Johan Andersson // Stålkofta (Steelcoat) // Stalcop

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Johan Andersson (Stalcop)

Nicknames: "Stålkofta (Steel jacket)", "Jan Stalcop", "John Anderson"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Strengnäs, Södermanland, Sweden
Death: Died in New Castle, New Castle, Delaware, United States
Place of Burial: Old Swedish Burying Ground, Fort Christina, New Castle, Delaware, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Andres Andriessen and Christina Andriessen
Husband of Kerstin / Christina Carlsdotter
Father of Anders (Andrew) Stalcop; Charles Johansson Stalcop; Mary Stedham; John Stalcop; Peter Stalcop and 2 others

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Johan Andersson (Stalcop)

http://www.colonialswedes.org/Forefathers/Stalcop.html

Progenitor of the Stalcup line in America. A qualifying New Sweden Forefather.3 Also called Johan Andersson von Strengnis. Gunner Johan Andersson Stalcop was born in 1627 at Strängnäs, Södermanland, Sweden. (38 miles west of Stockholm).4 He was hired by Måns Kling to go to New Sweden as a farm hand circa 1640 at Strängnäs, Södermanland, Sweden.4 He sailed from Stockholm aboard the "Charitas" for Gothenburg on 3 May 1641.4 He continued his journey to the Colony when his ship joined company with the "Kalmar Nyckel" in July 1641.4 He arrived in the New World on 7 November 1641 at Fort Christina, Delaware.4 He was hired in the capacity of a soldier for Governor Printz on 1 October 1646.4,5 He lived circa 1653 at Fort Christina, New Castle County, Delaware.5 As of 1654, also called Johan Anderson Stålkofta , or steel jacket. This was his nickname, and referred to the metal armor that soldiers, like he, wore. He was promoted while in the service of the new Governor, Rising, to the position of gunner, an occupation which may have led to his wearing a piece of armor called a breastplate, which probably explains the nickname of "Stälkofta" (steel coat in Swedish) by which he was usually called in Swedish records. His promotion in 1654.4,5 He served as gunner during the Dutch invasion, temporarily sent to the Fort to help bolster its defense, in 1655 at Fort Trefaldighet (Trinity), New Castle, Delaware.4 He married Christina Carlsdotter, daughter of Carl Jönsson, circa 1656 at Fort Christina, New Sweden Colony. Gunner Johan Andersson Stalcop was under Dutch rule, a farmer and landowner, acquiring land and eventually owning the greater part of the land now occupied by the City of Wilmington after 1656 at Delaware.4

""Johan Anderssen, a gunner nicknamed Stalkofta, or the Steelcoat, and John Coleman, wirepuller from behind the scenes, were members of the inner circle. Each had secret motives. Just as Armegot (Armegot Printz, daughter of Governor Johan Printz) wished to recover Big Belly's (Johan Printz) brewery and to regain his pleasure yacht, so Anderssen and Coleman, none too succesful farmers, coveted the estates of Englishmen. The Steelcoat, it was whispered, looked lecherously at lovely ladies and dallied with the thought that he could have a harem. His trim, gold-laced uniform, especially designed to set off his best features and to divert attention from a certain physical peculiarity, was always glittering where the women of the colony were wont to congregate. It was, in fact, his longing for the wives of other men that first caused his fellows to band together for the overthrow of Jacobsen's intrigue." (Henry Emerson Wildes, The Delaware, New York, 1940, pg. 35)."

""The plan of rebellion came to the ears of the English authorities before it's execution, and Marcus Jacobsen was apprehended and placed in prison to await trail." (Harry G. Staulcup, Notes on the Early Stalcop Family in Delaware, 1946, p. 11)."

(an unknown value) between 1669 and 18 October 1669 at the Long Finn Rebellion, Delaware. He was a participant in what was called the "Long Finn Rebellion", for which Long Finn (Marcus Jacobsen) was whipped, branded, and removed from the colony, and John Stalcop paid the largest fine of all the others at 1,500 Guilders between 1669 and 18 October 1669.6 He sold one-half of his Christina plantation, perhaps to recover from the incredibly stiff fine incurred during the Long Finn Rebellion, to Samuel Petersson and Lars Corneliusson on 10 October 1674 at Christina, Delaware.5 He was a witness where Samuel Petersson purchaser of one-half of John Anderson Stalcup's plantation on 10 October 1674 at Christina, Delaware.7 Gunner Johan Andersson Stalcop was granted 600 acres on the east side of Red Clay Creek for himself and eight children in 1677 at New Castle County, Delaware.5 He left a will on 29 August 1679; His will made bequests to his wife, Christina Carlsdotter, and seven children.5 He was naturalized by William Penn on 21 February 1682/83.5 He died circa 1685 at Delaware Colony, New Castle County, Delaware. Gunner Johan Andersson Stalcop was buried in the Old Swedish Burying Ground, Fort Christina, Delaware.4

Citations

1. [S28] Letter, Stephen J. Stalcup to Robert Stewart, 1998.

2. [S41] ., Jones, E. E., Pgs 1-14, (1).

3. [S342] NSF, online http://www.colonialswedes.org

4. [S339] Larry S. Stallcup, "J. A. Stålcop".

5. [S428] J.D. Peter Stebbins Craig, Census 1693 (of Swedes), pg. 91.

6. [S428] J.D. Peter Stebbins Craig, Census 1693 (of Swedes), pg. 91 . (B. Frenow, Documents of the Dutch and Swedish Settlements, Albany, 1877, pp. 469-470).

7. [S428] J.D. Peter Stebbins Craig, Census 1693 (of Swedes), pg. 95-96.

8. [S428] J.D. Peter Stebbins Craig, Census 1693 (of Swedes), #165.

http://www.southern-style.com/Stalcop.htm

I am grateful to Larry Stallcup for his corrections and input on this very interesting line. I am including his email verbatum to make sure his corrections are recorded accurately. Please note his invitation for descendants to join The Swedish Colonial Society.

Larry S. Stallcup

Forefather Member, Swedish Colonial Society

1436 Lakeview Drive

Virginia Beach, VA 23455


Generation No. 1

1. JOHAN ANDERSSON1 STALCOP was born 1627 in in Str©Pngn©Ps, S©œdermanland, Sweden, and died February 08, 1685/86 in in New Castle County, Delaware. He married CHRISTINA (CARLSDOTTER) JONSSON, daughter of CARL J©NSSON.

Notes for JOHAN ANDERSSON STALCOP:

In 1646 he began a military career as "The Gunner" for New Sweden. Hewas frequently identified as Stalkofta or Steelcoat (the one who wears armor). This was anglicanized to the many versions of the Stalcup name.

Event: see notes Interesting Note:

His will made bequests to his wife, Christina Carlsdotter, and

seven children

Event: STALCUP FAMILY HISTORY (see notes) Interesting Note:

All Stalcops are descended from a Swedish immigrant named JohanAndersson. Johan was born about 1627 at Strängnäs, Sweden. He was hired by Måns Kling to plant tobacco in the Upland, Sweden area. Helater emigrated to America May 3, 1641 aboard the “Charitas” with 35other people. He was to have a salary of 10 R.A. a year and he received 10 D. copper money on departing. The ship arrived in Novemberat Fort Christina, New Sweden Sweden after the 6 month voyage and was one of the first ships to colonize the Atlantic coast of North America. He worked as a servant here for 5 years until age 19.

From Oct. 1, 1646 to Sept. 1, 1653 Johan served as Gunnery Sergaeant for New Sweden at Tinicum. He was one of 15 officers for a contingent of probably 70 soldiers. Armor had all but disappeared by this time because it was heavy, cumbersome, and mostly ineffective. The men who fired cannons, however, found it useful to continue using the breastplate since it provided protection from the powder flash. Johan apparently wore his armor all the time and because of this he was frequently identified as Stalkofta or Steelcoat (the one who wears armor). This was later anglicized to the many variations of the Stalcop surname. In 1653, Printz resigned as Governor and returned to Sweden, ending Johan’s military career.

In 1656, the “Mercurius” arrived with many Finnish immigrants including Christina Carlsdotter. She married our John Anderson soon after arriving. By 1677, John had become father to eight children who had all taken the Stalcop name.

Colonial Conflicts

In 1654, the Swedes expelled the Dutch from Ft. Casimir near what isnow New Castle. In retaliation, a Dutch force led by Peter Stuyvesant arrived at Fort Christina in 1655 with several hundred men and occupied this “South River” territory. It became part of the greater New Netherlands territories. Peter quickly returned to Manhattan, NewYork to defend the Dutch colonists there from an Indian uprising. Heappointed Jean Paul Jacquet as Vice-Director. Jean’s descendents were to later become involved with the Stalcop family. Jean’s first court session was held 1655 and the first matter to be considered concerned our Johan.

“The commandant, Dirick Smit (the Dutch military commander), appears to petition for a certain table and wardrobe which he allegedly bought from the gunnery segeant, Jan Staelcop; the aforesaid gunnery sergeant was heard and declared to have sold the same to him, and whereas theaforesaid Dirck Smit was offered payment for the table to be used by the vice-director, he would not, however, give up what belonged to him.”

This account is confusing but it appears our Johan was mentioned only to prove ownership issues. Smit had bought these items from Johan and they were then simply taken from him by Jacquet for his own persona luse. Smit refused later offer for payment and wanted the return of both pieces of furniture. This was the first of many problems Jacquet was to cause and he eventually lost his job because of such acts.

