James Rogers, of New London

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James Rogers, of New London

Birthdate:
Birthplace: England
Death: Died in New London, New London, Connecticut
Immediate Family:

Son of unknown father of James Rogers of New London and unknown mother of James Rogers of New London
Husband of Elizabeth Rogers
Father of Samuel Rogers of New London; Lydia Rogers; Joseph Rogers; John Rogers, of New London; Bathsheba Fox and 3 others

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About James Rogers, of New London

James Rogers was born in 1614/1615 in England and died in 1687 in New London, New London, Connecticut. His ancestry is unknown. No known relation to Thomas Rogers (d 1621), "Mayflower" pilgrim.

Biographical summary

From Find A Grave Memorial# 32476584

James Rogers married Elizabeth Rowland about 1639. Their marriage was blessed with seven children: Samuel, Joseph, John, Bathsheba Smith Fox, James, Jonathan, & Elizabeth Beebe.

James embarked from England on the ship "Increase" on April 15,1635, arriving several months later in Boston. In 1637, he participated in the "Pequot War" under Capt. John Underhill.

For many years prior to his retirement in 1666, he carried on by far the most extensive foreign and domestic trade of any man in New London. In 1660, he was made a 'Freeman'in New London.

After 1676, he was repeatedly subjected to fines and imprisonment for non-conformity to the rules of the established church. John Rogers and some of his followers, especially his sister Bathsheba, expressed themselves repeatedly by disrupting the meetings of the New London Congregational church, and as a result were often fined and jailed. This sect has become known as the Rogerene Quakers.

==Family==

Origins unknown. Parents have been seen as John Rogers & Elizabeth Bostwick with no supporting evidence.

Married:

  1. Elizabeth Rowland in Stratford, Connecticut. Elizabeth died about 1709. She was the daughter of Samuel Rowland.

8 children include:

  1. Samuel Rogers was born about 1640 in , , Connecticut, USA.Samuel married (1) Mary STANTON. Samuel also married (2) Joanna WILLIAMS.
  2. Joseph Rogers
  3. John Rogers
  4. Bathsheba Rogers
  5. James Rogers was born on 15 Feb 1652 in Connecticut, USA. James married Mary JORDAN.
  6. Jonathan Rogers was born on 7 Jan 1655 in Milford, Connecticut and drowned to death in 1697 near Gull Island (near Goshen), Connecticut He married Naomi Burdick in 1677 and had a son, Jonathon, born 1690 in New London. (fn1)
  7. Elizabeth Rogers

Footnotes

  1. Jonathan Rogers was born, according to Milford CT. records, Jan. 7, 1656. He married Naomi, daughter of Robert and Ruth (Hubbard) Burdick of Newport, RI. on March 2, 1678. Jonathan Rogers lived on a farm on the Great Neck, given to him by his father, James, which was also owned by his son Jonathan. The stone house occupied by the latter is still standing near the site of the house built by his father. Jonathan Rogers drowned near Gull Island. He had shot a seal and went for it on a log. He attached one end of a rope to the seal and the other end to his own body, in order to have free use of his hands. The seal revived in the struggle, and Jonathan Rogers was drawn under water and held there. It is further stated that his son Jonathan, 12 years of age, was with his father and saw him go down. It is also stated that Jonathan could have been 7 years of age since he was born in 1690 and his father drowned in 1697. "Jonathan Rogers adhered to the Sabbatarian (Quaker) principles.

