Jean Mousnier de la Montagne

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Jean Mousnier de la Montagne

Nicknames: "Johannes La Montagne", "Jan", "Johannes"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Saintes, Poitou-Charentes, France
Death: Died in Claverack, Ulster, New York, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Masion dela Montayne; MASION DE LA MONTAGNE; Agnietje dela Montayne and Agnietje DE LA MONTAGNE
Husband of Rachel DE LA MONTAGNE; Rachel de Forest and Agnietie Gillis Ten Waert
Father of Yolanta Van Kortryk; Yolanta de la Montagne; Jolant de la Montagne; Jesse de la Montagne; Jan Monier de la Montagne, Jr. and 7 others

Occupation: Doctor
Managed by: James D Roberts
Last Updated:

About Jean Mousnier de la Montagne

New Amsterdam - Immigrants

Source 1: Jean de la Montagne

From: The Northup/Banta Family Tree Contact: Karrie Email: karrielynne4@cfl.rr.com

Notes: Who was he, this man from whom we descend?

Johannes Monerius Montanus "Xanto", Dutch university student? Jehan Mousnier de la Montagne, Walloon explorer? Jean de La Montagne, French Huguenot minister of the Gospel? Johannes La Montagne, physician of New Amsterdam? J. LaMontagne, signer of treaties with Indian tribes? Dr. Johannes Mousnier de la Montagne, founder of an American family?

Jean Mousnier de la Montagne was a Protestant from France. He was born about 1595 and he lived most of his life in exile from France. That much is certain. No one knows where he was born nor where he was living before 1619. No one knows who his parents were nor what the double-barreled name denotes. Does it imply an aristocratic origin? It may literally have meant "the miller from the mountain."

He may have been a native of Saintonge in west-central France, as Riker believed, or he may have come from another mountainous area of France. No records have been found in Saintonge to support Riker's belief, and all of our ancestor's associations in Holland were with Walloons, French Huguenots from northern France. There is a village named Santes near Lille, which has been suggested as a more likely place of his origin than Saintes in Saintonge.

He first appears on record in the Netherlands on 19 November 1619 when he registered as a student of medicine at the University of Leyden, signing his name in Latin as Johannes Monerius Montanus, a native of "Xanto". He was twenty-four years old and was boarding with the family of Robert Botack, a shoemaker on the Voldersgraft10. He next appears as a signer of the round-robin petition of the Huguenot heads of family in Leyden, addressed in July 1621 to the British Ambassador at the Hague, asking for permission to establish a Huguenot colony in Virginia. Permission was not granted to the Huguenots for that colony and so Jehan Mousnier de la Montagne accompanied Jesse DeForest to the Amazon River and the coast of Guiana in 1623, one of a party of eleven Huguenot men on board the Pigeon looking for a site to establish a Huguenot colony. He returned to Leyden on the Black Eagle late in 1625, bringing with him the news of the death of Jesse DeForest, the so-called Journal of Jesse DeForest, and the maps of the exploration party.

He is named as a boarder in the home of the widow of Jesse DeForest in 1626 and again that same year as a medical student at the University of Leyden. On 28 November 1626, he married Rachel, daughter of Jesse DeForest and his wife Marie Du Cloux, in the Walloon Church in Leyden. He was then thirty-one years old; she about seventeen. There is no baptismal record for Rachel DeForest, but her parents were living at Moncornet in Thierache, in the French province of Picardy, between 1607 and 1615. They returned to Sedan to baptize Elizabeth in 1607 and David in 1608, but there is a break in the records of the Huguenot Church of Sedan between 1609 and 1617. For that reason, it is assumed that Rachel was also born at Moncornet and baptized at Sedan, probably in 1609, but the record has since been lost.

On 26 July 1629, Jean Mousnier de la Montagne left with his young bride on the Fortuyn for the island of Tobago, a Dutch possession in the Windward Islands, northeast of Guiana. His wife returned to Leyden in 1631, supposedly enfeebled by the climate of this Caribbean Island. Her husband probably returned in 1633 and appears on the register of University of Leyden a third time in 1636.

In Haag's Dictionnaire des familles protestantes de France, there is an entry for Jean de La Montagne, minister of the Gospel, who translated into French from English six religious tracts, published in France between 1633 and 1655. The fifth tract, Pensées chrestiennes sur nostre devoir envers Dieu, envers nos prochains et envers nous-mesmes includes some information about the translator. In the introduction, he states that he was born in 1590 but he doesn't say where. However, the first of these tracts was published in Sedan, which suggests that Jean de La Montagne might have originated from that area. Is this "our" Jean Mousnier de la Montagne? Perhaps. We know that our Dr. Johannes was gifted in languages, writing letters and reports in Latin, French, Dutch, and English, and evidently speaking some Indian languages. As a Protestant, he was interested in church doctrine, and as a university student, he would have studied theology.

On 25 September 1636, Dr. J. de la Montagne sailed for America a third time, this time with his wife and three children, Jesse (aged 7), Jean Jr. (aged 4), and Rachel (aged 2), on the ship Rensselaerswyck, owned jointly by the patroon Kiliaen Van Rensselaer and by his wife's uncle, Gerard DeForest. The DeForest group on the ship consisted of the DE LA MONTAGNE family, as well as Rachel's brothers Henry and Isaac DeForest. Another child, Marie, was born to Rachel DeForest at sea, before the ship reached New Amsterdam on 5 March 1637.

In the New Netherlands, Jean Mousnier de la Montagne was generally referred to as Jan or Johannes LA MONTAGNE. His excellent education and high natural abilities enabled him to take an important place in the community in New Amsterdam. On Manhattan Island, he immediately set up business as a physician and a chandler. Henry DeForest died soon after arrival in the New World, and Dr. La Montagne was forced to take charge of the establishment of the DeForest tobacco plantation in mid-Manhattan. Eventually La Montagne assumed the proprietorship of the property, living on it with his family and producing a profitable crop of tobacco. The farm, called Vredendahl, included much of the upper half of what is now Central Park. He was driven off the land by the Indians and lived thereafter near the fort at New Amsterdam. He was the official surgeon of New Amsterdam, First Councillor for both Directors Kieft and Stuyvesant (1638-1656), commander of the troops on Manhattan Island (1640-1656), and a member of several peace commissions with the Indians.

Another child, Willem, was born in 1641 but in 1643 Rachel died. Four years later Johannes de la Montagne wedded Agniete Gillis Ten Waert on 18 August 1647 at New Amsterdam. The marriage record showed that both of them had been previously widowed. Agniete, daughter of Gillis or Jellis Jochems Ten Waert and his wife Beicken Schuts, was baptized in Amsterdam on 1 December 1611. She had married Elias Provoost at Amsterdam on 17 May 1633. Elias died in July 1636 and Agniete then married Arendt Corssens Stam in Amsterdam on 26 January 1638. Agniete and her son, Johannes Provoost, came to the New Netherlands with her second husband. After Arendt Corssens Stam drowned at sea, Agniete married for a third time. Agniete had children by all three husbands, but only Johannes Provoost, born in Amsterdam in 1636, lived past infancy.

