireland, the name Conock finally becoming Calhoun.

The family first went to Pennsylvania, then to the present Wythe County, VA. They arrived at Calhoun's Settlement in February of 1756. The settlement was broken up in 1760 by the Indians . "They were overtaken by the Indians about a mile below Patterson's Brigade on Long Cane, and after a desperate engagement, a large portion of the settlers were killed, among them James Calhoun, the eldest." (Memoirs of John Ewing Calhoun) Twenty-three members of the little party, including Mrs. James Calhoun (Catherine Montgomery), and her son James, were massacred . Patrick, one of the surviving Calhoun brothers, erected stones to mark the site of the mass acre. James Calhoun, the Emigrant, was born in Ireland about 1680 and had evidently died some years before the Massacre. His wife, Catherine, who was 76 years old in 1760, was born in Ireland in 1684.


Child of JAMES CALHOUN and CATHERINE MONTGOMERY is:

3. i. JAMES3 CALHOUN, b. 1716, Donegal, Ireland; d. February 01, 1760, Indian Massacre at Long Cane Creek.


Generation No. 3


3. JAMES3 CALHOUN (JAMES2, PATRICK1) was born 1716 in Donegal, Ireland, and died February 01, 1760 in Indian Massacre at Long Cane Creek. He married SUSANNAH LONG, daughter of JOSEPH LONG and ANN.


Notes for SUSANNAH LONG:

In her family book, Mary Jane Constock states that the James Calhoun, who was massacred on Feb . 1, 1760 was married in Cumberland Co. (now Union) Pa. to Susanna Long, sometimes referred t o as Nancy and as Ann. She was daughter of Joseph and Ann Long and a sister of Agnes Long who married William Calhoun (brother of this James Calhoun). No descendants of couplenor proof of marriage given.


Child of JAMES CALHOUN and SUSANNAH LONG is:

i. MARTHA4 CALHOUN, m. JAMES WILSON.

Notes for MARTHA CALHOUN:

Elizabeth Willson's father, James Willson, was killed at the Battle of Cowpens on January 17 , 1781. (Pension records of Martha Calhoun Willson Anderson). Martha later married a William Anderson, and evidently her children were also known by the step-father's name of Anderson, because there was confusion among the descendants for many years whether the name was "Willson" o r "Anderson." For that reason the court records regarding this are included in this work (Some Descendants of David McWhorter...).The records show that this second marriage proved to b e not legal because Mr. Anderson still had a living wife whom he had not divorced. Martha Calhoun and James Willson had four children, three of them being Elizabeth, Mary W. Langston and James Willson. The petititon of Mrs. Mary W. Langston for a pension states the death date of he r mother, Martha Willson Anderson, as being on the 31 day of January, 1840.

The 1800 U.Sl Census of Pendleton District, S.C. lists a Martha Anderson, with 2 white males ( 10-16), one white female (under 10) and one white female (45-0ver).

Mrs. Shelley McWhorter Wright joined the DAR on the services of James Willson in the Revolutionary War. Her National DAR number is 395254.

Notes for MARTHA CALHOUN:

[Child of JAMES WILSON and MARTHA CALHOUN is:

2. i. ELIZABETH2 WILLSON, b. March 15, 1776, South Carolina; d. July 10,1840, Walhalla, S.C..


   

Copyright 1996 These are my own working genealogy files that I share with you. The errors are my own. But, perhaps they will give you a starting point. All original writing is copyrighted. Webmaster


JAMES2 CALHOUN (PATRICK1) was born 1680 in Donegal County Ireland. He married CATHERINE MONTGOMERY.

Notes for JAMES CALHOUN:

Some Descendants of David McWhorter (McWhirter) (ca. 1741-1789) and his wife Mary Poston (Posten) McWhorter (1750-1846) compiled by Shelley McWhorter Wright (Mrs. Clifton P.) of Chattano oga Tennessee.

