James Rogers, Jr. (1589 - 1676)

‹ Back to Rogers surname

Is your surname Rogers?

Research the Rogers family

James Rogers, Jr.'s Geni Profile

Records for James Rogers

8,270,494 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Birthplace: Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, USA
Death: Died in Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, USA
Managed by: CURTIS LEE BENJAMIN
Last Updated:
view all

Immediate Family

About James Rogers, Jr.

This "About" currently seems to be the result of several incorrect merges (i.e.: of different people) .... It is being left here until the relationships are resolved more correctly.

Birth dates in the "data conflicts" range from 1589 to 1615 to 1620.

========

b. 1589

d. 1676, Newport, Newport County, Rhode Island

m. 1621, Plymouth Plantation, Old Plymouth

--------------------

'Rogers Ancestral History

9. James Rogers was thought to be born 2 February 1615 in Stratford on Avon, Warwickshire, England. He immigrated to this land in April 1635 on the Ship Increase landing in Massachusetts Bay. In 1637 James Rogers was one of the six men from Saybrook, who, under Capt. John Underhill took part in the Pequot War. He then moved to Stratford, Connecticut where he acquired property and from then went to New Milford, Connecticut where he acquired considerable property and became a baker on a very large scale. He supplied all of New England, New York, Virginia, and Barbadoes with biscuit. Milford became too small for the operations of this great businessman. His friend, Governor Winthrope, induced him to settle in New London, where he took a place next to the Governor's. On this lot, Mr. Rogers built a dwelling-house of stone.

He moved to New London prior to 1660. He was elected representative to the general court six times. He soon became by far the largest landholder and the richest man in the colony. His landed possession became very extensive, consisting of several hundred acres on the Great Neck, a tract of land at Mohegan at the place called Pamechog, now called Massapeag, several house lots in town, and twenty-four hundred acres on the eastside of the river, which was held in partnership with Colonel Pyncheon of Springfield. In addition to his large baking business, he took charge of the town mill. He also carried on by far the most extensive domestic and foreign trade of any man in New London County. Between the years 1661 and 1670 he had a greater interest in the trade of the post than any other person. He was a baker and did an extensive business furnishing biscuit for seamen and for the Colonial troops between the years 1661 and 1670.

He and his sons were more esteemed and liked by the indians than any other men in the colonies. Uncas, Chief of the Mohegans, blood brother of Samuel Rogers, one of the sons of James Rogers, promised Samuel that he would protect him with all of his warriors in case of emergency. Samuel decided to test the faith of his friend, Uncas. "When prepared for the experiment, he fired a signal of alarm, which had been concerted with his tawny friend, in case either should be disturbed by an enemy, and in half an hour's time grim bands of warriors were seen on the hills and soon came rushing down with the sachem at their head to the rescue of their friend. Rogers had prepared a feast for their entertainment, but it was probable that they relished the trick nearly as much as the banquet."

Rev John Rogers, son of James, founded the Rogerene Church in America, and suffered great religious persecution. James Rogers and all of his sons, except Samuel became dissenters of the Church of England and joined the Rogerene Church.

James Rogers married Elizabeth Rowland in February 1639 or 1640 in Stratford, Connecticut. James Rogers died on 6 February 1687 in New London, Connecticut. James and Elizabeth Rogers were the parents of 7 children:   a. Samuel Rogers b. Joseph Rogers c. John Rogers d. Bathsheba Rogers e. Capt. James Rogers, Jr. f. Jonathan Rogers g. Elizabeth Rogers

English Ancestry Here is where our research has stopped for now. Many researchers have sought to find the parents of James Rogers of New London. Historical documents showing the connection to a particular Rogers’ line in England have not been found to this date (research from the book “James Rogers and His Descendants”, in 1902 by James Swift Rogers.) There are several records showing this line that have been proven wrong, but none so far has been able to prove which line is the correct one.

If tradition could be accepted as fact, we must believe that nine-tenths of those in this country bearing the name of Rogers, are descendants of John Rogers, the first martyr in Queen Mary’s reign. None are more positive of such descent than are the descendants of James, of New London. By some it is asserted that complete records were destroyed when the house of Peter Rogers, in New London, at the time of the massacre, was burned by the British, led by Benedict Arnold. Another version is published in the “New London Day,” of June 15, 1894: -- ~~~~~~~~~~ Bible translator and commentator, Protestant martyr, by Willem de Passe

John Rogers (Information extracted from the above named book written in 1861 by Joseph Lemuel Chester) as well as other sources.

Lineage of Rev. John Rogers, the Martyr

There is a dispute, however, over this traditional Rogers lineage, and at the heart of it is the descent coming from John Rogers, b. about 1500, who was burned at the stake in England for his religious views of Reformation, and for printing the Bible. He has become known as "John Rogers, the Smithfield Martyr" down through history from that time, and there is evidently a lot of controversy about his particular line of descent, with many families claiming to be descended from him. The document I am including does not appear to be the same as our line of descent until after it is in our country, where it does conform to our line, but to confirm that would take many hours of research, and then you would just have either confirmed or eliminated only one theory. The truth is that there appears to be little documentation of his direct line of descent, so there will probably always be controversy about it. Whatever the case may be, until documentation is shown to discount our line as it is, it shall stand. ~~~~~~~~~~~~

Early research believed Thomas Matthew Rogers to be the father of Thomas Rogers of the Mayflower and James of New London, Connecticut to be the son of Thomas of the Mayflower.

Recent research and DNA tests have proven that Thomas of the Mayflower was not a son of descent of John, the Smithfield Martyr and that James of New London, Connecticut is not the son of Thomas of the Mayflower.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Ancestral Anecdotes: James And John Rogers--Page 1

To contact the owner: Barbara Pahlow bpahlow@hotmail.com

ROGERS, JAMES/ROGERS, JOHN--Page 1 The Rogerene religious sect is well-covered. Much has been written about John Rogers, his father James,  and followers of the religious sect. It is an understatement to say John was not at peace spiritually. That he, his father, and many of the other members of the Rogers family were at odds with the local Congregationalist organization in his town of New London, CT—almost constantly—is a fact that is well-borne out with a little research. Some writers are unforgiving in their reports, while others are perhaps too quick to defend. Here is a brief time capsule: • The father, James Rogers, arrives in New England, in the ship Increase, in 1635, aged 20. • James married Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel Rowland in 1639, in Stratford, CT. • In New London, James Rogers acquires property, becomes affluent and influential in town politics, and becomes the local baker when Winthrop sets him up on his own property, near the mill. James Rogers builds a stone house. • James Rogers and some of his children become dissenters from the established Congregational church. Business dealings had taken James and his sons into the Seventh-Day Baptist establishment in Newport, RI, and they began to lean toward the teachings of that church. • The father James, wife and daughter Elizabeth are baptized in the Seventh Day Baptist church in 1676—a bit later than some of his sons. • The Rogers’ break with the Seventh Day Baptists. Son John starts his own sect. • In 1676, fines and imprisonments begin against James Rogers and his sons. • James Rogers, Sr. passes away in February 1687/8. Not much is known about his later years.

English Ancestry Here is where our research has stopped for now. Many researchers have sought to find the parents of James Rogers of New London. Historical documents showing the connection to a particular Rogers’ line in England have not been found to this date (research from the book “James Rogers and His Descendants”, in 1902 by James Swift Rogers.) There are several records showing this line that have been proven wrong, but none so far has been able to prove which line is the correct one.

If tradition could be accepted as fact, we must believe that nine-tenths of those in this country bearing the name of Rogers, are descendants of John Rogers, the first martyr in Queen Mary’s reign. None are more positive of such descent than are the descendants of James, of New London. By some it is asserted that complete records were destroyed when the house of Peter Rogers, in New London, at the time of the massacre, was burned by the British, led by Benedict Arnold. Another version is published in the “New London Day,” of June 15, 1894: --

“Capt. Henry Hammond Rogers had a store of information, such as few men get, even in as long a life as his. Much of this information he communicated to his son, H. Stennett Rogers, at various times. One of the Captain’s very interesting monologues with his son was as follows:

  “’When a youth, I was told by Deacon Jethro Beebe, then seventy years old, and a member of the Seventh Day Baptist Church, Waterford, that in the year 1300, Aaron Rogers, a merchant of Rome, Italy, in consequence of religious persecution, fled for his life and took up his residence in London, England. There he resumed his business as a merchant and became wealthy. He was the great grandfather of John Rogers, who was burned at Smithfield. James Rogers, (James Rogers of New London, Connecticut born about 1615) the grandson of John the martyr, came to America. Jonathan Rogers was his youngest son.’”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Thomas Fox of Concord and His ... - Google Book Search

by William F. Fox

Source: Thomas Fox of Concord and His Descendants page 19 ‘Bathsheba was born in Milford in 1650, and was the daughter of James Rogers, “the wealthiest man in the colony of New London after Governor Winthrop.”’ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

CT Nutmegger Volume 28, page 568

The Public Record Office in London contains a copy of a "license to go beyond the seas," dated April 15, 1635. Among those "to be transported to New England imbarqued in the "Increase"" is James Rogers, 20 years. In 1637 James Rogers was one of six men from Saybrook who took part in the Pequot War. A few years later James was in Stratford, CT where he married Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel Rowland. For a time James Rogers was in Milford, where his son Joseph was born, and thereafter he became prominent in New London. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The following was excerpted from the NEHGR, vol. 83, p. 112. James Rogers was a soldier in the Pequot War from Saybrook in 1637,

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

History of New London, Connecticut ... - Google Books  (Click Here to see the Google Digital Copy)

History of New London, Connecticut. 1612 to 1860 By Frances Manwaring Caulkins page 201 CHAPTER XIV.

THE ROGERS FAMILY, AND THE SECT OF ROGERENES. THE unity of religious worship in New London, was first interrupted by James Rogers and his sons. A brief account of the family will lead to the history of their religious doctrines. James Rogers is supposed to be the James Rogers, who came to America, in the Increase, 1635, aged 20.

As James Rogers, he is 

first known to us at Stratford, where he married Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel Rowland,2 and is afterward found at Milford, where his wife united with Mr. Prudden's church in 1645, and himself in 1652. Their children were, Samuel, whose birth has not been found on record, but his will, dated Feb. 12th, 1712-13, states his age to be " 72 and upwards," which will place it in 1640; Joseph, baptized in Milford, 1646 ; John, in 1648 ; Bathsheba, in 1650 ; James, not recorded, but next in order: Jonathan, born Dec. 31st, 1655; Elizabeth, 1658. Mr. Rogers had dealings in New London in 1656, and between that time and 1660, fixed himself permanently in the plantation. Here he soon acquired property and influence, and was much employed both in civil and ecclesiastical affairs. He was six times representative to the General Court.

