John Coggeshall, Sr. (c.1601 - 1647) MP

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Place of Burial: Newport/Coggeshall Cemetery, Newport, Rhode Island, United States
Birthplace: Halstead, Essex Country, England
Death: Died in Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, United States
Occupation: Silk Merchant, Farmer, and Early Governor of RI, Farmer and Early Governor of RI, first president of RI colony
Managed by: Scott Emery Wells
Last Updated:

About John Coggeshall, Sr.

John Coggeshall From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: John Coggeshall (1601 – 27 November 1647) was one of the founders of Rhode Island and the first President of all four towns in the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. Coming from Essex, England as a successful merchant in the silk trade, Coggeshall arrived in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1632 and quickly assumed a number of roles in the colonial government. In the mid 1630s he became a supporter of the dissident mininsters John Wheelwright and Anne Hutchinson. When Hutchinson was tried as a heretic in 1637, Coggeshall was one of three deputies who voted for her acquittal. Hutchinson was banished from the colony in 1638, and the three deputies who voted for her acquittal were also compelled to depart.

Before leaving Boston, Coggeshall and many other Hutchinson supporters signed a compact in March 1638 agreeing to form a government based on the individual consent of the inhabitants. They then established the new colony of Portsmouth on Aquidneck Island, also called Rhode Island, in the Narragansett Bay, later one of four towns comprising the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

Coggeshall was once again very active in civil affairs, but a rift in the leadership of the colony caused him and several other leaders to leave in 1639, and move to the south end of the island, establishing the town of Newport. The two towns of Portsmouth and Newport reunited in 1640 under the leadership of William Coddington, and Coggeshall was his assistant until 1647 when the two towns of Rhode Island united to form a common government with the towns of Providence and Warwick, and Coggeshall was elected President of the entire colony of four towns. His tenure was very short due to his death later the same year, but during his administration many excellent laws were established, becoming the legal basis for both the colony and state of Rhode Island.

Immigration to New England

John Coggeshall, the son of John and Ann (Butter) Coggeshall, was born and raised in northeastern Essex, England, being baptized at Halstead.[1] After his marriage he lived four miles (six km) away in Castle Hedingham where several of his children were baptized, and where he was a merchant prior to his emigration.[2] [3] In 1632, Coggeshall and his family joined the mass immigration of English Puritans to New England, sailing on the Lyon, the same ship that brought Roger Williams the year before.[4] [5] The Coggeshalls first settled at Roxbury where they were admitted to the Roxbury Church the year of their arrival, and where John Eliot would soon be the pastor.[6] In 1634 Coggeshall moved with his family to Boston where he and his wife were admitted to the church on 20 August, and where they became neighbors and acquaintances of the Hutchinson family.[4] [citation needed]

Coggeshall was a mercer, specifically involved in the silk trade, and held many offices in the Massachusetts Bay Colony.[7] He was a deputy to the General Court for Boston from 1634 to 1637 and a Boston selectman during the same period. In 1634 he was also on a committee to survey Mount Wollaston, and on a committee to oversee ammunition.[7]

Some time after moving to Boston, Coggeshall became an enthusiastic supporter of Anne Hutchinson, the controversial dissident minister and preacher. Also supporting her initially was the Reverend John Cotton, most of the Boston ministers and many of the church members.[8] Even the governor of the colony, Henry Vane was a strong admirer of Mrs. Hutchinson, but he was voted out of office, and when John Winthrop became the governor strong measures were taken to "stamp out heresy and drive out the heretics."[8] Because of her religious opinions, and her influence in conveying her ideas within the community, Mrs. Hutchinson was tried, convicted, and banished from the colony.[8] At her civil trial, Coggeshall spoke out in her defense and was one of only three deputies to vote for her acquittal, the other two being William Aspinwall and William Coddington.[8] Coggeshall also supported another dissident minister, the Reverend John Wheelwright, whose wife was the sister of Anne Hutchinson's husband. Shortly after Hutchinson's banishment, Coggeshall was expelled from the General Court and in March 1638, was also directed to leave Massachusetts.[8]

Scores of Mrs. Hutchinson's followers were ordered out of the Massachusetts colony, but before leaving Boston a group of them, including Coggeshall, signed what was later called the Portsmouth Compact, establishing a non-sectarian civil government upon the universal consent of the inhabitants, with a Christian focus.[8] Planning initially to settle in New Netherland, the group was persuaded by Roger Williams to purchase some land of the Indians on the Narragansett Bay. They settled on the north east end of Aquidneck Island, and established a settlement they called Pocasset, but in 1639 changed the name to Portsmouth.[9] William Coddington was elected the first judge (governor) of the settlement.[10] In May 1638 Coggeshall was on a committee to lay out land there, and was granted six acres at the same time.[7] The following year a disagreement prompted Coddington and a few other leaders, including Coggeshall, to leave Portsmouth and begin a new settlement at the south end of the island called Newport.[11] In his journal, Governor Winthrop described the 1639 disagreement in Portsmouth, writing, "the people grew very tumultuous and put out Mr. Coddington and the other three magistrates," Coggeshall being one of the three alluded to by Winthrop.[12] Leader of Rhode Island

Coggeshall was soon a leader in Newport, and was granted 400 acres (1.6 km2) of land on the south side of the town, along present-day Bellevue Avenue.[citation needed] In the first election in 1638, he was elected as treasurer, and in 1640 he became an assistant to the governor, which position he held continuously until 1647.[9] Coggeshall had a good working relationship with Roger Williams, and this relationship helped the four towns of Portsmouth, Newport, Providence and Warwick to unite and form the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations in the Spring of 1647, under the patent that Williams had obtained from the crown in 1644.[9] In May 1647 Coggeshall was elected the chief magistrate of the four-town colony being given the title of President.[9] He had four assistants, one from each town, a general recorder and a treasurer. Under his administration the courts of justice were established and the first complete code of laws was written.[9] Rhode Island historian and Lieutenant Governor Samuel G. Arnold made this tribute to the digest of statutes enacted under Coggeshall in 1647:

