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James Little

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Tirarden, Monaghan, Ireland
Death: Died in Aurelius,Cayuga,New York,USA
Cause of death: Wagon Accident
Immediate Family:

Son of William Little, Jr. and Letitia Little
Husband of Susanna Susan Pettingill
Father of Edwin Sobieski Little; Eliza Little; Feramorz Little and James Amasa Little
Brother of Moses Little; Nancy McMillan and Malcoln Little

Managed by: Richard Frank Henry
Last Updated:

About James Little

Birth: May 2, 1790, Tirarden, Cahans, County Monaghan, Ireland

Death: Nov. 15, 1822, Aurelius, Cayuga County New York, USA

Son of William Little and Letitia Smith

Married Susannah Young, 1814/1815, Cayuga County, New York. Susannah was born 1795, died 1852.

Children - Eliza Little, Edwin Sobieski Little, Feramorz Little, James Amasa Little

History - James Little, born about 1790 in Tirarden, County Monaghan, Ireland, came to America with his parents when a boy about 10-12 years old. It has been said by family friends who knew him that he was a short well-knit man with great powers of endurance. He was never known to complain of being weary; he slept about four hours out of 24, and read or worked the remainder of the time. It is also said he was a well read and intelligent man, possessed of quite a collection of books.

Land records at Auburn, New York, show that on March 4, 1816, he bought from Mathius Huffman, 50 acres of Land on lot 50 in Aurelius, Cayuga County, New York. Here he carried on farming and gardening. His sons have in their possession a printed hand-bill, dated 1819 advertising his business. It has been related that he was the first man in New York to sell seeds in packages; also to introduce tomatoes for table use. In order to do this it was necessary to get a permit from Governor Clinton. "Love apples," as tomatoes were then called, were thought to be poisonous and grown in gardens for decoration only.

James Little frequently visited Auburn, the county seat, four miles distant to dispose of his produce and bring home supplies. Near the road was a deep hole from which sand had been taken out for building purposes. It is supposed that the bank had caved in after he had gone over the road, and returning home in the darkness of night, the wheels on one side of his wagon slipped into the pit and turned the conveyance over with him under the loaded wagon.

It was thus he was found dead the next morning. The horse had got loose and was feeding nearby. The time of this incident is set in a letter from John Wildridge Little to Feramorz in which he says, "My father (Moses Little) and family arrived at the Little home in Junius, Seneca County, New York, November 5, 1822, and I should say the accident occurred not more than three weeks after our arrival, making the time the last week of November."

In 1814 or 1815 James married Susannah Young, daughter of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe Young, and is a sister to Brigham Young, the second president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and farmed Colonizer of the West. With her parents she moved from Massachusetts to Cayuga County, New York, in 1813, where she met her husband.

At his death she had the three small boys, the youngest, James, was about two and a half months old. A daughter, Eliza, had died earlier; her tombstone with the inscription partly finished was found in the home by the family succeeding the Little's. A few years later Susannah bound out her youngest son James, and then moved to Mendon, New York, where her father and other family members were living. About 1829, she married William B. Stilson.

While here she learned of the new church organized by the Prophet Joseph Smith. In June she was baptized, and suffered many of the persecutions of the Church. She moved with the Saints to Kirtland, Ohio, and then to Nauvoo in 1840. Here her son James found her in poor circumstances.

The year following she went to St. Louis, Missouri, where Mr. Stilson was located in the Jefferson Barracks, Camp A-3rd Regiment of Infantry, of the U.S. Army. He had left home earlier and had not been heard from for some years. He reenlisted in Company A-3rd Regiment of Infantry and was given family quarters in the Barracks. Sometime in the spring of 1844 Stilson died from "lung fever."

Her son Feramorz, who had also come west, now took his mother and half sister Cornelia to do for them what he could. James had enlisted in the Army and marched away to Fort Jessup. Susannah married a third time, Alonzo Pettingill, and when the Saints were expelled from Nauvoo and began their move westward, she and her husband, a shoemaker, left the camp of the Saints and went to St. Louis to find a means of subsistence.

In February, 1849, Pettingill died of "lung fever." He was buried in a St. Louis graveyard without anything to mark the spot "where lies the remains of a faithful, good man, my father in the Gospel," says James A. Little.

