Jan Thomasse van Dyck

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Jan Thomasse

Also Known As: "Jan Thomasse van Dyck"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Amsterdam, Government of Amsterdam, North Holland, The Netherlands
Death: Died in New Utrecht, Kings County, Province of New York
Immediate Family:

Son of Thomas Janse Van Dyke and Sytje Dirks
Husband of Tryntje Achias Achias (Aggese) Haegen
Father of Tryntje Van Dyck; Thomas Janse van Dyke, III; Annietje Janse Van Dyck; Carel Janse Van Dyck; Achias Janse Van Dyck and 2 others
Brother of Nicholas Thomasse Van Dyck; Hendrick Thomasse Van Dyke; Anetje "Anne" Van Dyke,; Tierck Thomassen van Dyck; Janse Achias Van Dyke and 1 other

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Jan Thomasse van Dyck

! came to New Utrecht 1652 Ship de Bonta Kou (the spotted Cow)

Migrated from Amsterdam Holland to New Amsterdam 1652 with wife and seven children, One of the founders of New Utrecht granted patent of land by the Govenor and Council of Fort Amsterdam 16 Jan 1657.

In 1659 he added to the first estate a tract of meadowland near what is now called Coney Island, commissioned Sergeant of New Utrecht by the Director - General and Council 2 Oct 1659. Appointed magnistrate (schepen) by Govenor Colve 18 Aug 1673 and died before 16 Oct 1673 for we find on that date an entry:

"October 16th 1673 The Govenor hath selected Jan Gyabertse Van Meteran as a Magistrate of and in place of Jan Thomasse now lately deceased."

I have viewed the bapt. records of Jan Thomasse (Van Dyke) before he and his family came to New Amsterdam and found out that he changed his name to Van Dyke. Actually, he only used the name Jan Thomasse. It was his posterity that used the Van Dyke name. The name he went by in Amsterdam, according to the records of the Old Church of Amsterdam was

Guecke/Gelcken/Guertsz/Goiken/Gueken/Geucksz.

This is also well documented in The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record Vol. 126, #4, Oct. 1995

!BIOGRAPHY: The following from Teunis G. Bergen's publication "Register of the Early Settlers of Kings County, Long Island, N.Y., from its first settlement by Europeans to 1700", pg. 336, (FHL #0982133/1): Jan Thomasse, emigrated from Amsterdam in 1652 and settled in New Utrecht, suppose to have m. 1st _____ _____, by whom Thomas, Carel, Derick, and Pieter; m. 2nd Tryntje Agias, Achias, or Hagen, who after his death m. 2nd Tileman Jacobsz Vander Meyer. In 1673 he was appointed one of the schepens of New Utrecht by Gov. Colve. Jan. 25, 1675, his old farm in the village of New Utrecht was sold at auction to "Rut Joosten" (Van Brunt) for 2500 guilders; his new farm was at the same date sold to Cryn Janse (Van Meteren) for 2000 guilders; and his 2 house plots in the village to Hendrick Janse Van Dyck for 750 guilders, as per town records. There was a Jan Tomassen on the Delaware in 1659, as per pg. 286 of Vol. XII of Doc. of Col. His. of New York, who possibly may have been this Thomas.

Issue

  1. Thomas Jansz;
  2. Achias or Agyas Jansz; Antje Jansz, m. Pieter Staats of Brooklyn;
  3. Angenietje or Annetje Jansz, m. Adriaen Willemse Bennet;
  4. Mayke or Marretje Jansz, m. Johannis Daniels Rinckerhoudt;
  5. supposly Tryntje Jansz; and
  6. supposly Lambert Jansz.

Continuing his biography, E. F. Baty; Over three hundred years of one line: nine gererations from Thomas Janse Van Dyke (1580-1665) to .../ compiled by Elizabeth P. Baty, Oregon, 1991, pg. 5-10 offers a different sequence of the children born to both wives of Jan Thomasse.