Other court cases very clearly show that Johan had wasted no time atall in making the most of his new opportunities available under Dutch rule. Within a year he had formed partnerships and was taking an active part in the business affairs of the community.

In 1664, New Netherlands was seized by the English. This territory became part of the lands held by the Duke of York. Johan resisted authority by becoming involved in an ill-fated attempt against English rule on the Delaware. This insurrection was led by a Finn in 1669 and became known as the Long Finn Rebellion.

"Johan Anderssen and John Coleman were members of the inner circle. Each had secret motives. None too successful farmers, they coveted the estate of Englishmen. The Steelcoat, it was whispered, looked lecherously at lovely ladies and dallied with the thought that hecould have a harem. His trim, gold-laced uniform [the one he wouldn'tgive up], especially designed to set off his best features and todivert attention from a certain physical peculiarity [what could this be?], was always glittering where the women of the colony were wont to congregate. It was, in fact, his longing for the wives of other men that first caused his fellows to band together for overthrow."

The plan of rebellion came to the ears of the English authorities before its execution, and the leader Marcus Jacobsen was apprehendedand placed in prison to await trial. The punishment for the "simplersorts" was requested as labor. Johan was to be secured in like manner as the lone Swede, since he was perceived as a chief instigator of this tragedy.

The trial was held quickly and the prisoners were sentenced. The Long Finn was sentenced to be whipped, branded on the face, and transported from the colony. The rest of the prisoners were fined. Heading this list was Johan Andersson, whose fine was 1500 guilders.

In 1682, the Duke of York conveyed his lands to William Penn. Immediately, the inhabitants of the Delaware territories were invited to take an oath of allegiance to the new form of government. Johantook this oath in 1683 along with several other members of his family.

Colonial Growth

Surprisingly, it was after the British takeover and failed revolt that Johan came to most prominence. The Stalcop families would maintain central roles during the colonial period throughout the bay area in Delaware, New Jersey, and Maryland. Family members were large landowners and operated businesses that were vital to the community. By the time of the American Revolution there were no Stalcops found in Delaware. Perhaps due to these Loyalist political leanings, they had decided to move to more hospitable locations. Most of the Stalcops moved westward prior to 1800 and in years following have settled in nearly every state throughout the United States.

Johan was engaged in an assortment of business ventures. A grant ofland from the Dutch vice-director and the help of two other investorsprovided the backing to build a grist mill between 1658-1662 at"Turtle Falls-kil". This business stayed in the Stalcop family forthree generations. Many land transfers and transactions were recorded during these years for Johan. The most lucrative was the eight hundred acres of land on which Wilmington, Delaware now stands; granted by theDuke of York to Johan about 1671.

Johan died about 1684 and his wife, Christina, died before 1697. By the time of his death he and his children were permanently known as Stalcop. Apparently, the continued allegiance to his military uniformwas reason enough for Johan Anderson to take his Stalkoft nicknameand anglicize it to John Stalcop. Most families bearing the Stalcop name today (or one of the many variations including Stalcup, Stallcup,Staulcup, Stallcop ) are descendants of this man (a few German immigrants may have taken this name in the late 1800’s). Stalcop seemsto be the most common spelling today in the U.S. and is used as the spelling throughout most of this article. However, research on any member of this family will almost certainly reveal many various spellings that can be found for just that one person.

From the second generation through the fifth the Stalcop family was very active in the affairs of the Old Swedes’ Church. A portion of the land on which to build the church was given by John Stalcop Jr.Various other family members, from time to time, worked on the church or donated money and materials. John Stalcop later sold land for the glebe of the new church. There are many references in the records ofthe Old Swedes’ Church concerning the Stalcop family. There aretwenty-three known Stalcop burials in the churchyard. Since the site of the church was the site of the Swedish burial ground perhaps even Johan Anderson Stalkofta is also buried somewhere nearby. Old Swedes’Church has been designated as a National Historical Site. Regula rservices are still held there. The church is now in the care of the Holy Trinity (Old Swedes’) Foundation.

summarized story by Neal Ekengren.

History of Stalcop Research

The records of the Stalcup Reunions held in Greene County, Indiana1919 through 1941 have proven invaluable.

L.D. Stallcup’s Outline of the Stallcup Family, 1937, was the firstknown published study of the Stalcup family. It charts the first six generations of Stalcups in the United States.


Larry Stallcup has kindly offered some corrections to the above chronicle: As all of his comments are insightful and informative, I have included his email as it was written to me with my thanks.

Larry S. Stallcup

Forefather Member, Swedish Colonial Society

1436 Lakeview Drive

Virginia Beach, VA 23455

His information ont he Stallcup family was originally published in Swedish Colonial News,

Volume 1, Number 4 (Fall 1991).

Dear Sharman,

Revising your Stalcop family write-up has turned out to be far more difficult than I though it would be. Some parts are not difficult, such as revising the death date for Pietter, but other items cause problems.

Consider, for example, the name of Johan Anderson’s wife. Swedish women did not change names when they married nor were they ever known by their father’s patronymic. Johan Anderson’s wife therefore is properly known as Christina Carlsdotter. She was never known by the name of Jönnson. By the way Carl Jönnson was later known as “Charles Johnson”.

Some apparently minor items have recently been discovered to have an extensive stories behind them. Johan’s starting salary is a good example.

I had never been able to figure out what the abbreviation of R.A. meant in terms of Swedish money so last October I had the opportunity to consult with two experts from Sweden. They determined that a translation error had occurred (in 1911) and the original text read “R.D.” or Riksdalers. At the time a Riksdaler copper money was worth about two Dalers copper money.

This discovery led to the question of why Johan would be advanced half of his annual salary before he had ever worked a day. The answer to that question turned out to be that he was advanced the money to buy clothing and supplies for the voyage before the ship sailed as he would not be paid any money once he arrived in New Sweden and such things were not yet available in the Colony. That answer raised more questions.

Turns out that no hard currency was ever sent to New Sweden. The people were expected to ‘live off the land’ and barter with the Dutch, English or Indians for anything they needed. To collect your pay you first had to return to Sweden and file a petition. Of course the Company kept a set of books wherein the value of everything used or consumed (food, clothing and even rental of farm animals) was carefully recorded. Your accumulated charges were then deducted from your pay.

Now, consider the implications of that in Johan Anderson’s case.

He had been in the Colony for 14 years but had never been paid anything except the original 10 dalers. His salary during the final year was set at 144 dalers. The problem was that he had to go back to Sweden even to petition for his back pay. The colony had just been lost to the Dutch by Governor Risingh who was trying desperately to deflect all attention away from himself. Risingh therefore placed blame on all of the officers at Fort Trinity for the lost of the entire colony and stated that as soon as they returned to Sweden he was going to have they tried by a court-martial.

After 14 years of hard work, five as a farm hand and nine as a soldier, our Johan Anderson Stålkofta found himself stone cold broke with no possibility whatsoever of ever collecting any of his back pay. Just to make things a bit worse his assigned house and garden just outside of Fort Christina had been destroyed during the Dutch siege. No wonder he was selling his furniture.

I corrected the reference to riksdalers but to add in details like the above, and dozens of other stories like it, would burden the intent of your brief summary story.

I rewrote the first portion of your story with the corrections I think should be made but I only marked with underlining those parts I think should be totally deleted. I did this so that you may know the parts of the story that are false.

Regards,

Larry Stallcup

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1. JOHAN ANDERSON STALCOP was born about 1627 in Sweden, and died about June 1685, New Castle County, Delaware. He married CHRISTINA CARLSDOTTER, the daughter of CARL JÖNSSON.

Event: STALCUP FAMILY HISTORY (see notes) Interesting Note:

All Stalcops everywhere, no matter how they spell the surname, are descended from a Swedish immigrant named Johan Anderson. Johan was born about 1627 somewhere in Sweden. He was hired in Strängnäs, Sweden, by Måns Kling to go to America and be a farm worker in the New Sweden Colony. He sailed May 3, 1641 aboard the ship Charitas. H e was to have a salary of 10 riksdalers per year and he was paid 10 dalers copper money, about half of his annual pay just before departing. The ship arrived in November at Fort Christina, New Sweden after the 6-month voyage. He served as a farm worker for five years until about the age of 19. On October 1, 1646, he hired into the military detachment of the colony as a soldier. He was one member in a contingent that probably never exceeded 70 soldiers.

He acquired his nickname soon after becoming a soldier. It probably was a reference to a piece of plate body armor he likely bartered from English traders. There is no record of plate armor being shipped from Sweden to the New Sweden Colony but the English in Virginia did import plate armor. Body armor had all but disappeared by the early Seventeenth Century because it was heavy, cumbersome, and mostly ineffective, especially against a firearm. The men who fired cannons, however, found it useful to continue using the piece called a breastplate since it provided burn protection from the powder flash when heavy weapons were fired. Nicknames were more or less a necessity in the Swedish community because of the patronymic naming system in use. There were nine men in the New Sweden community plus two Dutchmen in the area all with the name of Johan Anderson. One of these was Johan Anderson, Soldat, already in the military unit. Our Johan Anderson is consistently identified in the colony's records prior to his becoming a soldier as Johan Anderson von Strängnäs. The nickname he adopted was ‘Stålkofta’ soon after hiring into the military. In Swedish ‘stål’ means steel and ‘kofta’ means jacket or short coat. A ’stålkofta’ was a garment worn mostly by Swedish nobles. It was made of chain mail and usually was the middle layer in a personal body armor system. Chain mail was completely unknown in New Sweden therefore the reference in this case must have been to a piece of plate armor. Stålkofta is usually translated today as ‘steelcoat’. After becoming a soldier our Johan Anderson became known as “the Steelcoat”. He was trained to be a gunner and rose to the rank of Constaple (gunnery sergeant).