The same year James fitted up an outfit to take his mother and sister Cornelia to the mountains. The date is not remembered, but James A. says, "We left St. Louis quite as soon as the grass began to grow, and arrived at Kanesville about the 1st of June. There they found Susannah's brothers, Phineas H. and Joseph Young with their families. After a pause of about three weeks the journey was continued. On this tedious trek, the greatest fear was from stampedes of their cattle, which over balanced the ever fear of Indians.

She arrived in Salt Lake City 17 October 1849. James A. Little said, the place comprised houses enough for a respectable village, had they been closer together, but they were scattered over a large area of ground. For a time, Susannah lived in a one-room adobe house. On the 16 December, 1849, she got up a little dinner party to which her brother Brigham was invited. The occasion was the marriage of her son James. Soon after he found a house with two rooms, the one for his mother and sister, the other for himself and wife. The food brought with them was soon exhausted. Food was scarce that winter and consisted mainly of shorts bread and a little tea. Susannah died 5 May 1852 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Created by: SMSmith, Record added: Oct 06, 2008, Find A Grave Memorial# 30362713

SOURCE: Find A Grave.com -------------------- http://williamsfamilytrees.com/getperson.php?personID=I11072&tree=steve1

Little, James Male 1790 - 1822 Father Little, William Jr. Mother Smith, Letitia Born 2 May 1790 Terordan, Cahans, Mnghn, Died 15 Nov 1822 Aurelius, Cayuga, New York Buried Nov 1822 Aurelius, Cayuga, New York Family Young, Susanna, b. 7 Jun 1795, Hopkinton, Middlesex, Mass., d. 5 May 1852, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Married 1815 Aurelius, Cayuga, N.Y. Children

 1. Little, Edwin Zobriski,   b. 22 Jan 1816, Aurelius Twp, Cayuga, N.Y.,   d. 18 Mar 1846, Richardson's, Point, Lees, Iowa 
 2. Little, Eliza,   b. Jan 1818, Aurelius Twp, Cayuga, N.Y. ,  d. Bef 1822, Aurelius, Cayuga, New York
 3. Little, Feramorz,   b. 14 Jun 1820, Aurelius Twp, Cayuga, N.Y.   d. 14 Aug 1887, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
 4. Little, James Amasa,   b. 14 Sep 1822, Aurelius Twp, Cayuga, N.Y.,   d. 10 Sep 1908, Kanab, Kane, Utah  

http://www.dayfamilytree.ca/getperson.php?personID=I69176&tree=ddamd

https://familysearch.org/patron/v2/TH-301-43152-55-97/dist.pdf?ctx=ArtCtxPublic HISTORY OF JAMES LIT~LE Ja~es Little, son of William Little and Letitia Smith Little, was bor n in 1790 in Terordan, County Monaghan, Ireland. He came to America with his parents when a boy of ten or twelve years of age. It has been said by family friends who knew him that he was a short, well-knit man with great powers of endurance. He was never known to complain of being weary; he slep about four hours out of the twenty-four, and read or worked the remainder of the ti~e. It is also said he was well read and an intelligent man, possessed quite a colle~tion of books. In 1814 or 15 James married Susannah Young, daughter of John Young und 1bipail (Nabby) Howe Young, and a sister of Brigham Young, the 2nd. President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day .sa ints • ',0/1 th her pare nts she moved to M.assac huse tt s , Cayuga County, 1;8'., Yor k in 1813 '/Thereshe met her husband. Land records at Auburn, New York, s~ow that on March 4 1816 he bou~~ht from Hathius Huf'f'rnan , 50 acres of land in lot 50 In AureL« ius, CitYUgJ. County, N"e'N York. Here he carried out gardening and f'a r-mi.ur, l~is sons had in their possession a printed ha ndb i Tl , dated 1 : F', : '1 \', "i ;Sill -; :. Ls b u s 1n e s s • I t ;~1 S D.? -? n Y'O?1 a t 8 d t.r: u.t h (~ \ I J -: ~ 1'1·~ fj~':>; :.:cll it: r;'~'r: YOl'\( '.o sell seeds in nackav es ; a lso to l!lilt·.!II;;u t oma t cc s for table use. In order to do this it was necessary roret a permit from Governor Clinton. "Love Apples" as tomatoes we ro then called, were thought to be poisonous and ~rown in gardens for decoration only. Jdme s Lit tLe frequent ly vis i ted Auburn, the county seat, four miles distant to dispose of his produce and bring home supplies. 2·~eC1t.hre road 'Jas a dee p hole from which sand had been taken out for building purpDses. It is supposed t~at the bank had caved in after he had ~one over the road in the morning, and ret urnt ng home j n t.he darkness at ni~ht, the wheels on one side of his wagon sliGped into the pit and turned over with him under the loaded wagon, It was thus he was found dead the next morning. 'The horse had got 106se and was feedin~ neQr by. The time of this accident recorded in a letter from John Jildridge Little to Teramorez Little says the accident oC2ured during the latter part of November 1822. At the time of her husband's death, Susannah had three small boys, the your.gest James was about two and a half years old. A duug ht er , El iza, had died earlier, her tombs tone with the Inscr l.ption partly finished was found in the home. A few years later Susannah bound out her youngest son, James, and then moved to Mendon, Hew York, vhe re her father and other members of her faMily were living. Here she learned of the new church, organized by the Prophet Joseph Smith, and became a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In about 1829 she married William ff. Stilson and moved with the Saints to Kirtland, Ohio, and then to Nauvoo in 1840. The rest of her life is recorded in the history of her son, James Amasa Little. He added the middle name "Amasa" to his name.