For simplicty of diction, unencumbered as it is by the superfluous verbiage that clothes our modern statutes in learned obscurity; for breadth of comprehension, embracing as it does the foundation of the whole body of law, on every subject, which has since been adopted; and for vigor and originality of thought and boldness of expression, as well as for the vast significance and the brilliant triumph of the principles it embodies, the Digest of 1647 presents a model of legislation which has never been surpassed.[9]

Samuel G. Arnold, writing of the laws established during Coggeshall's administration

Coggeshall was in office only briefly, dying of an illness in Newport on 27 November 1647 and being buried on his own property in Newport. While he is noted for being the first president of the united colony of four towns, he is also noted for helping to establish the three towns of Boston, Portsmouth, and Newport, and the two colonies of Massachusetts Bay and Rhode Island.[9]

Family and legacy

Coggeshall's wife was named Mary, but her maiden name is uncertain.[7] They had eight children, five of whom were born in England, and the others born in Boston, but only half of whom are known to have survived to maturity.[7] Their oldest child, John, was very active in colonial affairs over a period of three decades, serving as treasurer, commissioner, assistant and deputy governor.[13] Their second child, Ann, married Peter Easton, a son of Nicholas Easton who served many terms as either president or governor of the Rhode Island colony.[14]

Places named for President Coggesahll include John Coggeshall Elementary School in Portsmouth, Rhode Island; Coggeshall Way and Coggeshall Circle in rural Middletown; and Coggeshall Avenue in Newport, which goes through the original Coggeshall property. His numerous descendants include painter Sanford Robinson Gifford and composer Jimmy Van Heusen. [citation needed]

____________________________________

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Coggeshall

JOHN COGGESHALL, 1591-1647. Deputy from Boston to Massachusetts General Court, 1634, 1635, 1636, 1637. A Founder of Rhode Island as one of the Original Proprietors of Aquidneck, 1638. A Founder, and Elder of Newport, 1639. President of Rhode Island Colony, 1647.

1632, June 22- Emigrated to U.S. with son Joshua, Sr. and Roger Williams on board the ship "Lyon".

1632, September 16- Arrived in Boston, MA.

1632, November 6- Freeman.

1634, March 4- Gave 5 pounds toward the sea fort.

1634, April 20- He was a member of the First Church, and soon after a deacon.

1634, September 3- He was chosen one of the overseers of powder and shot, etc.

1634- Selectman.

1634-37: Deputy.

1638, March 7-Signed a civil compact with eighteen others known as the "Portsmouth, RI Compact."

1638, March 12-One of the original purchasers of Aquidneck Island, Rhode Island. This land was purchased from the Narrangansett Indians with the assistance of Roger Williams for forty fathoms of white beads. He and others then began building a town called Pocasett which was later renamed Portsmouth on the north end of the island. John Coggeshall was one of three named to allot lands and was alloted six acres.

1639, April 28- Signed with eight others a compact in preparation of settling Newport, RI on the south end of Aquidnect Isalnd.

1640, March 10- Newport, RI. He had 389 acres of land recorded.

1640-44- Assistant.

1644- Corporal.

1647- Moderator.

1647, May 20- First President of the Rhode Island General Assembly under the Incorporation of Providence Plantations.

--------------------

1632, June 22- Emigrated to U.S. with son Joshua, Sr. and Roger Williams on board the ship "Lyon".

1632, September 16- Arrived in Boston, MA.

1632, November 6- Freeman.

1634, March 4- Gave 5 pounds toward the sea fort.

1634, April 20- He was a member of the First Church, and soon after a deacon.

1634, September 3- He was chosen one of the overseers of powder and shot, etc.

1634- Selectman.

1634-37: Deputy.

1638, March 7-Signed a civil compact with eighteen others known as the "Portsmouth, RI Compact."

1638, March 12-One of the original purchasers of Aquidneck Island, Rhode Island. This land was purchased from the Narrangansett Indians with the assistance of Roger Williams for forty fathoms of white beads. He and others then began building a town called Pocasett which was later renamed Portsmouth on the north end of the island. John Coggeshall was one of three named to allot lands and was alloted six acres.

1639, April 28- Signed with eight others a compact in preparation of settling Newport, RI on the south end of Aquidnect Isalnd.

1640, March 10- Newport, RI. He had 389 acres of land recorded.

1640-44- Assistant.

1644- Corporal.

1647- Moderator.

1647, May 20- First President of the Rhode Island General Assembly under the Incorporation of Providence Plantations. .

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Database: Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-33

ORIGIN: Castle Hedingham, Essex

MIGRATION: 1632 on Lyon [Hotten 150]

FIRST RESIDENCE: Roxbury

REMOVES: Boston 1634, Portsmouth 1638, Newport 1639

OCCUPATION: Mercer, merchant. (On 4 March 1634/5 he was the Boston delegate to a consortium which was to have a monopoly of trade with vessels in Boston Harbor [MBCR 1:142].)

CHURCH MEMBERSHIP: "John Coggshall" and "Mary Coggshall, the wife of John Coggshall," were admitted to Roxbury church as members #30 and #31, in the midst of a group of 1632 immigrants [RChR 75]; "John Coggeshall mercer and Marie his wife ... admitted from Roxbury" to Boston church, 20 August 1634 [BChR 18].

