Jean I I de Lorraine, duc de Lorraine (1346 - 1390) MP

‹ Back to de Lorraine surname

Is your surname de Lorraine?

Research the de Lorraine family

Jean I, duc de Lorraine's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Birthplace: Nancy,Meurthe-Et-Moselle,Lorraine,France
Death: Died in Germany
Occupation: Hertig i Lothringen 1346-90, Duke of Lorraine
Managed by: Maria Edmonds-Zediker, Volunteer Curator, on break until June 1
Last Updated:

About Jean I I de Lorraine, duc de Lorraine

John I, Duke of Lorraine From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

John I (February 1346 – September 23, 1390, Paris) was the duke of Lorraine from 1346 to his death. As an infant of six months, he succeeded his father, Rudolph, who was killed in the Battle of Crécy. His mother was Mary, daughter of Guy I of Blois. During his long minority, the regency was in the hands of his mother and Eberhard III of Wurtemberg. In December 1353, John did homage for the duchy to Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor, who made him lieutenant-general of the Empire in the Moselle country. John participated in the Drang nach Osten and its related crusades at the sides of the Teutonic Knights against Lithuania in 1356 and again in 1365. He was facing west when, on 19 September 1356, he aided Philip VI of France in the Battle of Poitiers, as his father had at Crécy, and where the French chivalry was mowed down by English longbowmen as before. He survived, however, unlike his father, to fight again, on the side of the Dauphin Charles in putting down the Parisian rebellion of Étienne Marcel. He attended Charles' coronation on 19 May 1364 in Rheims, strengthening the ties to France which had steadily been building in Lorraine for the past century. He entered the War of the Breton Succession, as had his father, to aid his uncle Charles of Blois against John of Montfort. At the Battle of Auray on 29 September 1364 with John as undisputed duke and Charles dead on the field. John and Bertrand du Guesclin were both taken prisoner. He continued to aid Charles V and Charles VI to reconquer the provinces lost by the Treaty of Brétigny, but in his latter years, he distanced himself from the French court. Partly this was due to the free companies ravaging his lands and in part the royal officials who tried to litigate the relationship between John (an Imperial vassal) and his vassals. In the end, he entered into rapprochement with Philip II, Duke of Burgundy. Nonetheless, he died at Paris on 22 September 1390, defending himself against a charge by the people of Neufchâteau of abuse of power. John married Sophie (1343-1369), daughter of Eberhard II, Count of Württemberg, in 1361. They had: Charles (1364-1431), successor Frederick (1369-1415), count of Vaudémont Isabella (d.1423), married Enguerrand VII of Coucy [edi

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_I,_Duke_of_Lorraine John I, Duke of Lorraine From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Effigy of John I (Iean I) in Nancy. This article does not cite any references or sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2007)

John I (February 1346 – September 23, 1390, Paris) was the duke of Lorraine from 1346 to his death. As an infant of six months, he succeeded his father, Rudolph, who was killed in the Battle of Crécy. His mother was Mary, daughter of Guy I of Blois.

During his long minority, the regency was in the hands of his mother and Eberhard III of Wurtemberg. In December 1353, John did homage for the duchy to Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor, who made him lieutenant-general of the Empire in the Moselle country.

John participated in the Drang nach Osten and its related crusades at the sides of the Teutonic Knights against Lithuania in 1356 and again in 1365.

He was facing west when, on 19 September 1356, he aided Philip VI of France in the Battle of Poitiers, as his father had at Crécy, and where the French chivalry was mowed down by English longbowmen as before. He survived, however, unlike his father, to fight again, on the side of the Dauphin Charles in putting down the Parisian rebellion of Étienne Marcel. He attended Charles' coronation on 19 May 1364 in Rheims, strengthening the ties to France which had steadily been building in Lorraine for the past century.

He entered the War of the Breton Succession, as had his father, to aid his uncle Charles of Blois against John of Montfort. At the Battle of Auray on 29 September 1364 with John as undisputed duke and Charles dead on the field. John and Bertrand du Guesclin were both taken prisoner.