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=dldecker&id=I11044 History - James Little, born about 1790 in Terordan, County Monaghan, Ireland, came to America with his parents when a boy about 10-12 years old. It has been said by family friends who knew him that he was a short well-knit man with great powers of endurance. He was never known to complain of being weary; he slept about four hours out of 24, and read or worked the remainder of the time. It is also said he was a well read and intelligent man, possessed of quite a collection of books.

Land records at Auburn, New York, show that on March 4, 1816, he bought from Mathius Huffman, 50 acres of Land on lot 50 in Aurelius, Cayuga County, New York. Here he carried on farming and gardening. His sons have in their possession a printed hand-bill, dated 1819 advertising his businesss. It has been related that he was the first man in New York to sell seeds in packages; also to introduce tomatoes for table use. In order to do this it was necessary to get a permit from Governor Clinton. "Love apples," as tomatoes were then called, were thought to be poisonous and grown in gardens for decoration only.

James Little frequently visited Auburn, the county seat, four miles distant to dispose of his produce and bring home supplies. Near the road was a deep hole from which sand had been taken out for building purposes. It is supposed that the bank had caved in after he had gone over the road, and returning home in the darkness of night, the wheels on one side of his wagon slipped into the pit and turned the conveyance over with him under the loaded wagon. It was thus he was found dead the next morning. The horse had got loose and was feeding nearby. The time of this incident is set in a letter from John Wildridge Little to Feramorz in which he says, "My father (Moses Little) and family arrived at the Little home in Junius, Seneca County, New York, November 5, 1822, and I should say the accident occurred not more than three weeks after our arrival, making the time the last week of November."

In 1814 or 1815 James married Susannah Young, daughter of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe Young, and is a sister to Brigham Young, the second president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and farmed Colonizer of the West. With her parents she moved from Massachusetts to Cayuga County, New York, in 1813, where she met her husband.

At his death she had the three small boys, the youngest, James, was about two and a half months old. A daughter, Eliza, had died earlier; her tombstone with the inscription partly finished was found in the home by the family succeeding the Littles. A few years later Susannah bound out her youngest son James, and then moved to Mendon, New York, where her father and other family members were living. About 1829, she married William B. Stilson.

While here she learned of the new church organized by the Prophet Joseph Smith. In June she was baptized, and suffered many of the persecutions of the Church. She moved with the Saints to Kirtland, Ohio, and then to Nauvoo in 1840. Here her son James found her in poor circumstances. The year following she went to St. Louis, Missouri, where Mr. Stilson was located in the Jefferson Barracks, Camp A-3rd Regiment of Infantry, of the U.S. Army. He had left home earlier and had not been heard from for some years. He reenlisted in Company A-3rd Regiment of Infantry and was given family quarters in the Barracks. Sometime in the spring of 1844 Stilson died from "lung fever."

Her son Feramorz who had also come west now took his mother and half sister Cornelia to do for them what he could. James had enlisted in the Army and marched away to Fort Jessup. Susannah married a third time, Alonzo Pettingill, and when the Saints were expelled from Nauvoo and began their move westward she and her husband, a shoemaker, left the camp of the Saints and went to St. Louis to find a means of subsistence. In February, 1849, Pettingill died of "lung fever." He was buried in a St. Louis graveyard without anything to mark the spot "where lies the remains of a faithful, good man, my father in the Gospel," says James A. Little.

