Jean-Baptiste Cyr dit Croc, Jr. (c.1708 - 1785)

public profile

Is your surname Cyr dit Croc?

Research the Cyr dit Croc family

Jean-Baptiste Cyr dit Croc, Jr.'s Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Nicknames: "Croque", "Crock"
Birthplace: Beaubassin, Acadia, Canada
Death: Died in Crock's Point, Kingsclear, New Brunswick, Canada
Occupation: Maple Sugar Farmer
Managed by: Dennis Harold Cloukey
Last Updated:

About Jean-Baptiste Cyr dit Croc, Jr.

Jean Baptiste Cyr, a son of Jean Baptiste Cyr and Francois Melanson, was born in 1708 (or 1710) at Beaubassin, Acadia. It was his grandfather, Pierre Cyr, who had left St. Germain de Bourgeuil in Tourainne, France and emigrated to Port Royal, Acadia in 1668.

On Jan. 26, 1734 at Beaubassin, Jean Baptiste Cyr married Marguerite Cormier, daughter of Pierre Cormier and Catherine Leblanc. We note that his mother-in- law was the sister of the notary, Rene Leblanc, immortalized in Longfellow's poem, Evangeline.

Probably at the instigation of Father Leloutre, Jean Baptiste Cyr, around 1750, moved from Beaubassin to Fort Beausejour on the Isthmus of Nova Scotia. There he took part in the unsuccessful defense of that fort in 1755. From there to Kennebecassis River and about 1757 settle at St. Anne du Pays Bas on the St. John River (Fredericton, N.B.), where we find him in 1759 with his 11 children.

There he was taken prisoner during Moses Hazen's seige of St. Anne's point. In 1763, again captive, he was taken to Kamouraska in the Province of Quebec. Twice between 1763 and 1768, he returned to St. Anne where he lived at a place called Crock's Point, six miles above Fredericton at the mouth of the Keswick River, on the east side of the St. John, facing French Village. After the rev- olution, we find him to have assisted Col.

Michael Francklin, Superintendent of Indian Affairs.

On April 8, 1785, Jean Baptiste Cyr was disposed of his land at Pays Bas. He then devised a scheme of moving north to what later came to be called the Mad- awaska Territory. However, he died shortly thereafter in May 1785.

His sons, Joseph, Firmain, and Laurent lived at Kennebecassis on the 24th of February 1788, as witnessed by ancient documents. On Sept. 29, 1788, his sons, Pierre, Francois, and Olivier demanded compensation for the loss of their lands at Upper French Village, N.B.

His nine sons who eventually moved to the St. John Valley, to whom all Cyrs can trace their lineage were: Jean Baptiste Cyr, 1734-1828; Joseph Cyr, 1738-1822; Pierre Cyr, 1737-1822; Paul Cyr, 1744-1812; Jacques Cyr, 1746-1828; Francois Cyr, 1744-1832; Firmain Cyr, 1747-1803; Olivier Cyr, 1742-1812; and Antoine Cyr, 1769-1837.

--------------------

http://members.tripod.com/~Scott_Michaud/Cyr-history.html

By the early 1700's, the tensions between the "French Neutrals" and the English were rising daily, and finally -- on September 5, 1755, under the order of Lieutenant Governor Lawrence, the British Governor of Acadia -- the expulsion of the Acadians began. With the beginning of Le Grand Derangement, the Cyr family would be scattered across North America.

Jean-Baptiste (II) would settle in the area of Sainte-Anne-des-Pays-Bas (modern day Fredericton, New Brunswick), which had been the scene of one of the only major victories by the Acadians against the British. The only Deportation ship ever captured by the Acadians, the Pembroke, and its settlers fled to the St. John River community in New Brunswick, under the protection of Boishébert. The Acadians cleared land and settled down, hoping to have their land grants approved by the British government after the war with France was over.

In 1784, English Loyalists, fleeing the United States in the aftermath of the American Revolution, would forcibly evict the Acadians from their new homes. Jean Baptiste would sign a number of petitions sent to the officials of Quebec and New Brunswick asking for redress, to no avail. Jean-Baptiste Cyr dit Croque is reported to have said: "My God, can it be true that you have made no lands for the Cayens [Acadians]?" In 1785, the Acadians sent a petition to the officials of Quebec and New Brunswick, to obtain land in the Madawaska area. Twenty-four Acadians and Canadians signed the petition for land grants a mile-and-a-half south of the Madawaska River Falls. The Acadian petitioners were: Louis Mercure, Jean Martin, Joseph Daigle Sr., Joseph Daigle Jr., Daniel Gaudin, Simon Martin, Paul-Francois Cyr, Joseph Cyr Jr., Pierre Cyr, Jean-Baptiste Cyr, Firmin Cyr, Alexandre Ayotte and Francois Martin. The Canadian petitioners were: Pierre Duperry, Jean Lizotte, Pierre Lizotte, Augustin Dube, Robert Fournier and Louis Sansfacon. Another petition in the Canadian Archives, was addressed to the Governor-General of Canada, and was signed by Jean-Baptiste Cyr, his wife Marguerite Cormier and his nine sons, Pierre, Olivier, Francois, Antoine, Paul, Jacques, Joseph, Firmin and Jean-Baptiste Jr., as well as Alexandre Ayotte, Zacharie Ayotte, Joseph Daigle Sr., Joseph Daigle Jr., Olivier Thibodeau and Louis Sansfacon.

