John Baylis Earle, US Congress

Is your surname Earle?

Research the Earle family

John Baylis Earle, US Congress's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

John Baylis Earle

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Pacolet Valley, North Carolina, USA
Death: Died in Silver Glade Plantation Pendleton Dist, South Carolina, USA
Place of Burial: Earle Family Cemetery (Silver Glade Plantation) Anderson Anderson County South Carolina
Immediate Family:

Son of Colonel John Earle and Thomasine Earle / Hannon
Husband of Sarah Earle; Sarah Cozad / Earle and Nancy Ann Earle
Father of Dr. Baylis Wood Earle; Samuel Sidney Earle; Eleanor Lewis and Georgia Washington Turpin
Brother of Ann Berry Lewis; Elizabeth Sorrell Hannon; Caroline Matilda Hannon; George Washington Earle; Earle and 4 others
Half brother of Joseph Berry Earle; Lydia Maverick Prince; Eleanor Kee Whitten; Letitia Sorrell Poole; Amaryllis Bomar and 2 others

Occupation: drummer boy, for starters
Managed by: Pam Wilson
Last Updated:

About John Baylis Earle, US Congress

http://politicalgraveyard.com/families/10446.html

John Baylis Earle (1766-1863) — of South Carolina. Born in North Carolina, October 23, 1766. U.S. Representative from South Carolina 8th District, 1803-05; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. Died in Anderson County, S.C., February 3, 1863 (age 96 years, 103 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Anderson County, S.C.

Relatives: Nephew of Elias Earle (1762-1823); cousin of Samuel Earle. -------------------- http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=6856881

US Congressman. He was raised in South Carolina and served in the Revolutionary War as a drummer boy and soldier, afterwards becoming owner of a plantation called "Silver Glade." In 1802 he was elected to the US House of Representatives as a Democratic-Republican and served one term, 1803 to 1805. he did not run for reelection in 1804 and returned to operating Silver Glade.

Earle remained interested in military affairs and for sixteen years served as South Carolina's Adjutant General, including leading the militia when it was mobilized for the War of 1812. In 1832 and 1833 he was a member of the state conventions that advocated nullification of the federal Tariff of 1828. John Baylis Earle was the nephew of Elias Earle, who succeeded him in Congress, and cousin of Samuel Earle, who also served in the US House.

-------------------- Earle, John Baylis

by H. B. Fant, 1986 23 Oct. 1766–3 Feb. 1836

John Baylis Earle, drummer boy and militiaman of Revolutionary North Carolina, planter, congressman, and longtime adjutant general of South Carolina, was born probably in Virginia as were his parents, Thomasson Prince and the frontiersman John Earle, who described himself to the Virginia House of Burgesses on 12 June 1770 as "late of the county of Frederick but now of the province of South Carolina." After pioneering settlement just below where the North Pacolet River entered Ninety-Six District (now Spartanburg County), S.C., the father established his growing household a few miles upstream in what became known as the Earle's Fort neighborhood of Rutherford (now Polk) County, N.C. From here he weathered the Revolution as a captain of Rangers, while John Baylis, the eldest son, took up the drum and before the arrival of peace blossomed into a Morgan District militiaman. The father helped site the courthouse for Rutherford County, became a justice of the peace, was named coroner, and by the turn of the century owned fifteen slaves and was called Colonel John Earle.

By 1800, as the second census shows, John Baylis Earle had become head of such a growing family of his own in Pendleton District (now Anderson County), S.C., that he must have married Sarah Taylor, eldest daughter of Major Samuel Taylor, as much as a dozen years before. Silver Glade, the Earle estate, was located near Big Beaverdam Creek, some twelve miles south of Pendleton village. From northwestern South Carolina, about to be traversed by President Jefferson's mail route from Washington to newly acquired New Orleans, Earle was elected as a representative to the Eighth Congress, 1803–5. The master of Silver Glade did a creditable job as congressman, but henceforth concentrated on farming and stock raising, diversified by travel over the state to supervise its militia affairs.

He may well have been the Adjutant General Earle whom Edward Hooker on 10 Dec. 1805 pronounced "an excellent officer," exhibiting "a handsome appearance" in contrast to the ill-kempt troops Hooker saw being directed in parade ground maneuvers. If so, Lieutenant Colonel John Baylis Earle could have been the state's adjutant general in the War of 1812. The excellent South Carolina archives of today have no records of the Adjutant General's Office earlier than 1836, but an act passed by the legislature on 13 Dec. 1815 explicitly upgraded Lieutenant Colonel Earle to brigadier general and expanded his duties to that of adjutant and inspector general.

Owner of thirty-eight slaves in 1830, a believer in states' rights, and conspicuous as a veteran of the Revolution, General Earle took a leading but much overlooked role in the convention that drafted the Nullification Ordinance of 24 Nov. 1832. When the legislature and the governor moved to implement the ordinance, it was Earle's General Orders of 20 and 21 Dec. 1832 that geared the state's emergency defense to individual volunteering rather than to unit mobilization. Fortunately for all concerned, the immediate tariff issue was compromised. In August 1835 Governor George McDuffie, with Earle present, alluded "in a handsome and feeling manner to the long and faithful services of the Adjutant General of the State, who had assured him, that he had commenced his military career during the Revolutionary War as a drummer boy."