The same year James fitted up an outfit to take his mother and sister Cornelia to the mountains. The date is not remembered, but James A. says, "We left St. Louis quite as soon as the grass began to grow, and arrived at Kanesville about the 1st of June. There they found Susannah's brothers, Phineas H. and Joseph Young with their families. After a pause of ab out three weeks the journey was continued. On this tedious trek, the greatest fear was from stampedes of their cattle, which over balanced the ever fear of Indians.

She arrived in Salt Lake City 17 October 1849. James A. Little said, the place comprised houses enough for a respectable village, had they been closer together, but they were scattered over a large area of ground. For a time, Susannah lived in a one-room adobe house. On the 16 December 1849 she got up a little dinner party to which her brother Brigham was invited. The occasion was the marriage of her son James. Soon after he found a house with two rooms, the one for his mother and sister, the other for himself and wife. The food brought with them was soon exhausted. Food was scarce that winter and consisted mainly of shorts bread and a little tea. Susannah died 5 May 1852 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Family links:

Children:
Edwin Sobieski Little (1816 - 1846)*
Feramorz Little (1820 - 1887)*
James Amasa Little (1822 - 1908)*
Spouse:
Susannah Susan Young (1785 - 1852)*

----------------------------------

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/LITTLE/2001-01/0980055539

James (1790-1822)

------------------------------------

https://familysearch.org/patron/v2/TH-303-42405-22-94/dist.pdf?ctx=ArtCtxPublic

Little, James1

(1790-1822) 

Introduction


Most of the information that will appear in this sketch comes from “History of James Little 1790-1822,” by Sandra Little Chatterley, no date. She, in turn, gives as one of her sources, Descendants of William Little, Jr., and Allied Families, by Harriet F. Little, BYU Press, 1958. (This book has since been reprinted and is available from Amazon Books—at the cost of $60). In addition, the LDS Church History Library has a manuscript, available on a CD, of part of the life of James A. Little, youngest son on James Little and Susannah Young. Differing data from Chatterley and James A. Little will be given in footnotes.


Birth, early life


James Little was born 2 May 1790 in Tirarden, Monaghan, Ireland, the third child born to William Little Jr. (1751-1821) and Letitia Smith (1754-1817)3 . William Little Jr.’s ancestors were:

William Little, born in Garvy, Tyrone Co., Ireland. 
John Little, (William’s father) born in Nockboy, Armagh, Ireland 
Thomas Little, (John’s father) “an emigrant from London, 
England, in company with William, Prince of Orange, and 
arrived in Karvickfurgus, Ireland in the year of our Lord 
1690.”4


Apparently, James Little was one of nine children—according to an old letter written by James’ younger sister, Nancy, who states that the family “consisted of seven boys and two girls”.5

Chatterly adds that we have 

records of only four of the children: Moses, b. Nov 1777, Malcolm, b. 7 Apr 1788, James b. 1790 and Nancy, b. Mar 1795. (Given the eleven-year gap between Moses and Malcolm, it is quite possible Nancy’s statement is correct).




1

For more information on James Little see FamilySearch-Family Tree: Susannah Young (James’ wife). 

3

According to a record in possession of Malcolm Little Jr., viewed by James A. and Feramorz Little 11 Dec 1875, 

“William Little Jr. was born in County Tyrone, town Cavankilgran, Ireland.” Source: The Life of James A. Little, p. 1 of CD, LDS Church History Library. 4

The Life of James A. Little, p. 1 of CD 

5

Chatterly, p. 1 

Littles → America


James Little was seventeen years old—just beginning his adult life-- when he came to this country. Of the arrival of the Littles in America Chatterly wrote:

“The family is thought to have emigrated from County Monaghan, Ireland. 

Moses, James and Nancy came with their parents. The Little family emigrated on the 11th

of April 1807 and arrived in New York City on the 19th
of May 1807. We 

are not sure if Malcolm was with them, but he also came in 1807.

We can only imagine what travel across the ocean was like in those days. 

There was no doubt much to interest a young man such as James. He probably helped care for his younger sister, Nancy and helped in many other ways.

We do not know what the Littles’ situation was, but many Irish emigrants 

came to America for economic reasons. The fact that he came indicates that he was probably not the oldest son in his family, as the oldest son inherited the land belonging to the family. After laws were passed making it illegal to break up the family’s holdings into small parcels, there was nothing to do but leave and seek a living somewhere else.