FREEMAN: 6 November 1632 (as "Mr. Jo: Coggeshall") [MBCR 1:367]. (Pope assigned John Coggeshall a date of freemanship of 3 March 1635/6, but this is for John Cogswell of Ipswich.)

EDUCATION: Contributed 13s. 4d. to maintenance of schoolmaster, 12 August 1636 [BTR 1:160].

OFFICES: Deputy to General Court for Boston, 14 May 1634, 4 March 1634/5, 6 May 1635, 25 May 1636, 8 September 1636, 7 December 1636, 9 March 1636/7 [MBCR 1:116, 135, 145, 174, 178, 185, 191; BTR 1:13, 16]; replaced as deputy, 6 November 1637 [BTR 1:20]. Auditor, 4 March 1634/5 [MBCR 1:136].

Assessor, 25 May 1636, 8 September 1636 [MBCR 1:175, 180]. Committee to survey Mount Wollaston, 14 May 1634 [MBCR 1:119]. Boston member of committee to oversee ammunition, 3 September 1634 [MBCR 1:125].

Boston selectman (for six-month terms), 1 September 1634, 14 March 1635/6, 16 September 1636, 20 March 1636/7, 8 October 1637 [BTR 1:1, 9, 11, 16, 20]; assessor, 6 October 1634 [BTR 1:2].

Committee to lay out land at Portsmouth, 20 May 1638 [RICR 1:55-56]. Treasurer, 27 June 1638 [RICR 1:57]. Committee "for the venison trade with the Indians," 16 November 1638 [RICR 1:62]. Chosen elder, 2 January 1638/9 (in this case a civil and not a church office) [RICR 1:64], an office which he retained after the move to Newport [RICR 1:87, 100]. Assistant for the combined government of Portsmouth and Newport, 12 March 1639/40, 16 March 1640/1, 16 March 1641/2, 13 March 1643/4 [RICR 1:101, 112, 120,127]. Committee to lay out land at Portsmouth, 12 March 1639/40 [RICR 1:102]. Treasurer, 1640 [RICR 1:106]. Auditor, 1641 [RICR 1:113, 119].

Chosen moderator of the first meeting under the charter for the colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, and then at the same meeting elected president, 19-21 May 1647 [RICR 1:147-48]. (He died after six months in office.)

ESTATE: Granted two hundred acres at Rumney Marsh, 8 January 1637/8 [BTR 1:28].

Contributed £5 to the building of the seafort, 1 April 1634 [MBCR 1:113].

Granted six acres at Portsmouth, 20 May 1638 [RICR 1:55].

BIRTH: Baptized Halstead, Essex, 9 December 1601, son of John and Ann (Butter) Coggeshall [NEHGR 73:21].

DEATH: Buried Newport 27 November 1647 [RIMM, Deaths 1; see also TAG 34:169].

MARRIAGE: By about 1624 Mary _____ (she is first seen in 1632 at admission to Roxbury church, but there is no evidence of an earlier wife); she died at Newport 8 November 1684 [see COMMENTS below].

CHILDREN:

i JOHN, b. say 1624; m. (1) Portsmouth or Newport 17 June 1647 Elizabeth Baulston [PoVR 1:32] (divorced 25 May 1655 [RICR 1:314, 319]); m. (2) December 1655 Patience Throckmorton; m. (3) 1 October 1679 Mary (Hedge) Sturgis [see COMMENTS below].

ii ANNE, bp. Castle Hedingham, Essex, 7 May 1626 [NEHGR 86:257]; m. 15 November 1643 Peter Easton, son of Nicholas [see COMMENTS below].


iii MARY, bp. Castle Hedingham 22 June 1628 [NEHGR 86:257]; named in the will of her grandmother, 16 April 1645; no further record.


iv JAMES, bp. Castle Hedingham 14 March 1629/30 [NEHGR 86:257]; named in the will of his grandmother, 16 April 1645; no further record.

v JOSHUA, b. say 1632; m. (1) 22 December 1652 Joan West [see COMMENTS below]; m. (2) 21 June 1677 Rebecca Russell [see COMMENTS below].

vi HANANIEL (daughter), bp. Boston 3 May 1635 [BChR 279]; no further record.

vii WAIT, bp. Boston 11 September 1636 [BChR 280]; m. 18 December 1651 Daniel Gould [see COMMENTS below]. (The name of this child, the short interval before the baptism of th next child of her parents, and the date of her marriage suggest that Wait may have been born before Hananiel.)

viii BEDAIAH (son), bp. Boston 30 July 1637 [BChR 282]; no further record.

ASSOCIATIONS: In her will, dated 16 April 1645 and proved 10 November 1648, Anne Coggeshall of Castle Hedingham, Essex, made bequests "unto my son John Coggeshall, now dwelling in New England, my house and lands at Sibble Hedingham," and £50 "to be divided equally between my eight grandchildren, John, Anne, Mary, Jos [sic] and James Coggeshall, the children of my son John, before mentioned, and John, Richard and Elizabeth Raymond, the children of Anne Raymond, my daughter" [Waters 748, citing PCC Essex 171].

(Anne Coggeshall seems not to have known of her granddaughter Wait Coggeshall; if she did not know this, she may also not have learned if Mary and James had already died, as they are not seen in any records other than their baptisms and her will.)


In a letter to John Winthrop Jr. dated 29 March 1634 Edward Howes enclosed a letter from "Sir Symon Harcourt's brother" to "Mr. Coggeshall" [WP 3:158].