Further research will be given to accurately place all children in order of birth and parentage, however, the author of this family group sheet agrees with the Baty publication rather than the Bergen publication because of the order of birth dates. The following is an exact quotation from the Baty publication:

Jan Thomassee Van Dyke, son of Thomas Janse Van Dyke and Sytie Dirks, was our ancestor. He was born in Amsterdam, Holland in 1605 and died in 1673 in New Utrecht, Long Island, New York. He married (1)___________ in Holland, and married (2) Tryntje Achias Haegen, also in Holland. He and his second wife Tryntje and seven children came to New Amsterdam from Holland in the year 1652. It is said that his first wife was the mother of the first four of his children.

Director-General Peter Stuyvesant had permitted the establishment of a new town comprising about one thousand acres divided into farms of fifty acres each. The founders of New Utrecht were granted patents by the Governor and Council at Fort Amsterdam on 16 January 1657 and Jan Thomasse was one of these founders. He owned one of these farms and in 1659 he added to it a tract of meadow land extending toward what is now called Coney Island. Jan Thomasse was active in the affairs of the colony from the beginning and soon received honors and appointments under its government. He inherited the qualities of energy and ability from his ancestors, a family which had long been considered one of the best of the burgher families.

His coat of arms is described in Rietstap's Armorial General of France, as follows: "D'arg. a une digue de sin., touchant les flancs de 1'ecu, mouv. d'une eau au nat., et surm. de trois etoiles d'or, rangees en chef. Crest: une etolile d'or."

The Director-General and Council at Fort Amsterdam on 2 October 1659 made the following proclamation:

"The Director-General and Council notify the inhabitants of the Town of New Utrecht to keep good watch and for the purpose of keeping good order they have appointed and set as in other cases the person Jan Thomassen to the office of Sergeant, they therefore order the inhabitants of the Town of New Utrecht to obey and acknowledge as Sergeant the above named Jan Thomassen."

This, then, was Jan Thomasse Van Dyke's commission as Sergeant.

It was often the custom of the Dutch to refer to a person by mentioning his first name and the first name of his father. To this would be added the name which indicated generally the place from which he came; thus Van Dyke was the man of the dyke. It was spelled Van Dyke, Van Duyk, Van Dike, Vandike, Van Dyk, Van Duyck and Van Dyck. The correct way of spelling the name of the family founded by Jan Thomasse is Van Dyke.

According to the Register of New Netherland, Jan Thomasse Van Dyke was for many years a magistrate at Fort Orange and New Utrecht. However, before he ever assumed a position at court he had a matter brought before the court wherein he was defendant in a complaint.

On 15 September 1661 a complaint was filed against Jan Tomassen (v. Dyck) of N. Utrecht for violently grasping a girl named Clara Gerrits by the throat, and assaulting one Jan van Cleef who would prevent him. On 22 September 1661 Jan Tomassen petitioned for a pardon. He was sentenced to pay a fine of 300 guilders ($120.00) for the above assaults. Then the action of damages by Jan van Cleef against said Tomassen was referred to arbitration. During this action Jan Thomasse was referred to as "magistrate of N. Utrecht". I guess our man had a temper, and one wonders what brought the whole thing on! (O'Callaghan; DUTCH MSS; 1865; p.801.

On 18 August 1673 Jan Thomasse was appointed one of the Schepens by Governor Colve. The following is a little information on the Court of Schepens: The Court of Schepens was an institution unknown in England, but it dates back to the Middle Ages in the Netherlands and other parts of Continental Europe. In its early existence its members were appointed from the nobility of the district, but upon the growing importance of the cities were appointed from its influential burghers. In the country the nability and large landowners continued their hold on its membership much longer but were gradually replaced by the smaller landowners and substantial farmers. The number of Schepens which made up the court varied in accordance with the size of the city or district under its jurisdiction. One of the members acted as president and attached to the court was a secretary. Their term of office was limited to a few years.In many instances, they could not fill the position for consecutive terms and had to be out of office for at least one term before being eligible for another appointment. When sitting as a Court of Law they dealt with both civil and criminal cases. The bailiff or sheriff acted as prosecutor. The Secretary, in most cases, trained in legal matters, saw to it that the provisions of thhe law were followed and he kept the records. Besides holding court, the Schepens attended to many other duties. They appointed receivers in bankruptcy, they attested to inventories, powers of attorney and various other legal papers, and they committed the afflicted to insane asylums. One of their most important functions was that they acted as registrars of deeds and mortgages, as such instruments had to be passed by their board and recorded by them. Another function was that all civil marriages had to be performed by their board. The Schepens could also make appointments of several of the minor officials and issue certain ordinances. The position of Schepen was one of great importance and in the cities was only surpassed by membership in the city Council and the higher municipal, provincial and federal offices. schepen records, therefore, form one of the most valuable sources of information for the genealogist. But, they can only be properly consulted by skilled searchers, thoroughly familiar with the old script and the legal terminology. They are poorly indexed and searching these records is a laborious task, but for building a pedigree, they are of the greatest importance. (Rubincam; GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS AND SOURCES: 1960; Vol. 1; pp. 387,388)