Mr. Winthrop had encouraged his settlement in the place, and had accommodated him with a portion of his own house lot, next to the mill, on which Rogers built a dwelling-house of stone. He was a baker on a large scale, often furnishing biscuit for seamen, and for colonial troops, and between 1660 and 1670 had a greater interest in the trade of the port than any other person in the place. His landed possessions were very extensive, consisting of several hundred acres on the Great Neck, the fine tract of land at Mohegan called the Pamechaug farm, several house lots in town, and twenty-four hundred acres east of the river, whieh he held in partnership with Col. Pyncheon, of Springfield.

1 Gleanings. Mass. Hist. Coll., 2d series, vol. 8, p. 161. 2 Samuel Rowland left his farm to Samuel Rogers, his grandson, which leads to the supposition that Elizabeth was his only child.

page 202 James Rogers and his wife and children, and those connected with 
the latter as partners in marriage, with the exception of Samuel 
Rogers and wife, all became dissenters in some sort from the established 
Congregational church, which was then the only one recognized 
by the laws of the land. The origin of this dissent may be 
traced to an intercourse which began in the way of trade, with the 
Sabbatarians, or Seventh-day Baptists of Rhode Island. John and 
James Rogers, Jun., first embraced the Sabbatarian principles, and 
were baptized in 1674; Jonathan, in 1675; James Rogers, Sen.,

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Came in "Increase" 1635 A soldier in the militia against the Indians in Saybrook, 1637 Stratford, Fairfield, CT about 1640 Milford, New Haven, CT Ten years 1645 thru 1655 Of New London, New London, CT about 1656 to 1687 when he died. built stone house in New London, Conn ca 1660 baker "Rogerenes" ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Walter Gilbert Genealogy: James Rogers & Elizabeth Rowland

Walter Gilbert Genealogy Walter@Gilbert.name Maryland

James Rogers was born in Stratford upon Avon, Warwick, England, on Thursday, February 2, 1615, and died in New London, Connecticut, on February 16, 1687. Elizabeth Rowland died in New London in 1709. They were married in Stratford, Connecticut, in 1639. She took the name Elizabeth Rogers. She is the daughter of Samuel Rowland. They had six children:

i. Samuel Rogers [#514]: He was born in New London on December 12, 1640, and died in New London on December 1, 1713.

ii. Joseph Rogers was born in New London on May 14, 1646, and died in New London on November 8, 1713.

iii. James Rogers was born in New London on December 1, 1648.

iv. Bathsheba Rogers was born in New London on December 30, 1650, and died in New London on November 23, 1711.

v. Jonathan Rogers was born in New London on December 31, 1655, and died in New London in 1697. He drowned near Gull Island, New London.

vi. Elizabeth Rogers was born in New London on April 15, 1658, and died in Orient, Suffolk, New York, on June 10, 1716. •~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
In the public record office in England 
there is to be found a copy of a "licens to 
go beyond the seas," dated April 15, 1635, 
and one of those who sailed for New 
England in the good ship "Increase" was 
James Rogers, twenty years old. This 
James Rogers was believed to have been 
the same James Rogers who lived in New 
London, Connecticut, and there is certainly 
no evidence against it.

During the Pequot War in 1637, James Rogers was one of the six men who took part 
under the command of Captain John Underbill, and Shortly after this time he acquired land in Stratford, Connecticut, where he married Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel Rowland.

In 1652 he removed from Stratford to Milford, in the same colony, and joined the Pruddens Congregational Church, which his wife had already joined in 1645.
According to different records of that time, it is believed that James Rogers was a baker and tradesman of importance in the community. Between 1656 and 1660 he became an inhabitant of the town of New London, and on March 14, 1660-61, was made a freeman there. James Rogers was a deputy to the Court of Elections in May, 1661, and 1662, and in the latter year was corn commissioner of New London. Between 1662 and 1673 he was a representative to the General Court seven times and was in close association with Matthew Griswold, serving with him, on State and church committees several times. To be chosen for church and State positions in the time of James Rogers was a far greater honor than attaches to a similar appointment to-day, as these matters were then considered of paramount importance. We can see therefore the high estimation in which he was held by the community. He was one of the largest landowners of New London and amongst his holdings was a grant given him by Uncas, chief of the Mohegans, in August, 1658. James Rogers died in 1687 in New London, and his wife about 1709. 

Their son, Samuel Rogers, was born, in all probability, in 1640. The birth has not actually been recorded, but as his will was made in 1712, in which he states that he was then seventy-two years of age, we are warranted in assuming his birth in 1640. On the occasion of his marriage he received from, his father two hundred pounds sterling. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

As an aside, we may still be related to John Rogers the Martyr. Somewhere on this desk is a note that says James 'Increase' Rogers brought with him the charred Bible of John Rogers, which Bible now rests at Alfred University in New York. One may well speculate how James would have come into possession of this Bible unless he was a descendant of this John Rogers. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~???

The following was excerpted from the NEHGR, vol. 83, p. 112.

James Rogers was a soldier in the Pequot War from Saybrook in 1637, lived later at Stratford and Milford, and settled finally at New London, Connecticut Colony, where he was a man of property, held important offices, and died in 1687/8. His wife was Elizabeth Rowland. Their son, Capt. James Rogers (1652–1714) of New London married Mary Jordan. He is also briefly mentioned in NEHGR, vol. 104, p. 163.

Walter Gilbert Genealogy: James Rogers & Elizabeth Rowland

Sources: • New England Historical and Genealogical Record (NEHGR), vol. 83, p. 112 (Memoir of Alice (Rogers) Moore).

http://www.otal.umd.edu/~walt/gen/htmfile/1028.htm ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Seventh Day Baptists of Europe and America

page 1273

In September, 1676, James Rogers, Sr., along with his 
wife and his daughter, Bathsheba Smith, were baptized on the The Rogerenes: Some Hitherto ... - Google Book Search
occasion of another visit by Rev. William Hiscox and Samuel 
Hubbard. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ The Rogerenes: Some Hitherto ... - Google Book Search

 by John Rogers Bolles, Anna Bolles Williams   page 232

Some Hitherto unpublished annals belong to the colonia history of Connecticut Stanhope press F. H. Gilson Company Boston, U. S. A.

March 25, at the meetinghouse. 
At the opening of the court, the sheriff announces that he has 
kept John Rogers safely until now and has him still in custody. 
The court orders the sheriff to set said prisoner at large. 
Samuel Beebe fails to follow up his claim on land of Capt. James 
at this court, but renews the suit regarding alleged gifts of the 
widow to his wife, viz., "moveables," including certain young 
slaves belonging to the estate of James Rogers. He enters suit, 
by his attorney, Colonel Livingston, against Samuel Fox (husband 
of Bathsheba) for two negroes with £5 damages, and against John 
Rogers, Jr., for three negroes; all five being free negroes in employ 
of said persons. The verdict goes against him. John Keeney 
and wife also lose a similar suit for similar alleged gifts on the part 
of the widow. On this same day, James Rogers, Jr., having presented his accounts, 
etc., to the Probate Court, as executor, said court orders 
distribution to be made of the residue of the estate (movables), 
according to regular form of law when a person dies intestate; a 
double portion to Samuel, as oldest son, the remainder to be 
equally divided between the other children. This gives James 
Rogers one-eighth of the movables, instead of the much larger 
share accorded by the codicil. Evidently self-interest had no part 
in the move made by James, Jr. Now comes the part of Samuel 
Rogers in this final issue. He states to the court, "in writing," 
that he has already, and before his mother's decease, received, by 
the terms of agreement among the heirs, according to his father's 
will, all that was due ' to him from his father's estate, to his full 
satisfaction, and absolutely quits claim to anything further. Joshua 
Hempstead is ordered to make distribution. (N.B. 
There has now been placed before the reader the sum 
and substance of all the litigation in regard to the estate of James 
Rogers, upon which Miss Caulk ins founded her statement regarding "
contention" among his children.) 
1 This due to him 
was £200 secured by note, and paid to him by the executor. ~~~Page 121----

THE GREAT LEADERSHIP. CHAPTER I. 
1637-1652. Page 121 Among noticeable young men in the Colony of Connecticut, previous to 1640, is James Rogers.1 His name first appears on record at New Haven, but shortly after, in 1637, he is a soldier from Saybrook in the Pequot war.2 He is next at Stratford, where he acquires considerable real estate and marries Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel Rowland, a landed proprietor of that place, who eventually leaves a valuable estate to his grandson, Samuel Rogers, and presumably other property to his daughter, who seems to have been an only child. A few years later, James Rogers appears at Milford. His wife joins the Congregational church there in 1645, and he himself joins this church in 1652.

He has evidently been a baker on a large scale for some time previous to 1655, at which date complaint is made to the General Court in regard to a quantity of biscuit furnished by him, which was exported to Virginia and the Barbadoes, upon which occasion he states that the flour furnished by the miller for-this bread was not properly ground. The miller substantially admits that he did not at that time understand the correct manner of grinding. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 1 The parentage and native place of James Rogers remain undiscovered. He may, or may not, have been the James Rogers who came over in the Increase (Hotten). There were several of the same name and date in New England. There is a tradition in the New London family, which can be traced as far back as 1750, that James Rogers of New London was a grandson, or great-grandson, of John Rogers the martyr. Up to this date (1904) no proof has been found to substantiate this claim. The same claim has been made by descendants of other first settlers of the name of Rogers, and their traditions are also proven to have been of early date. These long-standing and very persistent traditions may possibly be explained by some future discovery. 1 1679 — James Rogers sells Thos. Parker 50 A. of land that were granted James Rogers of N. London, by the Gen. Court, he being a Pequot soldier. — New London Land Records.