After passing through the Dutch language as ‘Staelcop’, a phonic transliteration rather than a translation of the meaning of the words, this Swedish nickname, ‘Stålkofta’, became the English ‘Stalcop’. In turn this is the basis for all of the current spellings of the name. It became a family surname simply because the English forced everyone to adopt a surname after their custom.

Colonial Conflicts:

In 1653 Johan Printz resigned as Governor and returned to Sweden. He was replaced by Governor Johan Risingh. In 1654 upon arrival and before he even landed at Fort Christina Risingh expelled the Dutch from Ft. Cassimir near what is now the town of New Castle. The next year a large Dutch force led by Peter Stuyvesant arrived in the South River and forced the surrender of Governor Risingh and the entirety of the New Sweden Colony. Stuyvesant quickly returned to New Amsterdam to defend the Dutch colonists there from an Indian uprising. He appointed Jean Paul Jacquet as Vice-Director on the South River. Jacquet’s first court session was held 1655 and the first matter to be considered before the court involved Johan Anderson Stålkofta. The Dutch military commander, Dirck Smit, appeared to petition for a certain table and wardrobe which he allegedly bought from the gunnery sergeant, Jan Staelcop, the aforesaid gunnery sergeant, was heard and declared to have sold the same to him, and whereas the aforesaid Dirck Smit was offered payment for the table to be used by the vice-director, he would not, however, give up what belonged to him. Smith had purchased these items from Stålkofta and they were then simply taken from him by Vice-Director Jacquet for his own personal use. Smit refused the later offer by Jacquet for payment for the table alone made and wanted an order from the court for the return of both pieces of furniture.

Other early Dutch court cases very clearly show that Johan had wasted no time at all in making the most of his new opportunities available under Dutch rule. Within a year he had formed partnerships and was taking an active part in the business affairs of the community.

In 1664, the English seized New Netherlands. The Delaware territory then became part of the lands held by the Duke of York. In 1669 Johan Anderson becoming involved in an ill-fated event known as the Long Finn Rebellion and was heavily fined. There was no actual rebellion or insurrection. Several Englishmen overheard some drunken rabble rousing between a man named Marcus Jacobson and Armagot Printz, the daughter of the former governor, Johan Printz. The English allowed their paranoia to take hold and simply arrested everyone in sight. Trials were held and all but two were fined.

The entire story underlined below is a complete fabrication by a modern writer who was trying to “spice up” an otherwise dull story so that he might sell more copies of his book. It must be deleted because it is totally false.

"Johan Anderssen and John Coleman were me mbers of the inner circle. Each had secret motives. None too successful farmers, they covete d theestate of Englishmen. The Steelcoat, it was whispered, looked lecherously at lovely ladie s and dallied with the thought that hecould have a harem. His trim, gold-laced uniform [the o ne he wouldn'tgive up], especially designed to set off his best features and todivert attenti on from a certain physical peculiarity [what could thisbe?], was always glittering where th e women of the colony were wont tocongregate. It was, in fact, his longing for the wives of o ther menthat first caused his fellows to band together for overthrow."The plan of rebellio n came to the ears of the English authorities before its execution, and the leader Marcus Jacobsen was apprehended and placed in prison to await trial. The punishment for the "simpler sorts " was requested as labor. Johan was to be secured in like manner as the lone Swede, since he w as perceived as a chief instigator of this tragedy.

Marcus Jacobson, called by the English the Long Finn, was sentenced to be whipped, branded on the face with the letter “R” and transported from the colony. This last means that he was taken to Barbados and sold into slavery in South America. Everyone else except Armagot Printz was fined. She was ignored. There is some evident to suggest that the fines were set at one-half of each person's property (land). Johan Anderson appears on several lists of those fined with an amount of 1500 Dutch guilders. This may be an estimate of the value of one-half of his property for he soon sold one-half of his land. The actual division of the land involved in this sale was not made until after is death.

In 1682, the Duke of York conveyed his lands to William Penn. Immediately the inhabitants of the Delaware territories were invited to take an oath of allegiance to the Penn form of government. Johan took this oath in 1683 along with three of his sons.

The stories underlined below are quite inaccurate and greatly confused fact with fantasy. They must be deleted. There is no evidence whatsoever that any Stalcop was a Loyalist. In fact, a number actively fought against the British. The Stalcop families moved out of Delaware in the general exodus of all of the Swedish and Dutch families mostly between 1755 and 1770. About half of the families went west toward the Ohio River and about half went south into North Carolina. There are almost no land transfer records existing that date during Johan Anderson's lifetime. The one concerning the grist mill is merely a mention in a letter found in the New York State Archives.

Colonial Growth: Surprisingly, it was after the British takeover and failed revolt that Johan came to most prominence. The Stalcop families would maintain central ro les during the colonial period throughout the bay area in Delaware, New Jersey, and Maryland . Family members were large landowners and operated businesses that were vital to the community. By the time of the American Revolution there were no Stalcops found in Delaware. Perhaps due to these Loyalist political leanings, they had decided to move to more hospitable locations . Most of the Stalcops moved westward prior to 1800 and in years following have settled in nearly every state throughout the United States. Johan was engaged in an assortment of business v entures. A grant of land from the Dutch vice-director and the help of two other investors provided the backing to build a grist mill between 1658-1662 at "Turtle Falls-kil". This business stayed in the Stalcop family for three generations. Many land transfers and transactions were recorded during these years for Johan. The most lucrative was the eight hundred acres of land o n which Wilmington, Delaware now stands; granted by the Duke of York to Johan about 1671.

Johan died about June 1685 and his wife, Christina, died before 1697. By the time of his death all of his children were permanently known as Stalcop. All family members bearing the Stalcop surname today (or one of the many spelling variations including Stalcup, Stallcup, Staulcup, Stallcop) are descendants of this man. Stalcup seems to be the most numerous spelling today. Stalcop is used as the spelling throughout most of this article because it is the first English spelling. Research on any member of the family will almost certainly reveal many spellings variations.

From the second generation through the fifth the Stalcop family was very active in the affairs of the Holy Trinity (Old Swedes) Church. A portion of the land on which to build the church was given by John Stalcop. Various other family members, from time to time, worked on the church or donated money and materials. John Stalcop later sold land for the glebe of the new church. There are many references in the records of the Old Swedes Church concerning the Stalcop family. There are twenty-three known Stalcop burials in the churchyard. Since the site of the church was the near the site of the old Swedish burial ground perhaps even Johan Anderson Stålkofta and Christina Carlsdotter are also buried somewhere nearby. Holy Trinity (Old Swedes) Church has been designated as a National Historical Site. Regular services are still held there. The church began as a Swedish Lutheran Church but is now an Episcopal Church.

  • *********************************************************************

Don’t know what to suggest abut the text below as I do not understand it purpose or intent.

summarized story by Neal Ekengren .History of Stalcop Research The records of the Stalcup Reunions held in Greene County, Indiana1919 through 1941 have proven invaluable. L.D. Stallcups Outline of the Stallcup Family , 1937, was the first known published study of the Stalcup family. It charts the first six generations of Stalcups in the United States. General Harry Garwood Staulcup, wrote a thesis for a requirement for a Masters Degree at the University of Delaware in 1946. It includes the early history of the Stalcops in Delaware and lists five generations. Stalcup Family History 1641-1986 (3 vols) was authored by Earl E. Jones after more than 20 years of research. This is still the definitive Stalcop reference and is the largest family history ever published in Tennessee. It contains over 5,000 names. It has consolidated the previous Stalcop references and incorporated extensive additional research from many collaborators. Sources at Balch Institute Library, Philadelphia, PA (also containing references to a second Johan Andersson which are easily confused) Rulle der V©œlcker So in New Schweden den 1 Marty Anno 1648 [Role List of South Company - all adult males in order of arrival] Monat Gelder Buch [Governor Printzs monthly account book listing employees] Another book which has greatly confused Stalco presearch is The Delaware Finns, E.A. Louhi, 1925, Humana Press. This book, a total fraud, apparently retrieved facts from many sources and than changed attribution to Finns. It also, claims that our Johan Anderson died from drowning while a young boy in Sweden.

[NO. Louie claimed that our Johan Anderson Stålkofta was the same person as Johan the Finn who drown trying to cross a stream in 1644 in New Sweden.}

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The text underlined below should be deleted as it mostly duplicates the text above.