Jan Thomasse Van Dyke must have died soon after his appointment because under the date 16 October 1673 was found the following entry: "The Governor hath, from the nomination made by the Magistrates of the Town of Utrecht selected Jan Gysbertse Van Meteren as a Magistrate in place of Jan Thomassen now lately deceased." (DOCUMENTARY HISTORY OF NEW YORK; Vol. II; pp. 577, 659)

In Bergen's REGISTER OF EARLY SETTLERS OF KING'S COUNTY, it is stated that in 1675 the heirs of Jan Thomasse sold his old farm in New Utrecht to Rut. Joosten for 2500 guilders; his new farm to Bryn Janse for 2000 guilders and his two lots in the village to his son Hendrick Janse Van Dyke for 750 guilders.

His widow Tryntje married (2) on 11 August 1678, Tileman Jacobsz Van Der Meyer, who came to America from Kamerik, Utrecht, Holland.

Children of Jan Thomasse Van Dyke and his first wife=== (in abreviated form):

  1. Antje Janse,
  2. Angenietje Janse,
  3. Thomas Janse,
  4. Derrick/Dirck Janse.

Children of Jan Thomasse and Tryntje A. Haegen=== (in abreviated form):

  1. Carel/Charles Janse,
  2. Jan Janse,
  3. Achias Janse,
  4. Hendrick Janse,
  5. Pieter Janse,
  6. Lambert Janse,
  7. Tryntje Janse,
  8. Mayke Janse.
..end of Baty publication.

---------------------------------------

ANCESTRAL FILE: (AFN:H2GQ-8H) lists birth after children are born, including

spouse which is obvious incorrect. This file seems to have a good

representation of children. (AFN:LOT8-9T) states birth abt. 1605, Amsterdam,

Holland and gives place of death at New Utrecht, Long Island, New York. Also

indicates spouse, Tryntie Achias HAGEN (AFN:LOT8-B1) and another unknown

spouse. Source of above: Margaret FRANDSEN, 6417 Brushwood Lane, Las Vegas,

Nv., 89107; microfilm #1512643, submission AF90-002150.

It is reported that Jan emigrated in 1652 with 6 children on the ship Bonta

Ke (Spotted Cow).

--------------------

Family Search Record(s): AFN: C4TL-WC

He had a wife before Tryntje. 4 of his children are from his first marriage, name unknown.

------------------------

The name Jan Thomassee Van Dyke, Jan Thomasse would mean: John the son of Thomas, thus Jan=John. Jan Janse,=John with this it is reasonable to assume that the Immigrant of the Van Dyke family here listed Thomas Janse Van Dyke was the Son of Jan or John as I understand the meaning Thomas son of Jan Van Dyke. (noted by Ed Weaver)

He came to America with his parents, and was a founder of New Utrecht, Long Island, which he served in the posts of sergeant, Magistrate and "schepen" or Judge.

Source: Ed Weaver's Van Dyke genealogy page,

     http://edoubleu7.tripod.com/cgi-bin/genealogy/vandyke.html

--------------------

Excerpt from Notable Southern families, Volume 1 By Zella Armstrong, Janie Preston Collup French:

The Van Dyke family is one of the oldest and most prominent in Tennessee. The genealogy of the family is traced in unbroken line nearly three centuries to Jan Thomasse Van Dyck II (son of Thomasse Van Dyck I of Amsterdam) who with his two brothers Hendrick Thomasse and Nicholas Thomasse came to New Amsterdam in America in 1652 His wife Tryntje (or Achias) and six children accompanied him on the good ship Bonta Ke (Spotted Cow) They settled on Long Island.