After death ended the general's career, his executors-sons-in-law B. F. Sloan and George Seaborn obtained the legislature's permission in December 1836 for payment of his salary for the quarter in which he died. The general's first wife predeceased him in 1815, leaving at least four sons and five daughters; his marriage to the widow Nancy Ann Douglas resulted in a sixth daughter. He is said to have been buried at Silver Glade.

To Thomas Jefferson from John Baylis Earle, 21 October 1808 South Carolina Pendleton C House 21st. Oct. 1808.Sir Although I have never had the Honor either of corresponding or a very intimate acquaintance with you; the few hours I have so agreably spent in your company will long be a source of pleasing reflection and warrants the belief, that in addressing You upon a subject in which I concieve my country’s interest is involved, I shall neither be thought presuming or to exceed the limits of a citizens privileges Under this impression I Venture to Submit to your better Judgment a project which if it could be effected I have long thought would very much facilitate the intercourse between the Western and Atlantic States—As the wealth and prosperity of a Country are intimately connected with its Commerce and as the Navigation of the Mississippi is both difficult and dangerous it would certainly be of immence consequence to have the Trade of that River diverted to a channel much cheaper and more safe. For this purpose I would substitute the Tumbeckby, the Navigable waters of which are from those of Bear Creek (a tributary branch of Tennesee and which mouths Just below the Muscle shoal) remote about sixty or Seventy Miles; Over which I am credibly informed by men well acquainted with the country that an excellent Road could be made for a very inconsiderable Sum, how far such a thing would be consistent with the views of Government I am not competent to decide but am of opinion that a Treaty for the purchase of Lease, of the land over which a road would pass is a desirable object to the people of the Western Country—And I must beg leave to observe that the Value of the Indian’s land will diminish in their estimation, in proportion to the number of high ways owned by the united States in their country: I have little doubt but you have often revolved this subject in your mind, if so, this communication, can do no harm, if otherwise it may be of some utility—I must however beg you to believe that it has been dictated intirely by a wish to serve my country, and if I should be so fortunate as to have any agency in contributing in any way to her welfare I shall feel myself very happy in having done so. For the liberty I have taken and the trouble this letter may Occasion you I hope to have your pardon; and should I be honored by a reply to it shall feel myself not a little flattered— Accept Sir the Homage of my Respect and believe me very faithfully Your Obdt. Hble Servt. JB Earle

EARLE, John Baylis, (1766 - 1836)

EARLE, John Baylis, (nephew of Elias Earle and cousin of Samuel Earle), a Representative from South Carolina; born on the North Carolina side of the North Pacolet River, near Landrum, Spartanburg County, S.C., October 23, 1766; moved to South Carolina; completed preparatory studies; served as a drummer boy and soldier during the Revolutionary War; engaged in agricultural pursuits; elected as a Republican to the Eighth Congress (March 4, 1803-March 3, 1805); declined to be a candidate for reelection in 1804; resumed agricultural pursuits; adjutant and inspector general of South Carolina for sixteen years; served throughout the War of 1812; member of the nullification convention of 1832 and 1833; died in Anderson County, S.C., February 3, 1836; interment in the cemetery on his plantation, “Silver Glade,” in Anderson County, S.C.

Birth: Oct. 23, 1766 Death: Feb. 3, 1836 Anderson Anderson County South Carolina, USA

US Congressman. He was raised in South Carolina and served in the Revolutionary War as a drummer boy and soldier, afterwards becoming owner of a plantation called "Silver Glade." In 1802 he was elected to the US House of Representatives as a Democratic-Republican and served one term, 1803 to 1805. he did not run for reelection in 1804 and returned to operating Silver Glade. Earle remained interested in military affairs and for sixteen years served as South Carolina's Adjutant General, including leading the militia when it was mobilized for the War of 1812. In 1832 and 1833 he was a member of the state conventions that advocated nullification of the federal Tariff of 1828. John Baylis Earle was the nephew of Elias Earle, who succeeded him in Congress, and cousin of Samuel Earle, who also served in the US House. (bio by: Bill McKern)


Family links:

Spouses:
 Sarah Taylor Earle (1775 - 1815)*
 Nancy Ann Earle (1793 - 1852)*

Children:
 Eleanor Earle Lewis (1792 - 1840)*
 Samuel Sidney Earle (1799 - 1870)*
 Mary Earle Purvis (1810 - 1894)*
 Georgia Washington Earle Turpin (1824 - 1903)*
  • Calculated relationship

Burial: Earle Family Cemetery (Silver Glade Plantation) Anderson Anderson County South Carolina, USA

view all

John Baylis Earle, US Congress's Timeline

1766
October 23, 1766
Pacolet Valley, North Carolina, USA
1792
1792
Age 25
1799
1799
Age 32
1824
1824
Age 57
1836
February 3, 1836
Age 69
Silver Glade Plantation Pendleton Dist, South Carolina, USA
????
????
????
????
Earle Family Cemetery (Silver Glade Plantation) Anderson Anderson County South Carolina