(Chatterly, p. 1 of download) 

James siblings- their life directions


Moses married in New York, but later moved to Scotland, then England and finally back to Ireland. He became the father of nine children.


James’ brother, Malcolm married twice. Four of his children were born to the first marriage and three children to the second. He spent his married life in Seneca County, NY.


James’ sister, Nancy, became the mother of eleven children. Eight were born in New York and three in Ohio.


First residence: Seneca Lake, NY


One of the first decisions William Little Jr. had to make when he arrived in this country was: Where to live? Much of the coastal area of New York, Connecticut and surrounding states had already been taken and was under cultivation and development. However, land was available at rock-bottom prices in the western part of New York. In addition, the area near Lake Ontario was flat and very conducive to farming. Perhaps William read or heard reports of the area that had been written two hundred years earlier and reaffirmed just twenty years before his arrival: Goiogouen [the early name for the area of Seneca] is the fairest country I have seen in America. It is a tract between two lakes and not exceeding four leagues in width, consisting of almost uninterrupted plains, the woods bordering it are extremely beautiful. Around Goiogouen there are killed more than a thousand deer annually. Fish, salmon, as well as eels and other fish are plentiful. Four leagues from here I saw by the side of a river (Seneca) ten extremely fine salt springs.

(1671 Report of a Jesuit missionary priest named Father Raffeix.) 

The positive opinion of the area continued for 200 years. In 1791 a traveler visiting the region wrote:

“The map of the world does not exhibit two lakes equal in magnitude to the 

Seneca and Cayuga, which are so happily situated. The country between these two lakes rises gradually in symmetry from the opposite shores towards the center, producing a pleasing effect. Whenever it reaches a state of cultivation it will become the “Paradise of America.”


William Little, whatever his source of information, finally decided to take his family to the remote western frontier of New York, to the newly-created County of Seneca.6


The first challenge William faced was how to arrive at his destination. Two routes were used in the early 1800s by travelers and would-be settlers. The first was via old Indian trails and rivers, such as the Mohawk. The second option was more southern—travel along the Susquehanna River and Tioga Rivers to Newtown (Elmira), NY and then portage to Seneca County. Both routes were difficult and time-consuming. A person, for example, coming from New York City as were the Littles, could expect to take as much as four to six weeks of poling, rowing, floating, portaging and arduous walking. It was frontier country to which the Littles came. The area was covered by a dense, luxuriant forest, part of the land previously belonging to the Cayuga Indians. However, in 1779 Sullivan’s


6

Actually, Seneca County was not uninhabited by the time William Little and family arrived in 1809-1810. The first 

settlers, taking advantage of the offer of free land in the new “Military Tract” began arriving in the area in 1786- 1789. “Hundreds of veterans settled in this new Military Tract after the war, with more than 300 in Seneca County.”( “Early Settlement in Seneca County” By 1800 there were nearly 5,000 people in Seneca County. In 1820, when the Erie Canal opened, settlers were suddenly able to get their crops to market quickly and obtain urgently needed goods and farm equipment and that fact only made the area much more enticing

raid shattered the Cayugas as a nation—as a punishment for being allies of Britain during the Revolution. In the census of 1810 for Seneca County, William is listed with his family. He settled on Lot #7, which was described in the Balloting Book as being one of the lots in Junius Township #26 (see 1804 map on previous page for location of Junius) reserved for the “gospel & c.” In other words it was reserved for the use of a minister or ministers of the gospel. Samuel North, a Methodist minister, became an occupant of Lot #7 in 1806. It may have been from him the Littles obtained their land. Later, William’s son, Malcolm Little, patented 164 acres of Lot #7 on July 13, 1816, and 155 and 8/10th

acres on September 8, 1827. (As indicated previously, it appears that 

William’s brother, Malcolm lived his entire adult life in Seneca Co., NY).


Of James’ possible early life, Chatterly wrote:


James Little was a young man of about 17 years of age when he came from Ireland. He was old enough to be an asset to a pioneering family. No doubt there was land to be cleared besides many other duties. Perhaps his experiences were common to others of the day who later wrote that they drove the cows morning and evening, to and from distant pastures; chopped and carried in fuel for the parlor fire; took the grain to the mill and fetched the flour; brought lime from the kiln and did errands of the family generally. He also, like Brigham Young, his contemporary, may have had “the privilege of picking up brush, chopping down trees, rolling logs and working amongst the roots and getting shins, feet and toes bruised.