Also in "Memorial History of Hartford," by J. Hammond Tmmbull (pub. 1886), p. 81, is a chapter on the Pequot war, by Rev. Increase N. Tarbox, which names the men from Saybrook, viz. "John Underbill, Edward Pattison, James Rogers, Edward Lay, John Gallup and John Wood." ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

In the course of ten years, Milford proves too small a port for the operations of this enterprising and energetic man, whose business includes supplies to seamen and troops. Governor Winthrop is holding out inducements for him to settle at New London. In 1656 he is empowered by the General Court to sell his warehouse at Milford, with his other property, provided said building be used only as a warehouse. He now begins to purchase valuable lands and houses at New London, and so continues for many years, frequently adding some choice house-lot, Indian clearing, meadow- land, pasture or woodland to his possessions. In 1659 he selk to Francis Hall, an attorney of Fairfield, "all" his "lands, commons and houses in Stratford, Milford and New Haven." — (History of Stratford.) At New London, in addition to his large baking business, he has charge of the town mill, by lease from Governor Winthrop, at the head of an inlet called Winthrop's Cove and forming Winthrop's Neck, which neck comprises the home lot of the governor. That James Rogers may build his house near the mill,1 the Governor conveys to him a piece of his own land adjoining, upon which Mr. Rogers builds a stone dwelling. He also builds a stone bakery by the cove and has a wharf at this point.2 The long Main street of the town takes a sharp turn around the head of the cove, past the mill and to the house of the Governor, the latter standing on the east side of the cove, within a stone's throw of the mill. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

1 An ancient mill built in 1728, on or very near the site of the first mill, is still standing (see "Hempstead Diary," page 200). Less than fifty years ago, the cove was a beautiful sheet of water commencing just in front of the mill, separated from it by little more than the width of the winding street, and from thence stretching out in rippling, shining currents to the river. This cove has been so filled in of recent years that considerable imagination must be exercised to reproduce the ancient sweep of dear, blue water known as Winthrop's Cove. 1 In 1664 he gave his son Samuel land "by the mill" "west side of my wharf." 1 Occupied by his son-in-law after Mr. Winthrop's removal to Hartford in 1657. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The native forest is all around, broken here and there by a patch of pasture or planting ground. One of the main roads leading into the neighboring country runs southerly five miles to the Great Neck, a large, level tract of land bordering Long Island Sound. Another principal country road runs northerly from the mill, rises a long hill, and, after the first two or three miles, is scarcely more than an Indian trail, extending five miles to Mohegan, the headquarters of Uncas and his tribe. Upon this road are occasional glimpses, through the trees, of the "Great River" (later the Thames).

James Rogers is soon not only the principal business man of this port, but, next to the Governor, the richest man in the colony. His property in the colony much exceeds that of the Governor. He is prominent in town and church affairs, he and his wife having joined the New London church; also frequently an assistant at the Superior Court and deputy at the General Court. His children are receiving a superior education for the time, as becomes their father's means and station. Life and activity are all about these growing youth, at the bakery, at the mill, at the wharf. Many are the social comings and goings, not only to and from the Governor's house,1 just beside them, but to and from their own house. His extensive business dealings and his attendance at court have brought James Rogers in contact with intelligent and prosperous men all over the colony, among whom he is a peer. His education is good, if not superior, for the time. He numbers among his personal friends some of the principal planters in this colony and neighboring colonies.

In 1666 James Rogers retires from active business. His sons Samuel and Joseph are capable young men past their majority. Samuel is well fitted to take charge of the bakery. Joseph inclines to the life of a country gentleman. John, an active youth of eighteen, is the scholar of the family. He writes his father's deeds and other business documents, which indicates some knowledge of the law. Besides being sons of a rich man, these are exceptionally capable young men. That there is no stain upon their reputations is indicated by the favor with which they are regarded by certain parents of marriageable daughters. In this year occurs the marriage of Samuel to the daughter of Thomas Stanton, who is a prominent man in the colony and interpreter between the General Court and the Indians. The parents of each make a handsome settlement upon the young people, James Rogers giving his son the stone dwelling-house and the bakery. This young man has recently sold the farm received from his grandfather, Samuel Rowland. Having also grants from the town and lands from his father (to say nothing of gifts from Owaneco), together with a flourishing business, Samuel Rogers is a rich man at an early age.

Somewhat before the marriage of Samuel, his father, in anticipation of this event, established himself upon the Great Neck, on a farm bought in 1660, of a prominent settler named Obadiah Bruen. This is one of the old Indian planting grounds so valuable in these forest days. Yet James Rogers does not reside long on the beautiful bank of Robin Hood's Bay (now Jordan Cove), for in this same year his son Joseph, not yet twenty-one years of age, receives this place, "the farm where I now dwell" and also "all my other lands on the Great Neck," as a gift from his father. All the "other lands" being valuable, this is a large settlement. (It appears to mark the year of Joseph's marriage, although the exact date and also the name of the bride are unknown. The residence of James Rogers for the next few years is uncertain; it is not unlikely that he takes up his abode in one of his houses in town, or possibly at the Mamacock farm, on the Mohegan road and the "Great River," which place was formerly granted by the town to .the Rev. Mr. Blinman, and, upon the latter's removal from New London, was purchased by Mr. Rogers.) The next marriage in this family is that of Bathsheba, a beloved daughter. She marries a young man named Richard Smith. A prominent feature in the character of this daughter is her fidelity to her parents and brothers, and especially to her brother John. 1670. Matthew Griswold is a leading member in the church of Say- brook. He resides close by the Sound, at Lyme, on a broad sweep of low-lying meadows called Blackhall, which is but a small portion of his landed estate. His wife is a daughter of Henry Wol- cott, one of the founders and principal men of Windsor, and a prominent man in the colony. Matthew Griswold is, like James Rogers, a frequent assistant and deputy. There are many proofs that he and his wife are persons of much family pride, and not without good reasons for the same. When, in 1670, they enter into an agreement with James Rogers for the marriage of their daughter Elizabeth to his son John, it is doubtless with the knowledge that this is a very promising young man, as well as the son of a wealthy and generous father. How far from the mind of the young lover, when, on the night before the happy day when he is to call Elizabeth his bride, he pens the writing * which is to give her the Mamacock farm, recently presented to him by his father, is a thought of anything that can part them until death itself. To this writing he adds: "I do here farther engage not to carry her out of the colony of Connecticut." This sentence goes to prove the great fondness of the parents for this daughter, her own loving desire to live always near them, and the ready compliance of the young lover with their wishes. He marries her at Blackhall, October 17, and takes her to the beautiful river farm which upon that day becomes her own. He does not take her to the farmhouse built by Mr. Blinman, but to a new and commodious dwelling, close by the Mohegan road, whose front room is 20 by 20, and whose big fireplaces, in every room, below and above, will rob the wintry blasts of their terror. The marriage settlement upon the young couple, by James Rogers and Matthew Griswold, includes provisions, furniture, horses, sheep, and kine.1 ( page 126) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Ancestral Anecdotes: James And John Rogers--Page 3

Entire contents copyright 2004 B. Pahlow
bpahlow@hotmail.com

This lineage is reported in "James Rogers Of New London, CT And His Descendants"
"Gen. John C. Underwood, of Covington, KY, states the line of James Rogers, of New London, to be as follows:" 1. Sir John FitzRoger, of Dorset, England, and wife Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Simon Ferneaux, Knight, descended from the Earls of Bush. 2. Sir John FitzRoger and Agnes Mordaunt, 1415-1441. 3. Sir John FitzRoger and Elizabeth Shuttlebroke. 4. Sir Henry Rogers and Annie, daughter of Lord William Stornton. 5. Thomas Rogers and Catherine DeCourtenay. The lineage of Catherine DeCourtenay can be traced in an unbroken line to Alfred The Great. 6. Nicholas Rogers. 7. William Rogers. 8. William Rogers and Mary Ash. 9. John Rogers (born 1571, died 1635) and Elizabeth Bostwick. 10. James Rogers and Elizabeth Rowland. Rogers, James Swift. James Rogers Of New London, CT And His DescendantsBoston: published by the author, 1902, Introduction

Family of James Rogers: Ancestors unknown: "Many of his descendants firmly believe the tradition that he himself said he was the great-grandson of John Rogers the Martyr." Children: 1. Samuel (12 December 1640 – 1 December 1713) m. (1) Mary Stanton (2) Joanna Williams 2. Joseph (14 May 1646 – 8 November 1713) m. Sarah. 3. John (b. 1 December 1648) m. (1) Elizabeth Griswold (2) Mary Ransford (3) Sarah Cole. 4. Bathsheba (30 December 1650 – 23 November 1711) m. (1) Richard Smith (2) Samuel Fox. 5. James (15 February 1652) m. Mary Jordan. 6. Jonathan (b. 31 December 1655) m. Naomi Burdick 7. Elizabeth (15 April 1658- 10 June 1716) m. Samuel Beebe. Sources: Sifakis, Carl. Great American Eccentrics New York: Galahad Books, 1994. Pgs. 9 - 11. More information Caulkins, Francis Mainwaring. History Of New London, CT From The First Survey Of The Coast in 1612, to 1852. New London, CT. Published by the author, 1852. Chapter 14. More information Rogers, James Swift. James Rogers Of New London, CT And His Descendants. Boston: published by the author, 1902 More informatio B. Pahlow
bpahlow@hotmail.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ E-Mail to John Clancy Nov. 3, 2009

Dear John,

I see that I did not proofread my e-mail...so let me make corrections.

I will start again. ~~~~~~~~~

Jonathan Rogers  born  31 Dec. 1655  Milford,  New Haven County, CT

(Some sources say that he was born in Stratford, Fairfield, CT I am theorizing that Milford is correct because of the following text below.... .concerning  James Rogers, the Immigrant  and his wife,  Elizabeth Rowland.  ) Source:

History of New London, Connecticut ... - Google Books  (Click Here to see the Google Digital Copy)

History of New London, Connecticut.  1612 to 1860 By Frances Manwaring Caulkins

CHAPTER XIV.

THE ROGERS FAMILY, AND THE SECT OF ROGERENES.  THE unity of religious worship in New London, was first interrupted  by James Rogers and his sons. A brief account of the family  will lead to the history of their religious doctrines.  James Rogers is supposed to be the James Rogers, who came to  America, in the Increase, 1635, aged 20. 

(James Rogers served in the militia at Saybrook, Ct in 1637 under Captain John Underhill   fighting Indians)

 As James Rogers, he is  first known to us at Stratford, where he married Elizabeth, daughter  of Samuel Rowland,2 

and is afterward found at Milford, where his  wife united with Mr. Prudden's church in 1645, and himself in 1652. 

(James and Elizabeth Rogers lived in Milford, C for at least 10 years.  (about 1645 - 1655)

Their children were  Samuel, whose birth has not been found on  record, but his will, dated Feb. 12th, 1712-13, states his age to be " 72 and upwards," which will place it in 1640;  (Possibly born in Stratford, Fairfield, CT

Joseph, baptized in Milford, 1646 ;  John, in 1648 ;  Bathsheba, in 1650 ;  James, not recorded, but next in order: ( abt 1652) Jonathan, born Dec. 31st, 1655;  (  Joseph, John, Bathsheba,  James and Jonathan  were all born in Milford, CT.)

Elizabeth, 1658.  was born in New London, New London Co., CT

Mr. Rogers had dealings in New London in 1656, and between  that time and 1660, fixed himself permanently in the plantation.  (He had a stone house built by 1660.)

Here he soon acquired property and influence, and was much employed  both in civil and ecclesiastical affairs. He was six times  representative to the General Court. 

