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John Arnold

Birthplace: England
Death: Died in Hartford,Hartford,Connecticut
Place of Burial: Hartford,Hartford,CT
Immediate Family:

Son of Nicholas Thomas Arnold and Alice Arnold
Husband of 2nd wife after 1631 not Susan; Elizabeth and Susannah Arnold
Father of Josiah Arnold; John Arnold; Sarah Arnold; Miss Arnold; Mary Buck and 3 others
Brother of Thomasine Hacker; Joanna Hopkins; Margery Barnard (Arnold); Joanna Dudley; William Arnold and 6 others
Half brother of Nicholas Arnold; Eleanor Arnold; Elizabeth Arnold, of Ilchester; Unnamed Arnold and Thomas Arnold (Not an Immigrant)

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About John Arnold

Biographical Summary:

John Arnold, freeman, Cambridge, May 6,1635; an original proprietor of Hartford, received sixteen acres in the division of 1639-40, when a lot was given him on the south side of the road leading from George Steele's to the south meadow. He died December, 1664; inventory December 26, 1664, £105. 10. His widow, Susannah, was one of the original members of the South Church.


i. Josiah, Hartford, freeman, 1657.

ii. Joseph, freeman, 1658; one of the first settlers of Haddam;

iii. Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel Wakeman, of Hartford; died October 22,1691.

iii. John.

iv. Daniel, freeman, 1665; died May 10, 1691, leaving wife and child.

v. daughter married _________ Buck.

vi. daughter

SOURCE: James Hammond Trumbull, editor, The memorial history of Hartford County, Connecticut, 1633-1884, Volume 1 (Boston, Massachusetts: Edward L. Osgood, 1886), pages 228-229. Retrieved: 3 May 2011 from Google Books

Alt. d.o.d. December 30, 1664

___________________________________________________ The following list of those who were members of the Newtown congregation, and are thought to have removed in Hooker's company, makes no pretense of being other than what a careful and unprejudiced study of the records seems to the author to warrant. It includes those who probably secured lots at Suckiaug in 1635, and returned to Newtown. The order follows the list of proprietors of Hartford, except as to Thomas Hooker himself.

Mr. Thomas Hooker, Mr. Mathew Allyn, John Talcott, James Olmsted, William Wadsworth, William Lewis, Tim- othy Stanley, Edward Stebbins, John Pratt, William Ruscoe, James Ensign, John Hopkins, George Steele, Stephen Post, Thomas Judd, Thomas Lord, Sen., John Stone, Richard Lord, John INlaynard, Jeremy Adams, Samuel Greenhill, Robert Day, Nathaniel Richards, Joseph Mygatt, Richard Butler, John Arnold, Thomas Bull, George Stocking, Seth Grant, Richard Olmsted, Joseph Easton, Clement Chaplinp., Thomas Lord, Jr., John Olmsted and Samuel Whitehead.


drews, 30; Samuel Wakeman, 30; Jeremy Adams, 30; Richard Lyman, 30; William Butler, 28; Thomas Lord, 28; Mathew Marvin, 28; Gregory Wolterton, 28; Andrew Bacon, 28; Richard Goodman, 26; Nathaniel Richards, 26; John Pratt, 26; Thomas Birch wood, 26; George Steele, 26; John Barnard, 24; James Ensign, 24; John Hopkins, 24; Stephen Post, 24; Edward Stebbins, 24; George Grave, 24; John Clarke, 22; William Gibbons, 20; John Crow, 20; Thomas Judd, 20; William Hills, 20; George Stocking, 20; Joseph Mygatt, 20; Nathaniel Ely, 18; Richard Lord, 18; William Hyde, 18; William Kelsey, 16; John Arnold, 16; William Blumfield, 16; Richard Butler, 16; Arthur Smith, 14; Robert Day, 14; John Maynard, 14; Seth Grant, 14; William Hayden, 14; Thomas Spencer, 14; Thomas Stanton, 14; John Baysey, 14; John Wilcox, 13; John Marsh, 12; William Parker, 12; Nicholas Clarke, 12; Thomas Bull, 12; John Higginson, 12; William Holton, 12; Edward Elmer, 12; Francis Andrews, 12; Richard Church, 12; James Cole, 10; Zachary Field, 10; John Skinner, 10; Joseph Easton, 10; Thomas Hale, 10; Richard Olmsted, 10; Samuel Hale, 8; Richard Risley, 8; Thomas Olcott, 8; Robert Bartlett, 8; Thomas Selden, 6; Thomas Root, 6; William Pratt, 6. — Total, 95.