Many thanks to La rry S. Stallcup for pulling together many parts ofthis research. Much of the story here is hi s account. His version of this story is copied below:_______________________________________ ____________________________________Johan Anderson St©Ælcopby Larry S. Stallcup Forefathe r Member, Swedish Colonial Society1436 Lakeview Drive Virginia Beach, VA 23455originally p ublished in Swedish Colonial News,Volume 1, Number 4 (Fall 1991)Johan Anderson of Str©Png n©Ps, S©œdermanland, Sweden, was just a young boy of perhaps 13 or 14 when he was hired by M©Æn s Kling to go to New Sweden as a farm hand. He sailed May 3, 1641, from Stockholm aboard the Charitas for Gothenburg, where his ship joined company with theK almar Nyckel. The two ships departed for the Colony in July and arrived at Fort Christina November 7,1641. Johan Anderson was soon at work and, with the arrival of Governor Printz in 1643, he became one of the first tobacco planters at Upland (now Chester).At about the age of 19, Johan Anderson was hired b y Governor Printz to be a soldier. With the arrival of Governor Rising in 1654, he was promote d to the position of gunner, an occupation which may have ledto his wearing a piece of armo r called a breastplate, which probably explains the nickname of "St©Plkofta" (steel coat in Swe dish) by whichhe was usually called in Swedish records. During the Dutch invasion in1655, Joh an Sf©Plkofta was the gunner at Fort Trefaldighet (Trinity) at present New Castle. His nickname soon appeared phonetically in Dutchrecords as "Staelcop" and later passed into English reco rds as"Stalcop." This last version became the basis for the surnames adoptedby all of his descendants (Stallcop, Stallcup, Staulcup, Stalcup).Under Dutch rule Johan Anderson St©ÆIcop b egan acquiring land and eventually owned the greater part of the land now occupied by the City of Wilmington. He married Christina Carlsdotter, the daughter of CarlJ©œnsson. Carl J©œnsson an d his family, from Letstigen in southeasternV©Prmland, Sweden, arrived on the Mercurius, the l ast expedition to the colony, which reached the Delaware River in 1656 after New Sweden had fallen to the Dutch. Johan Anderson and Christina Carlsdotter established their home only abou t 400 paces (approximately one-quarter mile) west from Fort Christina. Their seven known child ren and their approximate year of birth were:1. Anders (Andrew), born 1656, who married Catharine (parents unknown)and had five children before his death c. 1692.2. Charles, born 165 8 and died, unmarried, in 1692.3. Daughter (name unknown), born 1660, who was the first wif e of Lulof Stedham, and had three children before her death c. 1691. After her death, Lulof Stedham married Catharine, the widow of Andrew Stalcop.4. John, born 1662, married Annika (daughter of Johan Ericksson). John Stalcop played a large role in the building of Holy Trinity (O ld Swedes') Church by providing some of the land (inherited from his father) where the church i s built. Later he sold some 250 acres of land to the church for a glebe. John died unexpectedl y 1700. He and Annika had four children.5. Peter, born 1664, married Catharine (daughter o f Samuel Petersson). Peter operated a large plantation on Red Clay Creek. He died in 1710,survived by six children. [ Our families descend from Peter]6. Mary, born 1666, married John Hance Steelman. They had at least four children.7. Jonas, born 1669, was unmarried and apparently died about 1690.Johan Anderson St©Plcop died in 1685 and Christina Carlsdotter died about a decade later. They probably were buried in the Old Swedish Burying Ground near old Fort Christina which later became part of the graveyard of Holy Trinity (Old Swedes') Church. Toda y their descendants comprise one of the largest single family units in America.

The entirety of Footnote 1 should be deleted as it is false.

1Father: Andres ANDRIESSEN </cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2102216&id=I955> b: ABT 1585 in Sweden

Mother: Christina COOLBRANDT </cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2102216&id=I956> b: ABT 1589 i n SwedenMarriage 1 Christina (Carlsdotter) JONSSON </cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2102216&id= I945> b: ABT 1638 in Finland

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Christina Carlsdotter was likely born about 1640-42 in Sweden but she was born to Finnish parents. Her family may have lived in Sweden for several generations.

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Married: ABT 1656 in Fort Christina, New Sweden Colony

Children

Anders STALCOP b: 1657 in the Colony of the Company, South River

Carl STALCOP b: ABT 1658 in the Colony of the Company, South River

Unknown daughter STALCOP b: ABT 1661 in the Colony of the Company, South River

John STALCOP < b: ABT 1662 in the Colony of the Company, South River

Peter STALCOP b: ABT 1664 in the Colony of the Company, South River

Maria STALCOP b: ABT 1665 in New Castle County , Pennsylvania Colony

Jonas STALCOP b: ABT 1669 in New Castle County , Pennsylvania Colony

Sources:

Abbrev: Johan Anderson St©ÆlcopTitle: Johan Anderson St©Ælcopby Larry S. Stallcup Forefather Member, Swedish Colonial Society1436 Lakeview Drive Virginia Beach, VA 23455originally published in Swedish Colonial News,Volume 1, Number 4 (Fall 1991)

More About JOHAN ANDERSON STALCOP:

Fact 1: 1685, Old Swedish Burying Ground, Fort Christina, Delaware

Notes for CHRISTINA CARLSDOTTER:

1656 New Sweden Colony, Fort Christina, Delaware with her parents and two siblings

More About CHRISTINA CARLSDOTTER:

Fact 1: Old Swedish Burying Ground, Fort Christina, Delaware

Child of JOHAN STALCOP and CHRISTINA JONSSON is:

2. i. PETER2 STALCOP, b. Abt. 1664, in New Castle County, Delaware; d. September 5, 1709 New Castle County, Delaware.

General Harry Garwood Staulcup, wrote a thesis for a requirement for a Masters Degree at the University of Delaware in 1946. It includes the early history of the Stalcops in Delaware and lists five generations.

Stallcop Family History and Genealogy 1641-1986 (3 vols) was authoredby Earl E. Jones after more than 20 years of research. This is still the definitive Stalcop reference and is the largest family historyever published in Tennessee. It contains over 5,000 names. It has consolidated the previous Stalcop references and incorporated extensive additional research from many collaborators.

Sources at Balch Institute Library, Philadelphia, PA (also containing references to a second Johan Andersson which are easily confused)

Rulle der Völcker So in New Schweden den 1 Marty Anno 1648 [Role Listof South Company - all adult males in order of arrival]

Monat Gelder Buch [Governor Printz’s monthly account book listingemployees]

Another book which has greatly confused Stalcop research is The Delaware Finns, E.A. Louhi, 1925, Humana Press. This book, a total fraud, apparently retrieved facts from many sources and than changedattribution to Finns. It also, claims that our Johan Andersson died from drowning while a young boy in Sweden.

Many thanks to Larry S. Stallcup for pulling together many parts of this research. Much of the story here is his account. His version ofthis story is copied below:

___________________________________________________________________________

Johan Andersson Stålcop

by Larry S. Stallcup

Forefather Member, Swedish Colonial Society

1436 Lakeview Drive

Virginia Beach, VA 23455

originally published in Swedish Colonial News,

Volume 1, Number 4 (Fall 1991)

Johan Andersson of Strängnäs, Södermanland, Sweden, was just a youngboy of perhaps 13 or 14 when he was hired by Måns Kling to go to NewSweden as a farm hand. He sailed May 3, 1641, from Stockholm aboardthe Charitas for Gothenburg, where his ship joined company with theKalmar Nyckel. The two ships departed for the Colony in July andarrived at Fort Christina November 7,1641. Johan Andersson was soon atwork and, with the arrival of Governor Printz in 1643, he became oneof the first tobacco planters at Upland (now Chester).

At about the age of 19, Johan Andersson was hired by Governor Printzto be a soldier. With the arrival of Governor Rising in 1654, he waspromoted to the position of gunner, an occupation which may have ledto his wearing a piece of armor called a breastplate, which probablyexplains the nickname of "Stälkofta" (steel coat in Swedish) by whichhe was usually called in Swedish records. During the Dutch invasion in1655, Johan Sfälkofta was the gunner at Fort Trefaldighet (Trinity) atpresent New Castle. His nickname soon appeared phonetically in Dutchrecords as "Staelcop" and later passed into English records as"Stalcop." This last version became the basis for the surnames adoptedby all of his descendants (Stallcop, Stallcup, Staulcup, Stalcup).

Under Dutch rule Johan Andersson StåIcop began acquiring land and eventually owned the greater part of the land now occupied by the City of Wilmington. He married Christina Carlsdotter, the daughter of CarlJönsson. Carl Jönsson and his family, from Letstigen in southeastern Värmland, Sweden, arrived on the Mercurius, the last expedition to the colony, which reached the Delaware River in 1656 after New Sweden hadfallen to the Dutch.

Johan Andersson and Christina Carlsdotter established their home only about 400 paces (approximately one-quarter mile) west from Fort Christina. Their seven known children and their approximate year of birth were:

1. Anders (Andrew), born 1656, who married Catharine (parents unknown)and had five children before his death c. 1692.

2. Charles, born 1658 and died, unmarried, in 1692.

3. Daughter (name unknown), born 1660, who was the first wife of LulofStedham, and had three children before her death c. 1691. After herdeath, Lulof Stedham married Catharine, the widow of Andrew Stalcop.

4. John, born 1662, married Annika (daughter of Johan Ericksson). JohnStalcop played a large role in the building of Holy Trinity (OldSwedes') Church by providing some of the land (inherited from hisfather) where the church is built. Later he sold some 250 acres ofland to the church for a glebe. John died unexpectedly 1700. He andAnnika had four children.