Mr. Winthrop had encouraged  his settlement in the place, and had accommodated him with a portion  of his own house lot, next to the mill, on which Rogers built a  dwelling-house of stone. 

 He was a baker on a large scale, often  furnishing biscuit for seamen, and for colonial troops, and between  1660 and 1670 had a greater interest in the trade of the port than any other person in the place.

 His landed possessions were very extensive, consisting of several hundred acres on the Great Neck, the fine tract of land at Mohegan called the Pamechaug farm, several house lots in town, and twenty-four hundred acres east of the river, whieh he held in partnership with Col. Pyncheon, of Springfield.   1 Gleanings. Mass. Hist. Coll., 2d series, vol. 8, p. 161. 

James Rogers and his wife and children, and those connected with the latter as partners in marriage, with the exception of Samuel Rogers and wife, all became dissenters in some sort from the established Congregational church, which was then the only one recognized by the laws of the land. The origin of this dissent may be traced to an intercourse which began in the way of trade, with the Sabbatarians, or Seventh-day Baptists of Rhode Island.

John and James Rogers, Jun., first embraced the Sabbatarian principles, and were baptized in 1674; Jonathan, in 1675; James Rogers, Sen., with his wife and daughter Bathsheba. in 1676, and these were received as members of the Seventh-day church at Newport. Jonathan Rogers still further cemented his union with the Seventh-day community, by marriage with Naomi Burdick, a daughter of one of the elders of the church. Of the baptism of Joseph Rogers we have no account. His wife went down into the water on Sunday, Nov. 24th, 1677, near the house of Samuel Rogers, at the head of Winthrop's Cove. Elders Hubbard and Hickox, from Rhode Island, were present, and it was expected that one of them would perform the rite; but the town authorities having interfered and requested them to do it elsewhere, on account of the noise and tumult that might ensue, they acquiesced in the reasonableness of the proposal, and declined acting on the occasion. But John Rogers would assent to no compromise, and assuming on the spot the authority of an elder, and the responsibility of the act, he led the candidate into the water, and performed the baptism.1 From this time forth, John Rogers began to draw off from the Sabbatarians, and to broach certain peculiar notions of his own. He assumed the ministerial offices of baptizing and preaching, and having gained a few disciples, originated a new sect, forming a church or society, which were called Rogerenes, or Rogerene Quakers, and sometimes Rogerene Baptists.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

James Rogers, Immigrant Came in "Increase" 1635 Residences: Saybrook  1637 Stratford Milford, CT New London, New London, CT

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Jonathan Rogers  b. 1655  Milford, New Haven, CT  Died 1697 - He was drowned off Gull Island between New London and East Lyme CT.

He married Naomi Burdick   2 Mar 1678 in  Westerly, Washington Co, (It was part of CT Colony at the time, and later became a part of Rhode Island.)

Naomi Burdick was born in 1658 in Newport, Newport Co., Rhode Island. She died 3 Feb 1715 in New London, New London Co., CT

They had seven children:  Ruth, Elizabeth, Naomi, Content, Jonathan, Rachel and Katherine ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Jonathan Rogers

Eventually established home and business in New London, New London, CT He resided on a farm on the Great Neck given to him by his father.   “Rogers Genealogy”  pp. 46-7 Notes for Jonathan Rogers

My genealogy program shows  Ruth Rogers  as born about 1678  in Montville, New London, CT Died in 1734 in New London, New London Co., CT  at age 56 

She was the daughter of Jonathan Rogers and Naomi Burdick,

She married William  Beebe  after 1692.

William Beebe was born 1665 in New London, New London Co., CT He died on the 27 of Feb 1749 in Westerly, Washington Co, RI   age 84

William Beebe was a Quaker as was his father, Samuel Beebe.  His will was dated August 8, 1750 and proved January 8, 1751. He mentions his sons; Samuel, Stephen, William, Ezekiel and daughters; Lydia and Mary. Mary was under age 18 and was by his third wife Hannah.

"New England Families Genealogical and Memorial", by William Richard Cutter; IV:2037-9; Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc.; Baltimore, Maryland; 1916 (929.274 C991 LAPL) (974.0 NEa SCGS) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

In my family,  the Myers Family of Spencerport, New York,  we are descended from three of the children of James Rogers and Elizabeth Rowland.

Those three are 

Bathsheba  Rogers :   thru Samuel Fox II,  the Younger and  Rachel Rogers  (1st cousins)

Capt James Rogers Jr. :  thru William Rogers who m. Elizabeth Harris, dau. of Peter Harris and  Elizabeth Manwaring.     Jonathan Rogers :  thru  Rachel Rogers who married Samuel Fox II, the Younger

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I hope all this clears the air.......If you have more questions,  feel free to ask.   I have more infomation on the Rogerenes.  Actually, it is easy to find a great deal by just Googling    Rogerenes  

Your Distant Cousin,   Ethel Myers Stanton

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

History of New London, Connecticut ... - Google Books

Caulkins

1 The houses of James Rogers and Edward Stallion, both bnilt before 1660, were of stone. Stallion's was on the Town Street: afterward Edgecombe property. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

RootsWeb: ROGERS-STEPHEN-NS-L Re: James Rogers and Elizabeth Rowland

http://listsearches.rootsweb.com/th/read/ROGERS-STEPHEN-NS/2001-04/0988073808

CT Nutmegger Volume 28, page 568

The Public Record Office in London contains a copy of a "license to go beyond the seas," dated April 15, 1635. Among those "to be transported to New England imbarqued in the "Increase"" is James Rogers, 20 years.

In 1637 James Rogers was one of six men from Saybrook who took part in the Pequot War. A few years later James was in Stratford, CT where he married Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel Rowland. For a time James Rogers was in Milford, where his son Joseph was born, and thereafter he became prominent in New London. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Descendants of Edward Thurston, the ... - Google Books

, the first of the name in the colony of Rhode Island Printed 1865

By Charles Myrick Thurston

page 28

202. James Rogers came from London to America April 15, 1635, in the Increase, aged 20 years. He first settled at Stratford, where he married Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel Rowland ; afterward at Milford, where his wife united with Mr. Prudden's church in 1645, and himself in 1652. He afterwards removed to New London, where he received a grant of land June 15, 1659. In August, 1658, he received grants of land within the Mohegan reservation from Uncas, and became one of the largest landholders of the place. He died in February 1688, and his will was proved in Boston; it was recorded in New London July 22, 1703. Children. 203—1. Samuel, born December 12, 1640, married Mary Stanton. 204— 2. Joseph, baptized in Milford, 1646. 205—3. John, baptized in Milford, 1648, married Elizabeth Griswold. 206—4. Bathsheba, baptized in Milford, 1650, married Richard Smith, Samuel Fox. 207—5. James, , married Mary Jordan. 208—6. Jonathan, born December 31, 1655, married Naomi Burdick, of Newport, R. I. 209—7. Elizabeth, born 1658, married Samuel Beebee.

All of this family, excepting Samuel Rogers and wife, became dissenters from the Congregational Church, the only one recognized by law, and embraced the Sabbatarian principles, and became members of the Seventh-day Baptist Church at Newport, R. I.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Signers of the Mayflower Compact - Google Books

by Annie Amoux Haxtun

Will of James Rogers Sr.

Page 65

Extract:

1. My land at Mystic I bequeath to my three eldest sons, Samuel, Joseph and John, it being first by them divided into three parts, and then let it be divided to them by lot, that each may know what his part is, for as the lot falls, so shall each one’s part be, they paying to my daughter Elizabeth 25 pounds.

2. To my son James, I bequeth Goshen Neck, and he shall have a highway to it over the pond where I now go.

3. To my son Jonathan, my houses and lands so fr back as Magunk fence, which lies within my field fence, and the bounds between my son ames and son Jonathan, which is, so to say, between Goshen and my field shall be the great rock which lies between the pond, and the sea on the north side of the beach, a line being run north and south from the said rock shall be the bound between them. To my son Jonathan I bequeth the twenty acres in the new pasture joining his house and running between the head of my son James his home lot and my son Jonathan his own dwelling house.

4. To my son John and son Jonathan I bequeath all the rest of my land lying in the new pasture, as also all the rest of my land lying in the General Neck, it being divided by them into two parts first, and then as the lot comes forth shall each one know wht his lot is, and my will is that my son James pay to my daughter Elizabeth twenty pounds within a year after the death of his mother (my wife) and that my son Jonathan pay to my daughter Elizabeth fifty ounds within three years after the death of my wife, ten of it the first year after her death.

5. To my son Joseph I bequeath the land I had of Obadiah Bowen, called Bruin’s Neck.

6. To my son John I leave the land I hadof Robert Allyn, lying on the east side of the river that goeth to Norwich, he paying to his sister, my daughter Bathsheba the sum of twenty pounds within a year after the death of my sife, and if he see cause not so to do, my daughter Bathsheba hall have said land. And all the rest of my estate, as cattle, household goods, debts, and personal estate, I leave to my wife to dispose of as she see good, only to pay to my daughter Elizabeth ten pounds if she sees good, with the advice of my son John.

I also give liberty to my wife to sell or dispose of any part of my land or estate here willed, if she sees cause so to do, without offense to any of my children, and to have the use of my houses to live in or to let out.

Some cattle was left with me by my son John to use as my own, not giving me power to give or will away, but did promise me what I sold or killed for the family’s use he never would demand pay, but for only those that should be remaining in my hands. The chamber where my son John now lies I leave to him with the room under it for him to live in during his lifetime if my wife see cause not to order it otherwise.

If any difference should arise about my land here willed, or any part of my estate, for want of a plain discovery, whether about bounds or otherwise, my will is there shall be no lawing among my children before earthly judges, but that the controversy be ended by lot, and so I refer the judgment of God, and as the lot comes forth, so let it be.

And this I declare to be my last will and testament, as witness my hand this eleventh day of the ninth month, one thousand six hundred and eighty three

James Rogers.

Samuel Beebe, Mary Beebe, witnesses.

Recorded in the third book of wills for New London County this 22d day of July 1703

(Since James Rogers died when the government of Sir Edmund Andros was paramount i New Englnd, His will was therefore proved in Boston, Mass. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Rogers Ancestral History

John Rogers: The compiler of the First Authorized English Bible The Pioneer of the English Reformation And it’s First Martyr

John Rogers (Information extracted from the above named book written in 1861 by Joseph Lemuel Chester) as well as other sources.