He continued to aid Charles V and Charles VI to reconquer the provinces lost by the Treaty of Brétigny, but in his latter years, he distanced himself from the French court. Partly this was due to the free companies ravaging his lands and in part the royal officials who tried to litigate the relationship between John (an Imperial vassal) and his vassals. In the end, he entered into rapprochement with Philip II, Duke of Burgundy. Nonetheless, he died at Paris on 22 September 1390, defending himself against a charge by the people of Neufchâteau of abuse of power.

John married Sophie (1343-1369), daughter of Eberhard II, Count of Württemberg, in 1361. They had:

   * Charles (1364-1431), successor
   * Frederick (1369-1415), count of Vaudémont
   * Isabelle (d.1423), married Enguerrand VII of Coucy

[edit] See also

   * Dukes of Lorraine family tree

Preceded by Rudolph Duke of Lorraine 1346-1390 Succeeded by Charles II This page was last modified on 11 June 2010 at 07:06. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_I,_Duke_of_Lorraine John I, Duke of Lorraine From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Effigy of John I (Iean I) in Nancy. This article does not cite any references or sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2007)

John I (February 1346 – September 23, 1390, Paris) was the duke of Lorraine from 1346 to his death. As an infant of six months, he succeeded his father, Rudolph, who was killed in the Battle of Crécy. His mother was Mary, daughter of Guy I of Blois.

During his long minority, the regency was in the hands of his mother and Eberhard III of Wurtemberg. In December 1353, John did homage for the duchy to Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor, who made him lieutenant-general of the Empire in the Moselle country.

John participated in the Drang nach Osten and its related crusades at the sides of the Teutonic Knights against Lithuania in 1356 and again in 1365.

He was facing west when, on 19 September 1356, he aided Philip VI of France in the Battle of Poitiers, as his father had at Crécy, and where the French chivalry was mowed down by English longbowmen as before. He survived, however, unlike his father, to fight again, on the side of the Dauphin Charles in putting down the Parisian rebellion of Étienne Marcel. He attended Charles' coronation on 19 May 1364 in Rheims, strengthening the ties to France which had steadily been building in Lorraine for the past century.

He entered the War of the Breton Succession, as had his father, to aid his uncle Charles of Blois against John of Montfort. At the Battle of Auray on 29 September 1364 with John as undisputed duke and Charles dead on the field. John and Bertrand du Guesclin were both taken prisoner.

He continued to aid Charles V and Charles VI to reconquer the provinces lost by the Treaty of Brétigny, but in his latter years, he distanced himself from the French court. Partly this was due to the free companies ravaging his lands and in part the royal officials who tried to litigate the relationship between John (an Imperial vassal) and his vassals. In the end, he entered into rapprochement with Philip II, Duke of Burgundy. Nonetheless, he died at Paris on 22 September 1390, defending himself against a charge by the people of Neufchâteau of abuse of power.

John married Sophie (1343-1369), daughter of Eberhard II, Count of Württemberg, in 1361. They had:

   * Charles (1364-1431), successor
   * Frederick (1369-1415), count of Vaudémont
   * Isabelle (d.1423), married Enguerrand VII of Coucy

[edit] See also

   * Dukes of Lorraine family tree

Preceded by Rudolph Duke of Lorraine 1346-1390 Succeeded by Charles II This page was last modified on 11 June 2010 at 07:06.

view all

Jean I, duc de Lorraine's Timeline

1346
February 1346
Nancy,Meurthe-Et-Moselle,Lorraine,France
1361
December 16, 1361
Age 15
Nancy,Meurthe-Et-Moselle,,France
December 16, 1361
Age 15
1364
1364
Age 17
Nancy,Meurthe-Et-Moselle,Lorraine,France
1368
1368
Age 21
Lorraine, France
1369
April 26, 1369
Age 23
Lorraine, France
1370
1370
Age 23
Nancy, Mthe-et-Melle, France
1387
1387
Age 40
Veldenz, Pfalz, Deutschland(HRR)
1390
September 27, 1390
Age 44
Germany