Notes

  1. James Rogers came to America from London, England, in 1635, in the ship "Increase," at 20 years of age. He is first heard of in Stratford, CT., where he married Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel Rowland. They moved to Milford, CT., where his wife united with Rev. Mr. Prudden's Church in 1645. He became a member of the same church in 1652 and all of their children were baptized in Milford.
  2. In 1656 James Rogers had business in New London, CT. and this is where he settled permanently, becoming a resident of the "plantation" previous to 1660. Gov. Winthrop encouraged his settlement in New London and accommodated him with a portion of his own house lot, next to the mill which was afterwards leased to him.
  3. On this lot James Rogers built a stone dwelling house. He was a baker and did an extensive business furnishing biscuit for seamen and for the Colonial troops between the years 1661 and 1670.
  4. He became an extensive landowner, owning several hundred acres on Great Neck, a tract of land at Mohegan, in the place then called Pamechaug farm, which was one of the first grants of land within the Mohegan reservation north of New London, and was made to James Rogers by Uncas, in August, 1658. This is now known as Wassapeag, in the town of Montville.
  5. He also owned several town lots, and in partnership with Col. Pyncheon, of Springfield, Mass. 2,400 acres on the east side of the river.
  6. He acquired a position of influence in the town both in civil and ecclesiastical affairs, and was elected as representative to the General Court six times.
  7. He was an upright and circumspect man, whose memory is held in great honor by his throng of descendants.
  8. He severed his connection with the orthodox Congregational Church and joined the Sabbatarians, who were afterward called Quakers.
  9. James Rogers was born in 1615, and is supposed to have been the son of Rev. John Rogers, of Dedham, England, who died in 1636;
  10. James is not mentioned as a son of Thomas the Pilgrim on the Mayflower website. 1635, James Rogers, age 20 years. Underhill, took part in the Pequot War. A few years later he is recorded as 'Of Stanford' , where he aquired property and married Elizabeth, the daughter of Samuel Rowland.
  11. He went from Stratford to Milford where he joined Mr. Prudden's Congregational Church in 1652. Elizabeth, his wife, joined this church in 1645 and some of their children were baptized there. He had dealings in New London as early as 1656 and by 1660 was an inhabitant and made freeman March 14, 1660.
  12. Note: continued after following inserted information
  • ** following: Nov. 22, 1645. 'Ordered that James Rogers have a home lot adjoining that of Mr. Fowler's.' In 1646 James Rogers 'hath three acres more or less.' In 1648 the Court ordered that James Rogers have a piece of land against his lot. of biscuit he was furnishing for Virginia and Barbados. James responded to the court that the flour furnished by the miller was of inferior quality, and the miller acknowleged that, at the time, he did not understand the proper manner of grinding. At that period there was considerable emigration to those points, as is shown by the lists still preserved and the inference is that James Rogers was a baker and in demand of no small importance at and before that date. 'There is much more information given following this on the CD [Vol.2] #0470 JamesRogers
  1. 1662, Corn Commissioner 1662, Representative to the General Court 7 times between 1662 and 1673. He retired from active business in 1666 in favor of his son, Samuel. He owned several hundred acres of land on Great Neckand the fine tract at Mohegan, the first land grant with Mohegan reservation north of New London made to James Rogers by Uncas in Augustof 1658. He also owned several house lots in the town proper, and in partnership with Governor Pyncheon of Springfield, MA., 2400 acres eastof the river. His home farm for some years prior to his death was on that part of Great Neck called Goshen. to my son I bequeth Goshen Neck and he may have a highway to it, over the same pond where I now goe.'-------------- Society bulletin from October 1863. Other data was taken from the book 'James Rogers of New London, CT. and his Decendants by James Swift Rogers, published by the compiler. Other data was taken from the book 'John Rogers' by Joseph Lemuel Chester, published by Longman, Green, Longman and Roberts in 1861.
  2. 2-02-1614/15 CT. in 1652 and New London CT. where he died. His information comes from the book James Rogers of New London, CT. and his Decendants by James Swift Rogers published in Boston, MA. by the compiler in 1902. native of England. James Rogers was a good friend of Rev. Mr. Blinman who settled first at Marshfield, CT. Many similar coincidences and the fact up to that time neither the parents of John Rogers of Manshfield, CT., nor those of James Rogers of New London, CT., nor those of William Rogers of Branford, CT., have been found which leads the compiler to suspectthat these three progenitors of so many people may have been brothers. proof that they were all born their as it was not unusual to record the names and birth dates of the children in the town to which the family moved reguardless of the place of birth and it was probable that some ofthe children were born in Stratford, CT.