The Names of such Inhabitants as were Granted Lots to have only at the towns courtesy, with liberty to fetch wood and keep swine or cows by proportion on the common.



The Founders of Hartford

Here are the 163 men and women listed in the Book of Distribution of Land as being those who settled in Hartford before February 1640. Their names are on a monument in Hartford's Ancient Burying Ground. Click on each of these names for more information about the person.

Click here for an informational list of later settlers who lived in Hartford in the 17th century, but are not considered Founders of Hartford.

listed : John Arnold Source:

_____________________ Founders of Hartford The following is a list of names of the Founders of Hartford that are engraved on the Founders Monument in the Ancient Burying Ground, also sometimes referred to as the "Old" or "Center" Cemetery. The original brownstone Monument erected in 1837 was replaced by one of pink Connecticut granite in 1986. The cemetery is located at the rear of the First Congregational ("Center") Church at the corner of Main and Gold Streets in Hartford. Jeremy Adams Matthew Allyn William Andrews John Arnold Andrew Bacon John Barnard Robert Bartlet John Baysey Richard Butler Francis Andrews John Bidwell Thomas Birchwood William Bloomfield Thomas Bull Thomas Bunce Benjamin Burr William Butler Clement Chaplin Richard Church John Clark Nicholas Clark James Cole John Crow Robert Day Joseph Easton Edward Elmer Nathaniel Ely James Ensign Zachariah Field William Gibbons Richard Goodman Ozias Goodwin William Goodwin Seth Grant George Graves Samuel Greenhill Samuel Hale Thomas Hale Stephen Hart William Hayden John Haynes Thomas Hooker William Hill William Holton Edward Hopkins John Hopkins Thomas Hosmer William Hyde Thomas Judd William Kelsey William Lewis Richard Lord Thomas Lord Richard Lyman John Marsh Matthew Marvin John Maynard John Moody Joseph Mygatt Thomas Olcott James Olmsted Richard Olmsted William Pantrey William Parker Stephen Post John Pratt William Pratt Nathaniel Richards Richard Risley Thomas Root William Rusco Thomas Scott Thomas Selden Richard Seymour John Skinner Arthur Smith Thomas Spencer William Spencer Thomas Stanley Timothy Stanley Thomas Stanton Edward Stebbing George Steele John Steele Goerge Stocking Samuel Stone John Talcott William Wadsworth Samuel Wakeman Nathaniel Ward Andrew Warner Richard Webb John Webster Thomas Welles William Westwood John White William Whiting John Wilcox Gregory Wolterton George Wyllys 1636 Bibliography


A Catalogue of the Names of the Early Puritan Settlers of the Colony of ...

By Royal Ralph Hinman

Will dated Aug. 22, 1664 left portion to son Joseph Grandson Joseph original proprietor of Haddam p.58 ________________________