Johannes de la Montagne was appointed Vice-Director of the entire colony in 1656, with special responsibility for Fort Orange (Albany) and the settlement of Beverwyck. At Albany, Dr. La Montagne was the chief administrator for a large area, including all the Dutch and Huguenot settlements along the Hudson Valley, from 1656 to 1664. His stepson, Johannes Provoost, acted as his clerk at Fort Orange. With the English take-over of the colony in 1664, Dr. La Montagne drops out of official records. As an official of the Dutch West Indies Company, he had to relinquish his position as Vice-Director. He did sign a loyalty oath to the new British government and Riker believed that he accompanied Peter Stuyvesant back to Holland in 1665 to defend the surrender of the colony. However, there is no mention of Dr. La Montagne in Dutch records, although Stuyvesant and his defense occupy many pages of official reports. Dr. La Montagne is, on the other hand, mentioned at least twice in 1665 in Albany. His stepson, Johannes Provoost, continued to live in Albany, and it seems likely that Dr. La Montagne and Agnietje continued to stay close to her only living son.

When Willem de La Montagne took over the care of his sister's orphaned children in 1673, the Wiltwyck Court records refer to Dr. La Montagne as being deceased. It is believed that he died in 1670 since his son Jean/Jan dropped the use of Jr. that year. It is not known where Dr. La Montagne is buried nor either of his wives, although it is probable that Dr. La Montagne and Agnietje were buried in the churchyard of the first Reformed Dutch Church in Albany, a location at the intersection of State and Market Streets, long since buried under landfills and modern construction.

Construction sites in the late 19th century at the location of the burial grounds of the original Beverwyck RDC are known to have turned up human bones. Some remains were later moved to Washington Park but never identified. With new interest in preserving the Dutch heritage at Albany, perhaps our Montagne Surname DNA project will one day be useful in contributing to the identification of the bones of Dr. Johannes de la Montagne.

Marriage 1 Rachel DEFOREST b: 1609 in Moncornet, Picardy, France Married: 28 NOV 1626 in Walloon Church in Leyden, Holland 1 2 Children

Jolant de la MONTAGNE b: 1627 in Leyden, Holland
Jesse de la MONTAGNE b: 1629 in Leyden, Holland
Jan Monier LA MONTAGNE b: 1632 in Leyden, Holland
Rachel de la MONTAGNE b: 1634 in Leyden, Holland
Maria de la MONTAGNE b: 25 JAN 1637 in off the coast of Madeira, Portuguese island in the Atlantic Ocean
Willem de la MONTAGNE b: 1641 in New Amsterdam, now New York City

Marriage 2 Agnietie Gillis TEN WAERT b: 1611 in Amsterdam, Holland Married: 18 AUG 1647 in New Amsterdam Reformed Dutch Church Children

Gillis de la MONTAGNE b: 1650 in New Amsterdam, now New York City
Jesse de la MONTAGNE b: 1653 in New Amsterdam, now New York City

Sources: Title: Book of Marriages of the Pieterskerk, Leiden, Holland Publication: Original record books in the Leiden Archives Repository: Media: Book Page: 27 November 1626 Text: Jean Moenijer jongman student inde medicinae, wonend opde Voldersgraft vergeselt met Geraerd de Foree zijn bekende op Mare met Ragel de Foree jonge dochter wonende aldaer vergeselt met Heste de la Grange haer moeije mede aldaer Title: Records of the Walloon Church, Leiden, Holland Publication: Original record books in the Leiden Archives Repository: Media: Book Page: Marriage Book for 28 November 1626 Text: Jean Monnier estudiant en medicine demeurant sur l;e Voldersgracht, et Rachel des Forests demeurant au mesme endroit.

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Source 2: http://www.gencircles.com/users/scottypimpin/20/data/1737

"Aaron Family Tree (Rev. 131)" by Aaron

Email Address:rtanyon@yahoo.com

Notes: French Huguenot physician. Recieved his degree from the University of Leyden. He was the first educated medical man in New Amsterdam. He wasappointed a member of the Council under Governor Kieft and GovernorStuyvesant in New Amsterdam. He was in command of Fort Orange [Albany,NY] as Vice-Director and surrendered the fort to the English in 1664. Hebelonged to ancient nobility in France. Source pedigree from Eleanor M.Hall THE SEE FAMILY AS I SEE IT Eleanor M. Hall. pp16 "The MontagneFamily had been in America for a long time when the See family arrived.Johannes dela Montangne, Sr, had made the first home outside the fort atNew Harlem, and dutch controlled villages were popping up like mushroomson Staten Island, Long Island, and Manhattan.

Memoir of Philippe Maton Wiltsee and his Descendants Page 10 NAMES OF THE WALLOONS AND FRENCH WHO WISHED TO EMIGRATE TO VIRGINIA. (This is the onlylist containing names of Walloons and other families in the book.)Monsiuer de la Montague, apothecary and surgeon; marrying man. Monsieurde la Montague, medical student; marrying man. HONORABLE JEAN DE LAMONTAGNE, a French Huguenot, who was graduated in medicine at theUniversity of Leyden in 1615, and in 1637 emigrated to New Netherlands(New York), where he became prominent in public affairs. He was highlyesteemed by both Governor William Kieft and Governor Peter Stuyvesant,and served in the council of the former from 1638 until 1646, and in thatof the latter from 1647 until 1656. In 1641 he was appointed by GovernorKieft to command a military force sent against the English at Fort GoodHope. In 1643 he was appointed general to command a force against theIndians on Staten Island, and the following year he headed a militaryexpedition against the Indians on Long Island, where one hundred andtwenty savages were killed. In 1645 he accompanied Governor Kieft on hisfirst voyage to Fort Orange, to secure the friendship of the Mohawks, onwhich occasion he conducted an analysis of the war paint of the natives,and discovered gold there in, to the great comfort of Governor Kieft. In1647 he was retained in the council by Governor Stuyvesant; in 1648 hewas despatched to the Delaware River to secure the Dutch acquisitionsthere, which was successfully done. In 1653 he was in the enjoyment of anincome of nearly four hundred dollars a month from his public offices. On28 September, 1656, he was commissioned by Governor StuyvesantVice-Director-General of Fort Orange (Albany), and performed his firstofficial act in this capacity on 12 October, same year. He served withdistinction in the directorship until 1664, when he surrendered FortOrange to the English, and swore allegiance to the new dynasty. Hisestate ("bouwery") in New York was east of Eighth Avenue, and extendedfrom Ninety-third Street north to Harlem River, containing about twohundred acres, which was called "Vredendael" (peaceful vale). He ismentioned in official documents ("Documentary History of the Colony ofNew York," i. 341) as "a very learned man." He married, for first wife,at the Walloon Church at Leyden, 12 December, 1626, Rachel de Forrest,daughter of Isaac de Forrest by his wife Marie Cloux. His eldest son,JEAN (or JAN) DE LAMONTAGNE, JUNR, was a prominent citizen of Harlem, NewYork, and deacon of the Dutch Church there. He married (1), 14 March,1655, Peternella, daughter of Jan Pikes, of Amsterdam, Holland, and hadby her: VINCENT MONTAGNE, who married Ariantje Faub, and by her had:THOMAS MONTAGNE, who married, 25 November, 1718, Rebecca Bryant, and byher had sixteen children, the fifteenth child being BENJAMIN MONTAGNE,who was baptizedin the New York Dutch Church, 16 January, 1745, andmarried Cornelia Cooper, by whom he had five children, the eldest beingREVEREND THOMAS B. MONTANYE, first above mentioned. Dr. Johannes Mouniesde la Montanye was born in Saintonge, France, 1595. He married Rachel DeForest, at Leyden, December 12, 1626. He came to Harlem in 1637, took upMontanye Flats, was secretary of the Harlem Colony, and later was incommand at Fort Orange (now Albany), as vice-director, until 1664, whenpossession was taken by the British. He died in Holland, in 1670, havinggone there with Governor Stuyvesant, after the British occupation of NewYork. (II) Jan (or John), son of Dr. Johannes Mounies de la Montanye,came to Harlem soon after his father, and entered business with VincentPikes. He returned to Holland and married Peternella Pikes there, about1654. Returned to New York in 1655, and soon after settled in Harlem andtook up Montanye Point; was secretary and teacher at Harlem until hisdeath, in 1672. His first wife died and he married (second) MariaVermilye, June 10, 1661.