Links

 Class of 1960]

-------------------- James Rogers 1615-1687

Among the Mss. preserved in the Public Record Office in London, England, there is found a copy of a "license to go beyone the seas," dates Apr 15 1635, and to be transported to New England imbarked in the ship "Increase", and gives the name of "James Rogers, twenty years of age." In 1637, James Rogers was one of six members from Sybrook who, under Captain Underhill, took part in the Pequot War. A few years later he was recorded at Stratford, where he acquired property and married Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel Rowland. He removed to Medford, where some of his children were baptized. In 1655 he was engaged in making biscuits to be shipped to Virginia and the Barbadoes, and it is inferred that he was a baker and tradesman of no small importance. About 1660 he removed to New London where he was made a freeman March 14 1661. Both he and his wife joined the church in New London. He was assessed for L548 worth of personal property, the nexst largest holder being John Winthrop, Esq., who was assessed L185. This shows him by far the wealthiest man of the colony at that time. He was elected deputy to the General Court Mat. 1661-1662. He was Corn Commissioner from New London in 1662 and again Representative to the General Court seven times between 1662 and 1673 and, with his son Samuel, on a committee to fortify New London. On Mr. Winthrop's removal to Hartford, he leased the town mill to Mr. Rogers and transferred a building spot from the north end of his home lot next to the mill. Upon this spot Rogers erected his dwelling house and bakery both built of stone. James Rogers carried on by far the most extensive foreign trade of any man in New London. His real estate holdings were large. He owned several hundred acres of land on Great Neck and a large farm, given him by chief Uncas. He also owned several home lots and, in partnership with General Pynchon, owned 2400 acres of land east of the river. His home farm was in that part of the Great Neck called Goshen. There is a place having the appearance of a grave, a little northwest from the rock on the beach named in James Roger's will, where it is supposed that his wife is buried. It is near the pond on the old James Roger's estate. The Rogers homestead by Mill Cove was purchased by Madam Winthrop in 1713, and three cellars were found where the house was moved from this site. During the later years he was subjected to fines and imprisonment for nonconfirmity to the rules of the Established Church. The inventory of his estate contains the following items: "His lands in Goshen, 13 akers in another field, 33 akers improved land, 10 acres of fenced land, 150 more acres of fenced land, 376 acres lying in the Common, a little island, one copper kettle, one brass kettle, one iron kettle, 3 iron potts, one of them broken, three small puter platters, three basons, three plates, one feather bed, and furniture, one other bed and bedding and bedstead, chests, chairs, wooden ware. Husbandry tables, two axes, one pair of plows, harrow, scythe, cartwheels, house and bar, Indian servant and his wife, a negro woman, Adam, a Molotta Servant, a negro woman deaf and dumb, one ox, six cowes, two steers, three yearlings, two heifers, two years old, two other heifer one year old, one bull one year old, six cattle one year old in the spring, one horse, one mare, 44 sheep, two sows, nine shoates, 40 bushels Indian corn, 10 bushels pease, 8 bushels meslin, 5 bus. barley, three barrels of beef, one barrol of porke, 30 acres of land on the east side of the river, 40 acres by the tan yard, two pair of pot hangers, gridiron, stiull yardes, another horse, another cow, one barrell molasses, one firkin butter, one large platter, wearing apparel, 20 years kersey. Coverlids and blankets, a warming pan, two pitts, two bibles, a bedstead, three stacks of hay, barrol of a messqiet." Goshen seems to have been the home farm of James Rogers at the time of his death. It was a sort of peninsula, called "The Neck", lying between Ayluif Cove and Jordan Cove and is now called "Goshen Farms." It borders the Sound just west of Ocean Beach and is now occupied by the home of three wealthy city men. A part of it was sold for golf grounds. James Rogers expressly states in his will that his children should refrain from applealing to the court in the settlement of his estate; but in spite of that, they engaged in a bitter controversy regarding boundaries.