. . . So James grew up, working hard, learning whatever and whenever he could, and 

probably teaching himself much. He must have spent whatever time he could reading. It would be interesting to know what books he had, whether they came across the ocean with the family, or whether they were bartered at the general store, or bought perhaps on a trip to Albany, or from a circuit-riding preacher. Years later James would name his children romantic names, no doubt inspired by the books he read: Feramorz, James, Amasa, Edwin Sobieski and Eliza. A love of growing things must have developed as James grew, helping his father on his farm, raising trees, vegetables and grain. This interest became his chosen life work.”

(Chatterly, pp. 3, 5)

Marriage, family


In 1814 the Littles were living in Junius, Seneca County, New York. As the map to the right shows, Junius is located between and slightly north of the two largest of the “Finger Lakes” Seneca and Cayuga.7

Living just across the Seneca 

7

The Finger Lakes are a pattern of lakes in the west-central section of Upstate New York in the United States. This 

region is defined as a bioregion. They are a popular tourist destination. The lakes are long and narrow (resembling fingers), and are oriented roughly on a north-south axis. The two longest, Cayuga Lake and Seneca Lake, are among the deepest in America. Both are close to 40 miles (64 km) from end to end, and never more than 3.5 miles (5.6 km)

River (which drains Seneca and Cayuga Lakes) in the area of Aurelius a man named John Young had recently acquired land and taken up residence. John Young had several sons and daughters among whom were Susannah Young, age 20, Brigham Young, 14, and Lorenzo Dow Young, 88 . We do not know the circumstances of James Little’s acquaintance and courtship with Susannah Young, but they got married in 1814. James was twenty-four and his wife, twenty.


James’ business venture


Almost immediately after marrying, James began to look for land suitable for farming. He was innovative and ambitious with a desire to do something different. Rather than grow corn, oats or wheat as most farmers did, James envisioned growing vegetables and garden produce—truck farming as it later came to be called. Land records at Auburn, NY, show that on 4 Mar 1816, James bought from Mattius Huffman, 50 acres of land on lot 50 in Aurelius, Cayuga, NY on the Old Seneca Turnpike. “Today a nursing homes stands on the property on the intersection of West Genesse Road and Lime Kiln Road. The house build by James Little probably was torn down sometime after 1875 when James’ son, James Amasa, visited the site and found the home still standing, occupied by a Baker family and the land fenced must as it was when his father farmed there.” (Chatterly, p. 7)


On that plot of land James commenced a farming and gardening enterprise. His sons were said to have in their possession a printed handbill, dated 1819, advertising their father’s business. It is claimed that he was the first man in New York to sell seeds in packages; also to introduce tomatoes for table us. In order to do this it was necessary to get a permit from Governor Clinton. “Love apples,” as tomatoes were then called, were thought to be poisonous and grown in gardens for decorations only. 9


Death of two mothers: Susannah’s and James’


On June 11, 1815 Abigail Young died of consumption. She left five unmarried children: Joseph, Phinehas, Brigham, Louisa and Lorenzo, ranging in age from eighteen to eight. At about the same time10

James’ own mother died. Within two years both fathers, John Young and William 

Little Jr. remarried. Apparently, John Young’s new wife was a widow, with children. Therefore, John sent nearly all his own children off to serve apprenticeships or live with relatives. Brigham, age 14, was apprenticed to a carpenter in Auburn—about 4 miles distant.


wide. Cayuga is the longest (38.1 miles, 61 km) and Seneca the largest in total area. Seneca is the deepest (618 feet, 188 m), followed by Cayuga (435 feet, 133 m), with their bottoms well below sea level. These largest lakes resemble the others in shape, which collectively reminded early map-makers of human fingers. Oneida Lake is generally not considered one of the Finger Lakes, but it is sometimes called the "thumb", while Seneca Lake is the middle finger. 8

Actually, John Young and His wife Abigail “Nabby” Howe Young ended up with eleven children, ten of whom 

reached adulthood. 9

James Little, internet download www.geni.com/people/James-Little/6000000001370356302. The internet 

history of tomatoes adds: “Possibly, some people continued to think tomatoes were poisonous at this time; and in general, they were grown more as ornamental plants than as food. Thomas Jefferson, who ate tomatoes in Paris, sent some seeds back to America” 10

Chatterly states: “Sometime before 1817 James’ mother died and his father remarried a widow, Eleanor Keis. 