Their children were:


  1. Thomas Janse III born 1646,
  2. Antje Janse born 1642,
  3. Anjenietje born 1644,
  4. Carl born 1646,
  5. Achias born 1648,
  6. Jan born 1650,
  7. Hendrick born July 2 1653 in New Amsterdam.

In 1687 the three brothers took the oath of allegiance to their adopted country. Their descendants may be found in New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee numbers of them having risen to prominence

--------------------

From T.G. Bergen's Early Settlers, 1881, p.336

Jan Thomasse, emigrated from Amsterdam in 1652 and settled in N.U.(New Utrecht); (sup.) m. 1st (???) (???), by whom Thomas, Carel, Derick, and Pieter; m. 2d Tryntje Agias, Achias,or Hagen, who after his death m. 2d Tileman Jacobsz Vander Meyer. In 1673 he was appointed one of the schepens of N. U. by Gov. Colve. Jan. 25, 1675, his old farm in the village of N. U. was sold at auction to "Rut Joosten" (Van Brunt) for 2500 gl.(Guilders); his new farm was at the same date sold to Cryn Janse (Van Meteren) for 2000 gl.; and his 2 house plots in the village to Hendrick Janse Van Dyck for 750 gl., as per town rec.

There was a Jan Tomassen on the Delaware in 1659, as per p. 286 of Vol. XII. of Doc. of Col. His. of N. Y., who possibly may have been this Thomas. Issue:--Thomas Jansz; Derick Jansz; Carel or Charles Jansz; Pieter Jansz; Achias or Agyas Jansz; Hendrick Jansz, bp. July 2, 1653, in N. A.; Jan Jansz; Antje Jansz, m. Pieter Staats of Brn; Angenietje or Annetje Jansz, m. Adriaen Willemse Bennet; Mayke or Marretje Jansz, m. Johannis Daniels Rinckerhoudt; (sup.) Tryntje Jansz; and (sup.) Lambert Jansz.

-------------------

From Distinguished Families in America Descended From Silgelmus Beekman and Jan Thomasse Van Dyke, by William B.Aitken, The Knickerbocker Press, New York and London, 1912, pp. 173~176:44 [Page 173] The Van Dyke Family CHAPTER VI

JAN THOMASSE VAN DYKE, THE FOUNDER

JAN THOMASSE VAN DYKE, the son of Thomas Van Dyke, was the founder of the Van Dyke family in America. He came to New Amsterdam from Amsterdam, Holland, in the year 1652 with his wife Tryntje Achiasor Haegen and seven children. It is said that she was his second wife and that his first wife was the mother of four of his children. He died in 1673. He was one of the founders in 1657 of New Utrecht, where Director-General Peter Stuyvesant had permitted the establishment of a town comprising about one thousand acres divided into farms of fifty acres each. The early settlers in America could not purchase land from the Indians without permission of the government and when a purchase was arranged it was followed by a special grant allowing the formation of a settlement or town. This is in accordance with the "Law of Nations" expressed in Wheaton.

Jan Thomasse Van Dyke owned one of these farms and in 1659 added to it a tract of meadow land extending toward what is now called Coney Island. The founders of New Utrecht were granted patents by [Page 174] the Governor and Council at Fort Amsterdam on January 16, 1657. They were Jacques Cortelyou; the Lord Counsellor and Fiscal Nicasius de Sille; Peter Buys; Johan Zeelen; Albert Albertsen (Terhune); Willem Willemse(Van Engen); Jacob Hellickers (alias Swart); Pieter Jansen; Huybert Hoock; Jan Jacobson; Yunker (or Squire)Jacobus Corlear; Jan Thomasse Van Dyke; Jacobus Backer; Rutgert Joosten (Van Brunt); Jacob Pietersen; Pieter Roeloffse; Claes Claessen (Smith); Cornelis Beeckman and Teunis Joosten.

There were then in New Netherlands besides Jan Thomasse Van Dyke two other representatives of Van Dyke families of Holland; Franz Classen Van Dyke or Dyck, and Hendrick Van Dyke, who was "Fiscall" or State's Attorney under Governor Peter Stuyvesant, and who came to New Amsterdam in 1640. He is the one who raised a disturbance on Broadway which nearly caused the early finish of New Amsterdam. He had a house and orchard just south of where Trinity Church now stands. In 1655 he shot and killed an Indian who was stealing fruit from his orchard. This hasty action led to much trouble with the Indians and many settlers were killed.

He died in 1688, leaving a son Cornelius who was the ancestor of the Albany Van Dykes and a son Rodolphus Van Dyke who married Elizabeth Oudenade and had a son Rev. Henry Van Dyke, born in 1740 in Nassau Street, New York City, died in 1811, who married Hulda Lewis of Stratford.

An account of this Van Dyke family may be found in Rev. G. Morgan Hill's History of the Church in Burlington, N. J. Tunis G. Bergen, in a footnote to his History of the Bergen Family, says that the father of Jan Thomasse Van Dyke was Thomas Janse Van Dyke of Amsterdam, who married Sytie Dirks, and that they had two other sons, Nicholas Thomasse Van Dyke and Hendrick Van Dyke. Jan Thomasse Van Dyke was active in the affairs of the colony from the beginning and soon received honors and appointments under its government. He inherited the qualities of energy and ability from his ancestors of Holland, a family which had long been considered one of the best [Page 175] of the burgher families. His coat of arms is described in Rietstap's Armorial General of France, as follows: "D'arg.? une digue de sin., touchant les flancs de l'’cu, mouv. d'uneeau au nat., et surm. de trois ’toiles d'or, rang’es enchef. Crest: une ’toile d'or."

The Director-General and Council at Fort Amsterdam on October 2,1659, made the following proclamation:"The Director-General and Council notify the inhabitants of the Town of New Utrecht to keep good watch and for the purpose of keeping good order they have appointed and set as in other cases the person Jan Thomassen to the office of Sergeant, they therefore order the inhabitants of the Town of New Utrecht to obey and acknowledge as Sergeant the above named Jan Thomassen." This was the commission of Sergeant Jan Thomasse Van Dyke.

According to the Register of New Netherland Jan Thomasse Van Dyke was for many years a Magistrate of Fort Orange and New Utrecht. Jan Thomasse Van Dyke was appointed by Governor Colve, August 18, 1673, one of the Schepens. He must have died soon after for under date October 16, 1673, we find in Documentary History of New York, vol. ii.,577 and 659, the following entry: [Page 176] "The Governor hath, from the nomination made by the Magistrate sof the town of Utrecht selected Jan Gysbertse Van Meteren as a Magistrate in place of Jan Thomassen now lately deceased."

In Bergen's Early Settlers of King's County, it is stated that in 1675 his heirs sold his old farm in New Utrecht to Rut. Joosten for 2500 guilders; his new farm to Bryn Janse for 2000 guilders, and his two lots in the village to his son Hendrick Janse Van Dyke for 750 guilders. His widow Tryntje Haegen married on August 11, 1678, Tileman Jacobsz Van der Hard, who came to America from Kamerik, Utrecht, Holland. Jan Thomasse Van Dyke and Tryntje Haegen his wife had 11 children.

view all 13

Jan Thomasse van Dyck's Timeline

1605
1605
Amsterdam, Government of Amsterdam, North Holland, The Netherlands
1616
1616
Age 11
1632
1632
Age 27
(Present Long island City), Long Island (Present Queens County), New Netherlands (Present New York), (Present USA)
1638
1638
Age 33
New Amsterdam, Kings, NY
1643
1643
Age 38
Amsterdam, Government of Amsterdam, North Holland, The Netherlands
1648
1648
Age 43
Amsterdam, Government of Amsterdam, North Holland, The Netherlands
1648
Age 43
Amsterdam, Government of Amsterdam, North Holland, The Netherlands
1650
1650
Age 45
Amsterdam, Government of Amsterdam, North Holland, The Netherlands
1652
1652
- 1652
Age 47
Emigratred with his wife and 7 children from Amsterdam Holland
1653
July 2, 1653
Age 48
New Utrecht, New Netherland Colony