James Rogers was born in Straford upon Avon, Warwick, England, on Thursday, February 2, 1615, and died in New London, Connecticut, on February 16, 1687. Elizabeth Rowland died in New London in 1709. They were married in Stratford, Connecticut, in 1639. She took the name Elizabeth Rogers. She is the daughter of Samuel Rowland. They had six children: 


i. Samuel Rogers [#514]: He was born in New London on December 12, 1640, and died in New London on December 1, 1713. 
ii. Joseph Rogers was born in New London on May 14, 1646, and died in New London on November 8, 1713. 
iii. James Rogers was born in New London on December 1, 1648. 
iv. Bathsheba Rogers was born in New London on December 30, 1650, and died in New London on November 23, 1711. 
v. Jonathan Rogers was born in New London on December 31, 1655, and died in New London in 1697. He drowned near Gull Island, New London. 
vi. Elizabeth Rogers was born in New London on April 15, 1658, and died in Orient, Suffolk, New York, on June 10, 1716. 


The following was excerpted from the NEHGR, vol. 83, p. 112. 

James Rogers was a soldier in the Pequot War from Saybrook in 1637, lived later at Stratford and Milford, and settled finally at New London, Connecticut Colony, where he was a man of property, held important offices, and died in 1687/8. His wife was Elizabeth Rowland. Their son, Capt. James Rogers (1652–1714) of New London married Mary Jordan. 
He is also briefly mentioned in NEHGR, vol. 104, p. 163. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
So urces:
New England Historical and Genealogical Record (NEHGR), vol. 83, p. 112 (Memoir of Alice (Rogers) Moore). 
Mormon Family Search web service (which includes the usual varied assortment of "facts" and absolutely no source citations. The most common or believable values were selected.)
 Child of James Rogers and Eliza Rowland
Bathshua Rogers+ b. 1650, d. 3 Nov 1711
Citations

[S50] William Freeman Fox, Thomas Fox of Concord. 
[S1030] "Descendants of Thomas Fox of Concord," Simeon Moses Fox, 1909 Collection of A. Gulbransen. 
[S1029] Simeon Moses Fox, Corrections to Thomas Fox of Concord.

James embarked from England on the ship "Increase" on April 15,1635, arriving several months later in Boston. In 1637, he participated in the "Pequot War" under Capt. John Underhill. For many years prior to his retirement in 1666, he carried on by far the most extensive foreign and domestic trade of any man in New London. In 1660, he was made a 'Freeman'in New London.

After 1676, he was repeatedly subjected to fines and imprisonment for non-conformity to the rules of the established church. John Rogers and some of his followers, especially his sister Bathsheba, expressed themselves repeatedly by disrupting the meetings of the New London Congregational church, and as a result were often fined and jailed. This sect has become known as the Rogerene Quakers. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=32476584