Lineage of Rev. John Rogers, the Martyr

There is a dispute, however, over this traditional Rogers lineage, and at the heart of it is the descent coming from John Rogers, b. about 1500, who was burned at the stake in England for his religious views of Reformation, and for printing the Bible. He has become known as "John Rogers, the Smithfield Martyr" down through history from that time, and there is evidently a lot of controversy about his particular line of descent, with many families claiming to be descended from him. The document I am including does not appear to be the same as our line of descent until after it is in our country, where it does conform to our line, but to confirm that would take many hours of research, and then you would just have either confirmed or eliminated only one theory. The truth is that there appears to be little documentation of his direct line of descent, so there will probably always be controversy about it. Whatever the case may be, until documentation is shown to discount our line as it is, it shall stand.

[Going back in history to the 1500s] Rev. John Rogers, a reformed English clergy [living in England], led by William Tyndall, had prepared for the press much of the Bible translated into English [At that time only landed gentry could own a bible]. Soon after Queen Mary arrived in London, John was the first martyr. He was burned at the stake at Smithfield on February 4th in 1555, (Encyclopedia Americana).

JOHN ROGERS (c. 1500-1555), English Protestant martyr, was born in Deritend, an area of Birmingham then within the parish of Aston. His father was also called John Rogers and was a lorimer – a maker of bits and spurs – whose family came from Aston; his mother was Margaret Wyatt, the daughter of a tanner with family in Erdington and Sutton Coldfield . Rogers was educated at the Guild School of St John the Baptist in Deritend at Pembroke Hall, Cambridge University, where he graduated B.A. in 1526. Between 1532 and 1534 he was rector of Holy Trinity the Less in the city of London. Holy Trinity the Less was an ancient church within the boundaries of the City of London that was destroyed during the Great Fire of London in September 1666.

In 1534 John Rogers went to Antwerp, Belgium as chaplain to the English merchants of the Company of the Merchant Adventurers of London. Here he met William Tyndale, under whose influence he abandoned the Roman Catholic faith, and in 1536 married Antwerp native Adriana de Weyden (b. 1511, anglicised to Adrana Pratt).

After Tyndale's death Rogers pushed on with his predecessor's English version of the Old Testament, which he used as far as 2 Chronicles, employing Coverdale's translation (1535) for the remainder and for the Apocrypha. Tyndale's New Testament had been published in 1526. The complete Bible was put out under the pseudonym of Thomas Matthew in 1537; it was printed in Paris and Antwerp by Adriana's uncle, Sir Jacobus van Meteren. Richard Grafton published the sheets and got leave to sell the edition (1500 copies) in England. At the insistence of Archbishop Cranmer, the "King's most gracious license" was granted to this translation. Previously in the same year, the 1537 reprint of the Myles Coverdale's translation had been granted such a license.

The pseudonym "Matthew" is associated with Rogers, but it seems more probable that Matthew stands for Tyndale's own name, which, back then, was dangerous to employ. Rogers had little to do with the translation; his own share in that work was probably confined to translating the prayer of Manasses (inserted here for the first time in a printed English Bible), the general task of editing the materials at his disposal, and preparing the marginal notes collected from various sources. These are often cited as the first original English language commentary on the Bible. Rogers also contributed the Song of Manasses in the Apocrypha, which he found in a French Bible printed in 1535. His work was largely used by those who prepared the Great Bible (1539-40), and from this came the Bishops' Bible (1568) and the King James Version.

Rogers matriculated at the University of Wittenberg on 25 November 1540, where he remained for three years, becoming a close friend of Philipp Melanchthon and other leading figures of the early Protestant Reformation. On leaving Wittenberg he spent four and a half years as a superintendent of a Lutheran church in Meldorf, Dithmarschen, near the mouth of the River Elbe in the north of Germany.

Rogers returned to England in 1548, where he published a translation of Philipp Melanchthon's Considerations of the Augsburg Interim.

The quotation that follows is from Foxe’s Book of Martyrs, by John Foxe, Chapter 16.

John Rogers, Vicar of St. Sepulchre's, and Reader of St. Paul's London

"John Rogers was educated at Cambridge, and was afterward many years chaplain to the merchant adventurers at Antwerp in Brabant. Here he met with the celebrated martyr William Tyndale, and Miles Coverdale, both voluntary exiles from their country for their aversion to popish superstition and idolatry. They were the instruments of his conversion; and he united with them in that translation of the Bible into English, entitled "The Translation of Thomas Matthew." From the Scriptures he knew that unlawful vows may be lawfully broken; hence he married, and removed to Wittenberg in Saxony, for the improvement of learning; and he there learned the Dutch language, and received the charge of a congregation, which he faithfully executed for many years. On King Edward's accession, he left Saxony to promote the work of reformation in England; and, after some time, Nicholas Ridley, then bishop of London, gave him a prebend in St. Paul's Cathedral, and the dean and chapter appointed him reader of the divinity lesson there. Here he continued until Queen Mary's succession to the throne, when the Gospel and true religion were banished, and the Antichrist of Rome, with his superstition and idolatry, introduced.

The circumstance of Mr. Rogers having preached at Paul's cross, after Queen Mary arrived at the Tower, has been already stated. He confirmed in his sermon the true doctrine taught in King Edward's time, and exhorted the people to beware of the pestilence of popery, idolatry, and superstition. For this he was called to account, but so ably defended himself that, for that time, he was dismissed. The proclamation of the queen, however, to prohibit true preaching, gave his enemies a new handle against him. Hence he was again summoned before the council, and commanded to keep to his house. He did so, though he might have escaped; and though he perceived the state of the true religion to be desperate. He knew he could not want a living in Germany; and he could not forget a wife and ten children, and to seek means to succor them. But all these things were insufficient to induce him to depart, and, when once called to answer in Christ's cause, he stoutly defended it, and hazarded his life for that purpose.

After long imprisonment in his own house, the restless Bonner, bishop of London, caused him to be committed to Newgate, there to be lodged among thieves and murderers.

After Mr. Rogers had been long and straitly imprisoned, and lodged in Newgate among thieves, often examined, and very uncharitably entreated, and at length unjustly and most cruelly condemned by Stephen Gardiner, bishop of Winchester, the fourth day of February, in the year of our Lord 1555, being Monday in the morning, he was suddenly warned by the keeper of Newgate's wife, to prepare himself for the fire; who, being then sound asleep, could scarce be awaked. At length being raised and awaked, and bid to make haste, then said he, "If it be so, I need not tie my points." And so was had down, first to bishop Bonner to be degraded: which being done, he craved of Bonner but one petition; and Bonner asked what that should be. Mr. Rogers replied that he might speak a few words with his wife before his burning, but that could not be obtained of him.

When the time came that he should be brought out of Newgate to Smithfield, the place of his execution, Mr. Woodroofe, one of the sheriffs, first came to Mr. Rogers, and asked him if he would revoke his abominable doctrine, and the evil opinion of the Sacrament of the altar. Mr. Rogers answered, "That which I have preached I will seal with my blood." Then Mr. Woodroofe said, "Thou art an heretic." "That shall be known," quoth Mr. Rogers, "at the Day of Judgment." "Well," said Mr. Woodroofe, "I will never pray for thee." "But I will pray for you," said Mr. Rogers; and so was brought the same day, the fourth of February, by the sheriffs, towards Smithfield, saying the Psalm Miserere by the way, all the people wonderfully rejoicing at his constancy; with great praises and thanks to God for the same. And there in the presence of Mr. Rochester, comptroller of the queen's household, Sir Richard Southwell, both the sheriffs, and a great number of people, he was burnt to ashes, washing his hands in the flame as he was burning. A little before his burning, his pardon was brought, if he would have recanted; but he utterly refused it. He was the first martyr of all the blessed company that suffered in Queen Mary's time that gave the first adventure upon the fire. His wife and children, being eleven in number, ten able to go, and one sucking at her breast, met him by the way, as he went towards Smithfield. This sorrowful sight of his own flesh and blood could nothing move him, but that he constantly and cheerfully took his death with wonderful patience, in the defence and quarrel of the Gospel of Christ."

Noailles the French ambassador, speaks of the support given to Rogers by the greatest part of the people: "even his children assisted at it, comforting him in such a manner that it seemed as if he had been led to a wedding." He was the first Protestant martyr of Mary's reign, and his friend Bradford wrote that "he broke the ice valiantly."

From the source: John Rogers: the Compiler of the First Authorized English Bible; the Pioneer of the English Reformation; and Its First Martyr, by Joseph Lemuel Chester, Longman, Green, Longman, & Roberts, London. 452 pp we find the following:

There can be little doubt that John Rogers was born “about the year 1500, and probably at the little village or hamlet of Deritend, in the parish of Aston, Warwickshire, England, then in the suburbs of, but now quite surrounded by the city of Birmingham.”

John Rogers, the martyr married Adrian Pratt alias De Weyden of Brabant, Antwerp, Belgium who was born in 1511, daughter of Weyden De Pratt, in 1536 at Branbant, Antwerp, Belgium. John Rogers was burned at the stake on the 4th of February, 1555 at Smithfield, London, England.

From the visitation of Warwick, 1563 it is recorded that John and Adrian Rogers had eleven children, thus given:   1. Susan Rogers, born in 1537 at Branbant, Antwerp, Belgium who married John Short, merchant of London

2. Daniel Rogers, was born abt 1538 at Wittenburg, Saxony-Anhault, Deutschland. He came to England with his family in 1548 and was naturalized with them, by special Act of Parliament, in 1552. After his father’s death, he returned to Wittenberg and studied for some time under Melancthon, but came back to England eary in Elizabeth’s reign, and completed his education at Oxford where he took his degrees as early as August 1561. He was of Sunbury, county of Middlsex, clerk of the council to Queen Elizabeth (ob. 1591), married Susan, daughter of Nicasius Yetsworth/Yetswiert, clerk of the signet, and secretary of the French tongue. He died 11 January 1590. The children of Daniel and Susan Rogers were a son and a daughter, viz:   a. Francis Rogers who married a daughter of _______ Cory and had a son   1. Francis Rogers(a son)

b. Posthuma Rogers, (daughter) who married _______ Spears

3. John Rogers, born about 1540 in Wittenburg, Saxony-Anhault, Deutschland. He came to England with the family in 1548 and was naturalized with them, by special Act of parliament in 1552. It is doubtful if he left the country after his father’s death, as he matriculated as a pensioner of St. John’s College, Cambridge, May 17th , 1558, only about three years after his father was martyred. He afterwards migrated to Trinity College, of which he became a scholar. He proceeded B.A. in 1562-3, was soon after elected Fellow, and commenced M.A. in 1567. In some old pedigrees he is styled as “Proctor of the Civil Law,” but, in 1574, he was created LL.D., and on the 21st of November in that year, he was admitted to the College of Advocates. He married Mary Leete, daughter of William Leete, of Everden, county of Cambridge, D.C.L. He died 3 Jul 1601 at Moulsham, Chelmsford, Essex, England (will probated) was a proctor of the civil law.