Dr. Ernest E. Trice, in his book referred to elsewhere, pg. 45, states:"Scotch-Irish immigration into the Valley of Virginia, stimulated by the new land policy, began in 1732. In that year Joist Hite, a Hollander, migrated from Philadelphia with 15 families in addition to his own , the most being Scotch Irish. Included in the number were the ancestors of Andrew Jackson, John C. Calhoun, Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis."

There is an account of the Calhoun family, primarily that of John C.Calhoun, to be found in Notable Southern Families, Armstrong, Vol. I, II,Gen. Pub. Co. 1918-22, Chattanooga, pp. 46-58 . It is quite certain that James Calhoun, Sr. was a member of the same family. Mrs. Armstrong does not trace the descendants of James Calhoun, the Second, eldest son of James Calhoun the Emigrant and his wife Catherine Montgomery Calhoun. He was born in Donegal County Ireland a bout 1716. He was killed in the Indian Massacre at Long Cane Creek, February 1, 1760, being a bout 44 years of age. (P. 48)

Mrs. Armsrong traced the Calhoun Family back to a younger son of King Conock of Ireland, the name Conock finally becoming Calhoun.

The family first went to Pennsylvania, then to the present Wythe County, VA. They arrived at Calhoun's Settlement in February of 1756. The settlement was broken up in 1760 by the Indians . "They were overtaken by the Indians about a mile below Patterson's Brigade on Long Cane, and after a desperate engagement, a large portion of the settlers were killed, among them James Calhoun, the eldest." (Memoirs of John Ewing Calhoun) Twenty-three members of the little party, including Mrs. James Calhoun (Catherine Montgomery), and her son James, were massacred . Patrick, one of the surviving Calhoun brothers, erected stones to mark the site of the mass acre. James Calhoun, the Emigrant, was born in Ireland about 1680 and had evidently died some years before the Massacre. His wife, Catherine, who was 76 years old in 1760, was born in Ireland in 1684.


Child of JAMES CALHOUN and CATHERINE MONTGOMERY is:

3. i. JAMES3 CALHOUN, b. 1716, Donegal, Ireland; d. February 01, 1760, Indian Massacre at Long Cane Creek.

Mr. Calhoun:

I have the history of the Calhoun Family which includes part

of Andrew Pickens family. I found the Calquhoun Family (This

was the way their name was spelled and later changed to Calhoun.) The father of the 4 sons and daughter and wife _________Montgomery died in Lancaster Co.,Pennsylvania before his family immigrated to Augusta Co.,SC and later years this family migrated and settled in the Old 96 District, SC. which later became Abbeville Co.,SC. This early family was moving to Augusta, Ga. with other settlers

when they were attacked by Indians and Mrs. Calhoun was killed and also one son James. She also had a little grand-

daughter killed d/o William and also the Indians kidnapped

another small daughter of Williams. She was found about 12

years later living in an Indian Village but was returned.

I began my study of the Calquhoun Families in trying to locate my ancestors Kirkpatricks. I was at a dead end and

started following and learning about the Calquhouns since I

had read where the Kirkpatricks had inherited land in Scotland and took the name of their land which was Calquhoun. I have the history of the Calhouns you are searching for and will be happy to share the information with you. Please E-mail me in a couple of weeks as I am visiting family in FL. "Bitsie" Burt

http://www.oblevins.com/OBlevins/D0000/G0000076.html#I1581

NameJames Patrick CALHOUN

Birth1688, Newtownstewart (Crosh House), Tyrone, Ireland

Death1741, Chestnut Level, Lancaster, Pennsylvania

FatherReverand Alexander CALHOUN

MotherLady Judith HAMILTON

Misc. Notes

In Ireland, the Calhouns spelled their name Colhoun (Colquhoun in some records) before moving to the States.

Patrick and Catherine took their children to America in 1733, after her Stewart children were grown. They landed either in New York or Philadelphia and moved to Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania, where they settled in the Chestnut Level area. Around 1748, some time after Patrick’s death, Catherine moved her family to some new lands that were opening up in Augusta Co., Virginia.