Perhaps this was the event which prompted James to leave Junius and strike out on his own.

Joseph, 18, was apprenticed to James Little for miscellaneous “service.” Lorenzo, age 8, lived for a short time with his married sister, Rhoda Greene, and then went to the Littles to learn gardening and tree raising. Even Brigham eventually spent a short time with the James Little family. Lorenzo lived with the Little family for fives years and Brigham may have stayed until James’ death. Both Brigham and Joseph appeared as bondsmen on James Little’s estate papers in 1822.


In 1816 James welcomed Joseph Young, 18, Brigham Young, age 15, and Lorenzo Dow Young, age 9, into his household. Brigham as an apprentice was learning how to be a carpenter, painter and glazier and whether he lived with Susannah and James all the time is not known. Lorenzo Dow, on the other hand, was a young boy and must have worked side-by-side with his Uncle James. Later in life, Lorenzo was keenly interested in horticulture and the raising of fruit trees and vegetables.


Children


James and Susannah lost little time in beginning their family. Over the next six or seven years, four children were born:

Edwin Sobieski Little b 22 Jan 1816 
Eliza Little b. Jan 1818 d. 182211

Feramorz Little b. 14 Jun 1822 
James Amasa Little b. 14 Sep 1822 

1820 Census


In the 1820 census the James Little family was listed with the following members:

James 
Susannah 
2 males under age10 (Edwin and Feramorz) 
1 male from 10-15 (Lorenzo Dow, age 13) 
2 males age 16-25 (Brigham, age 19, possibly Joseph Young, age 23) 

The James Little family at this time was prospering and had quite a few household goods, plus horses, wagons, a cow and hogs.


Family ties


James kept in contact with his family. Moses, of course, had returned to Ireland via Scotland and England, but Uncle Malcolm and Aunt Nancy McMillan were still living in the area. Much much later, in 1875 James’ sons, Feramorz and James A. returned to their birthplace and had a good visit with their Uncle Malcolm. He shared with them information about their family roots


11Eliza, who had died earlier, must have been buried on the family farm. Her tombstone with the inscription partly finished was found in the home by the family succeeding the Littles.” (James Little download, p. 2

and showed them records in his possession tracing the family as far back as Thomas Little who arrived in Ireland in 1690.12


William Little died in 1821 at the age of seventy (1751-1821). Only a year later, his son, James, would also end his earthly existence.


The “good” years.


Of the 1817-1821 period in James’ life, Chatterly wrote:

During the time from 1818 to 1822 James prospered and became a prominent 

farmer in Aurelius. In the minutes of a town meeting April 2, 1822, James was elected tob e one of the overseers of highways. A few months earlier, on December 7, 1821, he and his neighbors, A. B. Munroe, a blacksmith, Samuel Baker and Edmond Wright were granted a petition to be annexed to school district no 5 from district 18.

In the local weekly newspaper, the “Cayuga Patriot,” issued January 3, 1821, James 

advertised an “Everlasting Sweet Pea” he had developed. The description of this plant notes that “. . . t the vines, the last summer, produced fourteen thousand seven hundred and sixty four peas and the vines were thirty eight feet in circumference. After the peas were collected, the vines were in a fine green state of vegetation; were cut and weight twenty two pounds. They were given to cattle, and eaten freely as clover. The green leaves received no injury from winter frost and affords fine fresh feed, at all times, when the snow does not prevent it. Small quantities of seed may be had by application to the subscriber, James Little.”

There also exists a printed hand-bill dated 1819 advertising his business. 

Chatterly continued:

James’ reputation as a nurseryman must have extended for miles around, as one of 

those that owed him money at his death was a man by the name of Consider Fox, who lived in Thompkins County, to the south of Cayuga.

He was said to have been the first man in New York to sell packaged garden seeds. 

He also introduced tomatoes for table use. In order to do this it was necessary to get a permit from Governor Clinton. “Love apples,” as tomatoes were then called, were thought to be poisonous and grown in gardens for decoration only.

(Chatterly, p. 9) 

12

James A. Little CD, p. 1. 

Accidental death


James Little frequently visited Auburn, the county seat, four miles distant, to dispose of his produce and bring home supplies. In 1815 Auburn was a “Dutchy-looking” village of 200 buildings and 1,000 souls, a busy hamlet full of activity and ambition. It was the largest and most important place in western New York. Close to the Erie Canal that was under construction, it was fast-growing. Five years later its population would be 2,230, more than double the 1815 size. With foresight, James could see that his vegetable, seed and tree business and nurseryman in general had a great future.


On 15 Nov 1822 James started for home after one of his business trips. Near the road was a deep hole from which sand had been taken out for building purposes. It is supposed that the bank had caved in after he had gone over the road, and returning home in the darkness of night, the wheels on one side of his wagon slipped into the pit and turned the conveyance over with him under the loaded wagon. It was thus he was found dead the next morning. The horse had got loose and was feeding nearby.13

The local newspaper 

“Cayuga Republican” reported James’ death in the following way:

Wednesday, November 20, 1822 
Fatal Accident 

On Friday night last, about eleven o clock, Mr. James Little, of this town, aged 32, on his way home from this village, in a one horse wagon, lost track

of the road and ran off a bank; his wagon upset, and fell, together with a 

bag or two of flour, & c. on to him. He was found in this situation in the morning, dead. He ahs left a wife and three small children. Mr. Little carried on gardening and raising garden seeds, young fruit trees, &c. on a large scale,

and was a very useful man in his calling, in this part of the State. 

James left no Will. His brother-in-law, Joseph Young, was named the administrator. A document in the Cayuga County Court House Surrogate’s Office files dated December 5, 1822, contains Joseph’s signature, as well as that of Albigience B. Munroe and what may be the earliest known signature of Brigham Young.


The inventory of James’ estate, taken May 29, 1823 lists among numerous household belongings:

3 feather beds and bedding 
1 bookcase with 40 volumes of books 
2 horses 
1 cow 
2 one-horse wagons 

13

The time of this incident is set in a letter from John Wildridge Little to Feramorz in which he says, “My father 

(Moses Little) and family arrived at the Little home in Junius, Seneca County, NY, November 5, 1822 and I should say the accident occurred not more than three weeks after our arrival, making the time the last week of November.” James Little internet download, p. 2

1 plow

2 wooden clocks 
2 silver watches 
1 gun 
1 ax 
1 pitch fork 
$200 worth of garden seeds 
Notes (of debt) from various people totaling about $140 

Burial


James may have been buried on his farm, or in a small cemetery nearby, probably by the side of the baby, Eliza. His grave apparently was not marked since a search for its location by his son James Amasa in 1875 failed to find it.


His widow


Susannah was left a widow, at age 27, with three boys Edwin, 6, Feramorz, 2, and James, 2 mos. 14

Of necessity, Susannah had to give up the farm. The property James had bought reverted 

back to its former owner, Mr. Goodwin, who sold it to Samuel Baker in 1829.


At some point between 1822-25 Susannah moved to Canandaigua, NY where she apparently married Richard Oliphant, but soon left him as he was abusive.

Susannah remarried twice between 1826 and 1844, but both marriages turned out badly.

15


Within a short time, she bound out her youngest son, James, and then moved to Mendon, NY, where her father and other family members were living.


Conclusion


It has been said by family friends who knew him that James was a short, well-knit man with great powers of endurance. He was never known to complain of being weary; he slept about four hours out of twenty-four, and read or worked the remainder of the time. It is also said he was a well-read and intelligent man, possessed of quite a collection of books.


It is unfortunate that James Little suffered such an untimely and premature death. Had he remained alive, he in all likelihood would have joined with his brothers-in-law Brigham, Phinehas, Lorenzo Dow and many others in accepting the message being circulated by Mormon missionaries. Who knows what kind of a contribution he could have made to the newly formed LDS church.


14

It is thought that Eliza, the only daughter, died in about 1822. Mavis Moore Smith, “Susannah Young: 1795-1852 

and Family” p. 5. 15

Note of Family Group Sheet: 1830 Census of Mendon, Monroe, NY (Film #94) lists Susanna LITTLE in Mendon 

with two males under age 10. She probably did not marry STILSON until 1830.

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James Little's Timeline

1790
May 2, 1790
Tirarden, Monaghan, Ireland
1815
1815
Age 24
Cayuga Co., NY, USA
1816
January 22, 1816
Age 25
Aurelius, Cayuga, NY, USA
1818
January 1818
Age 27
1820
June 14, 1820
Age 30
Aurelius,Cayuga,New York , USA
1822
September 14, 1822
Age 32
Aurelius, Cayuga, NY, USA
November 15, 1822
Age 32
Aurelius,Cayuga,New York,USA