COMMENTS: Several of the vital records given above (death date for the widow of the immigrant and five of the marriage dates for various children) are found in secondary sources [Austin 49; Coggeshall Gen passim], but have not been found in contemporary documents.

On 1 April 1633 "John Sayle is bound with Mr. Coxeshall for 3 years, for which he is to give him £4 per annum; his daughter is also bound with him for 14 years. Mr. Coxeshall is to have a sow with her, & at the end of her time he is to give unto her a cow calf" [MBCR 1:104]. On 4 March 1633/4 it is "ordered that John Sayles shall be whipped for running from his master, Mr. Coxeall" [MBCR 1:112]. On 7 April 1635 William Coddington and William Pynchon were appointed to "examine & prepare the business betwixt Mr. Coxeall, Sayles his daughter, & John Levens, & to return the same to the next Court" [MBCR 1:144]. On 6 June 1637 in "regard Phebe Seales was, by order of Court, put apprentice to John Coggeshall, of Boston, merchant, who, at the instant request of the Court, accepted the same, & for that the said girl hath proved overburdensome to him, the Court, as formerly, so now, have thought it just to ease him of it; & whereas the said girl was put by the said John Coggeshall to one John Levins, of Roxberry, to be kept at a certain [blank], it is now ordered, that Mr. Deputy, calling to him Mr. Brenton & Will[iam] Parks, chosen by the said 2 parties, shall have power to end the difference between the said parties, & to set down such order for the ease & discharge of the said John Coggesall, & disposing of the said Phebe, as they shall think equal" [MBCR 1:198].

On 6 December 1635 "Marie Martin our brother John Coggeshall's maidservant" was admitted to Boston church [BChR 20].

John Coggeshall was one of the strongest supporters of Rev. John Wheelwright during the Antinomian Controversy. On 2 November 1637, immediately after William Aspinwall was dismissed as Boston deputy to the General Court, "Mr. John Coggeshall affirming that Mr. Wheeleright is innocent, & that he was persecuted for the truth, was in like sort dismissed from being a member of the Court, & order was given for two new deputies to be chosen by the town of Boston" and "being convented for disturbing the public peace, was disfranchised, & enjoined not to speak anything to disturb the public peace, upon pain of banishment" [MBCR 1:205, 207], and the town of Boston replaced him on 6 November 1637 [BTR 1:20]. On 20 November 1637 "Mr. John Coggeshall" was disarmed [MBCR 1:212]. On 15 February 1637/8 Governor John Winthrop rebuked William Coddington, John Coggeshall and William Colbron for a remonstrance they had written, apparently relating to the Antinomian Controversy [WP 4:8-9].

Despite the severity of these actions, Coggeshall continued to sit as a Boston selectman until 19 February 1637/8, and received a grant of land on 8 January 1637/8 [BTR 1:28, 31]. On 12 March 1637/8 he was the second of eleven men "having license to depart, summons is to go out for them to appear (if they be not gone before) at the next Court, the third month, to answer such things as shall be objected" [MBCR 1:223].

John Coggeshall had indeed "gone before," as he was fourth on the list of founding settlers of Portsmouth, Rhode Island, on 7 March 1637/8 [RICR 1:52]. He attended town meetings at Portsmouth for the following year [RICR 1:53, 54, 56, 60, 62, 63], and then on 28 April 1639 was one of the founding settlers of Newport [RICR 1:87], where he continued in the office of elder.

Savage was unaware of the death of the immigrant in 1647, and so assumed that many of the records after that date belonged to the immigrant when they applied to the son (although Savage was clearly not sure of himself). Because John Coggeshall the son was born about 1620, he was just beginning to fill important offices about the time his father died, and so the records give the appearance of recording one life rather than two. (A different sort of problem appears in the list of Rhode Island freemen which is dated 1655. The list includes both "John Coggeshall" and "John Coggeshall, Jun[io]r" [RICR 1:300-01]. Since the immigrant John Coggeshall had died in 1647 and the third generation John Coggeshall was born in 1649, there should be only one of the name in this list. Perhaps this compilation, like those in Plymouth, was augmented and revised after initial compilation in 1655.)

BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE: The standard genealogy of the family was compiled and published by Charles Pierce Coggeshall and Thellwell Russell Coggeshall [The Coggeshalls in America: Genealogy of the Descendants of John Coggeshall of Newport with a Brief Notice of Their English Antecedents (Boston 1930), cited above as Coggeshall Gen]. In 1884 Henry T. Coggeshall delivered an address in which he outlined the life and career of John Coggeshall in the style expected at that time [Rhode Island Historical Magazine 5:147-72].

The English ancestry of John Coggeshall has been presented in a series of articles in the Register, the first by Frederick Samuel Fish and the last two by George Andrews Moriarty [NEHGR 73:19-32, 86:257, 99:315-22, 100:14-24].

Marriage 1 Mary UNKNOWN

Children

1. Has Children John COGGESHALL

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1632, June 22- Emigrated to U.S. with son Joshua, Sr. and Roger Williams on board the ship "Lyon".

1632, September 16- Arrived in Boston, MA.

1632, November 6- Freeman.

1634, March 4- Gave 5 pounds toward the sea fort.

1634, April 20- He was a member of the First Church, and soon after a deacon.

1634, September 3- He was chosen one of the overseers of powder and shot, etc.

1634- Selectman.

1634-37: Deputy.

1638, March 7-Signed a civil compact with eighteen others known as the "Portsmouth, RI Compact."

1638, March 12-One of the original purchasers of Aquidneck Island, Rhode Island. This land was purchased from the Narrangansett Indians with the assistance of Roger Williams for forty fathoms of white beads. He and others then began building a town called Pocasett which was later renamed Portsmouth on the north end of the island. John Coggeshall was one of three named to allot lands and was alloted six acres.