Spouses

1Catherine MONTGOMERY

Birth1684, Near Convoy House, County Donegal, Ireland

Death1 Feb 1760, Abbeville, Abbeville County, South Carolina (Near Long Canes Creek)

FatherHugh MONTGOMERY (ca1640-ca1702)

MotherMary SNODGRASS

Misc. Notes

Following the death of Alexander, Catherine remarried in 1713, in County Donegal, Ireland to James Patrick Calhoun, son of Reverand Alexander Calhoun and Lady Judith Hamilton. Patrick and Catherine took their children to America in 1733, after her Stewart children were grown. They landed at New York or Philadelphia and moved to Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, where they settled in the Chestnut Level area. Around 1748, some time after Patrick’s death, Catherine moved her family to some new lands that were opening up in Augusta County, Virginia. In 1755 the Indians became more active and Catherine moved again to the Long Cane Creek area of Abbeville, South Carolina. They moved in the middle of winter and got there in February 1756. The place for a while was called North and South Forks of Calhoun Creek, where it joined the Little river. They were sixteen miles from the nearest Indian settlement and thought they would be safe there. The morning of January 31, 1760 a messenger came through the little settlement and told them that the Indians were on the warpath and moving toward their area. The afternoon of January 31st and the morning of February 1st were spent loading wagons and getting provisions ready to move out. About noon on February 1st, some 200-250 settlers moved out for Augusta, Georgia, a larger town about 40 miles southeast of their location. They had only gone about 10 miles when in crossing the Long Canes Creek, several wagons got stuck. By the time they had all the wagons across the creek it was dark so they camped for the night. Soon after dark, they were attacked by a band of Cherokee Indians. Some of the settlers escaped by horseback, some on foot, but most of them scattered finding shelter in the trees or whereever they could hide. Mostly women and children were killed as 23 settlers were left dead at the sign of the massacre. The Indians had burned all the wagons and nearly all the goods were stolen. In the group that was killed, Catherine Montgomery Stewart Calhoun was among them. She was 76 years old. A momument to the dead, including Catherine, was erected in the 1790’s by Catherine’s son, Patrick Calhoun. Two small girls, ages 3 and 5 of the Calhoun’s were abducted by the Indians. One eventually returned, but the other was never heard from again.

The following articles appeared in the South-Carolina Gazette:

“Yesterday se’night the whole of the Long-Cane Settlers, to the number of 150 souls, moved off with most of their effects in Waggons; to go towards Augusta in Georgia, and in a few hours after their setting off, were surprized and attacked by about 100 Cherkees on horseback, while they were getting their waggons out of a boggy place. They had amongst them 40 gunmen, who might have made a very good defence, but unfortunately their guns were in the waggons; the few that recovered theirs, fought the Indians half an hour, and were at last obliged to fly. In the action they lost 7 waggons, and 40 of their people killed or taken (including women and children) the rest got safe to Augusta whence and express arrived here with the same account on Tuesday morning.”

“Canes, who were attacked by the Cherokees on the 1st Instant, as they were removing their wives, children and best effects, to Augusta in Georgia for safety, is just come to town and informs us, ‘That the whole of those settlers might be about 250 souls, 55 or 60 of them fighting men; that their loss in that affair amounted to about 50 persons, chiefly women and children, with 13 loaded waggons and carts; that he had since been at the place where the action happened, in order to bury the dead, and found only 20 of their bodies, most inhumanly butchered; that the Indians had burnt the woods all around, but had left the waggons and carts there empty and unhurt; and that he believes all the fighting men would return to and fortify the Long-Cane Settlement, were part of the rangers so stationed as to give them some assistance and protection.’”

“We have no late advices from Fort Prince George, or any consequence from places in that route. But from Fort Moore, we learn, that a gang of about 18 Cherokees, divided into 8 or 4 parties, on the 15th instant, way-laid, killed and scalped Ulric Tobler, Esq.; a Captain of Militia in those parts, as he was riding from his father’s to that fort; and shot Mr. William Calhoon, who was with him, in the hand; 3 other persons, who were in company escaped unhurt; the Indian who killed Captain Tobler, left a hatchet sticking in his neck, on which were 3 old notches, and 3 newly cut.”