http://www.rootsweb.com/~nycortla/montanye.htm

Jean Mousnier de laMontagne who married Rachel DeForest 12/12/1626 in Walloon Church in Leyden Holland. They had 3 children whom I assume theysailed with: Jean Mousnier, Jolant, and Jesse Mousnier. Another child,Maria, was born 1/26/1636/37 off the coast of Madiera on the voyage tothe new world! They came on the ship Rensselaerswyck. The log of thatvoyage has survived and a translation is printed in the Van RensselaerBowier Manuscripts, translated and edited by A. J. F. van Laer, 1908.They left Amsterdam on Sept. 25, 1636; and then left the Texel on Oct 8,1636. They arrived at Manhattan on March 4, 1637. A summary of theirtravails and why they took so long is here:

http://www.rootsweb.com/~ote/rens1637.htm

You won't find them listed in the conventional passenger list for this voyage. I think that is because that list has been derived on the basisof when people showed up at Rensselaerswyck. Jean and Rachel got off atManhattan. However, they are mentioned in the log. Here is the account ofMarie's birth from p.369: "1637 January" Sun. 25 In the morning about anhour after sunrise we were between poerte sante [Porto Santo] and madeere[Madeira]. About two o'clock in the afternoon we got a steady breeze fromthe WSW and ran south and in the evening the SW point of madeere lay 12leagues NNW from us. Our latitude by dead reckoning was then 31 deg. 40min. From there we sailed WSW with rough weather and lower sails. Thewind about north with high seas. This night about three o'clock a child[Marie] was born; the father is montanij Johannes La Montagne and themother raegel [Rachel]. The day gone." - So she was born at 3 AM. But Iam not sure whether it was 3 AM the morning of the 25 or 3 AM the morningof the 26. I've seen both days cited. I think I would have to read a lotof the log to get a feel for when each day's events were recorded andwhen a day was considered to have started and ended. Help welcome.Another book you might want to get ahold of is: A Walloon Family inAmerica; Lockwood de Forest and His Forbears 1500-1848, by Mrs. Robert W.de Forest, 1914. Among other items on the De Forests, it has the log ofJesse's voyage to Guiana. He left the Texel on 16 July, 1623. I have notchecked this, but the above book says that Jolant died young. And shows adau. Rachel b. 1634 who would have been on the Rensselaerswyck with them.Regards, Howard hswain@ix.netcom.com

Jean, the first member of the family in America, was the son of the Maisonde la Montagne which became distinguished in the fields oftheology, medicine, and literature during the sixteenth century. Hisbirthplace in Saintes province of Saintonge, France (now the Departmentof Charente Imperieure), a province in the western part of France in thevicinity of the Bay of Biscay. The original name in France was Mousnier(some spelled it Monier) meaning miller and the "de la Montagne" simplysignified the part of France from which the family came. La Montagne is amountainous region of Burgundy. The spelling of Montagne gradually becameMontanye. Some retained Monier for a time. Many held onto the de laMontanye. Jean was a Huguenot, exiled in Holland and attended theUniversity of Leyden, first registering as a student on 19 November 1619in the Latin style as Johannes Monerius Montanus (entering at age 24, heapparently had attended another school) and graduated in medicine. Whilea student at the University, at one time he boarded at the house of MarieDe Forest, a widow. The De Forest family (De la Forest) were also FrenchHuguenots driven into exile in Holland. The De Forests, Jesse -- Marie'shusband -- and Gerard, stood prominent among the French refugees. Jessehad married Marie du Cloux in France and was licensed "to dye serges andcamlets in colors. "Jean married Rachael De Forest at the Walloon Churchin Leyden. Rachael was the only daughter of Jesse and Marie. Rachael'stwo brothers, Isaac and Henry, and a cousin Crispin, emigrated to NewAmsterdam (New York) and with their descendants played a very prominentrole in the new colony as did the Montanyes. Jean and Rachael emigratedto New Amsterdam, arriving early spring of 1637, having left Holland infall of 1636. En route, Marie Montanye was born being named for hermaternal grandmother. Dr. Montagne, reputed to be skillful in hisprofession, was a welcome addition to the colonists. Governor Kieftimmediately called him to a seat on the Council which he held until 1656.In the intervening years, Dr. Montagne held many offices among them beingVice-Director of Fort Orange, Member of the Convention of 1653,Commissioner of Fortifications, and Secretary of the Colony under PeterStuyvesant who was his close personal friend. When the Dutch colonypassed into the hands of the English in 1664, Dr. Montagne promptly sworeallegiance to the new government. After this date he is lost sight of butit is thought that he accompanied his friend, Peter Stuyvesant, toHolland to defend his surrendering the colony to the English. There isreason to conclude that Dr. Montagne died abroad in 1670. NOTE: The aboveinformation is from Harlem, City of New York, Its Origin and Early Annalsby James Riker, Published in 1881 by the author.