1636-HARTFORD (Massachusetts) Governor Winthrop's son John, then twenty-nine years of age, arrived at Boston from England in October. He bore a commission as governor of the Connecticut territory, from the proprietors of the soil. With him came Hugh Peters, his senior by six years, and Henry Vane, only twenty-four years of age, who were joint commissioners with him, instructed to build a fort and plant a colony at the mouth of the Connecticut River. They were directed to gather the scattered settlers near the fort but these were left where they had planted themselves. Other measures were taken to secure the possession of the territory and peace of the colony. Governor Bradford had denounced as "an unrighteous and injurious intrusion," the settling of Massachusetts people upon the lands on the Connecticut which the Plymouth people had purchased from the Indians, not considering that the "Plymothians," as the Dutch called them, were equally intruders upon the territory of New Netherland, according to English doctrine. And the Connecticut commissioners perfected their usurpation of the territorial authority of the Netherlands by driving away, by force of arms, a Dutch vessel which came into the river to protect the rights of the West India Company. "Might makes right," was the stern rule among the nations then and the cannon at the mouth of the river gave a warrant for the more important emigration of the English to the Connecticut Valley, which occurred in the summer of 1636. The dispute with the Plymouth people was amicably settled. Arrangements having been made for the accommodation of new settlers on the site of Hartford, the Rev. Thomas Hooker, a zealous nonconformist minister, who came to Boston from his refuge in Holland in 1633 led a company of one hundred men, women, and children thither. He was accompanied by the Rev. Mr. Stone. Their followers consisted of their families and congregations. The emigrants drove before them one hundred and sixty head of cattle. The cows of the herd, pasturing in grassy savannas which they found on the way, gave them an ample supply of fresh milk. They had no pathway, and were guided only by a compass. Through thickets and morasses, and over streams they made their way, clearing away here with axes, makingcauseways and bridges there with felled trees, and resting in shady groves. The women and children were conveyed in wagons drawn by oxen, and Mrs. Hooker, who was an invalid, was carried on a horse litter. The company had ample provisions and were regaled on the way by delicious strawberries growing in abundance in open places. The songs of birds and the fragrance of flowers afforded them exquisite delight in the midst of the weariness of travel. They made easy stages, consuming a fortnight in the journey of a hundred miles. It was ended when, on the fourth of July, they stood on the beautiful banks of the Connecticut, under the shadows of great trees and trailing vines, and sang hymns of praise to the Good Father. On the following Sabbath, Mr. Hooker preached and administered the Lord's Supper in the little chapel on the site of Hartford, which the first colonists there had erected. Some of the new comers settledat Wethersfield, and others went further up the river and founded Springfield.

Then followed the list (as above) of original propieters of Hartford inscribed on a monument.

Find a Grave on John Arnold 1st wife not sure name of 2nd wife but not Susan or Susanna (wife of son John) Birth: 1603, England Death: 1664 Hartford Hartford County Connecticut, USA

Born by about 1603, based on estimated date of marriage. Came to Massachusetts Bay in 1634 & 1st settled in Cambridge MA. Later moved to Hartford CT. Died in Hartford between 22 Aug 1664 (date of will) & 26 Dec 1664 (date of inventory). Married by about 1638, Susanna ____. On 21 Jun 1666, John Winthrop Jr. treated "Arnoll, Susan, widow of Hartford, 68 y.," & again on 12 Mar 1666/7 "Arnol, [blank], widow above 70 y. of Hartford." Source: Anderson's Great Migration Study Project.

Find A Grave contributor Leslie J. Steuben adds: John is my 7th great grandfather. First wife was believed to be Tomasin Dure, who died 15 Feb 1631 in England. [Susanna was 2nd wife] Son: Joseph Arnold, immigrated with him. [ca 1618-22 Oct 1691-VR/Haddam]. Memorial #64478376=John is a grandson.


New England Families, Genealogical and Memorial: A Record of the ..., Volume 2

edited by William Richard Cutte, p. 1011-1012  Brother William was administrator of brother John's estate.  John was an original proprietor of Hartford, CT.  William came to America and was a proprietor of Hingham, MA and then became associated with Roger Williams.  He then went to Rhode Island, and was a proprietor of Providence (one of 13). An agreement was signed in 1640. He married Christian Peake, daughter of Christopher Peake.  
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John Arnold's Timeline

Cheselbourne, Dorset, England
Age 23
May 1625
Age 31
Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts
Age 33
Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA
Age 33
Wethersfield,,Connecticut, USA
Age 35
Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts
May 1635
Age 41
Probably England