abt 1615 England - 16 Feb 1686/87 New London, New London Co., CT The last will and testament of James Rogers Senior, being in perfect memory & understanding; but under the the (sic) hand of God by sickneffe.
This I leaue wth my Wife,& all my Children, Sonnes & Daughters; I being old & knowing yt ye time of my departure is at hand.
What I haue of this world, I leaue Among you, defiring you not to fall out or contend about it; but lett yr loue one to another appear more; the rot he eftate I leaue wth you wc is but of this world.
And for yr comfort I signifie to you, yt I haue A perfect affurance; of an interest in Jesus Christ, & An Eternal happy eftate in ye world to come, and do know & see yt my name is written in ye book of life; & thereore mourn not for mee: as they yt are without hope.
I committ my spirit into ye hand of god almighty, difiring yt my body it may be buried (hopeing for A refurrection) and wt is Expended there upon let it be paid out of ye eftate I leaue.
# I defire yt all my debts may be paid out of ye eftate, I leave, I know of no old Debts unpaid, nor any great matter of Debts that I owe.
# My land at mistick I bequeath to my three Eldest sons Samuel Jofeph & John; it being first (by ym) Equally divided into three partes, & then let it be devided to ym by lot yt Each one may know wc his part is: for as ye lot fas so shal Each ones part be. They paying to my daughter Elizabeth twenty pounds.
# To my son James I bequeath, Gofhon neck & yt he shal haue A highway to it, over ye pond where I now goe.
# to my son Jonathan my Houfing: & and so farr as Magunck fence we life within my field fence; & ye bounds between my son James & son Jonathan yt is to say between Gofhon & my field : shal be ye great Rock we lise between ye pond and ye sea, on ye north side of ye beach A line being run north & south from ye sd Rock shal be the bounds between them.
# To my son Jonathan I bequeath twenty Acres in ye new paster ; Joyning to his houfe & running on ye north side of my field fence : & bounded on ye East wth ye lane running between ye head of my son James his home lot & my son Jonathan his now dwelling houfe.
# To my son James & son Jonathan I bequeath al ye rest of my land lying in ye new paster as also al ye rest of my land lying in ye General neck : it being divided by ym into two parts first, & then as ye lot comes forth shal Each one know which his part is, ( And my will in yt my son James pay to my daughter Elizabeth twenty pounds within a year after the death of his mother, my wife) And yt my son Jonathan pay to my daughter Elizabeth fifty pounds within three years after ye death of my Wife ten of it ye first year : after her death.
# To my son, John I leaue ye land yt I had of Robert Allyn lying on ye East side of ye River yt goeth to Norwich he paying to his sister my Daughter Bathfhua ye sum of twnety pound : within a year after ye death of my wife, & if he sees caufe not so to do, my daughter Bathfhua fhall haue ye fd land. 
# Ans all ye rest of my eftate, as cattel houfehold goods debts & parfonable eftate I leaue wth my wife to difpofe of as shee sees good : only to pay to my daughter Elizabeth ten pounds if shees sees good wth ye advice of my sonne John : I also giue liberty to my Wife to sell of difpofe of any part of my land of eftate here willed if shee sees caufe so to do, without offence to any of my Children : & to haue ye ufe of my houfing during her life time to liue in or let out.
Some cattel was left wth me by my son John, ufe as my own not giving me power to giue or will ym away but did promife me yt what I sould or killed for ye families ufe he would never demaund pay for, but only thofe yt should be remaining in my hand,
The Chamber where my son John now liues I leaue wth him with ye Roome under it for him to liue in during his life time : if my wife see caufe not to order it other wife.
If any difference should arife about my land here willed or Any parte of my eftate for want of a plain difcovery whether about bounds or other wife, my wil is yt there shall be no awing amonge my children before earthly Judges but yt ye Controverfie be ended by lt & so I referr ye Judgement to god : & as ye lot comes forth so shal it be : And this I declare to be my last will & teftatnent as witnefs my hand this Eleventh day of ye ninth month one thoufand six hundred eighty & three.

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James Rogers, of New London's Timeline

1615
1615
England
1615
Stratfordon Avon, Warwickshire, England, Prob.
1615
Stratfordon Avon, Warwickshire, England, Prob.
1630
1630
Age 15
East Lyme, New London Co., CT, USA
1632
1632
Age 17
Age when arrived to MA. was 20.
1632
Age 17
Came To MA. from Smithfield, England in the ship "Increase".
1636
1636
Age 21
1639
1639
Age 24
Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut
1640
December 12, 1640
Age 25
New London, New London Colony, (Present Connecticut), (Present USA)
1642
March 27, 1642
Age 27
Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA