James B Morgan, Sr (c.1607 - 1685) MP

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Birthplace: Llandaff, Vale of Glamorgan, Wales, United Kingdom
Death: Died in Groton, New London County, Connecticut, Colonial America
Occupation: Captain, came from Wales 1636/ New London Deputy to General Court, More about James Morgan:: Immegrent from Wales, m One of the Daughters is the ancestor of Princess Diana who Married Prince Charles of Wales & England
Managed by: Jocelynn Elaine Oakes
Last Updated:

About James B Morgan, Sr

MORGAN Morgan is a Welsh name meaning "By the sea" of "Sea born". The Morgan coat of arms is an escutcheon in green, bearing a lion rampant in gold. James Morgan was born in Wales in 1607, probably in Llandaff, Glamorgan County. The family appears to have moved from Llandaff to Bristol, England, prior to 1636. In March, 1636 James and two younger brothers, John and Miles, sailed from Bristol and arrived in Boston in April following. James may have settled first at Plymouth. He is found at Roxbury near Boston, before 1640. That year he married Margery Hill of Roxbury, August 6, 1640. Early in 1650 he had land granted him at Pequot. On the 25th day of December 1656, he sold his homestead and removed soon after across the river. James Avery, William Meades and Nehemiah and John Smith, were among the first settlers. He was a large proprietor and dealer in lands; distinguished in public enterprises; often employed by the public in land surveys, establishing highways, determining boundaries, adjusting civil difficulties, as a good neighbor and a Christian man, in whom all appear to have reposed a marked degree of confidence and trust. He was one of the townsmen or "Selectmen' of New London for several years, and was one of the first deputies sent from New London Plantations to the General Court at Hartford, and was nine times afterwards chosen a member of that grave assembly, the last time in 1670. He was an active and useful member of the church under Reverend Richard Blinman's ministry, and his name is prominent in every important movement of proceeding. His son James Junior was born March 3, 1642 and married Mary Vine in November of 1666. Like his father he was one of the deputies to the General Court from New London and afterwards on ol the first deputies from the town of Groton in 1708. For several years he was a commissioner to advise and direct the Pequot Indians in the management of their affairs. His daughter Elizabeth married Jonathan Starr. Their descendants are given in the Starr chapter.

  • --------------------
  • James Morgan
  • M, #73917, b. circa 1607, d. 1685
  • Father Sir William Morgan b. c 1560, d. 19 Jan 1629
  • Mother Elizabeth Winter b. c 1562, d. b 1650
  • James Morgan was born circa 1607 at Landaff, Glamorganshire, Wales. He married Margery Hills, daughter of George Hills and Mary Symonds, on 6 August 1640 at New London, New London, CT. James Morgan died in 1685 at Groton, New London, CT.
  • Family Margery Hills b. 16 Jun 1611, d. 28 Apr 1690
  • Children
    • Hannah Morgan+ b. 18 May 1642, d. 12 Dec 1706
    • James Morgan+ b. 3 Mar 1644, d. 8 Dec 1711
  • From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p2460.htm#i73917

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  • I HAVE INCLUDED ONLY THE PARENTAGE OF THE MORGAN LINE, THERE ARE ALSO OTHER LINES INCLUDED IN THE REFERENCE.
  • Register of the Society of Colonial Wars in the District of Columbia, 1904 ... By General Society of Colonial Wars (U.S.). District of Columbia, Albert Charles Peale
  • http://books.google.com/books?id=s08ZDpggmHsC&pg=RA1-PA154&lpg=RA1-PA154&dq=captain+john+morgan+1645+1712+ct&source=web&ots=coHY78rEeQ&sig=RNo-lQ30ByLzIGvHGhdmT_G3V0U&hl=en#v=onepage&q=morgan&f=false
  • Pg.162
    • CALEB ROCHFORD STETSON
    • Clergyman, Washington City, Born, Boston, Massachusetts, April 16, 1871.
  • Great-great-great-grandson of - Humphrey Avery (1699-1788) and Jerusha (Morgan) Avery (1704-1763).
  • Great-great-great-great-grandson of
  • Pg.163
  • - William Morgan (1699---) and Margaret (Avery) Morgan (1674---)
  • Great-great-great-great-great-grandson of - James Morgan, Jr. (1644-1711) and Mary (Vine) Morgan (1641-1689).
  • Great-great-great-great-great-great-grandson of
  • Pg.164
  • - James Morgan (1607-1685) and Margary (Hill) Morgan (---).
  • Pg.165
  • JAMES MORGAN, JR. (1644-1711) of Groton, Connecticut; Captain and Commander of the Dragoon Force of New London County, Connecticut, 1690; Deputy from New London, 1689-1700; Deputy from Groton, 1706
  • JAMES MORGAN (1607-1685) of Groton, Connecticut; Deputy to the General Court at Hartford, 1657 et seq.