The children of John and Mary Leete Rogers were:   a. Cassandra b. Elizabeth c. Hecuba d. Constantine e. John f. Edward g. Mary h. Varro (a son)

Another source at (http://dgmweb.net/genealogy/FGS/R/RogersJohn- MaryLeete-JoanGarlinge.shtml) has a second wife for John: Joan Garlinge – Will proved 10 Nov 1612, brother: William Garlinge of Totham, ESS. Joan married 2nd in 1604, John Hamond, surgeon of Mouisham, Chelmsford Parish, ESS. Five other children are thought to be children of this John Rogers at this source:   a. Thomas Rogers, baptized 30 Jan 1574 b. Mary Rogers, baptized 28 Apr 1576, m. William Griffin c. Elizabeth Rogers, baptized 21 Jul 1577 d. Richard Rogers, baptized 15 Apr 1579 e. John Rogers

4. Augustine Rogers, born at Wittenburg, Saxony, Prussia 5. Ambrose Rogers, born 1542 at Wittenburg, Saxony-Anhault, Deutschland 6. Bernard Fitz Rogers, was born 1543 at Wittenburg, Saxony-Anhault, Deutschland, married Mary abt 1564 at Scotland, moved from Scotland to England and died in 1583. Barnard's children were:   a. Thomas Matthew Rogers b. 1565 b. Jiles [Giles] Rogers c. Samuel Rogers -- was father of:   i. Robert Rogers who married Francis Russell -- Robert and Francis were parents of :   1. Hugh Rogers

7. Samuel Rogers, born 1545 at Wittenburg, Saxony-Anhault, Deutschland 8. Philip Rogers, born 1547 at Wittenburg, Saxony-Anhault, Deutschland 9. Elizabeth Rogers, born 1551 at Wittenburg, Saxony-Anhault, Deutschland, married James Proctor, chancellor of Salisbury 10. Hester Rogers, born 1553 in London, Middlesex, England, married Henry Ball, physician 11. Barnaby Rogers, born 1554 at London, Middlesex, England 12. Susannah Rogers,* born 15??; died 29 Sep 1565; buried St Mary Woolnoth Parish, London, married William SHORTE (Could this be the Susan Rogers married to John Shorte listed as child no. 1? It is recorded that there were only 11 children born to this family.)

  • Source: "Genealogical Gleanings in England." New England Historical and Genealogical Register, by Henry F. Waters, 1890. 44(3): 296-308 lists a 12th child: 1565. Sep. 29, Susanna, wife of William Shorte, grocer, and daughter to Mr. Rogers, late burned in Smithfield. [Parish Register of St. Mary Woolnoth, Burials, p. 188]

[Footnote:] If Col. Chester had seen the [above] entry he might have been spared much labor in proving the family of the proto-martyr. This entry, taken with the pedigree found in the British Museum, constitutes proof positive.--Editor.

[http://dgmweb.net/genealogy/FGS/R/RogersJohn-AdryanDeWeyden.shtml] One of the pedigrees mentioned in the book “John Rogers” by Joseph Lemuel Chester would seem to indicate that Daniel was the fifth child, the three daughters and a son, Ambrose, preceding Daniel in birth order. The other mentions Daniel distinctly as the oldest child. The Will of Daniel Rogers, preserved at Doctors’ Commons, describes Ambrose as his youngest brother and, of course, is authoritative on this point.

The father of James Rogers, the martyr, it would seem, was John Thomas Rogers of Deritend, Aston Parish-- the fifth generation of descent from John Fitz Rogers, who married a daughter of Sir Simon Furnseup, descended from the Earls of Bush;” – who by his wife, Margery M. Wyatt, had three sons and two daughters:   1. John 2. William 3. Edward 4. Eleanor who married Robert Mylward of Alnechurch 5. Joan also married

Further information on John Rogers, the Martyr can be found at:

1. John Rogers: the Compiler of the First Authorised English Bible, Joseph Lemuel Chester, (1861), London: Longman, Green, Longman, and Roberts, OCLC 257597540, http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=-oALAAAAYAAJ

2. The Bible in English, David Daniell, (2003), Yale University Press, ISBN 0300099304

3. "Rogers, John (c.1500–1555)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Online ed.), Oxford University Press, http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/23980

4. Encyclopædia Britannica, Eleventh Edition, online at: http://encyclopedia.jrank.org/RHY_RON/ROGERS_JOHN_c_1500_1555_.html

5. Fox’s Book of Martyrs, by John Foxe, edited by William Byron Forbush http://www.biblebelievers.com/foxes/findex.htm http://www.ccel.org/f/foxe/martyrs/home.html http://www.gutenberg.org/files/22400/22400-8.txt http://www.biblestudytools.com/History/AD/FoxsBookofMartyrs/ http://www.sacred-texts.com/chr/martyrs/index.htm

The John Rogers Bible

The descendants of the line of James Rogers of New London who was born in 1615 have possession of a bible thought to have belonged to the Rev. John Rogers, the Smithfield martyr. A Bible that, it is alleged, belonged to John Rogers the Smithfield martyr, is carefully preserved in the archives of Alfred University, Alfred, New York. Its history, as told by William H. Potter, of Mystic River, is as follows:

Judith Rogers, daughter of Capt. Jonathan Rogers, married Thomas Potter, of Hopkinton, Rhode Island, then a part of Westerly. She was his second wife, and had, when married, or upon the death of her father (as the oldest child) the Bible which James’ brought over from England in 1635.

The Bible was printed in 1549, in the days of King Edward VI, under the patronage of Thomas Cranmer, primate of England, who was burnt at Oxford, March 1, 1556, in the third year of Mary’s reign. This book, as tradition in the family says, was the property of John Rogers, prebendary of St. Paul’s, London, who was burnt at Smithfield, Feb. 4, 1555, being the first Protestant martyr in the reign of Bloody Mary.

James Rogers, one of the descendants of the martyr, brought the Bible to this country at his immigration in 1635. It had, he said, been concealed in a feather bed during the rest of Mary’s reign.

He used it as a pillow in his travels and sojourn in the wilderness as a sort of talisman, to protect him from a nightly attack of the savages. It eventually came into possession of Jonathan, fifth son of James; descended to his only son, Jonathan, and came into possession of his oldest child, Judith, as above said.

The children of Thomas and Judith (Rogers) Potter were: Judith, Mary, Thomas, Caleb, Jr., Clarke, Sarah, and Catharine. Mary, commonly called Polly, a maiden, who remained with the old folks, inherited the homestead and also came into possession of the precious Bible. She kept it very close, but was persuaded about the year 1836 or ’37, to commit it in charge of William H. Potter (a descendant of Thomas Potter, who married Judith Rogers) to have it rebound. It had been rebound once before Judith Rogers inherited it. It was carefully rebound a second time, and taken by W. H. Potter to New Haven, to compare with ancient copies of the Holy Scriptures in the library of Yale College, where it was examined by antiquarians and pronounced a version as early as A.D. 1549. It was then returned to Polly Potter, who has since died, leaving it in possession of her niece, Mrs. Saunders, now, 1857 residing at Potter Hill, R.I.

The following is taken from a compilation by Prof. E. M. Tomlinson, of Alfred University, describing the book: --

Cranmer’s first edition, to which this accurately corresponds, was first published in 1539. We give this the date of 1549, for fear of antedating. 1539 might with more propriety have been its date.

The book itself is a small, thick quarto, containing the New Testament (the translation of Cranmer of 1539), the Psalms, and a portion of the Liturgy of the Protestant Church at that time. The title page and a few of the first and the last leaves have been lost, the book having been twice rebound. It is printed in the large, full ancient German Text, with ornamental initial letters to a portion of the chapters, and a few marginal references. The chapters are divided [as] in King James’ version, but they have no division into verses, capital letters in the margin indicating the commencement of paragraphs as they appear in each chapter. In various parts of the book we find brief notes and memorandums by different persons relative to its carefully cherished and authentic history.

In Austin’s Genealogical Dictionary, p. 106, Samuel Hubbard, of Rhode Island, is quoted as writing in 1675, “I have a testament of my grandfather Cocke’s printed in 1549, which he hid in his bed-straw lest it should be found and burned in Queen Mary’s days.” Samuel Hubbard was the grandfather of Naomi Burdick, the wife of Jonathan Rogers (the father of Judith Rogers Potter). Both the “Potter Bible and the “Burdick Bible” are described as “testaments,” and this fact, taken with the story of concealment, leads one to infer that the same book is referred to in both instances.

In an article on “John Rogers the Martyr,” printed in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register, in April, 1851, is this clause: -- John Rogers printed, finished, and introduced into England in 1537 the folio Bible, being the first complete edition of both the Old and New Testaments: revised and published by him alone under the assumed name of “Thomas Matthew.” He printed on the last leaf these words: “To the honoure and prayse of God was this Byble printed and Fynished in the Yere of oure Lord God. A. M. D. XXXVII.”

Quoting from Rev. R. P. Stebbins’ “Leominster,” we find another Bible claimed to be “the genuine Martyr Bible.” Mr. Carter, of Lunenburg, Mass., has in his possession the “Rogers Bible.” Tradition is uniform in saying that the martyr’s Bible was brought to this country, and this book has been handed down from the branch of the family in Boxford. It is printed in black letter, without verses. Sections are marked on the margin with letters of the alphabet. The first part is gone to the thirty-eighth chapter of Exodus. It has been burned pretty badly, and the tradition is that it was burnt at the stake. At the commencement of the Book of Psalms and of the Apocrypha, there are title pages, but no date; there is the monogram, or mark of the printer, however, which helps to decide the age of the book. The late C. C. Baldwin, librarian of the American Antiquarian Society, examined this Bible and thus writes to Mr. Carter: “This mark was used by an ancient printer, by the name of John Cawood, to designate the books printed by him. He printed only one edition of the Bible, which was in 1549; at least I cannot ascertain that he printed more than one. These two circumstances –the mark and the single edition printed by him – make it very manifest that this Bible was printed in 1549. And as John Rogers did not suffer at the stake until Feb. 4, 1555, it is possible that this may have been the identical copy which belonged to him.”

From the above widely differing statements the reader must draw his own conclusions. Patient searching has thus far failed to disclose facts to substantiate any of the traditions. But the question as to which was the particular copy used by the martyr, pales into insignificance compared with the well established facts that he not only published a Bible, but that he forfeited his life for his devotion to its sacred precepts as he interpreted them.