1639, April 28- Signed with eight others a compact in preparation of settling Newport, RI on the south end of Aquidnect Isalnd.

1640, March 10- Newport, RI. He had 389 acres of land recorded.

1640-44- Assistant.

1644- Corporal.

1647- Moderator.

1647, May 20- First President of the Rhode Island General Assembly under the Incorporation of Providence Plantations.

--------------------

1632, June 22- Emigrated to U.S. with son Joshua, Sr. and Roger Williams on board the ship "Lyon".

1632, September 16- Arrived in Boston, MA.

1632, November 6- Freeman.

1634, March 4- Gave 5 pounds toward the sea fort.

1634, April 20- He was a member of the First Church, and soon after a deacon.

1634, September 3- He was chosen one of the overseers of powder and shot, etc.

1634- Selectman.

1634-37: Deputy.

1638, March 7-Signed a civil compact with eighteen others known as the "Portsmouth, RI Compact."

1638, March 12-One of the original purchasers of Aquidneck Island, Rhode Island. This land was purchased from the Narrangansett Indians with the assistance of Roger Williams for forty fathoms of white beads. He and others then began building a town called Pocasett which was later renamed Portsmouth on the north end of the island. John Coggeshall was one of three named to allot lands and was alloted six acres.

1639, April 28- Signed with eight others a compact in preparation of settling Newport, RI on the south end of Aquidnect Isalnd.

1640, March 10- Newport, RI. He had 389 acres of land recorded.

1640-44- Assistant.

1644- Corporal.

1647- Moderator.

1647, May 20- First President of the Rhode Island General Assembly under the Incorporation of Providence Plantations.

--------------------

From:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Coggeshall

John Coggeshall (ca. 1591 - November 27, 1647) was one of the founders of Rhode Island.

Coggeshall was born in Halstead, Essex, England, to a wealthy family of Puritan leanings. As an adult Coggeshall made a propserous living as a silk merchant. Around 1618 he married his wife Mary (last name unknown) and they would eventually have eight children.

In 1632, Coggeshall and his family joined the mass emigration of English Puritans to New England, sailing on the "Lyon" (the same ship which had brought over Roger Williams the year before) in 1632. The Coggeshalls first settled at Roxbury, but quickly moved to Boston, where by chance they became next-door neighbours to the Hutchinson family. Some time after moving to Boston, Coggeshall became an enthusiastic supporter of Anne Hutchinson, the controversial dissident minister and preacher. At her civil trial, Coggeshall spoke out in her defense and was of only three deputies to vote for her acquittal. Shortly after Hutchinson's banishment, Coggeshall was expelled from the General Court and in March 1638, was banished from Massachusetts himself. Working with Roger Williams, William Coddington, and others, Coggeshall helped purchased Aquidneck Island in 1638. Right before Coggeshall and the others moved, they first signed the Portsmouth Compact, which was the first document granting religious freedom in American history. Soon after, Coggeshall and the others founded the town of Portsmouth, Rhode Island. However, a political dispute in the new town caused Coggeshall and others, including William Coddington, to leave for the southern half the island in 1639 to found Newport.

Coggeshall was soon a leader in Newport, and was granted 400 acres (1.6 km2) of land on the southern side of the town, along present-day Bellvue Avenue. In the 1640s, Coggeshall was one of the most important leaders of Newport, often being in charge of moderating the town meetings. Coggeshall also had a working relationship with Roger Williams. The two had first met up in Boston and had a deep respect for each other, and it was this working relationship that helped the four towns on Narragansett Bay to unite and form the colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations in the Spring of 1647. In May of that year Coggeshall served as the first "President" of the united colony. Coggeshall would only stay in office briefly, dying of an illness in Newport on November 27, 1647. He was buried at the Coggeshall Cemetery in Newport, which can still be seen today. Although the union Coggeshall helped formed dissolved several years later, the colony later was permanently reunited under the royal charter of 1663.

John Coggeshall had married Mary (last name unknown) around 1618 in England. They had the following children: John (who would also be a major leader in the early days of Rhode Island), Ann, Mary, Joshua, James, Hanneel, Wayte, and Beduiah. All were born in England except the last three, who were born in Massachusetts. Mary Coggeshall died in Newport on November 8, 1684, and is buried next to her husband.

John Coggeshall Elementary School in Portsmouth, Rhode Island is named for him, as well as Coggeshall Way and Coggeshall Circle in rural Middletown and Coggeshall Avenue in Newport (which goes right through the heart of the old Coggeshall property). His numerous descendants include painter Sanford Robinson Gifford and composer Jimmy Van Heusen.

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From

"Descendants of John Coggeshall, First President of RI"

http://files.usgwarchives.org/ri/newport/bios/coggshll.txt

John Coggeshall, progenitor of the family in America, and first president of the Colony of Rhode Island, was a member of an ancient and honorable English family, whose lineage has been traced to the early part of the twelfth century, to one Thomas de Coggeshall, the owner of vast estates in Essex and Suffolk, England, in 1135-54. He was born in Essex, England, about 1591, and died at Newport, R. I., November 27, 1647. He emigrated from England to the New World in the ship "Lyon," arriving at the port of Boston, Mass., in 1632, with his wife Mary Surgis, and three children, John, Joshua, and Anne, on September 16, 1632. His name and that of his wife are on the original records of the church of Roxbury, of which John Eliot was pastor.