In the fall of 1993, Mr. and Mrs. Tracy L. Forsythe traveled to Abbeville, South Carolina to find the common gravesite of those killed in the massacre. Mr. Forsythe had obtained information and clues concerning the location of the gravesite from different people and also from historical articles. They had a difficult time locating the gravesite, as many of the Abbeville townsfolk had not been there in a long time and could not give very specific directions. Mr. Forsythe finally pieced together various clues given to him and was able to locate a sign that read “Indian Massacre Cemetery - 3 miles.” They followed the road until they came to a fork and did not know which way to go. They discovered a small sign in the weeds near a fencepost that read: “Indian Massacre Cemetery - 1 mile,” with an arrow pointing down the right-hand fork. They finally found the cemetery after crossing over a narrow, “walk-over bridge” and entering a clearing surrounded by tall pine trees. There was the cemetery containing three stones. One stone was for Catherine Montgomery Stewart Calhoun, another was very old and they could not tell if it had any inscription. The third looked new with the names of four Norris family members who had also been killed in the massacre. After all the travels over many dirt roads, the Forsythes now know how to get to the cemetery. Go to Troy, South Carolina, either via McCormick or Bradley; Troy is very small. When you get into town, you will find a railroad track on one side of the road and a gas station/mechanic shop on the other. Turn to the southwest and cross the tracks and immediately (right now) stop and turn your head and look over your left shoulder and there is an exact duplicate of the sign that was found at the entrance to the cemetery. From there, the sign that says “three miles west is the site of the Massacre” is correct, as the first line on the sign at the cemetery is incorrect. So you go ahead and follow this road as it makes a curve to the left and in a little distance, about 1 mile from the tracks) you will arrive at a fork. Take the left-hand road and you will soon reach another fork where the arrow points to the right-hand lane. Take that fork and soon you will reach the sign that reads “Long Canes Massacre.” A sign points to a road to the left which says, “Massacre Cemetery 1 mile.” You soon arrive at the cemetery from the same direction as the victims. Before crossing the footbridge, there is a large sign which reads:

SOUTH CAROLINA

LONG CANES MASSACRE

Three miles west is a Site

of an attack by Cherokee Indians

upon settlers of Long Canes in the

Cherokee War of 1759-1761. There

on Feb. 1, 1760, about 150 settlers,

refugeeing to Augusta, were overtaken

by 100 Cherokee Warriors. Twenty-three

victims were left on the scene of action

and are there buried in one grave.

Catherine was pregnant with their daughter, Mary, before the death of Alexander. Following Alexander’s death, Catherine remarred in 1713, County Donegal, Ireland, to James Patrick Calhoun.

Some records show Catherine and James with a daughter, Jean, who may have died young. Mary (Catherine and Alexander’s daughter) was born after Catherine’s marriage to Patrick Calhoun so, therefore, was called Mary Calhoun or in some records Catherine Mary Calhoun. 294

ChildrenJames (1716-1760)

Ezekiel (1720-1762)
William (1725-1790)
Patrick (1727-)

-------------------- On arrival in America, spelling of family name was changed from Colhoun to Calhoun.

view all 12

James Calhoun's Timeline

1688
December 23, 1688
Newton Stewart, Tyrone, Ireland, United Kingdom
1713
1713
Age 24
Corkagh, Barony Raphoe, Donegal, Ireland
1713
Age 24
Londonderry, Tyrone, Donegal, Ireland
1716
1716
Age 27
Donegal, Ireland
1720
August 19, 1720
Age 31
Donegal, County Donegal, Ireland
1726
1726
Age 37
Donegal, Ireland
1727
June 11, 1727
Age 38
Donegal, Ireland
1733
1733
Age 44
1741
1741
Age 52
Chestnut Level, Lancaster, Pennsylvania
1931
April 15, 1931
Age 53