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   Who was he, this man from whom we descend?
   Johannes Monerius Montanus "Xanto", Dutch university student?
   Jehan Mousnier de la Montagne, Walloon explorer?
   Jean de La Montagne, French Huguenot minister of the Gospel?
   Johannes La Montagne, physician of New Amsterdam?
   J. LaMontagne, signer of treaties with Indian tribes?
   Dr. Johannes Mousnier de la Montagne, founder of an American family?
   Jean Mousnier de la Montagne was a Protestant from France. He was born about 1595 and he lived most of his life in exile from France. That much is certain. No one knows where he was born nor where he was living before 1619. No one knows who his parents were nor what the double-barreled name denotes. Does it imply an aristocratic origin? It may literally have meant "the miller from the mountain."
   He may have been a native of Saintonge in west-central France, as Riker believed, or he may have come from another mountainous area of France. No records have been found in Saintonge to support Riker's belief, and all of our ancestor's associations in Holland were with Walloons, French Huguenots from northern France. There is a village named Santes near Lille, which has been suggested as a more likely place of his origin than Saintes in Saintonge.
   He first appears on record in the Netherlands on 19 November 1619 when he registered as a student of medicine at the University of Leyden, signing his name in Latin as Johannes Monerius Montanus, a native of "Xanto". He was twenty-four years old and was boarding with the family of Robert Botack, a shoemaker on the Voldersgraft10. He next appears as a signer of the round-robin petition of the Huguenot heads of family in Leyden, addressed in July 1621 to the British Ambassador at the Hague, asking for permission to establish a Huguenot colony in Virginia. Permission was not granted to the Huguenots for that colony and so Jehan Mousnier de la Montagne accompanied Jesse DeForest to the Amazon River and the coast of Guiana in 1623, one of a party of eleven Huguenot men on board the Pigeon looking for a site to establish a Huguenot colony. He returned to Leyden on the Black Eagle late in 1625, bringing with him the news of the death of Jesse DeForest, the so-called Journal of Jesse DeForest, and the maps of the exploration party.
   He is named as a boarder in the home of the widow of Jesse DeForest in 1626 and again that same year as a medical student at the University of Leyden. On 28 November 1626, he married Rachel, daughter of Jesse DeForest and his wife Marie Du Cloux, in the Walloon Church in Leyden. He was then thirty-one years old; she about seventeen. There is no baptismal record for Rachel DeForest, but her parents were living at Moncornet in Thierarche, in the French province of Picardy, between 1607 and 1615. They returned to Sedan to baptize Elizabeth in 1607 and David in 1608, but there is a break in the records of the Huguenot Church of Sedan between 1609 and 1617. For that reason, it is assumed that Rachel was also born at Moncornet and baptized at Sedan, probably in 1609, but the record has since been lost.
   On 26 July 1629, Jean Mousnier de la Montagne left with his young bride on the Fortuyn for the island of Tobago, a Dutch possession in the Windward Islands, northeast of Guiana. His wife returned to Leyden in 1631, supposedly enfeebled by the climate of this Caribbean Island. Her husband probably returned in 1633 and appears on the register of University of Leyden a third time in 1636.
   In Haag's Dictionnaire des familles protestantes de France, there is an entry for Jean de La Montagne, minister of the Gospel, who translated into French from English six religious tracts, published in France between 1633 and 1655. The fifth tract, " Pensées chrestiennes sur nostre devoir envers Dieu, envers nos prochains et envers nous-mesmes," includes some information about the translator. In the introduction, he states that he was born in 1590 but he doesn't say where. However, the first of these tracts was published in Sedan, which suggests that Jean de La Montagne might have originated from that area. Is this "our" Jean Mousnier de la Montagne? Perhaps. We know that our Dr. Johannes was gifted in languages, writing letters and reports in Latin, French, Dutch, and English, and evidently speaking some Indian languages. As a Protestant, he was interested in church doctrine, and as a university student, he would have studied theology.
   On 25 September 1636, Dr. J. de la Montagne sailed for America a third time, this time with his wife and three children, Jesse (aged 7), Jean Jr. (aged 4), and Rachel (aged 2), on the ship Rensselaerswyck, owned jointly by the patroon Kiliaen Van Rensselaer and by his wife's uncle, Gerard DeForest. The DeForest group on the ship consisted of the DE LA MONTAGNE family, as well as Rachel's brothers Henry and Isaac DeForest. Another child, Marie, was born to Rachel DeForest at sea, before the ship reached New Amsterdam on 5 March 1637.
   In the New Netherlands, Jean Mousnier de la Montagne was generally referred to as Jan or Johannes LA MONTAGNE. His excellent education and high natural abilities enabled him to take an important place in the community in New Amsterdam. On Manhattan Island, he immediately set up business as a physician and a chandler. Henry DeForest died soon after arrival in the New World, and Dr. La Montagne was forced to take charge of the establishment of the DeForest tobacco plantation in mid-Manhattan. Eventually La Montagne assumed the proprietorship of the property, living on it with his family and producing a profitable crop of tobacco. The farm, called Vredendahl, included much of the upper half of what is now Central Park. He was driven off the land by the Indians and lived thereafter near the fort at New Amsterdam. He was the official surgeon of New Amsterdam, First Councillor for both Directors Kieft and Stuyvesant (1638-1656), commander of the troops on Manhattan Island (1640-1656), and a member of several peace commissions with the Indians.
   Another child, Willem, was born in 1641 but in 1643 Rachel died. Four years later Johannes de la Montagne wedded Agniete Gillis Ten Waert on 18 August 1647 at New Amsterdam. The marriage record showed that both of them had been previously widowed. Agniete, daughter of Gillis or Jellis Jochems Ten Waert and his wife Beicken Schuts, was baptized in Amsterdam on 1 December 1611. She had married Elias Provoost at Amsterdam on 17 May 1633. Elias died in July 1636 and Agniete then married Arendt Corssens Stam in Amsterdam on 26 January 1638. Agniete and her son, Johannes Provoost, came to the New Netherlands with her second husband. After Arendt Corssens Stam drowned at sea, Agniete married for a third time. Agniete had children by all three husbands, but only Johannes Provoost, born in Amsterdam in 1636, lived past infancy.
   Johannes de la Montagne was appointed Vice-Director of the entire colony in 1656, with special responsibility for Fort Orange (Albany) and the settlement of Beverwyck. At Albany, Dr. La Montagne was the chief administrator for a large area, including all the Dutch and Huguenot settlements along the Hudson Valley, from 1656 to 1664. His stepson, Johannes Provoost, acted as his clerk at Fort Orange. With the English take-over of the colony in 1664, Dr. La Montagne drops out of official records. As an official of the Dutch West Indies Company, he had to relinquish his position as Vice-Director. He did sign a loyalty oath to the new British government and Riker believed that he accompanied Peter Stuyvesant back to Holland in 1665 to defend the surrender of the colony. However, there is no mention of Dr. La Montagne in Dutch records, although Stuyvesant and his defense occupy many pages of official reports. Dr. La Montagne is, on the other hand, mentioned at least twice in 1665 in Albany. His stepson, Johannes Provoost, continued to live in Albany, and it seems likely that Dr. La Montagne and Agnietje continued to stay close to her only living son.
   When Willem de La Montagne took over the care of his sister's orphaned children in 1673, the Wiltwyck Court records refer to Dr. La Montagne as being deceased. It is believed that he died in 1670 since his son Jean/Jan dropped the use of Jr. that year. It is not known where Dr. La Montagne is buried nor either of his wives, although it is probable that Dr. La Montagne and Agnietje were buried in the churchyard of the first Reformed Dutch Church in Albany, a location at the intersection of State and Market Streets, long since buried under landfills and modern construction.
   Construction sites in the late 19th century at the location of the burial grounds of the original Beverwyck RDC are known to have turned up human bones. Some remains were later moved to Washington Park but never identified. With new interest in preserving the Dutch heritage at Albany, perhaps our Montagne Surname DNA project will one day be useful in contributing to the identification of the bones of Dr. Johannes de la Montagne.