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  • Morgan genealogy : A history of James Morgan, of New London, Conn., and his descendants; from 1607 to 1869 ... With an appendix containing the history of his brother, Miles Morgan, ....
  • https://archive.org/details/morgangenealogyh00morg
  • https://archive.org/stream/morgangenealogyh00morg#page/17/mode/1up
  • Pg.17
  • JAMES MORGAN, the common ancestor of a numerous family now scattered widely over nearly or quite, every state and territory of the United States, was born in Wales, in 1607, but in what precise locality our honest progenitor first saw the light is uncertain, though probably in Llandaff, Glamorgan Co. The family appears to have removed from Llandaff to Bristol, Eng. on the opposite side of Bristol Channel, a short time at least, perhaps a few years, prior to 1636. The name of his father is unknown, but there is some traditionary evidence that it was William.*
  • That year, 1636, in the month of March, he and two younger brothers, John and Miles, sailed from Bristol and arrived at Boston, Mass. in April following.
  • JOHN MORGAN, his next younger brother, who from tradition appears to have been a high churchman and to have exceedingly disliked the austerity of the Puritans, left Boston in disgust for more congenial society in Virginia, soon after their arrival. How far the Morgans of Virginia are descended from him I am unable to say.
  • MILES MORGAN, the youngest brother, born in 1615, on his arrival at Boston, or soon after, joined a party of emigrants, mostly from Roxbury, of whom Col. Wm Pyncheon was at the head, and founded the settlement of Springfield, Mass.
    • * See William, No. 46.
  • https://archive.org/stream/morgangenealogyh00morg#page/18/mode/1up
  • Pg.18
  • He is said to have been under 21 years of age at the commencement of this settlement, and to have suppressed the fact of his minority in order to share in the drawing for house lots, which minors were not privileged to do. It is certain that he drew a house lot and afterwards built upon it ; and it was the homestead of himself during his life, and of his descendants for many years after. It was situated upon the south side of "Ferry Lane," and in 1845 was sold by the Brewer family to the Conn. River Railroad Co. ; their tracks now covering the original lot, and their repair shop standing upon the site of the old Morgan homestead.
  • He married, about 1643, Prudence Gilbert, of Beverly, Mass., who was a fellow passenger with him in the voyage from England. Of this courtship and marriage, an interesting and curious account is preserved. He had 8 children by this marriage, 4 sons and 4 daughters ; and his wife, Prudence, dying 14 Nov. 1660, he next married Elizabeth Bliss, of Springfield, 15 Feb. 1670, dau. of Thomas, by whom he had 1 son only. His children by Prudence were, Mary, b. 14 Dec. 1644; Jonathan, 16 Sept. 1646; David, 23 July, 1648; Pelatiah, 17 May, 1650; Isaac, 17 March, 1652; Lydia, 8 Feb. 1654; Hannah, 11 Feb. 1656; Mercy, 18 May, 1658 ; and by 2d wife, Nathaniel, 14 June, 1671.
  • This family of Miles Morgan* has numerous ....
    • * See Appendix.
  • https://archive.org/stream/morgangenealogyh00morg#page/19/mode/1up
  • Pg.19
  • JAMES MORGAN, the elder brother, and our lineal ancestor, may have settled first at Plymouth ....
  • Wherever he settled at first, he is found in Roxbury, near Boston, before 1640. That year, Aug. 6, 1640, he married there, Margery Hill, of Roxbury. His eldest daughter, Hannah, was born there 18 May, 1642, and all his 5 other children, except perhaps the youngest, who d. in infancy, were also probably born there. He was made a freeman there 10 May, 1643. He is named as a resident there in the inventory of John Graves, 1646, and was a freeholder there as late as 1650, the same year that he removed to Pequot, (now N. London,) and had a houselot assigned him there.
  • It has been heretofore supposed, by myself as well as others, that James Morgan was one of the party of emigrants called the "Cape Ann Company," who came ....
  • https://archive.org/stream/morgangenealogyh00morg#page/22/mode/1up
  • Pg.22
  • 1. JAMES, born in Wales, 1607, m. Margery Hill, of Roxbury, Mass. 6 Aug. 1640, died 1685, age 78. He was settled in Roxbury at first, and all his children except the youngest dau. were probably born there.
  • CHILDREN.
    • 2. Hannah, 18 May, 1642, m. Nehemiah Royce, 20 Nov. 1660.
    • 3. James, 3 March, 1644, m. Mary Vine, Nov. 1666.
    • 4. John, 30 March, 1645,m. Rachel Dymond; 2d, wid. Elizabeth Williams.
    • 5. Joseph, 29 Nov. 1646, m. Dorothy Park, April, 1670.
    • 6. Abraham, 3 Sept. 1648, d. Aug. 1649.
    • 7. A daughter, 17 Nov. 1650, d. the week after.