He was admitted a freeman of Roxbury, November 6, 1632, and two years later, in 1634; removed to Boston, where he became a merchant. John Coggeshall became one of the leading citizens of Boston, and in the year of his arrival, there was elected a member of the Board of Selectmen and a deacon of the church. His name also heads the list of deputies to the General Court of Massachusetts from Boston, May 14, 1634, and he served, with three interruptions, until November 1637. He was one of the staunchest supporters and defenders of Anne Hutchinson, and upon her banishment was expelled from the Court, and from the State of Massachusetts, in company with eighteen other men, who were also identified with her. These eighteen men, and; a company including William Coddington, John Clarke, the Hutchinson family, and others, settled on the island of Aquidneck, by the advice of Roger Williams, who had already settled in Providence. The land was purchased from the Narragansett sachems, and the form of government there established was one of the first in New England which separated the civic from the religious issues. The colony grew with great rapidity and to accommodate newcomers and the over flow, the town of Newport, R. I., was established. On the return of Roger Williams from England with a charter; they organized a government, in September, 1644. In May, 1647, John Coggeshall was elected president of Rhode Island, with Roger Williams as assistant for Providence, William Coddington for Newport, and Randall Holden for Warwick. While in this office, he was the founder or was largely influential in founding two cities, two states and two separate and independent governments. He died in office, November 27, 1647. at the age of fifty-six years, and is buried on his estate in Newport. He married, in England, Mary Surgis, born in 1604, died November 8, 1684, at the age of eighty.

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From The Howland Heirs By William Morrell Emery:

John and Mary Coggeshall of Essex County, England. He was a silk merchant who came to this country in 1632 (on the Lyon, see below), and lived at Boston and Newport. While in Boston he was selectman and for four years deputy, but in 1637 was deprived of the latter office for affirming that Rev. John Wheelwright was innocent of heresy charges and that he was persecuted for the truth. Being disfranchised he departed with the Wheelwright and Hutchinson party for Rhode Island, where he became in 1647 the president of the colony.

ORIGIN: Castle Hedingham, Essex

MIGRATION: 1632 on Lyon [Hotten 150]

FIRST RESIDENCE: Roxbury

REMOVES: Boston 1634, Portsmouth 1638, Newport 1639

OCCUPATION: Mercer, merchant. (On 4 March 1634/5 he was the Boston delegate to a consortium which was to have a monopoly of trade with vessels in Boston Harbor [MBCR 1:142].)

CHURCH MEMBERSHIP: "John Coggshall" and "Mary Coggshall, the wife of John Coggshall," were admitted to Roxbury church as members #30 and #31, in the midst of a group of 1632 immigrants [RChR 75]; "John Coggeshall mercer and Marie his wife ... admitted from Roxbury" to Boston church, 20 August 1634 [BChR 18].

FREEMAN: 6 November 1632 (as "Mr. Jo: Coggeshall") [MBCR 1:367]. (Pope assigned John Coggeshall a date of freemanship of 3 March 1635/6, but this is for John Cogswell of Ipswich.)

EDUCATION: Contributed 13s. 4d. to maintenance of schoolmaster, 12 August 1636 [BTR 1:160].

OFFICES: Deputy to General Court for Boston, 14 May 1634, 4 March 1634/5, 6 May 1635, 25 May 1636, 8 September 1636, 7 December 1636, 9 March 1636/7 [MBCR 1:116, 135, 145, 174, 178, 185, 191; BTR 1:13, 16]; replaced as deputy, 6 November 1637 [BTR 1:20]. Auditor, 4 March 1634/5 [MBCR 1:136]. Assessor, 25 May 1636, 8 September 1636 [MBCR 1:175, 180].

Committee to survey Mount Wollaston, 14 May 1634 [MBCR 1:119]. Boston member of committee to oversee ammunition, 3 September 1634 [MBCR 1:125].

Boston selectman (for six-month terms), 1 September 1634, 14 March 1635/6, 16 September 1636, 20 March 1636/7, 8 October 1637 [BTR 1:1, 9, 11, 16, 20]; assessor, 6 October 1634 [BTR 1:2].

Committee to lay out land at Portsmouth, 20 May 1638 [RICR 1:55-56]. Treasurer, 27 June 1638 [RICR 1:57]. Committee "for the venison trade with the Indians," 16 November 1638 [RICR 1:62]. Chosen elder, 2 January 1638/9 (in this case a civil and not a church office) [RICR 1:64], an office which he retained after the move to Newport [RICR 1:87, 100]. Assistant for the combined government of Portsmouth and Newport, 12 March 1639/40, 16 March 1640/1, 16 March 1641/2, 13 March 1643/4 [RICR 1:101, 112, 120, 127]. Committee to lay out land at Portsmouth, 12 March 1639/40 [RICR 1:102]. Treasurer, 1640 [RICR 1:106]. Auditor, 1641 [RICR 1:113, 119].

Chosen moderator of the first meeting under the charter for the colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, and then at the same meeting elected president, 19-21 May 1647 [RICR 1:147-48]. (He died after six months in office.)

ESTATE: Granted two hundred acres at Rumney Marsh, 8 January 1637/8 [BTR 1:28].

Contributed £5 to the building of the seafort, 1 April 1634 [MBCR 1:113].

Granted six acres at Portsmouth, 20 May 1638 [RICR 1:55].

BIRTH: Baptized Halstead, Essex, 9 December 1601, son of John and Ann (Butter) Coggeshall [NEHGR 73:21].

DEATH: Buried Newport 27 November 1647 [RIMM, Deaths 1; see also TAG 34:169].

MARRIAGE: By about 1624 Mary _____ (she is first seen in 1632 at admission to Roxbury church, but there is no evidence of an earlier wife); she died at Newport 8 November 1684 [see COMMENTS below].