Marriage 1 Rachel DEFOREST b: 1609 in Moncornet, Picardy, France

   * Married: 28 NOV 1626 in Walloon Church in Leyden, Holland 1 2

Children

  1. Has No Children Jolant de LA MONTAGNE b: 1627 in Leyden, Holland
  2. Has No Children Jesse de LA MONTAGNE b: 1629 in Leyden, Holland
  3. Has Children Jan Monier LA MONTAGNE b: 1632 in Leyden, Holland
  4. Has Children Rachel de LA MONTAGNE b: 1634 in Leyden, Holland
  5. Has Children Maria de LA MONTAGNE b: 25 JAN 1637 in off the coast of Madeira, Portuguese island in the Atlantic Ocean
  6. Has Children Willem de LA MONTAGNE b: 1641 in New Amsterdam, now New York City

Marriage 2 Agnietie Gillis TEN WAERT b: 1611 in Amsterdam, Holland

   * Married: 18 AUG 1647 in New Amsterdam Reformed Dutch Church

Children

  1. Has No Children Gillis de LA MONTAGNE b: 1650 in New Amsterdam, now New York City
  2. Has No Children Jesse de LA MONTAGNE b: 1653 in New Amsterdam, now New York City

Sources:

  1. Title: Book of Marriages of the Pieterskerk, Leiden, Holland
     Publication: Original record books in the Leiden Archives
     Repository:
     Media: Book
     Page: 27 November 1626
     Text: Jean Moenijer jongman student inde medicinae, wonend opde Voldersgraft vergeselt met Geraerd de Foree zijn bekende op Mare met Ragel de Foree jonge dochter wonende aldaer vergeselt met Heste de la Grange haer moeije mede aldaer
  2. Title: Records of the Walloon Church, Leiden, Holland
     Publication: Original record books in the Leiden Archives
     Repository:
     Media: Book
     Page: Marriage Book for 28 November 1626
     Text: Jean Monnier estudiant en medicine demeurant sur l;e Voldersgracht, et Rachel des Forests demeurant au mesme endroit. 

-------------------- Dr Johannes De La Montagne was a Hugenot physician and came from Holland to New Amsterdam in 1637. -------------------- Fled to Holland and attended the University of Leyden 1619. Married Rachel Monjour deForest on 27 November 1626 in Leyden. Emigrated to New Amsterdam 1637.

Enroute to America in January 1637 when his daughter Maria was born at sea.. Dr. de la Montagne was born in 1592, a Huguenot of great learning, and served in the governor's council and as vice-director of Fort Orange (Albany)(p.1132)

Described as "the Huguenot Physician and a learned and vigilant member of the Council and right hand man of the Director" in an article published in the "Brooklyn Daily Eagle" of Sunday, April 19, 1885. -------------------- Dr. Johannes Mousnier de la Montagne (1595-1670)

Illustrious Huguenot doctor, scholar, explorer, and statesman

...Dr. Montagne, whose name has been variously misspelled, a descendant of French Huguenots who--like many other Nieuw Netherlands settlers--had fled persecution to settle in Holland. Jean Mousnier de la Montagne from the time of his arrival in Nieuw Netherland signed himself simply La Montagne, though he was often called Johannes La Montagne or Montanye, and the name was frequently pronounced according to the latter spelling... http://maddiesancestorsearch.blogspot.com/2012_02_12_archive.html

Mousnier de la Montagne was a Huguenot. He was a Walloon signer of the 1621 Round Robin petition, promising "to go into Virginia and there to live in the same condition as others of His Majesty's subjects, but in a town of incorporation by themselves"

From the 16th to the 18th century the name Huguenot was describing a member of the Protestant Reformed Church of France. They are sometimes known as the French Calvinists. Walloons" are a French-speaking people who live in Belgium, principally in Wallonia.

from "Who was Jean de la Montagne?" http://delamontagne.org/history.htm==

Jean Mousnier de la Montagne was a Protestant from France. He was born about 1595 and he lived most of his life in exile from France. That much is certain. No one knows where he was born nor where he was living before 1619. No one knows who his parents were nor what the double-barreled name denotes. Does it imply an aristocratic1 origin? It may literally have meant "the miller from the mountain."

He may have been a native of Saintonge in west-central France, as Riker2 believed, or he may have come from another mountainous area of France. No records have been found in Saintonge3 to support Riker's belief, and all of our ancestor's associations in Holland were with Walloons4, French Huguenots from northern France5. There is a village named Santes near Lille, which has been suggested6 as a more likely place of his origin than Saintes in Saintonge.

He first appears on record7 in the Netherlands on 19 November 1619 when he registered as a student of medicine at the University of Leyden, signing his name in Latin as Johannes Monerius Montanus, a native of "Xanto"8. He was twenty-four years old9 and was boarding with the family of Robert Botack, a shoemaker on the Voldersgraft10. He next appears as a signer11 of the round-robin petition of the Huguenot heads of family in Leyden, addressed in July 1621 to the British Ambassador at the Hague, asking for permission to establish a Huguenot colony in Virginia. Permission was not granted to the Huguenots for that colony and so Jehan Mousnier de la Montagne12 accompanied Jesse DeForest to the Amazon River and the coast of Guiana in 1623, one of a party of eleven Huguenot men on board the Pigeon looking for a site to establish a Huguenot colony. He returned to Leyden on the Black Eagle late in 1625, bringing with him the news of the death of Jesse DeForest, the so-called Journal of Jesse DeForest13, and the maps of the exploration party.

He is named as a boarder in the home of the widow of Jesse DeForest in 1626 and again that same year as a medical student at the University of Leyden14. On 12 December 1626, he married Rachel, daughter of Jesse DeForest and his wife Marie Du Cloux, in the Walloon Church in Leyden15. He was then thirty-one years old; she about seventeen. There is no baptismal record for Rachel DeForest, but her parents were living at Moncornet in Thierache, in the French province of Picardy, between 1607 and 1615. They returned to Sedan to baptize Elizabeth in 1607 and David in 1608, but there is a break in the records of the Huguenot Church of Sedan between 1609 and 1617. For that reason, it is assumed16 that Rachel was also born at Moncornet and baptized at Sedan, probably in 1609, but the record has since been lost.

On 26 July 1629, Jean Mousnier de la Montagne left with his young bride on the Fortuyn for the island of Tobago17, a Dutch possession in the Windward Islands, northeast of Guiana. His wife returned to Leyden in 1631, supposedly enfeebled by the climate of this Caribbean Island. Her husband probably returned in 163318 and appears on the register of University of Leyden a third time in 1636.