ANCESTRAL LINE OF JOHN ROGERS, SMITHFIELD MARTYR

Following is the ancestral line of John Rogers, the Smithfield Martyr as compiled by Charles Rogers, son of Forrest Rogers. This line originally connected to James Rogers of New London, born in 1615 in England through Thomas Rogers of the Mayflower. This connection has since been proven to be wrong and it is known that Thomas of the Mayflower does not descend from the line of John Rogers, the Smithfield martyr and James Rogers of NewLondon, Connecticut is not the son of Thomas Rogers of the Mayflower. Since documentation of early descendants of James Rogers of New London, Connecticut claim ancestry to the Smithfield martyr and have possession of a bible written and edited by him, I am including this ancestral line in this book. It is my deepest desire that the parents of James of New London may someday be known and this ancestral chart would assist in the lineage of our Rogers line when this connection is found.

1. Sir Tancred de Hauteville, was born about 970 AD, and died about 1058. He was Commander of ten knights in the militia of duke Robert of Normandy. His second wife was Fressenda. Source of the following is: History of MF Planters by L.C. Hills: The Rogers Family: Sir Tancred de Hautville, born c970. died after 1058, a nobleman of Hautville near Cautauces, Normandy, married firstly c.992 Moriella; married secondly c.1013 Fredistand. There among their sons were Robert, Roger and William.

Robert "Guiscard" born 1015, became a great General, commanding Norman troops in Italy, and was created Duke of Apulia 1059; King of Naples and had other honors, and died in 1085. His brother Roger became Grand Count Roger I 1089-1102 of Sicily. He was born 1030 and died in 1101/2. Duke Robert and his brother Grand Count Roger were largely responsible for the Norman conquest of Sicily, and the Fitz Roger name in South West England is said to have arose from descendants of these brothers.

Their son of descent was:

2. Roger de Hauteville, Grand Count of Sicily, was born 1030 and died 22 June 1101. Roger was the youngest of twelve sons of Tancred. The Hauteville family conquered the southern part of Italy and the Island of Sicily. Roger and his brother Robert Guiscard (the cunning) were the most outstanding commanders of the family. Rogers’ third wife was Adelaide. Their son was:

3. Roger II, Grand Count of Sicily, King of Sicily and the southern part of Italy, was born 22 December 1095 and died 26 Feb 1154. Creator of the Norman Kingdom of Sicily, Roger II ruled one of the best governed states in the 12th century Europe where Italians, Greeks, Muslims, and Jews lived together in cosmopolitan society. He was a man of great energy and ambition. He was crowned king on Christmas Day 1130 in the cathedral of Palermo. Roger was married three times. His first wife was Elvira. There son was:

4. Roger, Count of Apulia – Although married to Elizabeth, Roger had a son Tancred who was born illegitimately to Emma, daughter of Count Achard of Lecce. Their son was:

5. Tancred, King of Sicily – died in Palermo on 20 February 1194. During the reign of his uncle William I, he conspired against the government and had to take refuge in Constantinople. He returned upon Williams’ death and obtained the Countship of Lecce in 169. When William II died in 1189, a faction of the Norman nobility, reluctant to let the Sicilian crown go to Roger II’s daughter Constance, wife of German King Henry VI, elected Tancred King. His wife was Sibylla, daughter of Roger of Acerra. Their son was:

6. William III – was born in 1184. William became king at the age of 10 upon the sudden death of Tancred. He was deposed by Henry VI of Germany and later sent to prison in Germany with his mother and three sisters. His fate is unknown. According to some reports, he died in prison. According to others, he became a Monk. His mother and sisters were released after several years. This genealogy accepts his release from prison to a life of obscurity or seclusion. His son was:

7. Unknown – The connection to William II is based upon writings of Aaron Fitz Roger, without knowledge of the name of this link. His son was:

8. Aaron Fitz Roger was a merchant in Rome, Italy. His son was:

9. Aaron Fitz Roger was a merchant in Rome, Italy and was greatly persecuted by the Roman Church. He fled with his family to London, England where he re-established his business and reared his family in peace and quiet. He brought over with him the coat of arms and traditions of his royal ancestors. He often alluded to his great-great grandfather, the King of both Sicilys. The name Fitz Roger implies descent from a King named Roger. The Rogers Family were given the right to bear the coat of arms accredited to Grand Count Roger I of Sicily. His son was:

10. Aaron Fitz Roger, oldest son of Aaron Fitz Roger came to England with his father. He was born in Italy and died in England. Aaron Fitz Roger born c1265 of Rome, Italy; died c1330 London, Middlesex, England. The family business was merchandising after settling in Kent, Gloucestershire and Somersetshire. His son was:

11. John Fitz Roger, of Dorset, England was born about 1335 and married about 1385 to Elizabeth de Furneaux born 1330, only daughter of Sir Symon de Furneaux (Furneup), Knight, descended from the Earls of Bush, of Ashington, and other manors in Somersetshire and Devonshire and Alice de Umfraville, widow of Sir John Blount, Constable of the Tower of London.

John gained great wealth by marrying Elizabeth. With John FitzRoger she was cofounder of 'Rogers House' of South West England. Sir Symon's only surviving child, and sole heiress, was his daughter, Elizabeth de Furneaux b. c1334. She m. 1351, Sir Blount, Knight and a Constable of the Tower, by whom she Alice later that year in 1351. Sir Blount d. 1358, leaving an attractive and wealthy widow, who inherited many large estates.

The Furneaux's were from France, near Coutances, Normandy, the same area as the Sicilian Rogers family. Odo de Furneaux, b. c1040 in Normandy came to England with William the Conqueror and his son Sir Alan de Furneaux was born c1075 in Normandy, but settled in Devon and received from King Henry I, a manor house and land near Honiton, Devon. He had four sons: Sir Alan Furneaux, a Justiciary, 1165; Philip Furneaux; William Furneaux, and the eldest, his son and heir Sir Geoffrey Furneaux b. c1117-22. Sir Geoffrey was appointed Sheriff of Devon. He was a very influential man; was knighted and married late - about 1155 and had four sons - Geoffrey Furneaux, b. c1158; Sir Robert Furneaux, b. c1160, Sir Alan Furneaux , b. c1162 and his eldest son and heir -Sir Henry Furneaux (b. c1156. He also became Sheriff of Devon. He married, c1180, Johanna, daughter of Robert Fitz William, who brought to her husband the manor of Ashington in Somerset. Having by right of his wife become Lord of the manors in Somerset, he ultimately settled there; and had a least one son, Henry Furneaux, b. c1181- 1214.

The eldest sons, in the next two generations were called Matthew Furneaux I and Matthew Furneaux II, b. c1220, was a Sheriff of Devon under King Edward I (1276). Matthew II was b. c1245 and, c1270, married Matilda (or Maud), d/o Sir Warren deRaleigh of 'Nettlecombe' in Somerset. Sir Walter Raleigh, becoming famous two centuries later, descended from this Raleigh family. Matthew Furneaux II also had a son, Sir Matthew Furneaux III, ancestor of Thomas Rogers but not the eldest son in this generation, Lord of Ashington, his principal residence, he was knighted then summoned in 1295 into military service against the Welsh, and in 1296-98 and 1300 against the Scots. He was Sheriff of Somerset, Dorset & Devon variously and from 1304-1316, the year of his death. In 1312 he had custody of Devon and the King's Castle of Exeter; and in 1315 was custodian of the counties of Somerset & Dorset, and the Castle of Shireborn. He was a prominent member of the Furneaux family.

His son and heir was Sir Symon de Furneaux, b. c1271. Symon married Alice, daughter of Sir Henry de Umfraville of Penarth Point in Glamorgan Wales, and was a principal landowner of his county. He died without surviving male issue as his son William, born 1328, predeceased him. Among the many honors bestowed upon him was a Knighthood of the Shire of Somerset, in the Parliament of Edward III (1328). His recorded arms were: 'Gules, a bend between six crosses-crosslet, or; which are still preserved on some encaustic tiles in 'Cleve Abbey' - where he and his father were benefactors - to which, later heraldic authorities add a crest. The insignia & colors displayed by father & son were practically identical. This Coat of Arms, as well as the many other Coats of Arms of the Furneaux Family, can be seen in Burke's Armory and any other book listing Coat of Arms for England.

12. Sir John Fitz Roger, only child of John Fitz Roger, Gent. and Elizabeth de Furneaux, was born in 1385 and died on 4 October 1441. He married Agnes (Mordaunt) de Mereaunt (1415-1441) of Seamer, Suffolk County in 1406 when he was just past the age of 19. He was the manager of the vast Furneaux estates and bought 'Benham-Valence' and other properties in Berkshire and Dorset. He received a Knighthood through recognition of military service performed. He was one of the wealthiest people in his section of England. He and Agnes had two sons, John and Thomas. He died 4 October 1441 at his home at Bryanstone, and is buried at St. Martin's Church there. His will was dated 21 September and proved 10 November 1441. It was at this time the 'Fitz' to the Roger name was dropped and ultimately a terminal 's' added. His second wife was Anne, daughter and heir of Sir Thomas Etchingham, and widow of Dr. Audley.

13. Thomas Rogers, Gent. was the second son of Sir John Fitz Roger. He was born at Ashington, Somerset in 1408 in one of the Roger-Furneaux mansions, residing there until grown, then permanently settled at Bryanstone, Dorset. He was the Burgess, Mayor and Sheriff of Bristol in 1455, 1458 and 1459. He added an “s” on the end of his name and married about 1433. The name of his wife is unknown. Manor of Oare, Wilcot, Swanborough Hundred, Wiltshire was held by Thomas Rogers who died at “Benham-Valena” abt. 1471 / 1479 when it passed to his son William Rogers, then to his son Sir Edward Rogers whose son George Rogers married Jane Winter. (Victoria County History of Wiltshire). He had a son, Thomas, by his first wife who was born in 1435. In his second marriage he had a daughter, Elizabeth. Thomas Rogers (4th generation) never claimed the property of his father so it went to his sister.

[Genealogical Research in the book “John Rogers” by Joseph Lemuel Chester has the father of Thomas Rogers who married Catharine de Courtenay as Sir Henry Fitz-Roger (or Henry Rogers) of Bryanstone, who married Avice (or Amy) Stourton daughter of William, Lord Stourton (who died in 1477). This genealogy says Thomas who married Catharine de Courtenay appears to have had two elder brothers, viz. Sir John Rogers of Bryanston (who died in 1500), and James, a Doctor of Divinity; and also a younger brother, Richard.]

14. Thomas Rogers, of Bradford, Sergeant-at-Law was said to be the only Son of Thomas Rogers in one genealogy or the third born son of Sir Henry Fitz-Roger (Henry Rogers). He was born in 1435 and died at “Benham-Valena” in 1489. In 1478 he was created “Serviens ad Legem” and amassed a considerable fortune. He made his own coat of arms instead of using the coat of arms of his ancestors. This is supposed to be the Thomas Rogers (who died in 1485), who married Catherine de Courtenay of Powderham, County. If this is so, he is identical with him known as Thomas Rogers of Bradford, County of Wilts, who with eight others, formed the call of Sergeants at Law, June 9th 1477.