CHILDREN:

i JOHN, b. say 1624; m. (1) Portsmouth or Newport 17 June 1647 Elizabeth Baulston [PoVR 1:32] (divorced 25 May 1655 [RICR 1:314, 319]); m. (2) December 1655 Patience Throckmorton; m. (3) 1 October 1679 Mary (Hedge) Sturgis [see COMMENTS below].

ii ANNE, bp. Castle Hedingham, Essex, 7 May 1626 [NEHGR 86:257]; m. 15 November 1643 Peter Easton, son of Nicholas [see COMMENTS below].

iii MARY, bp. Castle Hedingham 22 June 1628 [NEHGR 86:257]; named in the will of her grandmother, 16 April 1645; no further record.

iv JAMES, bp. Castle Hedingham 14 March 1629/30 [NEHGR 86:257]; named in the will of his grandmother, 16 April 1645; no further record.

v JOSHUA, b. say 1632; m. (1) 22 December 1652 Joan West [see COMMENTS below]; m. (2) 21 June 1677 Rebecca Russell [see COMMENTS below].

vi HANANIEL (daughter), bp. Boston 3 May 1635 [BChR 279]; no further record.

vii WAIT, bp. Boston 11 September 1636 [BChR 280]; m. 18 December 1651 Daniel Gould [see COMMENTS below]. (The name of this child, the short interval before the baptism of the next child of her parents, and the date of her marriage suggest that Wait may have been born before Hananiel.)

viii BEDAIAH (son), bp. Boston 30 July 1637 [BChR 282]; no further record.

ASSOCIATIONS: In her will, dated 16 April 1645 and proved 10 November 1648, Anne Coggeshall of Castle Hedingham, Essex, made bequests "unto my son John Coggeshall, now dwelling in New England, my house and lands at Sibble Hedingham," and £50 "to be divided equally between my eight grandchildren, John, Anne, Mary, Jos [sic] and James Coggeshall, the children of my son John, before mentioned, and John, Richard and Elizabeth Raymond, the children of Anne Raymond, my daughter" [Waters 748, citing PCC Essex 171]. (Anne Coggeshall seems not to have known of her granddaughter Wait Coggeshall; if she did not know this, she may also not have learned if Mary and James had already died, as they are not seen in any records other than their baptisms and her will.)

In a letter to John Winthrop Jr. dated 29 March 1634 Edward Howes enclosed a letter from "Sir Symon Harcourt's brother" to "Mr. Coggeshall" [WP 3:158].

COMMENTS: Several of the vital records given above (death date for the widow of the immigrant and five of the marriage dates for various children) are found in secondary sources [Austin 49; Coggeshall Gen passim], but have not been found in contemporary documents.

On 1 April 1633 "John Sayle is bound with Mr. Coxeshall for 3 years, for which he is to give him £4 per annum; his daughter is also bound with him for 14 years. Mr. Coxeshall is to have a sow with her, & at the end of her time he is to give unto her a cow calf" [MBCR 1:104]. On 4 March 1633/4 it is "ordered that John Sayles shall be whipped for running from his master, Mr. Coxeall" [MBCR 1:112]. On 7 April 1635 William Coddington and William Pynchon were appointed to "examine & prepare the business betwixt Mr. Coxeall, Sayles his daughter, & John Levens, & to return the same to the next Court" [MBCR 1:144]. On 6 June 1637 in "regard Phebe Seales was, by order of Court, put apprentice to John Coggeshall, of Boston, merchant, who, at the instant request of the Court, accepted the same, & for that the said girl hath proved overburdensome to him, the Court, as formerly, so now, have thought it just to ease him of it; & whereas the said girl was put by the said John Coggeshall to one John Levins, of Roxberry, to be kept at a certain [blank], it is now ordered, that Mr. Deputy, calling to him Mr. Brenton & Will[iam] Parks, chosen by the said 2 parties, shall have power to end the difference between the said parties, & to set down such order for the ease & discharge of the said John Coggesall, & disposing of the said Phebe, as they shall think equal" [MBCR 1:198].

On 6 December 1635 "Marie Martin our brother John Coggeshall's maidservant" was admitted to Boston church [BChR 20].

John Coggeshall was one of the strongest supporters of Rev. John Wheelwright during the Antinomian Controversy. On 2 November 1637, immediately after William Aspinwall was dismissed as Boston deputy to the General Court, "Mr. John Coggeshall affirming that Mr. Wheeleright is innocent, & that he was persecuted for the truth, was in like sort dismissed from being a member of the Court, & order was given for two new deputies to be chosen by the town of Boston" and "being convented for disturbing the public peace, was disfranchised, & enjoined not to speak anything to disturb the public peace, upon pain of banishment" [MBCR 1:205, 207], and the town of Boston replaced him on 6 November 1637 [BTR 1:20]. On 20 November 1637 "Mr. John Coggeshall" was disarmed [MBCR 1:212]. On 15 February 1637/8 Governor John Winthrop rebuked William Coddington, John Coggeshall and William Colbron for a remonstrance they had written, apparently relating to the Antinomian Controversy [WP 4:8-9].

Despite the severity of these actions, Coggeshall continued to sit as a Boston selectman until 19 February 1637/8, and received a grant of land on 8 January 1637/8 [BTR 1:28, 31]. On 12 March 1637/8 he was the second of eleven men "having license to depart, summons is to go out for them to appear (if they be not gone before) at the next Court, the third month, to answer such things as shall be objected" [MBCR 1:223].