5. Peter, born 1664, married Catharine (daughter of Samuel Petersson).Peter operated a large plantation on Red Clay Creek. He died in 1710,survived by six children. [ Our families descend from Peter]

6. Mary, born 1666, married John Hance Steelman. They had at leastfour children.

7. Jonas, born 1669, was unmarried and apparently died about 1690.

Johan Andersson Stälcop died in 1685 and Christina Carlsdotter diedabout a decade later. They probably were buried in the Old SwedishBurying Ground near old Fort Christina which later became part of thegraveyard of Holy Trinity (Old Swedes') Church. Today theirdescendants comprise one of the largest single family units inAmerica.

1

Father: Andres ANDRIESSEN </cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2102216&id=I955> b: ABT 1585 in Sweden

Mother: Christina COOLBRANDT </cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2102216&id=I956> b: ABT 1589 in Sweden

Marriage 1 Christina (Carlsdotter) JONSSON </cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2102216&id=I945> b: ABT 1638 in Finland

Married: ABT 1656 in Fort Christina, New Sweden Colony

Children

Anders STALCOP </cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2102216&id=I957> b: 1657 in New Castle County, Delaware Colony

Carl STALCOP </cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2102216&id=I1011> b: ABT 1658 in New Castle County, Delaware Colony

Unknown STALCOP </cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2102216&id=I1012> b: ABT 1661 in New Castle County, Delaware Colony

John STALCOP </cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2102216&id=I1017> b: ABT 1662 in New Castle County, Delaware Colony

Peter STALCOP </cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2102216&id=I936> b: ABT 1664 in New Castle County, Delaware

Maria STALCOP </cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2102216&id=I1045> b: ABT 1665 in New Castle County, Delaware Colony

Jonas STALCOP </cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2102216&id=I1050> b: ABT 1669 in New Castle County, Delaware Colony

Sources:

Abbrev: Johan Andersson Stålcop

Title: Johan Andersson Stålcop

by Larry S. Stallcup

Forefather Member, Swedish Colonial Society

1436 Lakeview Drive

Virginia Beach, VA 23455

originally published in Swedish Colonial News,

Volume 1, Number 4 (Fall 199





In 1646 he began a military career as "The Gunner" for New Sweden. Hewas frequently identifie d as Stalkofta or Steelcoat (the one who wears armor). This was anglicanized to the many vers ions of the Stalcup name.

Event: see notes Interesting Note:

His will made bequests to his wife, Christina Carlsdotter, andseven children

Event: STALCUP FAMILY HISTORY (see notes) Interesting Note:

All Stalcops are descended from a Swedish immigrant named JohanAndersson. Johan was born abou t 1627 at Str©Pngn©Ps, Sweden. He was hired by M©Æns Kling to plant tobacco in the Upland, Swede n area. Helater emigrated to America May 3, 1641 aboard the Charitas with 35other people. H e was to have a salary of 10 R.A. a year and he received 10 D. copper money on departing. Th e ship arrived in Novemberat Fort Christina, New Sweden Sweden after the 6 month voyage and w as one of the first ships to colonize the Atlantic coast of North America. He worked as a ser vant here for 5 years until age 19.From Oct. 1, 1646 to Sept. 1, 1653 Johan served as Gunne ry Sergaeant for New Sweden at Tinicum. He was one of 15 officers for a contingent of probabl y 70 soldiers. Armor had all but disappeared by this time because it was heavy, cumbersome, a nd mostly ineffective. The men who fired cannons, however, found it useful to continue usin g the breastplate since it provided protection from the powder flash. Johan apparently wore h is armor all the time and because of this he was frequently identified as Stalkofta or Steelc oat (the one who wears armor). This was later anglicized to the many variations of the Stalco p surname. In 1653, Printz resigned as Governor and returned to Sweden, ending Johans milita ry career.In 1656, the Mercurius arrived with many Finnish immigrants including Christin a Carlsdotter. She married our John Anderson soon after arriving. By 1677, John had become fa ther to eight children who had all taken the Stalcop name.Colonial ConflictsIn 1654, th e Swedes expelled the Dutch from Ft. Casimir near what isnow New Castle. In retaliation, a Du tch force led by Peter Stuyvesant arrived at Fort Christina in 1655 with several hundred me n and occupied this South River territory. It became part of the greater New Netherlands te rritories. Peter quickly returned to Manhattan, NewYork to defend the Dutch colonists there f rom an Indian uprising. Heappointed Jean Paul Jacquet as Vice-Director. Jeans descendents we re to later become involved with the Stalcop family. Jeans first court session was held 165 5 and the first matter to be considered concerned our Johan.The commandant, Dirick Smit (t he Dutch military commander), appears to petition for a certain table and wardrobe which he a llegedly bought from the gunnery segeant, Jan Staelcop; the aforesaid gunnery sergeant was he ard and declared to have sold the same to him, and whereas theaforesaid Dirck Smit was offere d payment for the table to be used by the vice-director, he would not, however, give up wha t belonged to him.This account is confusing but it appears our Johan was mentioned only t o prove ownership issues. Smit had bought these items from Johan and they were then simply ta ken from him by Jacquet for his own persona luse. Smit refused later offer for payment and wa nted the return of both pieces of furniture. This was the first of many problems Jacquet wa s to cause and he eventually lost his job because of such acts.

Other court cases very clearly show that Johan had wasted no time atall in making the most o f his new opportunities available under Dutch rule. Within a year he had formed partnership s and was taking an active part in the business affairs of the community.In 1664, New Nethe rlands was seized by the English. This territory became part of the lands held by the Duke o f York. Johan resisted authority by becoming involved in an ill-fated attempt against Englis h rule on the Delaware. This insurrection was led by a Finn in 1669 and became known as the L ong Finn Rebellion."Johan Anderssen and John Coleman were members of the inner circle. Eac h had secret motives. None too successful farmers, they coveted the estate of Englishmen. Th e Steelcoat, it was whispered, looked lecherously at lovely ladies and dallied with the thoug ht that hecould have a harem. His trim, gold-laced uniform [the one he wouldn'tgive up], espe cially designed to set off his best features and todivert attention from a certain physical p eculiarity [what could this be?], was always glittering where the women of the colony were wo nt to congregate. It was, in fact, his longing for the wives of other men that first caused h is fellows to band together for overthrow."The plan of rebellion came to the ears of the En glish authorities before its execution, and the leader Marcus Jacobsen was apprehendedand pla ced in prison to await trial. The punishment for the "simplersorts" was requested as labor. J ohan was to be secured in like manner as the lone Swede, since he was perceived as a chief in stigator of this tragedy.The trial was held quickly and the prisoners were sentenced. The Lo ng Finn was sentenced to be whipped, branded on the face, and transported from the colony. Th e rest of the prisoners were fined. Heading this list was Johan Andersson, whose fine was 150 0 guilders.In 1682, the Duke of York conveyed his lands to William Penn. Immediately, the in habitants of the Delaware territories were invited to take an oath of allegiance to the new f orm of government. Johantook this oath in 1683 along with several other members of his family .Colonial GrowthSurprisingly, it was after the British takeover and failed revolt that Jo han came to most prominence. The Stalcop families would maintain central roles during the col onial period throughout the bay area in Delaware, New Jersey, and Maryland. Family members we re large landowners and operated businesses that were vital to the community. By the time o f the American Revolution there were no Stalcops found in Delaware. Perhaps due to these Loya list political leanings, they had decided to move to more hospitable locations. Most of the S talcops moved westward prior to 1800 and in years following have settled in nearly every stat e throughout the United States.

Johan was engaged in an assortment of business ventures. A grant ofland from the Dutch vice- director and the help of two other investorsprovided the backing to build a grist mill betwee n 1658-1662 at"Turtle Falls-kil". This business stayed in the Stalcop family forthree generat ions. Many land transfers and transactions were recorded during these years for Johan. The mo st lucrative was the eight hundred acres of land on which Wilmington, Delaware now stands; gr anted by theDuke of York to Johan about 1671.Johan died about 1684 and his wife, Christina , died before 1697. By the time of his death he and his children were permanently known as St alcop. Apparently, the continued allegiance to his military uniformwas reason enough for Joha n Anderson to take his Stalkoft nicknameand anglicize it to John Stalcop. Most families beari ng the Stalcop name today (or one of the many variations including Stalcup, Stallcup,Staulcup , Stallcop ) are descendants of this man (a few German immigrants may have taken this name i n the late 1800s). Stalcop seemsto be the most common spelling today in the U.S. and is use d as the spelling throughout most of this article. However, research on any member of this fa mily will almost certainly reveal many various spellings that can be found for just that on e person.From the second generation through the fifth the Stalcop family was very active i n the affairs of the Old Swedes Church. A portion of the land on which to build the church w as given by John Stalcop Jr.Various other family members, from time to time, worked on the ch urch or donated money and materials. John Stalcop later sold land for the glebe of the new ch urch. There are many references in the records ofthe Old Swedes Church concerning the Stalco p family. There aretwenty-three known Stalcop burials in the churchyard. Since the site of th e church was the site of the Swedish burial ground perhaps even Johan Anderson Stalkofta is a lso buried somewhere nearby. Old SwedesChurch has been designated as a National Historical S ite. Regula rservices are still held there. The church is now in the care of the Holy Trinit y (Old Swedes) Foundation.summarized story by Neal Ekengren.History of Stalcop Research The records of the Stalcup Reunions held in Greene County, Indiana1919 through 1941 have prov en invaluable.L.D. Stallcups Outline of the Stallcup Family, 1937, was the firstknown publ ished study of the Stalcup family. It charts the first six generations of Stalcups in the Uni ted States.