After receiving the promise of land grants from the British authorities, Jean-Baptiste Cyr called for a meeting at his home, where it was decided that half of the colony would go to the Madawaska and the other half would be divided among Amon, Memramcook, Miramichi, Tracadie, Caraquet and Bathurst. Jean-Baptiste would not make the trip. He died that same year, and was buried at "Crock's Point".

Determined to live free of further English interference, these families traveled up the St. John Valley, beyond Grand Falls -- where the British ships could not follow -- to the area called "the Madawaska", the Native American word for "the Land of the Porcupine..." They settled in June, 1785, on the banks of the St. John River. The Acadians has finally found a new home. By 1790, the British would finally affirm the land claims for the Acadian families on the banks of the St. John.

--------------------

480. Jean-Baptiste (Crock) CYR , a son of Jean Baptiste Cyr and Francois Melancon, was born in 1708 (or 1710) at Beaubassin, Acadia. On Jan. 26, 1734 at Beaubassin, Jean-Baptiste Cyr married Marguerite Cormier, daughter of Pierre Cormier and Catherine Leblanc..

The origin of the nickname "Crock" is difficult to ascertain. Records indicate that Jean-Baptiste manufactured large quantities of maple sugar and, during the disposal of same he would often ask his customers: "Vont-ils en avoir, de quoi a CROQUER". We know he lived, for a long time, near the French village of Kingsclear, also known as "Crock's Point" and it may be that this is where he acquired the nickname "Crock". By other accounts Crock Point, which is located eleven miles west of Fredericton New Brunswick, was named after Jean-Baptiste who was nicknamed Crock by the Scots, his surname being similar to a Gaelic word for crock. Other legends have it that he was called "Crock" since he cracked nuts with his teeth, declaring that he'd do likewise to the British.

History was soon speeding forward for the CYR family. The time of the "Grand Derangement" was upon them. Around 1750, probably at the instigation of Father Le Loutre, Jean Baptiste Cyr moved from Beaubassin to Fort Beausejour on the Isthmus of Nova Scotia.

However, in 1755, the situation between the British and the Acadians finally erupted and the Acadians were given the ultimatum to "take an unconditional oath of allegiance to the British Crown, or be deported." Although some 8000 people of Acadian origin were deported back to France, or to colonies in Boston, Massachusetts, or Louisiana, the Jean-Baptiste CYR family seems to have been able to elude this "Grand Derangement". Although not deported, he and his family were forced to flee the land.

Just prior to his death in 1785, Jean-Baptiste "Crock" CYR is reported to have walked through his farm one last time. There, bowed with age and discouraged with grief, he is reported to have cried out: "My God! Can it be true that there is no place left on earth for a 'cayen' (Acadian)?" He died shortly thereafter.

--------------------

80. Jean-Baptiste (Crock) CYR , a son of Jean Baptiste Cyr and Francois Melanson, was born in 1708 (or 1710) at Beaubassin, Acadia. On Jan. 26, 1734 at Beaubassin, Jean-Baptiste Cyr married Marguerite Cormier, daughter of Pierre Cormier and Catherine Leblanc..

The origin of the nickname "Crock" is difficult to ascertain. Records indicate that Jean-Baptiste manufactured large quantities of maple sugar and, during the disposal of same he would often ask his customers: "Vont-ils en avoir, de quoi a CROQUER". We know he lived, for a long time, near the French village of Kingsclear, also known as "Crock's Point" and it may be that this is where he acquired the nickname "Crock". By other accounts Crock Point, which is located eleven miles west of Fredericton New Brunswick, was named after Jean-Baptiste who was nicknamed Crock by the Scots, his surname being similar to a Gaelic word for crock. Other legends have it that he was called "Crock" since he cracked nuts with his teeth, declaring that he'd do likewise to the British.

History was soon speeding forward for the CYR family. The time of the "Grand Derangement" was upon them. Around 1750, probably at the instigation of Father Le Loutre, Jean Baptiste Cyr moved from Beaubassin to Fort Beausejour on the Isthmus of Nova Scotia.

However, in 1755, the situation between the British and the Acadians finally erupted and the Acadians were given the ultimatum to "take an unconditional oath of allegiance to the British Crown, or be deported." Although some 8000 people of Acadian origin were deported back to France, or to colonies in Boston, Massachusetts, or Louisiana, the Jean-Baptiste CYR family seems to have been able to elude this "Grand Derangement". Although not deported, he and his family were forced to flee the land.

Just prior to his death in 1785, Jean-Baptiste "Crock" CYR is reported to have walked through his farm one last time. There, bowed with age and discouraged with grief, he is reported to have cried out: "My God! Can it be true that there is no place left on earth for a 'cayen' (Acadian)?" He died shortly thereafter.

view all 16

Jean-Baptiste Cyr dit Croc, Jr.'s Timeline

1708
January 26, 1708
Beaubassin, Acadia, Canada
1734
January 6, 1734
Age 25
Beaubassin, Canada
1737
1737
Age 28
Nova Scotia, Canada
1741
March 13, 1741
Age 33
Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada
1743
June 25, 1743
Age 35
Amherst, NS, Canada
1744
December 28, 1744
Age 36
Acadia (Nova Scotia), Canada
1747
June 3, 1747
Age 39
Beaubassin, Amherst, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada
1748
1748
Age 39
Amherst, NS, Canada
1755
1755
Age 46
1756
1756
Age 47