Thomas Rogers had 2 wives: 1st Cecilia, daughter and co-heir of William Besyll of Bradford (one of the principal men in Wiltshire, in the time of Henry VI.), by whom he had one son, William who had a son named William from whom is descended, among others, the family of Rogers of Rainscombe, County of Wilts, the present representative of which is Rev. Edward Henry Rogers.

In 1483, Thomas Rogers married 2nd, Catharine de Courtenay, daughter of Sir William Courtenay of Powderham, County of Devon by his wife Margaret, daughter of Lord Bonville. (Lineage of Catharine de Courtenay can be traced in unbroken line to Alfred the Great.) Pursuing the maternal ancestry of the Martyr, we find that Sir William Courtenay, the father Catharine, wife of Thomas Rogers of Bradford, was the eldest son of Sir Philip Courtenay (who died in 1463), by Elizabeth, daughter of Walter, Lord Hungerford. Sir Philip was the eldest son of Sir John Courtenay (who died before 1415), by Joan (or Anne), daughter of Alexander Champernowne of Beer Ferrers, and widow of Sir James Chudleigh, Knt. Sir John was the second son of Sir Philip Courtenay, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (who died July 7th, 1406), by Margaret (or Anne), daughter of Sir Thomas Wake of Blisworth, County of Northampton. Sir Philip was the fifth son of Hugh de Courtenay, second of that name Earl of Devon (who died in 1377), by the Lady Margaret de Bohun (who died December 16, 1392). Lady Margaret was the second daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, fifth Earl of Hereford and third of Essex, Lord High Constable (who was slain at Borough Bridge in 1321), by the Princess Elizabeth Plantagenet, sixth daughter of Edward I., by Eleanor, daughter of Ferdinand, King of Castile. From Edward I, through Henry III, John, Henry II, Henry I, and William the Conqueror, even to Charlemagne.

Thomas and Catherine had 2 sons in the parish of Aston, County of Warwick:   1. Thomas Rogers of Sutton Vallens, County of Kent, who appears to have been the first-born son, and

2. John Rogers of Deritend who married Margery Wyatt.

Source for the following: A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland, by Barnard Burke: Rogers of Rainscombe, Rogers, Rev. Edward-Henry of Rainscombe, co. Wilts, M.A. &. 1827. Burke states:

Burke States, “The family of Rogers were seated at Bryanstone, co. Dorset, till the close of the 17th century. Of that line was Thomas Rogers, Esq., serjeant-at-law, temp. Edward IV, who settled at Bradford. He married first, one of the daughters and co-heirs of William Besyll, of Bradford, and by her had a son, William. He married second, a daughter of ---- Courtenay, of Powderham, and widow of Sir Thomas Pomeroy, and by her had a son, George, of Luppit, County Dorset, whose son Edward (Sir) was of Cannington.

William Rogers, Esq, the son of the first marriage married Jone, daughter of John Horton, Esq. of Ilford, and had (with a daughter, Cecily, married to Robert Maten) two sons, I. Anthony, married Dorothy Erneley, of Cannings, and had issue; and II. Henry, of whose line we treat. The latter, Henry Rogers, Esq., was father of Henry Rogers, Esq. of Heddington, who married Sarah, daughter of Thomas Hall, Esq. of Bradford, and had a son Robert Rogers, Esq. of Heddington, who married Anne, daughter of John Seager, Esq. of Bromham, Wilts, and was a. by his son, Henry Rogers, Esq. of Heddington, who, by Sarah, his wife, daughter of Francis Eagles, Esq. of South Broom, Wilts, was the father of Henry Rogers, Esq. of Heddington and Rainscombe, who married Ellen, daughter of Henry Pyke, Esq. of Rainscombe, and was a. by his son, Robert Rogers, Esq. of Rainscombe, who married Eliza, daughter of Thomas Smith, of Potterne, Wilts, and was father of Elizabeth, daughter of William Johnson, Esq. of Chippenham Hills, and by her had (with a daughter, Amella-Eliza, and a son, William) another son. The Rev. James Rogers, D.D. of Rainscombe, who married 1788, Catherine, youngest daughter and coheir of Francis Newman, Esq. of Canbury House, County Somerset, and by her (who died 1832) had issue, of whom the last survivor was Q. C., recorder of Exeter, b. 1791 who married 29 June 1822, Julia-Eleanora, 3rd daughter of William-Walter Yea, Esq. of Pyrland Hall,County Somerset, and sister of Sir Henry-Lacy Yea, Bart., and has issue, 1. Francis-Newman, his heir; 2. Edward-Henry, now of Rainscombe; 3.Walter-Lacy.

15. John Rogers of Deritend was the youngest son of Thomas and Catherine de Courtney. He was born at Bradford in 1485 and died about 1530. He married Margaret Wyatt in 1505.

John and Mary Rogers had 3 sons and 3 daughters as follows:   1. John, who married Adryan Pratt, of Brabant 2. William 3. Edward 4. Ellenor, who married Robert Mylward of Alnechurch, County of Worcester 5. Joan also married, but the name of whose husband is not stated.

16. Rev. John Rogers was the oldest son and heir of John Rogers of Deritend. He was born about 1500 and died on 4 February 1555 at Smithfield, London, England. He married Adrian Pratt aka De Weyden who was more “richly endowed with virtue and soberness of life than worldly treasures.” [Fox]. The Rev. John Rogers published the entire Bible in the English language. It was the first complete edition of the Old and New Testaments. He was Vicar of St. Sepulchre. After the accession of Queen Mary on 16 July 1533, he delivered a sermon at St. Paul’s Cross, wherein he exhorted the people to adhere to the doctrine taught during the reign of King Edward and to resist the forms and dogmas of Catholicism, and to beware of all Popery, idolatry, and superstition. For this, he was sentenced to be burned to death at the stake as an excommunicated heretic. Pardon was offered him if he would renounce Protestantism, but with scorn, he refused it. The Roman Church, to its everlasting shame, refused to permit him to see his wife and children. His death, on 4 February 1555 was a martyr to free religion. The simple man with the humble name – John Rogers – who, obscure as his personal history has been and still is, probably did more for the cause of Christianity in England than any other single man who ever lived.

Children of John Rogers and Adryan Pratt are given thus:   1. Daniel, of Sunbury, County of Middlesex, Clerk of the Council to Queen Elizabeth (ob. 1591), who married Susan, daughter of Nicasius Yetsworth /Yetswiert, Clerk of the Signet, and Secretary for the French tongue. The children of Daniel and Susan are:   a. Francis (a son) married a Miss Cory and had a son also named Francis and Posthuma (a daughter) who married a Mr. Spears. 2. John, a Proctor of the Civil Law, who married Mary, daughter of William Leete, of Everden, County of Cambridge, D.C.L. The children of John and Mary Rogers are:   a. Cassandra married Henry Saris, son of Thomas Saris of Horsham b. Elizabeth c. Heckuba d. Constantine e. John f. Edward g. Mary h. Varro (a son) 3. Ambrose 4. Samuel 6. Philip 7. Augustine 8. Barnaby 9. Susan, who married John Short, Merchant, of London 10. Elizabeth, who married James Proctor, Chancellor of Salisbury 11. Hester, who married Henry Ball, Physician

The line of descent to James Rogers of New London is at this time uncertain. Research of Charlie Rogers shows the line of descent through Bernard Rogers, son of John and Adrian (Pratt) Rogers, who was born in 1543 at Wittenburg, Saxony-Anhault, Deutschland through his eldest son, Thomas Matthew Rogers who was born in 1565. Bernard Rogers married Mary about 1564 at Scotland, moved from Scotland to England and died in 1583. Barnard and Mary Rogers children were:   1. Thomas Matthew Rogers born 1565, married about 1586, Miss McMurds 2. Jiles [Giles] Rogers 3. Samuel Rogers -- was father of:   a. Robert Rogers who married Francis Russell – Robert and Francis Rogers were parents of:   i. Hugh Rogers Early research believed Thomas Matthew Rogers to be the father of Thomas Rogers of the Mayflower and James of New London, Connecticut to be the son of Thomas of the Mayflower. Recent research and DNA tests have proven that Thomas of the Mayflower was not a son of descent of John, the Smithfield Martyr and that James of New London, Connecticut is not the son of Thomas of the Mayflower.

Further research needs to be done to verify the family line of James Rogers who came to America in 1635 on the Ship Increase who is thought to have been born 2 February 1615 in Stratford on Avon, Warwickshire, England and who died 6 February 1687 in New London, Connecticut. It is my prayer that this document of the research of so many will assist in the quest for the parents of our Rogers line and those other maternal direct lines that connect to it.

DNA Test Results

Charles Alva Rogers (Charlie), son of Forrest Rogers who was the brother of Charlotte Deliah Rogers has submitted his DNA to the Rogers DNA project at http://www.RogersDNA.com. We are fortunate that our Rogers line “cousins” are tech savy and have put together an awesome database to assist with unlocking the many Rogers lines in this country. There is much more information and links to other sources available at the Rogers DNA website which has given us the following information:

Our Rogers line is from the DNA Haplogroup I1a. Members of Haplogroup I1a were among the early arrivals in Europe. They originated in the Middle East and arrived in Europe perhaps 25,000 years ago (k.y.a.), prior to the last ice age and the development of farming. Ice age glaciers forced them south and they sheltered the Balkans (Albania area). As the glacial ice melted, this hunter-gatherer group expanded northward. Today its population is centered in Scandinavia where, despite being rivaled in numbers by another haplogroup (R1b), group I1a is often referred to as the Viking haplogroup. They are found throughout the British Isles and the I haplogroup averages about 16 % of the total population. Their numbers are strongest in East Central England and peak at nearly 1/3 of the population in York.

This information matches us with DNA test results of others of the line of James Rogers of New London, Connecticut who was born in 1615 in England and immigrated to this land in 1635 from London, England on the ship Increase and helps document our research connecting to this Rogers line.

Below is the migration chart from Haplogroup I1a. This map shows the migration of the early ancestors of this line as they moved from the middle east area throughout Europe. This migration matches what research has shown for the migration of the family lines of Sir Tancred de Hauteville which is the line our research shows is most likely our ancestral line.

Migration Chart of the Haplogroup I1a. is given at the end of this website.'

view all

James Rogers, Jr.'s Timeline

1589
October 8, 1589
Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, USA
1630
1630
Age 40
Newport, Newport, Rhode Island
1676
1676
Age 86
Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, USA
1958
March 29, 1958
Age 87
October 4, 1958
Age 87