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  • (ISSUES WITH DATES OF WILLIAM MORGAN & HIS CHILDREN)
  • A history of the family of Morgan, from the year 1089 to present times ([1902?])
  • https://archive.org/details/historyoffamilyo00morg
  • https://archive.org/stream/historyoffamilyo00morg#page/100/mode/1up
  • Pg.100
    • MORGAN OF CILFYNYDD.
    • (A Branch of Tredegar.)
  • I. William Morgan, of Llanvabon, born 1571 (his will describes him as late of Eglwysilian). He bore arms, CILFYNYDD, (see page 11). Issue: 1. Evan. 2.
  • https://archive.org/stream/historyoffamilyo00morg#page/101/mode/1up
  • Pg.101
  • Thomas. 3. John. 4 James. 5. Watkin. 6. Johnathan. 7. William. Of the above, Evan married Mary Friswyth, and had six children. THOMAS MORGAN, of Bedwas, County Monmouth, after of Eglwysilan, and then of Monmouth, and so described in the will of Janet Morgan, in 1779. He sold Bredwenarth to his brother Watkin, while the elder branch retained Cilfynydd, and the younger settled at Llandough. He married Mary, named in a post-nuptial settlement in 1716, and died 27th March in 1761. They had : 1. Thomas Morgan. 2. John. 3. Mary. 4. Margaret. JOHN MORGAN, called of Cowbridge in his sister's will died in 1775. He married Cecil Williams, of the Beach, Llysworney. They had : 1. William. 2. Watkin, died 20 October, 1793. 3. Jonathan. 4. Ann, who inherited Bredwenarth under her aunt's will. (Died 9th July, 1822, aged 77. Buried at Llandough. She married John Basset, of Bonvileston and had Thomas Basset.) 5. Mary Morgan. JONATHAN MORGAN, D. D., rector of Hedley, County Surrey. Presented 29th Nov., 1791, resigned 1818; married Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Richard Dunford, of Woodmanstone, County Surrey, and had : 1. William. 2. Ann Morgan married her cousin Thomas, son of John Basset and Ann Morgan, who was of Bonvileston and Bredwenarth. Issue: Richard Basset, of Bonvileston, and others. WILLIAM MORGAN, M. D. , M. A., was fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford. SIR THOMAS CHARLES, son of Thomas, of Basset, was born in London, 1783; knighted, 1814; died London, 1843 He married, 1812, Miss Sydney Owenson, who, as Lady Morgan, earned in her day a distinction in literature which is still recorded in catalogues of English letters. She wrote poems, novels, biography, and an autobiography. But her reputation was won by her political novel, "The Wild Irish Girl," the title of which became her own soubriquet. In 1817.
  • https://archive.org/stream/historyoffamilyo00morg#page/102/mode/1up
  • Pg.102
  • and 1821 she essayed historical writing, and succeeded in creating genuine sensations by her "France Under the Bourbons" and "Italy," which appeared respectively in the last-named years. . .
    • LINE of JAMES MORGAN, OF CONNECTICUT.
  • I. JAMES MORGAN ( 4 of I above), sailed from Bristol, in the ship Mary, with a kinsman, ROBERT MORGAN (see line of ROBERT, post.), in the summer of the year 1636, and landed in Boston, Massachusetts Bay. Settled first at Sandy Bay, near Gloucester, on Cape Ann, but found the coast bleak and the Indians troublesome. He married in Roxbury, where his first child was born, May 18, 1642. Finding fertile and desirable plantations at the mouth of the river Thames, at New London, in Connecticut, he, with the Sandy Bay colony, headed by its pastor. Rev. Richard Bliman, removed and settled there in 1649. Here he was assigned, February 10, 1650, lands granted him, "on the path to New street, being six acres of upland where the wipwams are, in the path that goes from his house toward Culvers, among the Rocky Hills," (New street is now Ashcroft street, in the city of New London, but it was called "Cape Ann street," in honor of the Cape Ann colony, for more than a century). In 1661 he was one of a committee "to layout the bounds of N. London on the east side of the Great River." In 1662 it is recorded that "James Morgan, Mr. Tinker and Obiadiah Brown are chosen to seat the people in the meeting house, which they doing the inhabitants are to rest silent." In 1662 he is appointed one of a committee to contract to build a house for the ministry at New London, and signs himself "James Morgan, Senior, of New Lon-
  • https://archive.org/stream/historyoffamilyo00morg#page/105/mode/1up
  • Pg.105
  • don." In this year, 1662, he stands third highest in amount among the taxpayers, he certifying to a holding of £250. He died in his homestead, about three miles from Groton. (occupied as late as 1869 by Elijah S. Morgan, a descendant), on the road to Poquonoc Bridge, about three miles from Groton, in 1685, aged seventy-eight years. He married Margery Hill, of Roxbury, August 6, 1640. Issue: 1. Hannah, born May 18, 1642, (married Nehemiah Royce, Nov. 20, 1660). 2. James, born March 3. 1644, married Mary Vine, Nov., 1666. 3. John, born March 30, 1645 (married, (1) Rachel Dymond; married (2) Elizabeth Williams, widow). 4. Joseph, born Nov. 29, 1646, married Dorothy Park, April, 1670. 5. Abraham, born Sept. 3, 1648, died Aug., 1649. 6. A daughter died in infancy, born Nov. 17, 1650.
  • II. JAMES (2 of I. above), March 3, 1644, m., Nov., 1666, (1) Mary Vine; married (2) Hannah Cromwell. He was deacon of the first church in Groton until his death; captain of the train band, 1692, by order of the Governor and Council; deputy to the General Court from New London, 1689 to 1700, and from Groton in 1706; commissioned to advise and direct the Pequots ten years. His will is dated, Groton, June 25, 1708; probated Jan. 22, 1712. Issue by last wife: 1. James, born 6 Feb., 1667, married Hannah --- , and second wife Anna --- . 2. William, born March, 1669, married Margaret Avery, 17 July, 1696. 3. Mercy, born March 20, 1670, married Thomas Starr, Jan. 1, 1695, 4. Hannah, born June 8, 1674, married William Latham, June 30, 1698. 5. Elizabeth, born Sept. 9, 1678, married Jonathan Starr, Jan. 12, 1698. 6. Jerusha, born 1682, was living in 1712, at date of father's will. MERCY, who married Thomas Starr, of Groton, son of Samuel Starr, of New London, Jan. 1, 1695, had issue: ....