John Coggeshall had indeed "gone before," as he was fourth on the list of founding settlers of Portsmouth, Rhode Island, on 7 March 1637/8 [RICR 1:52]. He attended town meetings at Portsmouth for the following year [RICR 1:53, 54, 56, 60, 62, 63], and then on 28 April 1639 was one of the founding settlers of Newport [RICR 1:87], where he continued in the office of elder.

Savage was unaware of the death of the immigrant in 1647, and so assumed that many of the records after that date belonged to the immigrant when they applied to the son (although Savage was clearly not sure of himself). Because John Coggeshall the son was born about 1620, he was just beginning to fill important offices about the time his father died, and so the records give the appearance of recording one life rather than two. (A different sort of problem appears in the list of Rhode Island freemen which is dated 1655. The list includes both "John Coggeshall" and "John Coggeshall, Jun[io]r" [RICR 1:300-01]. Since the immigrant John Coggeshall had died in 1647 and the third generation John Coggeshall was born in 1649, there should be only one of the name in this list. Perhaps this compilation, like those in Plymouth, was augmented and revised after initial compilation in 1655.)

BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE: The standard genealogy of the family was compiled and published by Charles Pierce Coggeshall and Thellwell Russell Coggeshall [The Coggeshalls in America: Genealogy of the Descendants of John Coggeshall of Newport with a Brief Notice of Their English Antecedents (Boston 1930), cited above as Coggeshall Gen]. In 1884 Henry T. Coggeshall delivered an address in which he outlined the life and career of John Coggeshall in the style expected at that time [Rhode Island Historical Magazine 5:147-72].

The English ancestry of John Coggeshall has been presented in a series of articles in the Register, the first by Frederick Samuel Fish and the last two by George Andrews Moriarty [NEHGR 73:19-32, 86:257, 99:315-22, 100:14-24].

John W. Coggeshall

Coggeshall is an early English surname of local origin, and denotes residence in the parish of St. Albans, in the town of Coggeshall. Arms - Argent a cross between four escallops sable. Crest - A stag lodged sable, attired or. The Coggeshall family, whose history is wrapped inseparably with that of Rhode Island, from the very earliest times, is one of the most distinguished in the annals of the colony and in its later, history. The progenitor of the Coggeshalls in America, John Coggeshall, was the first president of the struggling little Colony of Rhode Island; a man of great prominence and public influence. The family has been honorably connected with the several wars of the country since its establishment here, and has borne well its part in the making of the Nation. Its sons have held high places in the councils of the State. The late Hon. James Haydon Coggeshall, one of the most prominent public men of his day, was a direct descendant in the seventh generation of the founder, John Coggeshall. (I) John Coggeshall, progenitor of the family in America, and first president of the Colony of Rhode Island, was a member of an ancient and honorable English family, whose lineage has been traced to the early part of the twelfth century, to one Thomas de Coggeshall, the owner of vast estates in Essex and Suffolk, England, in 1135-54. He was born in Essex, England, about 1591, and died at Newport, R. I., November 27, 1647. He emigrated from England to the New World in the ship "Lyon," arriving at the port of Boston, Mass., in 1632, with his wife Mary Surgis*, and three children, John, Joshua, and Anne, on September 16, 1632. His name and that of his wife are on the original records of the church of Roxbury, of which John Eliot was pastor.

He was admitted a freeman of Roxbury, November 6, 1632, and two years later, in 1634; removed to Boston, where he became a merchant. John Coggeshall became one of the leading citizens of Boston, and in the year of his arrival, there was elected a member of the Board of Selectmen and a deacon of the church. His name also heads the list of deputies to the General Court of Massachusetts from Boston, May 14, 1634, and he served, with three interruptions, until November 1637. He was one of the staunchest supporters and defenders of Anne Hutchinson, and upon her banishment was expelled from the Court, and from the State of Massachusetts, in company with eighteen other men, who were also identified with her. These eighteen men, and; a company including William Coddington, John Clarke, the Hutchinson family, and others, settled on the island of Aquidneck, by the advice of Roger Williams, who had already settled in Providence. The land was purchased from the Narragansett sachems, and the form of government there established was one of the first in New England which separated the civic from the religious issues. The colony grew with great rapidity and to accommodate newcomers and the over flow, the town of Newport, R. I., was established. On the return of Roger Williams from England with a charter; they organized a government, in September, 1644. In May, 1647, John Coggeshall was elected president of Rhode Island, with Roger Williams as assistant for Providence, William Coddington for Newport, and Randall Holden for Warwick. While in this office, he was the founder or was largely influential in founding two cities, two states and two separate and independent governments. He died in office, November 27, 1647. at the age of fifty-six years, and is buried on his estate in Newport. He married, in England, Mary Surgis*, born in 1604, died November 8, 1684, at the age of eighty.

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President of RI Colony and Providence Plantations 1647

Governor's Assistant 1640-1644

Moderator 1647

Deputy, Mass 1634-1637

-------------------- Born in England on 1599 to John Coggeshall and Anne Butter. John married Mary Hodge Sturgie and had 8 children. He passed away on 1647 in Rhode Island, USA.

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John Coggeshall, Sr.'s Timeline

1601
December 9, 1601
Halstead, Essex Country, England
December 9, 1601
Halstead, Essex, United Kingdom
December 9, 1601
Halstead, Essex, England
December 9, 1601
Halstead, Earls Colne, Essex, England
December 9, 1601
Castle Hedingham, Halstead, Essex, England
December 9, 1601
Halstead, Essex, England
December 9, 1601
Halstead, Essex, England
1613
1613
Age 11
Halstead, Essex, United Kingdom
1617
1617
Age 15
HALSTEAD, Essex, England
1619
1619
Age 17
Halstead, Essex County, England