Larry Stallcup has kindly offered some corrections to the above chronicle: As all of his com ments are insightful and informative, I have included his email as it was written to me wit h my thanks.

Larry S. StallcupForefather Member, Swedish Colonial Society1436 Lakeview DriveVirginia B each, VA 23455His information ont he Stallcup family was originally published in Swedish Co lonial News,Volume 1, Number 4 (Fall 1991).

Dear Sharman,Revising your Stalcop family write-up has turned out to be far more difficul t than I though it would be. Some parts are not difficult, such as revising the death date fo r Pietter, but other items cause problems. Consider, for example, the name of Johan Anderso ns wife. Swedish women did not change names when they married nor were they ever known by th eir fathers patronymic. Johan Andersons wife therefore is properly known as Christina Carls dotter. She was never known by the name of J©œnnson. By the way Carl J©œnnson was later known a s Charles Johnson.Some apparently minor items have recently been discovered to have an ex tensive stories behind them. Johans starting salary is a good example. I had never been ab le to figure out what the abbreviation of R.A. meant in terms of Swedish money so last Octobe r I had the opportunity to consult with two experts from Sweden. They determined that a trans lation error had occurred (in 1911) and the original text read R.D. or Riksdalers. At the t ime a Riksdaler copper money was worth about two Dalers copper money. This discovery led t o the question of why Johan would be advanced half of his annual salary before he had ever wo rked a day. The answer to that question turned out to be that he was advanced the money to bu y clothing and supplies for the voyage before the ship sailed as he would not be paid any mon ey once he arrived in New Sweden and such things were not yet available in the Colony. That a nswer raised more questions. Turns out that no hard currency was ever sent to New Sweden. T he people were expected to live off the land and barter with the Dutch, English or Indian s for anything they needed. To collect your pay you first had to return to Sweden and fil e a petition. Of course the Company kept a set of books wherein the value of everything use d or consumed (food, clothing and even rental of farm animals) was carefully recorded. Your a ccumulated charges were then deducted from your pay. Now, consider the implications of tha t in Johan Andersons case. He had been in the Colony for 14 years but had never been pai d anything except the original 10 dalers. His salary during the final year was set at 144 dal ers. The problem was that he had to go back to Sweden even to petition for his back pay. Th e colony had just been lost to the Dutch by Governor Risingh who was trying desperately to de flect all attention away from himself. Risingh therefore placed blame on all of the officer s at Fort Trinity for the lost of the entire colony and stated that as soon as they returne d to Sweden he was going to have they tried by a court-martial.After 14 years of hard work , five as a farm hand and nine as a soldier, our Johan Anderson St©Ælkofta found himself ston e cold broke with no possibility whatsoever of ever collecting any of his back pay. Just to m ake things a bit worse his assigned house and garden just outside of Fort Christina had bee n destroyed during the Dutch siege. No wonder he was selling his furniture. I corrected th e reference to riksdalers but to add in details like the above, and dozens of other stories l ike it, would burden the intent of your brief summary story. I rewrote the first portion o f your story with the corrections I think should be made but I only marked with underlining t hose parts I think should be totally deleted. I did this so that you may know the parts of th e story that are false. Regards,Larry Stallcup****************************************** **************1. JOHAN ANDERSON STALCOP was born about 1627 in Sweden, and died about Jun e 1685, New Castle County, Delaware. He married CHRISTINA CARLSDOTTER, the daughter of CARL J ©NSSON.Event: STALCUP FAMILY HISTORY (see notes) Interesting Note:All Stalcops everywhere , no matter how they spell the surname, are descended from a Swedish immigrant named Johan An derson. Johan was born about 1627 somewhere in Sweden. He was hired in Str©Pngn©Ps, Sweden, b y M©Æns Kling to go to America and be a farm worker in the New Sweden Colony. He sailed May 3 , 1641 aboard the ship Charitas. H e was to have a salary of 10 riksdalers per year and he wa s paid 10 dalers copper money, about half of his annual pay just before departing. The ship a rrived in November at Fort Christina, New Sweden after the 6-month voyage. He served as a far m worker for five years until about the age of 19. On October 1, 1646, he hired into the mili tary detachment of the colony as a soldier. He was one member in a contingent that probably n ever exceeded 70 soldiers. He acquired his nickname soon after becoming a soldier. It proba bly was a reference to a piece of plate body armor he likely bartered from English traders. T here is no record of plate armor being shipped from Sweden to the New Sweden Colony but the E nglish in Virginia did import plate armor. Body armor had all but disappeared by the early Se venteenth Century because it was heavy, cumbersome, and mostly ineffective, especially agains t a firearm. The men who fired cannons, however, found it useful to continue using the piec e called a breastplate since it provided burn protection from the powder flash when heavy wea pons were fired. Nicknames were more or less a necessity in the Swedish community because o f the patronymic naming system in use. There were nine men in the New Sweden community plus t wo Dutchmen in the area all with the name of Johan Anderson. One of these was Johan Anderson , Soldat, already in the military unit. Our Johan Anderson is consistently identified in th e colony's records prior to his becoming a soldier as Johan Anderson von Str©Pngn©Ps. The nickn ame he adopted was St©Ælkofta soon after hiring into the military. In Swedish st©Æl means s teel and kofta means jacket or short coat. A st©Ælkofta was a garment worn mostly by Swedi sh nobles. It was made of chain mail and usually was the middle layer in a personal body armo r system. Chain mail was completely unknown in New Sweden therefore the reference in this cas e must have been to a piece of plate armor. St©Ælkofta is usually translated today as steelco at. After becoming a soldier our Johan Anderson became known as the Steelcoat. He was trai ned to be a gunner and rose to the rank of Constaple (gunnery sergeant). After passing thro ugh the Dutch language as Staelcop, a phonic transliteration rather than a translation of t he meaning of the words, this Swedish nickname, St©Ælkofta, became the English Stalcop. I n turn this is the basis for all of the current spellings of the name. It became a family sur name simply because the English forced everyone to adopt a surname after their custom. Colo nial Conflicts: In 1653 Johan Printz resigned as Governor and returned to Sweden. He was re placed by Governor Johan Risingh. In 1654 upon arrival and before he even landed at Fort Chri stina Risingh expelled the Dutch from Ft. Cassimir near what is now the town of New Castle. T he next year a large Dutch force led by Peter Stuyvesant arrived in the South River and force d the surrender of Governor Risingh and the entirety of the New Sweden Colony. Stuyvesant qui ckly returned to New Amsterdam to defend the Dutch colonists there from an Indian uprising. H e appointed Jean Paul Jacquet as Vice-Director on the South River. Jacquets first court sess ion was held 1655 and the first matter to be considered before the court involved Johan Ander son St©Ælkofta. The Dutch military commander, Dirck Smit, appeared to petition for a certain t able and wardrobe which he allegedly bought from the gunnery sergeant, Jan Staelcop, the afor esaid gunnery sergeant, was heard and declared to have sold the same to him, and whereas th e aforesaid Dirck Smit was offered payment for the table to be used by the vice-director, h e would not, however, give up what belonged to him. Smith had purchased these items from St©Æl kofta and they were then simply taken from him by Vice-Director Jacquet for his own persona l use. Smit refused the later offer by Jacquet for payment for the table alone made and wante d an order from the court for the return of both pieces of furniture. Other early Dutch cou rt cases very clearly show that Johan had wasted no time at all in making the most of his ne w opportunities available under Dutch rule. Within a year he had formed partnerships and wa s taking an active part in the business affairs of the community. In 1664, the English seiz ed New Netherlands. The Delaware territory then became part of the lands held by the Duke o f York. In 1669 Johan Anderson becoming involved in an ill-fated event known as the Long Fin n Rebellion and was heavily fined. There was no actual rebellion or insurrection. Several Eng lishmen overheard some drunken rabble rousing between a man named Marcus Jacobson and Armago t Printz, the daughter of the former governor, Johan Printz. The English allowed their parano ia to take hold and simply arrested everyone in sight. Trials were held and all but two wer e fined. The entire story underlined below is a complete fabrication by a modern writer wh o was trying to spice up an otherwise dull story so that he might sell more copies of his b ook. It must be deleted because it is totally false."Johan Anderssen and John Coleman wer e me mbers of the inner circle. Each had secret motives. None too successful farmers, they co vete d theestate of Englishmen. The Steelcoat, it was whispered, looked lecherously at lovel y ladie s and dallied with the thought that hecould have a harem. His trim, gold-laced unifor m [the o ne he wouldn'tgive up], especially designed to set off his best features and todiver t attenti on from a certain physical peculiarity [what could thisbe?], was always glitterin g where th e women of the colony were wont tocongregate. It was, in fact, his longing for th e wives of o ther menthat first caused his fellows to band together for overthrow."The plan o f rebellio n came to the ears of the English authorities before its execution, and the leade r Marcus Jacobsen was apprehended and placed in prison to await trial. The punishment for th e "simpler sorts " was requested as