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  • HILL, Margery
  • b. ABT 1618
  • Family:
  • Marriage: 6 AUG 1640 Boston, Suffolk, Mass.
  • Spouse: MORGAN, James
  • b. 1607 Wales, Great Britian
  • d. 1685 Groton, New London, CT.
  • Children:
    • MORGAN, Hannah
    • MORGAN, James
    • MORGAN, John
    • MORGAN, Joseph
    • MORGAN, Abraham b. 3 SEP 1648 New London, New London, CT. d. AUG 1649 New London, New London, CT.
  • From: http://www.genealogyofnewengland.com/f_119.htm#26

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fr. Nehemiah Morgan, p. 17: James Morgan, the common ancestor of a numerous family now scattered widely over nearly or quite, every state and territory of the United States, was born in Wales, in 1607, but in what precise locality our honest progenitor first saw the light is uncertain, though probably in Llandaff, Glamorgan Co. The family appears to have removed from Llandaff to Bristol, Eng. on the opposite side of Bristol Channel, a short time at least, perhaps a few years, prior to 1636. The name of his father is unknown, but there is some traditionary evidence that it was William.

fr. Appleton Morgan, p. 102: I. James Morgan (4 of I above), sailed from Bristol, in the ship Mary, . . . in the summer of the year 1636, . . . Finding fertile and desirable plantations at the mouth of the river Thames, at New London, in Connecticut, he, with the Sandy Bay colony, headed by its pastor, Rev. Richard Bliman, removed and settled there in 1649.