In Haag's Dictionnaire des familles protestantes de France, there is an entry for Jean de La Montagne, minister of the Gospel, who translated into French from English six religious tracts, published in France between 1633 and 165519. The fifth tract, Pensées chrestiennes sur nostre devoir envers Dieu, envers nos prochains et envers nous-mesmes includes some information about the translator. In the introduction, he states that he was born in 1590 but he doesn't say where. However, the first of these tracts was published in Sedan, which suggests that Jean de La Montagne might have originated from that area. Is this "our" Jean Mousnier de la Montagne? Perhaps. We know that our Dr. Johannes was gifted in languages, writing letters and reports in Latin, French, Dutch, and English, and evidently speaking some Indian languages. As a Protestant, he was interested in church doctrine, and as a university student, he would have studied theology.

On 25 September 1636, Dr. J. de la Montagne sailed for America a third time, this time with his wife and three children, Jesse (aged 7), Jan Jr. (aged 4), and Rachel (aged 2), on the ship Rensselaerswyck20, owned jointly by the patroon Kiliaen Van Rensselaer and by his wife's uncle, Gerard DeForest. The DeForest group on the ship consisted of the DE LA MONTAGNE family, as well as Rachel's brothers Henry and Isaac DeForest. Another child, Marie, was born to Rachel DeForest at sea, before the ship reached New Amsterdam on 5 March 1637.

In the New Netherlands, Jean Mousnier de la Montagne was generally referred to as Jan or Johannes LA MONTAGNE. His excellent education and high natural abilities enabled him to take an important place in the community in New Amsterdam. On Manhattan Island, he immediately set up business as a physician and a chandler. Henry DeForest died soon after arrival in the New World, and Dr. La Montagne was forced to take charge of the establishment of the DeForest tobacco plantation21 in mid-Manhattan. Eventually La Montagne assumed the proprietorship of the property, living on it with his family and producing a profitable crop of tobacco. The farm, called Vredendahl, included much of the upper half of what is now Central Park. He was driven off the land by the Indians and lived thereafter near the fort at New Amsterdam. He was the official surgeon of New Amsterdam, First Councillor for both Directors Kieft and Stuyvesant (1638-1656), commander of the troops on Manhattan Island (1640-1656), and a member of several peace commissions with the Indians.

Another child, Willem, was born in 1641 but in 1643 Rachel died. Four years later Johannes de la Montagne wedded Agniete Gillis Ten Waert on 18 August 1647 at New Amsterdam. The marriage record22 showed that both of them had been previously widowed. Agniete, daughter of Gillis or Jellis Jochems Ten Waert and his wife Beicken Schuts, was baptized in Amsterdam on 1 December 1611. She had married Elias Provoost at Amsterdam on 17 May 163323. Elias died in July 1636 and Agniete then married Arendt Corssens Stam in Amsterdam on 26 January 1638. Agniete and her son, Johannes Provoost, came to the New Netherlands with her second husband. After Arendt Corssens Stam drowned at sea, Agniete married for a third time. Agniete had children by all three husbands, but only Johannes Provoost, born in Amsterdam in 1636, lived past infancy.

Johannes de la Montagne was appointed Vice-Director of the entire colony in 1656, with special responsibility for Fort Orange (Albany) and the settlement of Beverwyck. At Albany, Dr. La Montagne was the chief administrator for a large area, including all the Dutch and Huguenot settlements along the Hudson Valley, from 1656 to 1664. His stepson, Johannes Provoost, acted as his clerk at Fort Orange. With the English take-over of the colony in 1664, Dr. La Montagne drops out of official records. As an official of the Dutch West Indies Company, he had to relinquish his position as Vice-Director. He did sign a loyalty oath to the new British government and Riker believed24 that he accompanied Peter Stuyvesant back to Holland in 1665 to defend the surrender of the colony. Whether he died abroad in Holland, as Riker claimed25, or whether he stayed in the now-British colony of New York as a private citizen is not known. The few records available show him in Albany with his second wife and her son Johannes Provoost in 1665 and 1666. It seems most likely that he stayed in Albany until his death in 1670 and that he was buried in the churchyard of the original Albany Reformed Dutch Church.

When Willem de La Montagne took over the care of his sister's orphaned children in 1673, the Wiltwyck Court records refer to Dr. La Montagne as being deceased. It is believed that he died in 1670 since his son Jean/Jan dropped the use of Jr. that year. It is not known when his second wife died, although she almost certainly was buried at Albany, too. There is no extant grave marker for Dr. La Montagne, nor for either of his wives. -------------------- Jean Mousnier de la Montagne - French Huguenot.

Added by sglover on 5 Jan 2007 ..

Our progenitor, our ancestor, the man from whom we descend?

- Johannes Monerius Montanus "Xanto", Dutch university student? - Jehan Mousnier de la Montagne, Walloon explorer? - Jean de La Montagne, French Huguenot minister of the Gospel? - Johannes La Montagne, physician of New Amsterdam? - J. LaMontagne, signer of treaties with Indian tribes?

Dr. Johannes Mousnier de la Montagne, founder of an American family? Jean Mousnier de la Montagne was a Protestant from France. He was born about 1595 and he lived most of his life in exile from France. That much is certain. No one knows where he was born nor where he was living before 1619. No one knows who his parents were nor what the double-barreled name denotes. Does it imply an aristocratic origin? It may literally have meant "the miller from the mountain."

He may have been a native of Saintonge in west-central France, as Riker believed, or he may have come from another mountainous area of France. No records have been found in Saintonge to support Riker's belief, and all of our ancestor's associations in Holland were with Walloons, French Huguenots from northern France. There is a village named Santes near Lille, which has been suggested6 as a more likely place of his origin than Saintes in Saintonge.

He first appears on record in the Netherlands on 19 November 1619 when he registered as a student of medicine at the University of Leyden, signing his name in Latin as Johannes Monerius Montanus, a native of "Xanto". He was twenty-four years old and was boarding with the family of Robert Botack, a shoemaker on the Voldersgraft. He next appears as a signer of the round-robin petition of the Huguenot heads of family in Leyden, addressed in July 1621 to the British Ambassador at the Hague, asking for permission to establish a Huguenot colony in Virginia. Permission was not granted to the Huguenots for that colony and so Jehan Mousnier de la Montagne accompanied Jesse DeForest to the Amazon River and the coast of Guiana in 1623, one of a party of eleven Huguenot men on board the Pigeon looking for a site to establish a Huguenot colony. He returned to Leyden on the Black Eagle late in 1625, bringing with him the news of the death of Jesse DeForest, the so-called Journal of Jesse DeForest, and the maps of the exploration party.

He is named as a boarder in the home of the widow of Jesse DeForest in 1626 and again that same year as a medical student at the University of Leyden. On 28 November 1626, he married Rachel, daughter of Jesse DeForest and his wife Marie Du Cloux, in the Walloon Church in Leyden. He was then thirty-one years old; she about seventeen. There is no baptismal record for Rachel DeForest, but her parents were living at Moncornet in Thierache, in the French province of Picardy, between 1607 and 1615. They returned to Sedan to baptize Elizabeth in 1607 and David in 1608, but there is a break in the records of the Huguenot Church of Sedan between 1609 and 1617. For that reason, it is assumed that Rachel was also born at Moncornet and baptized at Sedan, probably in 1609, but the record has since been lost.

On 26 July 1629, Jean Mousnier de la Montagne left with his young bride on the Fortuyn for the island of Tobago, a Dutch possession in the Windward Islands, northeast of Guiana. His wife returned to Leyden in 1631, supposedly enfeebled by the climate of this Caribbean Island. Her husband probably returned in 1633 and appears on the register of University of Leyden a third time in 1636.

In Haag's Dictionnaire des familles protestantes de France, there is an entry for Jean de La Montagne, minister of the Gospel, who translated into French from English six religious tracts, published in France between 1633 and 1655. The fifth tract, Pensées chrestiennes sur nostre devoir envers Dieu, envers nos prochains et envers nous-mesmes includes some information about the translator. In the introduction, he states that he was born in 1590 but he doesn't say where. However, the first of these tracts was published in Sedan, which suggests that Jean de La Montagne might have originated from that area. Is this "our" Jean Mousnier de la Montagne? Perhaps. We know that our Dr. Johannes was gifted in languages, writing letters and reports in Latin, French, Dutch, and English, and evidently speaking some Indian languages. As a Protestant, he was interested in church doctrine, and as a university student, he would have studied theology.

On 25 September 1636, Dr. J. de la Montagne sailed for America a third time, this time with his wife and three children, Jesse (aged 7), Jan Jr. (aged 4), and Rachel (aged 2), on the ship Rensselaerswyck, owned jointly by the patroon Kiliaen Van Rensselaer and by his wife's uncle, Gerard DeForest. The DeForest group on the ship consisted of the DE LA MONTAGNE family, as well as Rachel's brothers Henry and Isaac DeForest. Another child, Marie, was born to Rachel DeForest at sea, before the ship reached New Amsterdam on 5 March 1637.

In the New Netherlands, Jean Mousnier de la Montagne was generally referred to as Jan or Johannes LA MONTAGNE. His excellent education and high natural abilities enabled him to take an important place in the community in New Amsterdam. On Manhattan Island, he immediately set up business as a physician and a chandler. Henry DeForest died soon after arrival in the New World, and Dr. La Montagne was forced to take charge of the establishment of the DeForest tobacco plantation in mid-Manhattan. Eventually La Montagne assumed the proprietorship of the property, living on it with his family and producing a profitable crop of tobacco. The farm, called Vredendahl, included much of the upper half of what is now Central Park. He was driven off the land by the Indians and lived thereafter near the fort at New Amsterdam. He was the official surgeon of New Amsterdam, First Councillor for both Directors Kieft and Stuyvesant (1638-1656), commander of the troops on Manhattan Island (1640-1656), and a member of several peace commissions with the Indians.

Another child, Willem, was born in 1641 but in 1643 Rachel died. Four years later Johannes de la Montagne wedded Agniete Gillis Ten Waert on 18 August 1647 at New Amsterdam. The marriage record showed that both of them had been previously widowed. Agniete, daughter of Gillis or Jellis Jochems Ten Waert and his wife Beicken Schuts, was baptized in Amsterdam on 1 December 1611. She had married Elias Provoost at Amsterdam on 17 May 1633. Elias died in July 1636 and Agniete then married Arendt Corssens Stam in Amsterdam on 26 January 1638. Agniete and her son, Johannes Provoost, came to the New Netherlands with her second husband. After Arendt Corssens Stam drowned at sea, Agniete married for a third time. Agniete had children by all three husbands, but only Johannes Provoost, born in Amsterdam in 1636, lived past infancy.

Johannes de la Montagne was appointed Vice-Director of the entire colony in 1656, with special responsibility for Fort Orange (Albany) and the settlement of Beverwyck. At Albany, Dr. La Montagne was the chief administrator for a large area, including all the Dutch and Huguenot settlements along the Hudson Valley, from 1656 to 1664. His stepson, Johannes Provoost, acted as his clerk at Fort Orange. With the English take-over of the colony in 1664, Dr. La Montagne drops out of official records. As an official of the Dutch West Indies Company, he had to relinquish his position as Vice-Director. He did sign a loyalty oath to the new British government and Riker believed that he accompanied Peter Stuyvesant back to Holland in 1665 to defend the surrender of the colony. Whether he died abroad in Holland, as Riker claimed, or whether he stayed in the now-British colony of New York as a private citizen is not known. The few records available show him in Albany with his second wife and her son Johannes Provoost in 1665 and 1666. It seems most likely that he stayed in Albany until his death in 1670 and that he was buried in the churchyard of the original Albany Reformed Dutch Church.

When Willem de La Montagne took over the care of his sister's orphaned children in 1673, the Wiltwyck Court records refer to Dr. La Montagne as being deceased. It is believed that he died in 1670 since his son Jean/Jan dropped the use of Jr. that year. It is not known when his second wife died, although she almost certainly was buried at Albany, too. There is no extant grave marker for Dr. La Montagne, nor for either of his wives..

Who was he, this man from whom we descend?.

Johannes Monerius Montanus "Xanto", Dutch university student?.

Jehan Mousnier de la Montagne, Walloon explorer?.

Jean de la Montagne, French Huguenot minister of the Gospel?.

Johannes La Montagne, physician of New Amesterdam?.

J. LaMontagne, signer of treaties with Indian tribes?.

Dr. Johannes Mousnier de la Montagne, founder of an American family?.

Jean Mousnier de la Montagne was a Protestant from France. He was born about 1595 and lived most of his life in exile from France. That much is certain. No one knows where he was born nor where he was living before 1619. No one knows who his parents were nor what the double-barreled name denotes. Does it imply an aristocratic origin? It may literally have meant "the miller from the mountain.".

He may have been a native of Saintonge in west-central France, as Riker believed, or he may have come from another mountainous area of France. No records have been found in Saintonge to support Riker's belief, and all of our ancestor's associations in Holland were with Walloons, French Huguenots from northern France. There is a village named Santes near Lille, which has been suggested as a more likely place of his origin than Saintes in Saintonge..

He first appears on record in the Netherlands on 19 Nov 1619 when he registered as a student of medicine at the University of Leyden, signing his name in Latin as Johannes Monerius Montanus, a native of "Xanto." He was 24 years old and was boarding with the family of Robert Botack, a shoemaker on the Voldersgraft 10. He next appears as a signer of the round-robin petition of the Huguenot heads of family in Leyden, addressed in July 1621 to the British Ambassado at the Hague, asking for permission to establish a Huguenot colony in Viriginia. Permission was not granted to the Huguenots for that colony and so Jehan Mousnier de la Montagne accompanied Jesse deForest to the Amazon River and the coast of Guiana in 1623, one of the party of eleven Huguenot men on board the Pigeon looking for a site to establish a Huguenot colony. He returned to Leyden on the Black Eagle late in 1625, bringing with him news of the death of Jesse deForest, the so-called Journal of Jesse deForest, and maps of the exploration party..

He is named a boarder in the home of the widow of Jesse deForest in 1626 and again that same year as a medical student at the Unviersity of Leyden. On 28 Nov 1626, he married Rachel, daughter of Jesse deForest and his wife Marie Du Cloux, in the Walloon Churchin Leyden. He was then 31 years old, she about 17. There is no baptismal record for Rachel deForest, but her parents were living in Moncornet in Thierache, in the French province of Picardy, between 1607 and 1615. They returned to Sedan to baptize Elizabeth in 1607 and David in 1608, but there is a break in the records of the Huguenot Church of Sedan between 1609 and 1617. For that reason, it is assumed that Rachel was also baptized at Moncornet and baptized at Sedan, probably in 1609, but the record has since been lost..

On 26 Jul 1629, Jean Mousnier de la Montagne left with his young bride on the Fotuyn for the island of Tobago, a Dutch possession in the Windward Islands, northeast of Guiana. His wife returned to Leyden in 1631, supposedly enfeebled by the climate of this Caribbean Island. Her husband probably returned in 1633 and appears on the register of University of Leyden a third time in 1636..

In Haag's Dictionnaire des familles protestantes de France, there is an entry for Jean de la Montagne, minister of the Gospel, who translated into French from English six religious tracts, published in France between 1633 and 1655. The fifth tract, Pensees chrestiennes su nostre devoir envers Dieu, enves nos pochains et envers nous-mesmes includes some information about the translator. In the introduction, he states that he was born in 1590 but he doesn't say where. However, the first of these tracts was published in Sedan, which suggests that Jean de la Montagne might have originated from that area. Is this "our" Jean Mousnier de la Montagne? Perhaps. We know that our Dr. Johannes was gifted in languages, writing letters and reports in Latin, French, Dutch, and English, and evidently speaking some Indian languages. As a Protestant, he was interested in church doctrine, and as a university student, he would have studied theology..

On 25 Sep 1636, Dr. J. de la Montagne sailed for America a third time, this time with his wife and three children, Jesse (age 7), Jean Jr. (age 4), and Rachel (age 2), on the ship Rensselaeswyck, owned jointly by the patroon Killiaen van Rensselaer and by his wife's uncle, Gerard deForest. The deForest group on the ship consisted of the de la Montagne family, as well as Rachel's brothers Henry and Isaac deForest. Another child, Marie, was born to Rachel deForest at sea, before the ship reached New Amsterdam on 5Mar 1637..

In the New Netherland, Jean Mousnier de la Montagne was generally referred to as Jan or Johannes La Montagne. His excellent education and high natural abilities enabled him to take an important place in the community in New Amsterdam. On Manhattan Island, he immediately set up business as a physician and a chandler. Henry deForest died soon after arrival in the New World, and Dr, La Montagne was forced to take charge of the establishment of the deFroest tobacco plantation in mid-Manhattan. Eventually La Montagne assumed the proprietorship of the property, living on it with his family and producing a profitable crop of tobacco. The farm, called Vredendahl, included much of the upper half of what is now Central Park. He was driven off the land by the Indians and lived thereafte near the fort at New Amsterdam. He was the official surgeon of New Amsterdam, First Councillor for both Directors Kieft and Stuyvesant (1638-2656), commander of the troops on Manhattan Island (1640-1656), and a member of several peace commissions with the Indians..

Another child, Willem, was born in 1641 but in 1643 Rachel died. Four years later, Johannes de la Montagne wedded Agniete Gillis Ten Waert on 18 Aug 1647 at New Amsterdam. The marriage record showed that both of them had been previously widowed. Agniete, daughter of Gillis o Jellis Jochems Ten Waert and his wife Beicken Schuts, was baptized in Amsterdam on 1 Dec 1611. She had married Elias Provoost at Amsterdam on 17 May 1633. Elias died in July 1636 and Agniete then married Arendt Corssens Stam in Amsterdam on 26 Jan 1638. Agniete and her son Johannes Provoost came to New Netherlands with her second husband. After Arendt Corssens Stam drowned at sea, Agniete married for a third time. Agniete had children by all three husbands, but only Johannes Provoost, born in Amsterdam in 1636, lived past infancy..

Johannes de la Montagne was appointed Vice-Director of the entire colony in 1656, with special responsibility for Fort Orange (Albany) and the settlement of Beverwyck. At Albany, Dr. La Montagne was the chief administrator for a large area, including all the Dutch and Huguenot settlements alsong the Hudson Valley, from 1656 to 1664. His stepson, Johannes Provoost, acted as his clerk at Fort Orange. With the English takeover of the colony in 1664,Dr. La Montagne drops out of official records. As an official of the Dutch West India Company, he had to relinquish his position as Vice-Director. He did sign a loyalty oath to the new British government and Riker believed that he accompanied Peter Stuyvesant back to Holland in 1665 to defend the surrender of the colony. However, there is no mention of Dr. La Montagne in Dutch records, although Stuyvesant and his defense occupy many pages of official repots. Dr. La Montagne is, on the other hand, mentioned at least twice in 1665 in Albany. His stepson, Johannes Provoost, continued to live in Albany, and it seems likely that Dr. La Montagne and Agniete continued to stay close to her only living son..

When Willem de la Montagne took over the care of his sister's orphaned children in 1673, the Wiltwyck Court records refer to Dr. La Montagne as being deceased. It is believed that he died in 1670 since his son Jan dropped the use of Jr. that year. It is not known where Dr. La Montagne is buried nor eithe of his wives, although it is probable that Dr. La Montagne and Agniete were buried in the churchyard of the first Reformed Dutch Church in Albany, a location at the intersection of State and Market Streets, long since buried under landfille and modern construction..

Construction sites in the late 19th century at the location of the burial grounds of the original Beverwyck RDC are known to have turned up human bones.  Some remains were later moved to Washington Park but never identified.  With new interesst in preserving the Dutch heritage at Albany, perhaps our Mantagne surname DNA project will one day be useful in contributing to the identification of the bones of Dr. Johannes de la Montagne..
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Jean Mousnier de la Montagne's Timeline

1595
1595
Saintes, Poitou-Charentes, France
1618
1618
Age 23
1618
Age 23
Kortrijk, West Vlaanderen, South Holland, Netherlands
1626
November 28, 1626
Age 31
in Walloon Church in Leyden, Holland , Zuid, Holland, Netherlands
1627
1627
Age 32
Leyden, Zuid, Holland, Netherlands
1629
May 6, 1629
Age 34
Leyden, Zuid, Holland, Netherlands
1633
April 24, 1633
Age 38
Leiden, South Holland, The Netherlands
1634
1634
Age 39
Leiden, South Holland, Netherlands
1636
1636
- 1636
Age 41
New York, New York County, New York, United States

Attempts at earlier settlement on the northern end of Manhattan Island had proved futile but began in earnest with the arrival of Hendrick (Henry) de Forest, his brother Isaac de Forest and their sister and brother-in-law, Rachel and Dr. Jean Mousnier De La Montagne, Franco-Dutch immigrants in 1636.

1637
January 25, 1637
Age 42
off the coast of Madeira, Portuguese island in the Atlantic