labor. Johan was to be secured in like manner as the lon e Swede, since he w as perceived as a chief instigator of this tragedy. Marcus Jacobson, ca lled by the English the Long Finn, was sentenced to be whipped, branded on the face with th e letter R and transported from the colony. This last means that he was taken to Barbados a nd sold into slavery in South America. Everyone else except Armagot Printz was fined. She wa s ignored. There is some evident to suggest that the fines were set at one-half of each perso n's property (land). Johan Anderson appears on several lists of those fined with an amount o f 1500 Dutch guilders. This may be an estimate of the value of one-half of his property for h e soon sold one-half of his land. The actual division of the land involved in this sale was n ot made until after is death. In 1682, the Duke of York conveyed his lands to William Penn . Immediately the inhabitants of the Delaware territories were invited to take an oath of all egiance to the Penn form of government. Johan took this oath in 1683 along with three of hi s sons. The stories underlined below are quite inaccurate and greatly confused fact with f antasy. They must be deleted. There is no evidence whatsoever that any Stalcop was a Loyalist . In fact, a number actively fought against the British. The Stalcop families moved out of De laware in the general exodus of all of the Swedish and Dutch families mostly between 1755 an d 1770. About half of the families went west toward the Ohio River and about half went sout h into North Carolina. There are almost no land transfer records existing that date during Jo han Anderson's lifetime. The one concerning the grist mill is merely a mention in a letter fo und in the New York State Archives.Colonial Growth: Surprisingly, it was after the Britis h takeover and failed revolt that Johan came to most prominence. The Stalcop families would m aintain central ro les during the colonial period throughout the bay area in Delaware, New Je rsey, and Maryland . Family members were large landowners and operated businesses that were v ital to the community. By the time of the American Revolution there were no Stalcops found i n Delaware. Perhaps due to these Loyalist political leanings, they had decided to move to mor e hospitable locations . Most of the Stalcops moved westward prior to 1800 and in years follo wing have settled in nearly every state throughout the United States. Johan was engaged in a n assortment of business v entures. A grant of land from the Dutch vice-director and the hel p of two other investors provided the backing to build a grist mill between 1658-1662 at "Tur tle Falls-kil". This business stayed in the Stalcop family for three generations. Many land t ransfers and transactions were recorded during these years for Johan. The most lucrative wa s the eight hundred acres of land o n which Wilmington, Delaware now stands; granted by the D uke of York to Johan about 1671.Johan died about June 1685 and his wife, Christina, died b efore 1697. By the time of his death all of his children were permanently known as Stalcop. A ll family members bearing the Stalcop surname today (or one of the many spelling variations i ncluding Stalcup, Stallcup, Staulcup, Stallcop) are descendants of this man. Stalcup seems t o be the most numerous spelling today. Stalcop is used as the spelling throughout most of thi s article because it is the first English spelling. Research on any member of the family wil l almost certainly reveal many spellings variations. From the second generation through th e fifth the Stalcop family was very active in the affairs of the Holy Trinity (Old Swedes) Ch urch. A portion of the land on which to build the church was given by John Stalcop. Various o ther family members, from time to time, worked on the church or donated money and materials . John Stalcop later sold land for the glebe of the new church. There are many references i n the records of the Old Swedes Church concerning the Stalcop family. There are twenty-thre e known Stalcop burials in the churchyard. Since the site of the church was the near the sit e of the old Swedish burial ground perhaps even Johan Anderson St©Ælkofta and Christina Carlsd otter are also buried somewhere nearby. Holy Trinity (Old Swedes) Church has been designate d as a National Historical Site. Regular services are still held there. The church began a s a Swedish Lutheran Church but is now an Episcopal Church.******************************** **************************************Dont know what to suggest abut the text below as I d o not understand it purpose or intent.summarized story by Neal Ekengren .History of Stalco p Research The records of the Stalcup Reunions held in Greene County, Indiana1919 through 194 1 have proven invaluable. L.D. Stallcups Outline of the Stallcup Family , 1937, was the firs t known published study of the Stalcup family. It charts the first six generations of Stalcup s in the United States. General Harry Garwood Staulcup, wrote a thesis for a requirement fo r a Masters Degree at the University of Delaware in 1946. It includes the early history of th e Stalcops in Delaware and lists five generations. Stalcup Family History 1641-1986 (3 vols ) was authored by Earl E. Jones after more than 20 years of research. This is still the defin itive Stalcop reference and is the largest family history ever published in Tennessee. It con tains over 5,000 names. It has consolidated the previous Stalcop references and incorporate d extensive additional research from many collaborators. Sources at Balch Institute Library , Philadelphia, PA (also containing references to a second Johan Andersson which are easily c onfused) Rulle der Vb¿lcker So in New Schweden den 1 Marty Anno 1648 [Role List of South Comp any - all adult males in order of arrival] Monat Gelder Buch [Governor Printzs monthly accoun t book listing employees] Another book which has greatly confused Stalco presearch is The Del aware Finns, E.A. Louhi, 1925, Humana Press. This book, a total fraud, apparently retrieved f acts from many sources and than changed attribution to Finns. It also, claims that our Joha n Anderson died from drowning while a young boy in Sweden. [NO. Louie claimed that our Joha n Anderson St©Ælkofta was the same person as Johan the Finn who drown trying to cross a strea m in 1644 in New Sweden.}******************************************************************* **The text underlined below should be deleted as it mostly duplicates the text above.Man y thanks to La rry S. Stallcup for pulling together many parts ofthis research. Much of the s tory here is hi s account. His version of this story is copied below:________________________ _______________ ____________________________________Johan Anderson Stb©lcop by Larry S. Stallcup Forefathe r Member, Swedish Colonial Society1436 Lakeview Drive Virginia Beach, VA 23455 originally published in Swedish Colonial News,Volume 1, Number 4 (Fall 1991)Johan Anderson of StrbPng nbPs, Sb¿dermanland, Sweden, was just a young boy of perhaps 13 or 14 when he was hired by Mb©ns Kling to go to New Sweden as a farm hand. He sailed May 3, 1641, from Stockhol m aboard the Charitas for Gothenburg, where his ship joined company with the Kalmar Nyckel. The two ships departed for the Colony in July and arrived at Fort Christina November 7,1641. Johan Anderson was soon at work and, with the arrival of Governor Printz in 1643, he became on e of the first tobacco planters at Upland (now Chester).At about the age of 19, Johan Anderson was hired b y Governor Printz to be a soldier. With the arrival of Governor Rising in 1654 , he was promoted to the position of gunner, an occupation which may have led to his wearing a piece of armor called a breastplate, which probably explains the nickname of "StbPlkofta " (steel coat in Swedish) by which he was usually called in Swedish records. During the Dutch invasion in1655, Johan SfbPlkofta was the gunner at Fort Trefaldighet (Trinity) at present New Castle. His nickname soon appeared phonetically in Dutch records as "Staelcop" and later passed into English records as "Stalcop." This last version became the basis for the surnames adopted by all of his descendants (Stallcop, Stallcup, Staulcup, Stalcup). Under Dutch rule Johan Anderson Stb©Icop began acquiring land and eventually owned the greater part of the land now occupied by the City of Wilmington. He married Christina Carlsdotter, the daughte r of Carl b¿nsson. Carl Jb¿nsson and his family, from Letstigen in southeastern VbPrmland, Sweden, arrived on the Mercurius, the last expedition to the colony, which reached the Delaware River in 1656 after New Sweden had fallen to the Dutch. Johan Anderson and Christina Carlsdotter established their home only about 400 paces (approximately one-quarter mile) west from Fort Christina. Their seven known children and their approximate year of birth were:1. Anders (Andrew), born 1656, who married Catharine (parents unknown)and had five children befor e his death c. 1692.2. Charles, born 165 8 and died, unmarried, in 1692.3. Daughter (name unknown), born 1660, who was the first wif e of Lulof Stedham, and had three children before he r death c. 1691. After her death, Lulof Stedham married Catharine, the widow of Andrew Stalco p.4. John, born 1662, married Annika (daughter of Johan Ericksson). John Stalcop played a large role in the building of Holy Trinity (Old Swedes') Church by providing some of the land ( inherited from his father) where the church is built. Later he sold some 250 acres of land to the church for a glebe. John died unexpectedly 1700. He and Annika had four children.5. Pe ter, born 1664, married Catharine (daughter of Samuel Petersson). Peter operated a large plantation on Red Clay Creek. He died in 1710,survived by six children. [ Our families descend from Peter]6. Mary, born 1666, married John Hance Steelman. They had at least four children. Jonas, born 1669, was unmarried and apparently died about 1690.Johan Anderson Stalcop died in 1685 and Christina Carlsdotter died about a decade later. They probably were buried in t he Old Swedish Burying Ground near old Fort Christina which later became part of the graveyar d of Holy Trinity (Old Swedes') Church. Toda y their descendants comprise one of the largest single family units in America.The entirety of Footnote 1 should be deleted as it is fal se.1Father: Andres ANDRIESSEN </cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2102216&id=I955> b: ABT 1585 i n Sweden