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Father: William Morgan b: 1571 in LLandaff Co., Glamorgan, Wales Mother: Elizabeth Morgan b: 1583 in Tredegar, Monmouth, Glouchester, England

Children

Hannah Morgan b: 18 MAY 1642 in Roxbury, MA
James B. Morgan , Capt. b: 3 MAR 1643/44 in Roxbury, MA
John Morgan , Capt. b: 30 MAR 1645 in Roxbury, MA
Joseph Morgan , Lt. b: 29 NOV 1646 in Roxbury, MA
Abraham Morgan b: 3 SEP 1648 in Roxbury, MA
John Morgan b: 3 SEP 1648 in Roxbury, MA
Morgan b: 17 NOV 1650 in Groton, CT

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Military Service: Colonial Indian wars

Resource: http://www.gencircles.com/users/nana44w/2/data/ Title: Morgans, Wm andSons.FBK.FBK.FTWResource: http://www.gencircles.com/users/chesebro/1/data/26727.html

James was the immigrant of this family. He was made freeman of Massachusetts May 10, 1643. In early 1650 he had lands granted him in Pequot, now New London, as recorded in New London records, which soon became his residence "on the path to New street or Cape Ann street", as it was called in honor of the Cape Ann Company, who chiefly settled there. He removed to Groton where he built his house in 1657residing there until his death. He was one of the selectmen of New London for several years, and one of the first "Deputys sent from New London Plantation" to the General Court at Hartford, May session, 1657,and was nine times afterwards chosen member of the assembly, the last in1670, and he was also an active member of Rev. Richard Blinman's church, as his name is prominent in every important movement or proceeding.Title: History of Stonington, Connecticut, 1649 - 1900Author: Richard Anson WheelerPublication: New London, CT, Press of The Day Publishing Company, 1900Page: page 479 Resource: http://www.gencircles.com/users/nana44w/2/data/3474 [Morgans, Wm andSons.FBK.FBK.FTW]

In 1636, in March, James Morgan and two younger brothers, John and Miles, sailed from Bristol on a ship named "Mary" and arrived in Boston in April following. James Morgan settled first in Plymouth,then moved to Roxbury before 1640; lands were granted to him at Pequot in 1650. John Morgan was a high churchman and disliked the austerity of the Puritans. He moved to Virginia.Miles Morgan moved to Springfield, MA, and became the progenitor of the Morgan family represented by J. P. Morgan of Morgan and Company, International Bankers.The eldest brother, and our lineal ancestor, may have settled first at Plymouth. He is found at Roxbury near Boston, before 1640. That year, August 6, 1640, he married there Margery Hill of Roxbury. He was made a freeman there May 10, 1643. He is named as a resident there in the inventory of John Graves, 1646, and was a freeholder there a slave as 1650, the same year that he removed to Pequot (now New London) and had a house lot assigned him there. Early in 1650 he had land granted to him at Pequot which was occupied by him as a homestead "On the path of New Street" (now Ashcraft Street) and a further entry upon the records shows that " James Morgan hath given him about six acres of upland, where the wigwams were, in the path that goes from his house towards Culvers' among the rocky hills." These tracts were located near the present third burial ground, in the western suburbs of the city of New London: a location sterile and dreary and which in a few years was abandoned by its occupants for homes and broader lands of fairer promise on the east side of the River Thames. He continued to occupy this homestead on the path to New Street or "Cape Ann Lane" as it was called in honor of the Cape Ann Company who settled there until about March 1657.

On the 25th day of December 1656 he sold his homestead and removed soon after, with several others, across the river on large tracts of land previously granted them by the town, upon the east side, now the south part of Groton. James Avery, William Meades and Nehemiah and John Smith, who also had grants of land adjoining to him, were among the first settlers,and the earliest resident farmers upon the east side, now Groton. Grants of land had been made from time to time after 1652-53 by the colony of Pequot, with a liberal hand, upon the east side of the river, comprising the fertile regions of what is now the southern part of Groton, and these lands were soon after occupied generally by the several proprietors. It was upon the east side of the River Thames that James Morgan settled, and in a rude log cabin with his family consisting of wife and three sons and a daughter; and this territory, made the separate town of Groton May 1705, and again divided by setting off the town of Ledyard in 1836, has been and still remains the prolific hive of our name and family.

He was a large proprietor and dealer in lands; distinguished in public enterprises; often employed by the public in land surveys,establishing highways, determining boundaries, adjusting civil difficulties,as a good neighbor and a Christian man, in whom all appear to have reposed a marked degree of confidence and trust. He was one of the "townsmen" or selectmen of New London for several years, and was one of the first "Deputies" sent from New London Plantations to the General Court at Hartford, May session 1657(at which date he deposed his age to be about 50 years) and was nine times afterwards chosen a member of that grave and important assembly, the last time in1670. His associates and compeers composing the General Court or Colonial Assembly in May 1657, when he was first chosen, were Governor John Winthrop, John Mason, Jonathan Brewster, Thomas Welles, etc. To this carefully selected body of men was in trusted the whole sovereign power of the colony, and the administration of its government, in original jurisprudence and the most trifling as well as most henious offenses and causes of action, and the minutest details in every department.

James Morgan seems to have impressed this grave body of men with a high sense of his sterling honesty and integrity of character, and it appears that in a controversy between the General Court and the New London Plantation about boundaries and jurisdiction, it was ordered that the matter that should be submitted to three arbiters, mutually agreed upon, New London at once named their own townsman, James Morgan, really party in their own interest, but nevertheless the General Court as promptly accepted him, and without naming another, agreed to submit to his sole decision, which when made, seems to have satisfied all parties.

He was an active and useful member of the church under Rev.Richard Blinman's ministry, and his name is prominent in every important movement or proceeding."James Morgan, Mr. Tinker and Obadiah Brown, are chosen to seat the people in the meeting house, which they doing, the inhabitants are to remain silent." This was considered a difficult task, as the seating determined the social standing of all the people.(Minutes from the record.) In 1661 he was one of a committee of the General Court to lay out the bounds of New London "On the east side of the Great River."In 1662 he was one of a committee to contract " for building a house for the ministry" at New London.From about this time he signs his name "James Morgan, Senior, of New London," his eldest son, afterwards Capt. James Morgan, being then near twenty-one years of age. This year, 1662, his list on the the town assessment stands the third highest in amount; and among the tax-payers of that year, about one hundred in number, only seven had a list exceeding 200#. James Morgan's list was only 250#, but this was a large estate in those primitive days. The spot where he first built his house in Groton in 1657, and where he ever afterwards resided, and where he died, is a few rods southeast of the present dwelling (1868) of Elijah S. Morgan, about three miles from Groton Ferry, on the road to Poquonoc Bridge and this patriarchal homestead from that day down to the present occupant has descended through an unbroken line of James Morgans, for six generations. And it is worthy of note, in connection with this fact, that for eight generations as they hereinafter succeed each other, in regular order of individual precedence, each one is headed by the name of James Morgan. He died 1685, aged 78 years and his estate was divided soon after his death among his four surviving children. _____________________________________________

BIOGRAPHY: His famly moved to Bristol, on the opposite side of Bristolchannel, prior to 1636. There is a tradition that his father's name was William. In March, 1636, he sailed from Bristol, accompanied by two younger brothers, John and Miles, and arrived in Boston, Mass. the following month. John Morgan was a high churchman, and soon parted from the austere Puritans and made his home in Virginia. It is supposed that James Morgan lived for a time at Plymouth, but this cannot be proven. He was in Roxbury before 1640, and was made freeman there May 10, 1643. He appears there in 1646, and was a freeholder as late as 1650, the same year in which he removed to Pequot, now New London, Connecticut, and had a house lot assigned to him there. The records of that town show that lands for cultivation were granted him early in that year, and were soon occupied by him. His homestead was on the "new street," now Ashcroft street, and a subsequent entry shows that "James Morgan hath given him about six acres of upland, where the wigwams were, in the path that goes from his house toward Culver's, among the rocky hills." These tracts were located near the present third burial ground, in the western suburbs of New London, a sterile and dreary location which was soon abandoned by its occupants, who made their homes in the more promising district east of the river Thames. James Morgan became a large landed proprietor in that district which has ever since been occupied largely by his progeny. He was public-spirited, was often employed in surveying lands, establishing highways and boundaries, and as magistrate in adjusting civil difficulties. For several years he served as selectman, and was one of the first deputies sent by New London plantation to the general court at Hartford (May session, 1657), at which time he was fifty years old. An active member of the church, his name is prominent in every movement of that body. "James Morgan, Mr. Tinker and Obadiah Brown are chosen to seat the people in the meeting house, which they doing, the inhabitants are to rest silent." In 1661 he was one of a committee to lay out the bounds of New London "on the east side of the great river," and the next year he was on a committee to contract for building a house for the ministry at New London.