Mother: Christina COOLBRANDT </cgi-bin


Notes for CHRISTINA (CARLSDOTTER) JONSSON:

1656 New Sweden Colony, Fort Christina, Delaware with her parents and two siblings


Child of JOHAN STALCOP and CHRISTINA JONSSON is:

2. i. PETER2 STALCOP, b. Abt. 1664, in New Castle County, Delaware; d. April 10, 1710, New Castle County, Delaware.


Generation No. 2

2. PETER2 STALCOP (JOHAN ANDERSSON1) was born Abt. 1664 in in New Castle County, Delaware, and died April 10, 1710 in New Castle County, Delaware. He married CATHARINA (SAMUELSDOTTER) PETERSSON 1683 in Fort Christina, New Castle County, Delware, daughter of SAMUEL PETERSSON and BRITA JONSDOTTER.


Child of PETER STALCOP and CATHARINA PETERSSON is:

3. i. JOHN3 STALCOP, b. 1692, New Castle County, Delaware; d. June 24, 1751, New Castle County, Delaware.


Generation No. 3

3. JOHN3 STALCOP (PETER2, JOHAN ANDERSSON1) was born 1692 in New Castle County, Delaware, and died June 24, 1751 in New Castle County, Delaware. He married MARIA MORTON 1710 in in Old Swedes Church, Wilmington, Delaware, daughter of MATTHIAS MORTON and ANNA GUSTAFSON.


Child of JOHN STALCOP and MARIA MORTON is:

4. i. PETER4 STALCOP, b. 1712, New Castle County, Delaware; d. July 19, 1768, New Castle County, Delaware.


Generation No. 4

4. PETER4 STALCOP (JOHN3, PETER2, JOHAN ANDERSSON1) was born 1712 in New Castle County, Delaware, and died July 19, 1768 in New Castle County, Delaware. He married SUSANNA PAULSON 1716 in Old Swedes Church, Wilmington, Delaware, daughter of OLOF PAULSON.


Children of PETER STALCOP and SUSANNA PAULSON are:

i. SWITHIN5 STALCOP, b. New Castle County, Delaware.

ii. JOHN STALCOP, b. April 22, 1739, New Castle County, Delaware.

iii. WILLIAM STALCOP, b. May 27, 1741, New Castle County, Delaware.

iv. TOBIAS STALCOP, b. August 01, 1743, New Castle County, Delaware.

5. v. RACHEL STALCOP, b. August 01, 1749, Wilmington (New Castle County) Delaware.

vi. LYDIA STALCOP, b. June 11, 1752, New Castle County, Delaware.

vii. SUSANNA STALCOP, b. August 10, 1754, New Castle County, Delaware.

viii. PETER STALCOP, b. January 21, 1757, New Castle County, Delaware.


Generation No. 5

5. RACHEL5 STALCOP (PETER4, JOHN3, PETER2, JOHAN ANDERSSON1) was born August 01, 1749 in Wilmington (New Castle County) Delaware. She married ISAAC BRACKIN August 31, 1769, son of JOHN BRACKIN and CATHERINE ADAMS.


Notes for ISAAC BRACKIN:

Isaac is listed as head of household in the 1790 Census for Chatham District, Orange Co., pag e 1294. He is listed with 2 polls, 477 acres in this Tax List.

Isaac Brackin m. Rachel Stalcop August 31, 1769 in Wilmington (New Castle County) Delaware, da ughter of Peter Stalcop and Susanna Paulson. She diedDec. 19, 1830. He was the son of John Brackin d. April 24, 1770 in Orange County, N. C.. He married (1) Unknown. He married (2) Cather ine Adams Sept. 19, 1751 in Wilmington (New Castle County), Delaware. Children ofJohn and Unkn own were: James Brackin b. 1730, William Brackin d. 1808,Sumner County, Tenn., Thomas Bracki n d. Sept. 17, 1793, Rowan Co., N.C., John Brackin, Isaac Brackin, Samuel Brackin, Mary Bracki n b. 1742, d.March 13, 1817, Russel Co., Virginia. Isaac is listed as head ofhousehold in th e 1790 Census for Chatham District, Orange Co., page 1294.He is listed with 2 polls, 477 acre s in this Tax List. John Brackin'sparents were William Bracken b. 1671 and died Dec. 28, 174 9 in Wilmington(New Castle County) Delaware. He married Hannah Booker January 26,1691/92 in S laidburn (Yorkshired) England. She was born 1677. Theirchildren were John Brackin, Thomas Bra ckin, Henry Brackin, HannahBrackin, Margaret Brackin, Martha Brackin, Susanna Brackin. Willia msBracken's parents were Thomas Bracken b. 1631 and died 1683. Thomasmarried 1(1) Margaret Bl easdale June 11, 1662 in Lancaster, England and(2) Ellen Aft. September 1671. He wrote his wi ll Nov. 15, 1682. In it henamed his son Robert, his three children Henry, William, and Elizab eth,His wife Ellen, and Robert Croshell, her son. He named his son Robertexecutor. Thomas wa s Baptised Feb. 22, 1630/31, Parish Church of Melling(Lancaster Co., England). He was Burie d Feb. 06, 1682/83, Melling(Lancaster County) England. Margaret was buried September 09, 1671 ,Melling, England. Thomas Bracken's parents were Robert Bracken d. 1637.He married Margaret . He was buried April 02, 1637 at Melling, England. Hedied without a willso his wifewas the o nly one listed in the settlementpapers. Their children were Thomas Bracken b. 1631, d. 1683 , ChristopherBracken b. 1626 d. 1632, William Bracken b. 1628, d. 1699, Agnes Brackenb. 1633 . Robert's parents were William and Unknown. William wrote hiswill June 06, 1634. He requeste d in his will to be buried in the Mellingchurch yard as near his wife as possible. HE COULD H AVE TOLD US HER NAMEIF HE LOVED HER SO MUCH. He lists his five children in his will: Robertd . 1637, Isabella m. Leonard Townson, William, Elizabeth m. Rigge, AnnBracken. This info cam e from Dr. Brackin's book and from Kathy Stickneywho visit the Melling Churchlast year and go t to hold many of the Brackenpapers for baptism, etc.

I hope this helps, Cousin. I am the same line.

Charlotte Miller cbmiller@mail.com


Children of RACHEL STALCOP and ISAAC BRACKIN are:

i. MATTHIAS6 BRACKIN.

6. ii. CHARLOTTE BRACKIN, b. September 20, 1828, Alabama; d. October 20, 1888, Dale County, Alabama Claybank Cemetery.


Generation No. 6

6. CHARLOTTE6 BRACKIN (RACHEL5 STALCOP, PETER4, JOHN3, PETER2, JOHAN ANDERSSON1) was born September 20, 1828 in Alabama, and died October 20, 1888 in Dale County, Alabama Claybank Cemetery. She married JOHN DOWLING January 10, 1841, son of DEMPSEY DOWLING and MARTHA STOKES.


Children of CHARLOTTE BRACKIN and JOHN DOWLING are:

i. SAMUEL LAWSON7 DOWLING, m. SARAH J. WINDHAM.

ii. ELISHA MATHIAS C. DOWLING, m. TANSY J. BRITT.

iii. LACY ANN LUIZA DOWLING, m. JOHN C. PARKER.

iv. NANCY JANE DOWLING, m. JOHN F. MCDONALD.

v. JARRETT MALONE DOWLING, m. ELLA CRIS.

vi. LOUIS LAWRENCE DOWLING, m. IDA CONNELLY.

vii. JOHN PARROTT DOWLING.

viii. GEORGE WASHINGTON DOWLING, m. MOLLIE CARROLL.

7. ix. NOEL BAXTER DOWLING, b. August 15, 1853, Ozark, Alabama Dale County; d. March 28, 1915, Alabama, buried at Claybank Cemetery.


Generation No. 7

7. NOEL BAXTER7 DOWLING (CHARLOTTE6 BRACKIN, RACHEL5 STALCOP, PETER4, JOHN3, PETER2, JOHAN ANDERSSON1) was born August 15, 1853 in Ozark, Alabama Dale County, and died March 28, 1915 in Alabama, buried at Claybank Cemetery. He married ELIZABETH WELLS (LIZZIE E. WELLS) May 1874, daughter of EBEN WELLS and TAMSEY JOHNSON.

Notes for NOEL BAXTER DOWLING:

Ramsey house on Alice Street was town house for Pinckard residence forNoel Dowling.



Children of NOEL DOWLING and ELIZABETH WELLS) are:

i. RAY A.8 DOWLING, m. CONA ALENE YORK.

ii. HEYWOOD HART DOWLING.

iii. LOTTIE BEA DOWLING, m. CHARLES D. MURPHY , SR..

iv. CORA LEE DOWLING, b. 1877, Ozark, Al Dale County; d. Dothan, Alabama, City Cemetery; m. RICHARD HAWTHORNE RAMSEY, June 1966.

Notes for CORA LEE DOWLING:

1 AUTH Dothan, August 28, 1958



Notes for RICHARD HAWTHORNE RAMSEY:

1 AUTH bookkeeper for railroad

1 AGNC moved to Dothan June 8, 1988


v. CARROW DEE DOWLING, b. June 30, 1879, Ozark, Alabama; d. August 15, 1963, Jacksonville, Florida; m. CHARLES ERVIN MCCARN , JR., June 17, 1902, Alabama.

view all 11

Johan Andersson // Stålkofta (Steelcoat) // Stalcop's Timeline

1627
1627
Strengnäs, Södermanland, Sweden
1656
1656
Age 29
New Castle, Delaware, United States
1656
Age 29
Ft.Christina, New Sweden Colony, United States
1658
1658
Age 31
New Castle, Delaware Colony, United States
1661
1661
Age 34
New Castle, Delaware Colony, United States
1662
1662
Age 35
New Castle, New Castle, Delaware, United States
1664
1664
Age 37
1664
Age 37
Christinia, New Castle, Delaware
1669
1669
Age 42
1685
February 8, 1685
Age 58
New Castle, New Castle, Delaware, United States