DEATH: His estate was soon after divided among his four surviving children. Famous Political US Leaders has death on April 5, 1704.

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James Morgan, Sr and wife Margery Hill are ancestors of President Millard Fillmore." Ancestors of American Presidents", Gary Boyd Roberts, NEHGS, 2009 pp36-42

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Source

Title: A history of the family of Morgan, from the year 1089 to present times Authors: Morgan, James Appleton, City of Publication: New York Publisher: A. Morgan Date: 1902 Page Count: 297

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Title: Morgan genealogy : a history of James Morgan of New London, Conn., and his descendants, from 1607 to 1869 ... with an appendix containing the history of his brother, Miles Morgan, of Springfield, Mass., and some of his descendants ... Authors: Morgan, Nathaniel Harris, City of Publication: Hartford Publisher: Press of Case, Lockwood & Brainard Date: 1869 Page Count: 296 --------------------

717. James12 Morgan (William13, William14)(887) was born in Llandaff, Glamorgans, Wales about 1607. James died 1685 in Groton, New London, CT, at age 78.

He married Margery Hill August 6, 1640 in Roxbury, New London, MA. Margery was born about 1610 in Great Barnstead, Billerica, Essex, England. Margery(888) was the daughter of George Hill and Mary Symonds. Margery died April 28, 1690 in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut, Ct, at age 79. She was christened June 16, 1610 in Great Burstead, Billerica, Essex, England.

James Morgan and Margery Hill had the following children:

child 718 i. Hannah11 Morgan was born in Roxbury, Suffolk, MA July 18, 1642. Hannah died November 3, 1688 in Wallingford, CT, at age 46. She married Nehemiah Royce November 20, 1660 in New London, New London Co, Connecticut. Nehemiah was born about 1636/1642 in Long Sutton, Somerset, England. Nehemiah died November 7, 1706 in Wallingford, CT, at age 69.

She was christened December 28, 1642.

child 719 ii. Captain James Morgan was born in Roxbury, Suffolk, MA March 3, 1644. James died December 8, 1711 in Groton, New London, CT, at age 67. He married Mary Vine November 1666 in New London, New London Co, Connecticut. Mary was born 1641 in England. Mary died in Roxbury, Suffolk, Mass, at age unknown.

He was christened March 3, 1644 in Roxbury, Suffolk, MA.

child 720 iii. Captain John Morgan was born in Roxbury, Suffolk, MA March 30, 1645. John died 1712 in Preston, New London, Connecticut, Ct, at age 67. He married twice. He married Rachel Deming November 16, 1665 in Wetherfield, Hartford, Connecticut. Rachel was born about 1644 in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut, Ct. He married Elizabeth Jones 1689. Elizabeth was born about 1659. Elizabeth was the daughter of William Jones and Hannah Eaton.

child + 491 iv. Joseph Morgan Lt. was born November 29, 1646.

child 721 v. Abraham Morgan was born in New London, New London Co, Connecticut September 3, 1648. Abraham died August 1649 in New London, New London Co, Connecticut, at age unknown.

child 722 vi. Infant Morgan was born in New London, New London Co, Connecticut November 17, 1650. Infant died 1650 at age unknown.

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James B Morgan, Sr's Timeline

1607
April 5, 1607
Llandaff, Vale of Glamorgan, Wales, United Kingdom
1620
1620
Age 12
USA

Lives in Roxbury, MA and New London, Conn

1637
April 1637
Age 29
1640
August 6, 1640
Age 33
Roxbury, Ma, Usa
1642
May 18, 1642
Age 35
Roxbury, Suffolk, Massachusetts
1644
March 3, 1644
Age 36
Roxbury, Suffolk, Massachusetts
1645
March 30, 1645
Age 37
Roxbury (within present Boston), Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony
March 30, 1645
Age 37
Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States
1646
October 29, 1646
Age 39
Roxbury (within present Boston), Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony, (Present USA)
1648
September 3, 1648
Age 41
Roxbury,Suffolk,Massachusetts